UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1978

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128630.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128630.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128630-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128630-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128630-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128630-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128630-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128630-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128630-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128630.ris

Full Text

Array THi UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 12
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6,  1978
228-2301
UBC degrees
still good bet
SPINAL SUICIDE ATTEMPT by unfortunate forester shocks swimmers
in Empire Pool Thursday. Soggy student decided he was bored with life
and got things rolling to end it. Log rolling contest was one of many events
—peter menyasz photo
during forestry week designed to refute claims that UBC students are
spineless. Undercut dance Saturday night at the Agrodome ends week's
activities.
'Canada bled dry by foreign interests'
Canada has been bled dry by
foreign interests for the past 50
years and still does not see the
urgency of the situation, the federal
NDP candidate for Vancouver-
Quadra said Thursday.
Alan Bush said the NDP's main
belief is that the nation should be
independent and promote
Canadian interests. The myth that
Canadians cannot do things for
themselves must be dispelled, he
said.
"We can do things for ourselves.
We don't need foreign investment.
BUSH . . . hits foreign bucks
We are living on the world's second
largest piece of real estate and we
can feed ourselves."
Political and business world
leaders believe it is more profitable
to trade outside of Canada, Bush
told 20 people in SUB 212.
"The idea that it's cheaper to buy
foreign goods is hogwash. All the
101 signs of depression in human
beings, like alcoholism and mental
disease, is the price that we've paid
for foreign investment."
Bush said if the NDP came to
power, the party would turn down
foreign   investment   applications.
"The foreign investment review
board that exists right now is just a
weak little mouse. It's another
Liberal boon-dog."
And Bush attacked completely
profit-motivated systems. "The
NDP believes that people are a hell
of a lot more important than
profits. What is economy? It's a
Greek word for house-keeping," he
said.
Canada is locked into a tariff
situation that needs revision to find
cheaper and easier ways to control
imports and exports, Bush said.
"We import seventy-five per cent
of our food and that's dumb. That
destroys a lot of job opportunities."
Bush said he feels unemployment
is the major student issue in
Canada.
"How is the country going to
use the knowledge that students
gain in university? Are they going
to educate you and then crap all
over you? Because that's been the
Canadian track record so far," he
said.
Bush said the whole university
administration should be
reorganized. It's one of the best
examples of the rich getting richer
and the poor getting poorer, he
added.
The method of distributing
student population should be
improved to solve the university's
housing problem, said Bush.
"I really question the huge
numbers of students in sausage-
type factory universities."
Bush strongly criticized the
national arts promoter, the Canada
Council.
"It's staffed by a bunch of
Liberals who don't know anything
about art. We misdirect our
cultural efforts. Canadians are
brainwashed to think Americans
are better," he said.
By KEVIN McGEE
Registration in UBC's
professional faculties is up and a
university degree of any sort is still
your best bet to avoid a lifetime on
unemployment insurance.
The applied science and forestry
faculties experienced the greatest
increases in registration this year,
according to William Tetlow, UBC
office of institutional analysis and
planning director.
"We had anticipated an increase
in those faculties, just not quite so
large."
While engineering and forestry
increased in size by more than 10
per cent, the faculty of education
was hit with a decrease of about 10
per cent. The exception to this was
an increase of more than 30 per cent
in the master of education
program.
The commerce faculty would
have had an enormous increase if
not for an enrolment ceiling ex-
tablished several years ago,
commerce senior admissions officer
Glenn Williams said.
"About 170 students new to
UBC applied and were not admitted
for poor grades or lack of
prerequisites, and the number of
students presently at UBC who
applied were equal to that or
greater," he said.
Neil Risebrough, applied science
director of core programming, said
he expects an increase of applications into engineering.
"We are bound to increase in the
long run because we are .the only
engineering school in the province
and also we are hoping for an
increase in female students."
The faculty is currently admitting
about 25 women each year into the
first-year program, compared to
about five women per year in past
years, he said.
"I suspect we have between 70
and 75 women in all years of the
program and that's great. We're
encouraging them as much as we
can," said Risebrough.
Arts faculty enrolment has
remained constant over the past
five years, despite massive campaigns to channel students into
specific job-oriented careers.
The number of students
registered in arts has hovered
around 5,000, Tetlow said.
"I definitely don't get the impression of any exodus of arts
students."
Almost 24,000 students are
registered for the fall session. The
number of graduate students and
students attending night classes
has   also   increased   substantially.
Employment figures are not as
depressing as one might suspect.
Unemployment among university
graduates in B.C. was 3.6 per cent,
while the overall provincial
unemployment rate was 7.2 per
cent, according to Statistics
Canada's June issue of the Labor
Force.
The manager of the campus
Canada employment center, Ray
Chew said, "The key to getting
employment is not directly
dependent on your degree."
r
Television avec subtitles?
By PETER STOCKLAND
A UBC student is circulating a petition on
campus intended to pressure Vancouver's French
language television station into adding English
subtitles to its programming.
"English exposure to French culture must be done
on a step-by-step basis," Marc St. Louis, originator
of the petition, said Thursday.
"People here are isolated from what is going on
back there (in Quebec). If there is a good movie on
the French network most of the people in B.C. can't
watch it because there are only about 30,000 French-
speaking people here," he said.
But Jacques Landry, director of French services
for Vancouver's French TV station said the chances
that English subtitles will be added are "ninety per
cent impossible."
"Public relations wise it might be the move of the
century, but from a practical viewpoint it is almost
an impossibility. It would cost a fortune for one
thing," Landry said.
See page 3: TV Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978
r
Three lucky students will win
and discover happiness in the...
Here's how you enter.
Complete and send in the entry
form below. Carefully read the
rules and regulations and answer
the two easy questions on long
distance calling.
The cars have been donated by British Leyland Motors Canada Limited
Mail the completed entry
form; to be eligible, entries must
be received no later than
November 15th, 1978.
Happiness is a new Triumph
Spitfire, and who knows, you
could be driving around in one
before you know it.
Long
TransCanada Telephone System
r
l
l
L
Rules & Regulations
1. To enter the Long Distance Sweepstakes, complete the Official
Entry Form. Only official entry forms will be considered. LIMIT ONE
ENTRY FORM PER PERSON. Mail to:
LONG DISTANCE SWEEPSTAKES
Box 8101, Toronto,
Ontario, M5W1S8
Contest closes with entries received as of November 15, 1978.
2. There will be three winners determined. Each winner will
receive a new 1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 Automobile. Each
Spitfire is equipped with a 4-cylinder overhead valve 1.5 litre engine, 4-speed Synchromesh transmission, rack and pinion steering,
bucket seats, small radius steering wheel and real wood veneer
dashboard. Manufacturer's suggested list price, FOB Dartmouth,
Montreal, Burlington, Vancouver, $6,195.00 including Federal
Sales Tax. (Dealer may sell for less). Price does not include dealer
pre-delivery inspection, and make-ready, B.L's port handling
charge or destination charge (if any). Local delivery, provincial
and municipal taxes are included as part of the prize at no cost to
the winner. Only one prize per person. Winners agree to accept
responsibility for driver's permit and insurance. Prizes will be
delivered to the British Leyland Motors dealership nearest the
winners' residences in Canada. Prizes must be accepted as
awarded. No substitutions.
3. Following the close of the contest, selections will be made
from eligible entries received. Selected entrants, whose questionnaires are completed correctly, will be contacted and will be
required to first correctly answer a time-limited, skill-testing
question during a pre-arranged telephone interview, before being
declared a winner. Decisions of the judges are final. By entering,
contestants agree to the use of their names, addresses and
photographs in any forthcoming publicity in the event of
becoming a winner.
4. Contest is open only to students who are registered full-time
or part-time at any accredited Canadian University, College or
other Post-Secondary institution, except employees and
members of their immediate families of TransCanada Telephone
System member companies, British Leyland Motors Canada
Limited, their dealers and their respective advertising agencies,
and the independent judging organization. The contest is subject
to ail Federal, Provincial and Municipal laws.
Official Entry Form
Answer the following questions, then complete the information
below them. Mail the completed form to be received by midnight, November 15, 1978. (ONLY ONE ENTRY PER PERSOM).
Here are the questions
1. Do discounts ever apply to Long Distance station-ta-station
calls made from a pay phone?
Yes No	
2. During what hours can you save the most money on Long
Distance calls made between Monday and Friday?
Calling to (location of your choice)	
from am to am
pm pm
The following information will help us with our research.
Please indicate with a check mark any of the following reasons
for which you might make a Long Distance phone call over the
next six months.
1
Lj to wish someone happy birthday
i.J to clear up personal business
L. to wish someone happy anniversary
[J to arrange travel and get-togethers
" to wish someone Merry Christmas or
Happy New Year
i 1 to chat and "keep in touch"
Thanks!
number of calls
NAME (Please print)
ADDRESS
CITY/TOWN
POSTAL CODE
PROVINCE
PHONE NUMBER (where you can be contacted)
UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE attending
J Friday, October 6, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Dreaded police have no power
By JEFF RANKIN
You know who they are. The
click-clack of heavy boots on the
sidewalk behind you, the flash of
blue uniform glimpsed out of the
corner of your eye.
It's the campus security patrol, a
force of 41 people hired by the administration to regulate traffic and
prevent vandjilism on campus.
But do you know what they can
do or what their special legal
powers are?
"They don't have any," says
patrol supervisor Winston Ploeg.
"They have no powers as police officers at all."
Ploeg said Wednesday that while
the campus patrol can use
reasonable force to prevent a crime
and can make arrests, they can only
do so in the capacity of an ordinary
citizen.
"But we have never had need to,
since the RCMP is available to us 24
hours a day," Ploeg says.
But while the patrol's powers are
strictly limited, they do exercise
considerable authority over the less
fortunate automobile.
The hapless car is subject to the
traffic offence notice which is
issued by the university administration and not the government. The
car owner is not legally obligated to
pay these tickets, but refusing to
pay leaves one liable for such sanctions as the university sees fit to inflict.
In   other   words,   good   luck
—peter menyasz photo
LEMMING-LIKE ACTION of forestry students amazed observers Thursday. In fit of insanity similar to suicide-
prone lemmings, foresters took to Empire Pool diving board and plunged to death, hitting log jam set up in water
in anticipation of faculty enrolment restriction event. Self-inflicted genocide continued until Pit opened at 4 p.m.
'Sensational news oppresses gays'
There are two kinds of murderers in the news — gay
murderers and "normal" ones, psychiatrist Jaime
Smith said Thursday.
Smith told about 45 people in SUB 119 that such
headlines as "Gay murderer kills friend" are common
and are a means of setting gays apart.
"I challenge you to find a headline that says
Straight man robs bank" he said.
Smith said he feels oppressed when reading news
headlines which specify "gay skyjackers."
Singling gays out as different causes them to view
themselves as different, said Smith.
"We learn to loath homosexuality before we
acknowledge own (homosexuality)," he said.
Smith said in the past the news media discriminated
against blacks in the same way it currently singles out
gays. But newspaper headlines no longer discriminate
against blacks due to pressures from civil rights
groups, he added.
The gay minority is unique because it is virtually
invisible, Smith said.
"Gay people can only be identified if they want to
be identified," he said.
Gay men often asume a pronounced macho image
and gay women act very feminine as a defence
mechanism to combat androgynous tendencies, Smith
said.
"It takes a lot of bravery to flaunt it (androgynous
tendencies)." ,
Smith said people were treated for redirection of
sexual orientation 10 years ago, but now most
psychiatrists do not view homosexuality as an illness.
Gays with sexual identity problems are now often
referred to sympathetic counselling organizations, he
said.
registering next year.
The campus security patrol also
has the authorization to tow
vehicles which are parked illegally,
says Ploeg.
"We get outside tow trucks to do
the towing," he says. "We don't
actually do it ourselves, but we've
got a compound (for impounded
cars).
Rhodesian blacks
'need our support'
By VICKI BOOTH
Canadians should support efforts
to help the African Liberation Army combat white oppression in
Rhodesia for "humanitarian purposes", UBC professor Irving Hexham said Thursday.
Hexham told about 100 people in
Angus 104 Thursday that the World
Council of Churches is granting
money to the liberation movement
to help refugees, not to buy arms.
Hexham described the blacks'
position in Rhodesia and the
whites' unfair practices.
"Ever since Rhodesian blacks
started speaking of independence,
the reaction of the whites is to move
farther to the right. They have
always rejected politicians who
want to give the Africans a fair
deal," Hexham said.
The white regime's laws have
become more and more oppressive,
he said. The Land Tenure Act passed in 1968 divided the land into two
equal portions, one of which was
HEXHAM . . . supports blacks
given to the whites and one. of
which was given to the blacks.
"This means each black has
about seven acres of land, and each
white has about 160 acres of land,"
Hexham said.
The whites' policies on education
spending are also unfair, he added.
"About four per cent of the
children in Rhodesia are white, and
the other 96 per cent are black and
the same amount of money is spent
on the education of these two
groups.
"The army and the police are in
white hands, and the white vote is
entrenched in the Rhodesian parliament," said Hexham.
He said the Rhodesian government promoted the so-called "internal settlement" between Ian Smith
and black chiefs, but he called this
settlement a "complete sellout".
"First of all, these chiefs are not
traditional tribal leaders, but officials paid by the government, and
thrown out if they don't agree with
the government," Hexham said.
"Secondly, it doesn't change land
ownership in any sense. It gives the
Africans nothing."
He said African black guerrillas
do not want the whites to leave
Rhodesia, but are only fighting for
a "fair share of the cake".
"Whites have continually refused
to meet African demands, and so
more and more Africans have taken
up arms against the whites."
Hexham said the blacks are only
attacking military targets. White
farms are minor fortresses and are
legitimate targets, he said.
It is hard to get a realistic picture
of what is happening in Rhodesia
because of press censorship, Hexham said. He said no foreign journalists are allowed in the battle zone
and the army only takes Rhodesian
reporters to the battle scene.
Rhodesian reporters are not allowed to talk to anyone, he added.
Hexham said Rhodesia's Roman
Catholic missionaries support the
guerrilla tactics because they believe
the Africans have a right to revolt
against the corrupt regime. Because
of their support, the missionaries
have been jailed and deported by
the Rhodesian government, he added.
TV subtitles
would give
B.C. culture
From page 1
He said since programming is
only delayed three hours from
Eastern Canada to Vancouver,
there is not enough time to add
English subtitles.
Landry added that even if
practical problems were overcome
he doesn't think the move would be
made.
"I don't really think that using
subtitles is our role. The station is a
French station and should be
looked on that way," he said.
Other representatives of the
French community in Vancouver
said they agreed with Landry.
"It would be ridiculous to spend
the money that would be required,"
said Lyse Dansereau, social
development community officer for
La Federation Des Franco-
Colombiens.
"I am strongly, strongly against
it. If people want exposure to
French culture in Vancouver there
are lots of places to get it."
No rag
Be prepared for a long siege,
harship beyond imagine and a
period of intense darkness before
light can be seen at the end of the
tunnel.
Yes, The Ubyssey will be missing
in action for five hardship-laden
days. The unpaid peasant scribes
will be acting normally for a
change, celebrating        the
Thanksgiving holiday with their
families, or their loved ones.
Vancouver's "other" newspaper
will be back on Thursday. The
deadline for 'Tween classes submissions is noon Wednesday. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978
It's time for a constitutional
Students can be forgiven if they find
the constitutional wrangles being fought
in Alma Mater Society offices to be confusing.
The current AMS constitution is
understood by few people, with the
possible exception of its author, and
now we have two new proposals competing for students' attention.
The first one, submitted by a coalition
of undergraduate societies, recommends sweeping changes in representation on the student representative
assembly. Brian Short, one of the individuals who drafted this document,
claims the smaller SRA proposed in his
constitution will lead to more effective
student leadership and less internal
wrangling. No doubt there will be less
in-fighting because he has eliminated
responsible representation for almost
half the student population.
The other major change recommended by the Short proposal is to elect AMS
executive officers in at-large elections.
This is a good recommendation. The
current set-up removes student participation in the society's politics with its
parliamentary-style government. Now,
the president of the AMS is elected by a
handful of politicians.
But the  newest  proposal,  initiated
recently by four AMS presidents, past
and present, is an improvement on this
theme.
Instead of electing all five executive
officers in at-large elections, only the
president and vice-president will be
elected by the students. Elections will
thus be less unwieldy but students will
still have a chance to make their views
known to student politicos via the ballot
box.
Another good aspect of the
"presidents' constitution" is that it
returns fiscal control of the society back
IF IT WORKS, DO IT AGAIN/ITS THE OLDEST LAW
OrADYfKTISIHG.
CART6R CoMSiDFrT]
IffHaMSfAtf s=^J
j|CAHPOAlr,D:
©HM^1
to the politically responsible body — the
SRA.
Currently, the person responsible for
drawing up the society's annual budget
is not a politician, but a bureaucrat appointed by a committee of AMS politicians.
Money is power, and the manner in
which a budget is decided — who gets
cut where, or who receives increases —
is often a political decision, particularly
in the current tight money situation.
These decisions as a consequence
should be made by a politically responsible body.
Removing financial control from the
AMS bureaucracy — the student administrative commission — is also a
good suggestion in that it removes considerable power from the commission, a
body which has grown in power far
beyond original intentions.
After weighing the pros and cons of
the current constitution and the two
proposals, the draft by the four AMS
presidents seems to be the best choice.
It will still have shortcomings, as all constitutions do, but it seems to be a better
starting point for further changes than
the others.
Letters
Apathy strikes campus-anyone care?
It seems obvious that an epidemic
of apathy has again struck the UBC
campus.
Last Friday, less than four per
cent of the students bothered to cast
their ballot to elect their
representative to our highest
academic governing body. In spite
of excellent coverage by The
Ubyssey, many students had never
heard of the candidates and had no
idea of the issues involved.
Frequently, letters appear in your
newspaper protesting the way
things are run in the "tight
bureaucracy of the Alma Mater
Society." Yet interested students
seem non-existent when we poster,
leaflet, speak to groups and advertise in The' Ubyssey begging for
them to help serve on our com-
Ads hypocritical
Recently I wrote a letter to this
paper criticizing it for publishing an
RCMP recruitment ad. Various
back issues indicate that not only
does The Ubyssey advertise for the
police, but also for the Bank of
Montreal and the Royal Bank of
Canada, banks which through their
loans and investments support the
corrupt regimes of Chile and South
Africa.
In view of Ubyssey's support of
the movement last year which suggested   students   withdraw   their
funds from these two banks the present advertising policy of this paper
can only be regarded as
hypocritical.
As I'm sure The Ubyssey does
not wish to support, however indirectly, the repressive governments
of either Chile or South Africa, it
should clear up all ambiguities in its
position by refusing henceforth to
publish any advertisement for the
Bank of Montreal or the Royal
Bank of Canada.
John Walker
arts 2
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 6, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
The 60th anniversary issue deadline was approaching rapidly as eager Ubyssey staffers grabbed their
favorite Ubyssey-celebs. "! want Eric Nicol,'' shouted a distraught Mike Bocking who was obviously
confused by the name. Staffers like Peter Stockland, Mary-Ann Brunoro, Paul Hodgins, Rich Creech
and Dick Bale fought each other for the right to telephone illustrious Pierre Berton, "OOOh, I want
Stuart Keate," chimed in venal careerists Julie Wheelwright, Greg Strong, David Morton, Holly
Nathan, Mayo Moran, Robert Jordon and Larry Green. Mario Lowther Peter Menyasz, Keery Regier
and Thierry LeBrun studied their Earle Birnie so they wouldn't be embarrassed when they called him.
"Damn, Morley Safer's in the Missle East," cried an overly disappointed Kevin McGee to a confused
trio of Glen Schaefer, Richard Schreiner, and Dave Ward who frantically tried to recall past fears of the
60 Minutes experi. Under-31 silly females Heather Conn and Vicki Booth dreamed of rewriting judge
Les Bewley's copy. "And listen Ai, write long, and it it's late call it in," said an irate Bill Tieleman to
Fotheringham while he schemed to write his own M3clean's column. "Hey. I've got "Lance" Turner
on the line," said an impressed Tom Hawthorn. "And he says'the king is dead, long live the Crown
Prince'."
mittees (for example, the elections
committee and students court have
not yet been struck due to lack of
applicants).
While I'm on the subject of
apathy, I must add this. During the
first weeks of term, countless eager
new students were flocking to my
office for information on clubs.
Unfortunately, the majority of
these organizations had not
bothered (and haven't yet) to inform me of any current contact
names or numbers so that interested
students could reach them. I expect
No noise
required
This is just a small letter about a
big complaint concerning the big
noises a small number of groups
make on this campus. I write of
groups who, by using loudspeakers
mounted on cars, wander about
blaring out exhortations to support
their dances, drives or whatever.
When these often banal advertisements become so loud, however,
that they penetrate throughout
buildings they constitute noise
pollution.
My defence against this excessive
noise has been to deliberately ignore
the events concerned, whether or
not I have found them attractive.
Other campus goers have agreed
with me that the noise is an irritant
and an invasion of their privacy
which should not be condoned.
Therefore, my suggestion is that if
all students would use noisy advertisements as a criterion against supporting a particular function then
maybe the advertisers will exercise
more self-control.
On the other hand, if they compensate for the resultant poor attendance with even more noise, I will
gleefully join them. Only I am going to blare away while parked
underneath a certain you-know-
who's office window.
Clive Vardy
science 4
that by the time I track down all the
current information, these eager
students will have succumbed to
UBC apathy, and will no longer be
interested in any involvement
whatsoever.
So, if there are any students out
there who have room in their lives
for something other than classes,
come up to the AMS offices and
ask us what we can find that will
interest you. That's what we're here
for.
Sally Thome
secretary, SAC
UBC petered out
Having graduated from your tiny
kingdom, it's not often that I get to
see a copy of your campus rag.
Nonetheless I was startled to read
the other day that the board of
governors had elected a new Wizard
of Oz. In all respect to Ian
Greenwood, his election as board
chairman comes as a complete
surprise simply because it contradicts the established tradition at
UBC. Tradition has it that the most
senior member of the board is
selected as the new chair. In that
case the heir apparent to the
position would be none other than
my close friend and confidant —
Basil Peters.
Basil, who was last seen
drunkedly tossing tomatoes across
the dining floor at Victoria Station,
has been working on an acceptance
speech since last September. At that
time, Doug Kenny had by-passed
Basil as chairman of the prestigious
board finance committee, (where
Basil was also the senior member),
thereby immediately sparking
rumors that Kenny had better
things in mind for Basil. Needless
to say Basil was pleased with the
prospects and quickly went out and
bought a new suit, a gavel and a
zipper . . .for his lips.
Intrigued by Basil's non-
appointment, I contacted some
uninformed sources on-campus
(including Dean Neumann) hoping
to get some insight into this matter.
I have been told that there are two
possible explanations for Basil's
misfortune.
The first is, that Doug Kenny has
still better things in mind for Basil.
You   see,   Kenny   is   desperately
seeking a head for the New Health
Sciences Centre. Speculation is that
Basil may well be Kenny's choice.
Basil's chances for the position are
said to be "excellent" since the only
other applicant for the job is a UBC
neurologist who has been on leave
of absence since December of 1975.
Some of my friends who have
actually seen Basil on campus this
year, have asked him to shed some
light on all of this speculation.
Quite naturally, Basil being a good
board member, has had no comment.
Moe Sihota
uic 1
Even the
right-wing
has rights
I cannot help but respond to the
letter by John Walker, arts 2,
published Oct. 3. In his letter Mr.
Walker advocates that The Ubyssey
should oppose publishing ad-
vertisments for reactionary institutions such as the RCMP for
the reasons of supporting the
"rights" of left-wing groups.
Where is the logic in advocating
"rights" when he is failing to
recognize the "rights" of other
groups that have beliefs contrary to
his own?
R.G. Carriere
law Friday, October 6, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag© 5
Letters
Paper of fends
I am writing this letter in protest
of something that appeared on the
front page of the Thursday, Sept.
28 edition of The Ubyssey. It is a
minor item, frivolously done, yet it
manages through its inane manner
to reduce the tragic history of an
entire race to the subject of a
snicker. What I refer to is the
caption for the front page
photograph.
The photograph is of two persons
lounging in the sun. The caption
mentions Indian summer, then goes
on to talk about fur traders,
resource depletion, and the
genocidal circumstances facing the
Indian people. It may surprise
some, but these matters are taken
seriously by Indians.
I am Indian, and I'm capable of
taking a joke. But I don't like the
condition of my people belittled for
the sake of a cheap laugh. I was
offended,   as   were   many   other
people including the members of
the Native Indian Student Union
who asked me to represent them in
this letter.
I hope that in the future The
Ubyssey will exercise more editorial
discretion in matters such as these.
A university is, I hope, a civilized
place. We are entitled to expect that
its students' voice, this newspaper,
will conduct itself in a civilized
manner. But there is nothing
civilized about laughing at other
people's problems. It is simply
crude and thoughtless. I hope a
word is enough to prevent
something like this happening
again.
Theo Collins
Native Indian Student Union
The cutline you refer to was not
intended as a slur against anyone.
We apologize if anyone was offended —staff.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
General Student Meeting For
ELECTIONS
Of The Student Program Committee
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 11—8 P.M.
At International House
• The future programs of International House will be largely
developed by this committee
• Every student member can vote and run for positions
• Memberships are available to anyone interested in
International House ($2 per year, at the office)
ONE PLANET
ONE PEOPLE
PLEASE
baha'i'"Faith
If you would like more information please contact Michael
and Ruth Bray at 228-0583 or attend an informal discussion
Tuesday at 12:30 rm. 113 SUB.
BULLETIN
(Second Update)
1 CAMPUS RECRUITMENT
PRE-SCREENING
The Information below is a summary and up-date ol the screening deadlines up to October 17.
UCPA APPLICATION
DEADLINE FOR
PRE-SCREENING
NAME OF EMPLOYER
FACULTIES REQUIRED
CAMPUS VISIT
DATES
Wed. Oct. 11
Winspear, Higgins,
Stevenson & Co. (Vane.)
C. A. Students
Nov. 8, 9
Wed. Oct. 11
Exams: Oct. 14
& Oct. 16
Public Service Commission
(Ask for Federal
Government Application
Form; return to
CEC on campus)
All Except: Historical
Research, Dentistry, Home
Ec, Medicine, Occup. & Phys.
Therapy, Pharmacy, Psyc,
Sci. Regulation, Sci. Research,
Taxation, (External Affairs:
Foreign Service)
Nov. 14, 15, 16,
17, 20, 21, 22, 23
Wed. Oct. 11
Canadian General Electric
Co. Ltd. (Manuftg.)
(Toronto)
Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering
Nov. 15, 16
Wed. Oct. 11
Honeywell Info. Systems
(Toronto)
Any graduate interested
in sales
Nov. 22
Thur. Oct. 12
Shell Canada Resources
Ltd. (Calgary) & Shellburn
Refinery (Vancouver)
ENG: Mech., Chem.,
Geological, Eng. Physics,
Geology (Petro & Minerals),
Geophysics & Physics
Oct. 30, 31,
Nov. 1, 2, 3, 20, 21
Fri. Oct. 13
Gardner, MacDonald & Co.
(Prince George)
C. A. Students
Nov. 6
Fri. Oct. 13
Canadian General Electric
Co. Ltd. (Finance)
(Toronto)
B. Com., Economics, Math,
Finance
Nov. 6
Fri. Oct. 13
Ontario Hydro (Toronto)
Engineering: Elect., Mech.
Nov. 9, 10
Fri. Oct. 13
Energy Resources
Conservation (Calgary)
Engineering: Chem., Civil,
Mech., Geological, Geology
Nov. 14, 15
Fri. Oct. 13
Burroughs Business
Machines Ltd.
M.B.A. and Comp. Sc.
Nov. 15
Fri. Oct. 13
Campbell, Sharp
C. A. Students
Nov. 17, 20, 21
Tues. Oct. 17
Gardner, McDonald & Co.
(Vancouver)
C. A. Students
Oct. 30, 31,
Nov. 1, 2, 3
NOTE: INCO METALS CO. (pre-screening deadline October 10) have
cancelled their campus recruiting.
DIRECT SIGN-UP
The information below is a summary and up-date of the beginning dates for direct sign-up,  starting Oct.  16.
NAME OF EMPLOYER   FIRST DATE
FACULTIES REQUIRED
CAMPUS VISIT
FOR DIRECT SIGNUP
Peat, Marwick,      Direct Sign-up beginning
C. A. Students
Oct. 30, 31,
Mitchell & Co.      Oct. 16
Nov. 1, 6, 7
Coppers &            Direct Sign-up beginning
C. A. Students
Oct. 30, 31,
Ly brand                 Oct. 16
Nov. 1, 2, 3
Deloitte, Haskins Direct Sign-up beginning
C. A. Students
Oct. 30, 31, Nov. 1
& Sells                   Oct. 16
Winspear,             Direct Sign-up beginning
C. A. Students
Oct. 30, 31
Higgins,                 Oct. 16
Stevenson & Co.
(Pr. George)
Union Oil Co.        Direct Sign-up beginning
Summer:
Nov. 1, 2
Oct. 16
3rd yr. (Masters eligible) and
4th yr. Geology & Geophysics;
3rd yr. Geological Engineering
Permanent:
B. Sc. & M. Sc Geology &
Geophysics
B. Sc. & M. Sc Geological
Engineering
Hudson's Bay Co.Direct Sign-up beginning
B. Com. B. Home Ec.
Nov. 1, 2
(The Bay)               Oct. 16
Collins, Barrow     Direct Sign-up beginning
C. A. Students
Nov. 2, 3
& Co.                       Oct. 16
Schlumberger of  Direct Sign-up beginning
ENG: Mech., & Elect.
Nov. 2, 3
Canada                 Oct. 16
Geophysics, Eng. Physics
(Edmonton)
Geological Engineering.
Please   check  in  at  the   Canada   Employment  Centre
office  at  least  once  a   week   tor
details  and  revisions.
Location: Brock Hall, Room 214
Hours: Monday - Friday — 8:30 - 4:30
For Bulletin No. 2. See the UBYSSEY end of October.
DIRECT SIGN-UP INSTRUCTIONS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Students may sign up for one person only, whether that person be themselves or someone else,
i.e. a "buddy" system.
The Canada Employment Centre will be open early, at 7:00 a.m. on these days: Mon. Oct. 16 and Mon.
Oct. 23. Otherwise opening is at 8:30 a.m. This early opening is for the sign-up with Chartered
Accounting firms only.
Students wishing to sign up for firms other than C.A. companies will not be allowed into the "sign-up"
area until the regular opening time of 8:30 a.m. on Oct. 16 and Oct. 23.
All stgn-up's will be at Brock Hall, and there will be 2 separate queues — one lined up for C.A. firms
and another lined up for all other firms.
The general pattern is that two weeks prior to the campus visit date of the company, there will be a
direct sign-up date for that company.
The direct sign-up dates of Oct. 16 and Oct. 23 will cover all the C.A. firms, so that students will not
have to line up more than twice in order to reach any of these firms.
Details of the companies and their "sign-up" dates will continue to be published in regular intervals
in THE UBYSSEY, and also distributed to the student employment reps.
I*
■ TV
CANADA EMPLOYMENT
CENTRE   ON  CAMPUS
A NEW EXPANDED EMPLOYMENT SERVICE FOR STUDENTS
LOCATION: BROCK HALL, ROOM 214
HOURS; MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 - 4:30 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 1X.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Thanksgiving   dance   with   live  band,   9   p.m..
International House.
MUSSOC
Get-acquainted dance, party, 8:30 p.m., SUB 207.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion aujourd'hui, noon, International House.
GAY PEOPLE
Gay disco dance, 9 p.m., Grad Student Centre
garden room.
ATA
Annual  general  meeting,  elections,  noon,  Grad
Student Centre garden room.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Qualifying debates, noon, Buchanan 204.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
General meeting, elections, noon, Grad Student
Centre upper lounge.
HILLEL HOUSE
Soviet jewery meeting, noon, Hillel House.
HANG-GLIDING CLUB
Meeting, slide show, noon, SUB 215.
HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Arthur Blanchette,  Canadian envoy to organization of American states, speaks on Canada's Role
in Latin America, noon, Buchanan 104.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
FORESTRY FACULTY
Photo exhibit Footloose in the National Parks 11920
-1940), 9:30 a.m.. Macmillan Building lobby.
SUS
Lecture on The Planet Mars as Explored by the
Viking Expedition, noon, Hennings 200.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper, discussion, worship, 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
NORMAN BETHUNE CLUB
Speech, presentation on current uprising in Iran,
7:30 p.m. SUB 213.
DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS
Lecture Hannibal and the Romans by Prof. P. G.
Walsh, University of Glasgow, noon, Buch. 104. *
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
THURSDAY
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Discussion, noon. SUB 113.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
SFFEN
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
SUB ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Leslie Poole's studio show, 10:30 a.m.,
SUB art gallery.
FRIDAY
SUB ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Leslie Poole's studio show, 10:30 a.m.,
SUB art gallery.
SATURDAY
SKI CLUB
Work weekend, party, Oct. 7,8,9, Whistler cabin.
PUBLIC
228-6121
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    ,75
ADULTS $1.2S
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
NORRES
_f* MOVING AND \z;
Si TRANSFER LTD. >
■STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th:
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES.
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
FORESTRY UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY PRESENTS
UNDERCUT '78
dress: hardtimes
place: P.N.E. Agrodome
time: 7:30— 12:30
Saturday Oct. 7, 1978
Band: ZI6 ZAG MOUNTAIN STRING BAND
Only $4.00 single — $7.00 per couple
FACILITIES
Tickets available from Foresters or Phone 224-4693
t
SAVE $$
BUY A
Bigegros BUS PASS
I     E»
2
I
Pass valid Oct. 15 - Dec. 31
-good 7 days a week - UNLIMITED travel
-good in zone A and the common zone
A $56 value for only $46
* Based on 5 round trips per week
SALE OCT 10 - OCT 27
In AMS Business Office
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Cash or Certified Cheque
WE'RE YOUR AMS
ri
HILLEL HOUSE
presents
MAUREEN GOLD
Problems of Russian Immigrants
Coming to Vancouver
TUESDAY 10 OCTOBER
12:30 at Hillel House
Modern Hebrew Lessons begin on 13 Oct 12:30 at Hillel.
HILLEL HOUSE IS ACROSS FROM SUB *H0 BEHIND BROCK HALL
YOUR A.U.S. PRESENTS
SUNRISE
NIGHT ! !
FEATURING
SHOTS, SUNRISES AND TAC0S
SEE YOU THERE
OCTOBER 6
4-8 P.M. in
BUCHANAN LOUNGE
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35a
Commercial v 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
TONIGHT
Thanksgiving Danes
With The  Fabulous CUDJO  Band
9  P.M. — Free Turkey Too
$2 Non-Members — $1 Members
35 — Lost
THE   VANCOUVER   INSTITUTE
FREE   PUBLIC   LECTURE
DR. LEONARD KURLAND
MAYO CLINIC
Rochester/ Minnesota
Incidence/  trends  and   outcome   of
disease. Dr. Kurland has utilized the
unique  medical   records  system   of
the Mayo Clinic to conduct a series
of outstanding  studies on  the  epidemiology of disease. Saurday, Oct.
7th, 8:00 p.m..  Lecture  Hall   No.  2,
Woodward   I.R.C.
LOST — Man's gold watch, in the area
of B lot. Engraved on back. Reward.
278-1908.
LOST — A gold wedding ring. 3rd floor
Computer Science Bldg. Unusual design. Reward. 521-6876.
SEMINAR — By the Director ot the
Canadian Institue of Ukrainian Stud-
Canadian Institute of Ukranian Studies, University of Alberta, Dr. M&noly
Lupul, on ''Ukrainian Canadians In
Our Time Of Political Crisis". To be
held on Friday, October 6, 8:00 p.m..
Room 157, Law Building.
LOST — HP-21 CALCULATOR/ Oct. 4,
CPSC 201. Call Gord, 224r3475.
LOST.— MY MIND, in promoting Sub-
film's LED-ZEPPELJN "The Song Remains The Same". Now at SUB theatre.
65 — Scandals
GAY DISCO DANCE — All women and
men welcome. October 6, Grad Centre, Garden Room, 9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m.
$1.50 with AMS  card,  $2.00  visitors.
70 — Services
HOT HOT HOTI CSA's Saturday Night
Fever Disco this Saturday, Oct. 7,
SUB Ballroom. Everybody welcome.
FREESEE: Romantic versus Classic Art
Series. Now showing every Wed.,
12:35 p.m., SUB Aud. Free film series.
U.B.C. BOWLING LEAGUE meets Mondays at 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. in
SUB Lanes. Everyone is welcome. For
further information phone Chris, at
224-6539. Come out and bowl.
10 — Tor Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for Ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
11 — For Sale — Private
1961 FORD VAN. $2,000 invested/ city
tested, new paint, camper equip. $950
o.b.o. 291-1777.
THESIS AND
MAGAZINE BINDING
Permanent Hardcover w~^ng
Gold Lettering
Reasonable Cost
CENTENNIAL    BOOKBINDING
224-3009 929-2706
Monday-Friday,   9:30-3:30
85 — Typing
20 — Housing
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Double
rooms. $75 each per mo., singles $125-
$150 per mo.; kitchen facilities. Rent
discounts possible. 2280 Wesbrook.
ph. 224-9679, Mike or Greg.
30-Jobs
EARN EXTRA MONEY and help the
environment! Greenpeace needs can-
vassers. Good commission. Comue",;
Linda Spong at 736-0321.
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3680 after
6:00 p^n.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING — Correcting
IBM! Selectric.  254-8365.
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
kStf^^LsLTDl
1 '^4558 W 10th
.224-9112 or 224-5858.
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED GET RESULTS PAGE FRIDAY
,----,;*
1     .      —«»v-\.CS-   ■■■■
r	
• The explosive issue of Solar Energy
• The story behind the Soft Rock closure
•   Skycellar artists
^
/NS/DE PAGE FR/DAY
• VSO and Chamber Choir reviews
• film reviews of Fou/ P/oy and Madame Rosa
• A new short1 story— Ms. Lucy
• and features on Brass Rubbing and the Circle Art Gallery
• a review of the Maynard Ferguson and Grappelli concerts
L.	 \energy feature |
Solar house provides energy solution
By DAVID MORTON
Quietly under construction in the heart of
Vancouver is a small townhouse project that
will soon have far-reaching consequences in
the housing industry. The project will be
unique because it addresses itself to two
major issues facing Canadians in the 1970s.
Peculiar to this decade are two phenomena
which have drastically raised the cost of
living for all Canadians. The cost of land and
housing has risen so sharply over the past few
years that decent living spaces have become
less accessible, particularly to families.
Perhaps a more far reaching problem than
housing, however, is the rising cost of fuel.
The Arab oil embargo of 1973 caused North
Americans to re-evaluate not only their
dependence on foreign oil sources, but as
well the precarious state of the fossil fuel
supply on a world scale.
The so-called "energy crisis" forced many
to realize that energy strategists have been
predicting for years that we are running out
of energy.
The search for a solution to this potentially
annihilating problem has resulted in a
massive controversy. On one side are
gargantuan oil corporations pushing for
government subsidies for further exploration
so they can increase their short term profits.
On the other hand, there are those who are
proposing a restructuring of the entire energy
system. By decentralizing energy distribution
and by developing the renewable energy
sources such as the sun, wind and tides, this
group believes the world would be better
prepared for the eventual depletion of fossil
fuels.
This is a more realistic solution than either
the short term concerns of the oil corporations or those proponents of that
ecologically threatening alternative of
nuclear energy.
Kitsilano Townhouse project is situated on
an organization which has been active in the
area of alternative people-oriented housing
for a number of years.
Former president of the KHS and project
co-ordinator for the Solarplace Co-op,
Jacques Khouri says the project fulfills what
he sees as the primary concern of the
organization.
"Education is the main purpose. Most
people haven't been informed that there are
other ways of owning a house as well as
living in a house."
Khouri says the elimination of the landlord
in the co-op system also eliminates any
alienation on the part of the tenant because
the tenant is the owner of the house.
"Most people would like to own their own
houses, but this day and age just doesn't
allow for it. The co-op format allows them to
take an active part in the decision making
and day to day business of the house. It's the
next best thing to owning."
Khouri says the solar component of the
Solarplace Co-op fits into the KHS aim of
education by bringing the ideas of energy
conservation and renewable energy sources
into reality. The tenants of the co-op will be
responsible for maintaining the working
requirements of the solar system such as
opening and closing insulating shutters, and
conserving heat when it is needed.
Khouri believes that Solarplace Co-op will
affect the housing industry by not only
proving to investors that such different
housing projects can get off the ground, but
by influencing developers by showing them
that there are different attitudes to
developing besides those which involve tax
write-offs and capital gains.
"If you start with a different attitude, you
get a different house. For the developer, the
process is all the same — you have to deal
with the same people,  the same building
IW&OLATED   ^3T£0Crup,E:
HEATEb /MR
RISING,   foV
Odmve<itiow
|Ne»ULAT\00
the corner of Broadway and Vine in the
Kitsilano area and incorporates solutions to
these two problems of high energy and land
costs.
The project has been tentatively called
Solarplace Co-op, a name which illustrates
two solutions. It is a non-profit co-operative
housing system. Rather than being subject to
the rules and regulations, and oftentimes the
whims of a landlord, the tenants in this case
own the house co-operatively. It is the
tenants who decide monthly rent structures
and the policies that run the apartment
building.
Members of a co-op join by buying shares
in the house which may range from $500 to a
thousand dollars depending on the house
policy. Monthly rent is charged to the individual on the basis of their monthly income
so that nobody can be prevented from living
in a co-op if their financial situation prevents
it.
But a more unique aspect of Solarplace
Co-op is its heating system. In combination
with numerous energy conserving measures
and a backup electrical heating system, the
townhouse will be heated by the sun. The
solar system will provide 90-95 per cent of
the annual space heating and cooling
requirements.
Solarplace Co-op was organized by the
members of the Kitsilano Housing Society,
codes and the same investors as a normal
housing development.
"But if you start with the attitude that you
want to provide inexpensive housing, then
the product will be more satisfying to people.
If you are willing to get involved and spend a
little more time and energy, more human
ways of housing will emerge."
The KHS certainly spent its share of
energy and time in getting the Solarplace Coop off the ground. Plagued by extended
delays while research councils and government mortgage corporations considered their
plans, on top of the normal building codes,
the organization struggled for more than a
year before they were able to sign a contract
with the construction company.
The KHS purchased the building on the
corner of Broadway and Pine in 1976. It was
as dilapidated and unkempt as the property
itself, which looked like a portion of
hurricane-stricken wheatfield. The front
yard was used as a lot to sell Christmas trees
in the month of December.
The first plan of action by the KHS was to
organize the tenants into a co-operative
system by implementing shares in the
building and creating a tenant's committee.
But their long range plans were to add a
number of new housing units on the existing
property through a relatively new renovation
technique called infill.
Kitsilano Townhouses
SOUR   COLLECTORS
WHITE  RERECTING  ROOF SUR«CE
SKYLIGHT   WITH  "SKYLIOS"
ROHAGLASS
INSULATING   SHUTTERS  WITH
SUPERGRAPHIC
DARK   PAINTED   CONCRETE
TROMBEWALL	
REFLECTIVE   GRAVEL   SURFACE -
Rather than tearing down the existing
building, as most city developers are accustomed to doing, Khouri kept the old
building and planned another structure on
the same property where the Christmas trees
were once sold. This is infill.
The process by-passes the wastage of
present structures which are just as adequate,
and keeps the cost of housing down to a
more accessible level. A building with some
old charm is preserved at the same time.
In the course of designing the infill
project, Khouri and architect Klaus Schmidt
were faced with a number of problems. City
building codes and other bureaucratic
stipulations were a small part of them.
They wanted a family oriented townhouse
that would allow for a reasonably well
contained children's playing space. Nearby
Broadway would be hazardous for children,
and some attempt had to be made by the
developer to keep children off the street.
This was solved by forming a courtyard
between the two buildings, the existing one,
and the new building which would be built
close to Broadway in front of the older one.
Another problem which became clearer to
Khouri through the course of running the
existing building was the rising heating bills.
In the first few months after purchase of the
building, money was lost by the society. A
good deal of this was attributed to heating
costs.
By coincidence, Khouri heard of a series of
solar heating workshops being held in the
city by solar expert Chris Mattock. Concerned primarily with cutting heating costs,
Khouri consulted Mattock about the
feasibility of incorporating a solar heating
system into the design of the new building.
Not only was it feasible, but the solar
system   Mattock   suggested   also    solved
L- CONCRETE    BLOCK   I    2 LAYER   GYPSOC
WALLS   FOR . HEAT    STORAGE
another problem that Khouri and Schmidt
were concerned about.
The building location on Broadway was a
disadvantage because of the noise problem.
Being situated on one of the city's busiest
streets it was sure to be plagued by
the constant noise of traffic at all hours of
the day.
Mattock suggested that one part of the
solar system in the project should be a
passive system.
A passive solar system functions through
the natural mechanisms of heat transfer. In
general, a passive system requires no other
form of energy other than the sun to function
— pumps or fans are not needed. Any
building that has windows with a southern
exposure is already passively heated. Passive
systems also use structural and architectural
elements within the building to act as heat
collectors.
One of the more frequent characteristics of
a passive solar system is a Trombe wall. This
is a concrete wall often one to one and a half
feet thick which is painted black on its
surface to aid in the absorption of sunlight.
It is also south-facing.
Solar radiation passes through a double
glazed window which is situated a few inches
in front of the Trombe wall, and then is
intercepted by the concrete wall. The heated
air between the wall and the window passes
through vents located at the top and bottom
of the wall, and is distributed immediately
into the space behind through the principle
of convection.
The radiation received by the actual wall
appears in the living space about eight to ten
hours later as the heat takes this long to pass
through the concrete.
turn to PF 8
VANCOUVERS Hilll
_    SOLAR-HEATED COOP
AN8UNIT DEMOhJ8TRATK>NpIKk«CT. SPONSORED BY THE :
KITS HOUSU4G SOCIETY.***83 8Y we national research cowkx
—peter menyasz photos
SOLAR   PIONEERS   persist   in face   of   establishment   reluctance
Page Friday. 2
U B YSSE
Friday, October 6, 1978 I entertainment I
Soft Rock Cafe closed by council fears
By MARIO LOWTHER
The signs on the door and windows of the
Soft Rock Cafe at 1921 West Fourth Avenue
reads "Closed for renovations."
So you think, "Okay, fine. I'll come back
when it's open."
I toast your patience. You may have to
wait a long time for the Soft Rock to reopen.
It may be forever because there is more to
their closing than simple renovations.
Soft Rock lost its license recently. Or to
put it more bluntly, had it suspended for a
period of three months by the Vancouver city
council.
Soft Rock's noise level was above the 45
decibel point for the residential zone across
the laneway, but the cafe was under the 65
point reading for the commercial zone it was
on. Blame the mix-up on city zoning.
Residents complained and council imposed a
10:30 live music curfew on Soft Rock.
The curfew did hamper the Soft Rock's
business, but noise is noise. So the Soft Rock
is being soundproofed.
I can't really blame the residents or city
council for getting uptight about the noise,
nor can I ridicule council's worrying, from
day one, that the Soft Rock would bring
back the drug scene to a cleaned-up Kitsilano.
Remember that it was only ten years ago
that West Fourth was the place to be. Kit-
silano's reputation preceded Soft Rock,
and the cafe's image seemed to fit right in
with that reputation. It would have been nice
if nothing had arisen to convince council that
their fears were being realized. But cafe
patrons were found doing dope in the
parking lot beside the cafe and that was that.
I interviewed Patti Fiedler and Elizabeth
Coleman, co-owners of Soft Rock, shortly
before  their  license   was   revoked.
To those of you who never partook in Soft
Rock's fashion of branching — for the six
months it inhabited the brown building at
1921 West Fourth Avenue. To you I extend
my sympathies. Day and night, The Soft
Rock Cafe offered a service unlike that of
any other entertainment facility in the city.
The sexual competition of discos^was never
to be seen in the Soft Rock, nor was there the
noisy abrasiveness of cabarets, the chaotic
inebrity of pubs, or the hurried up, in-and-
out scheme of restaurants.
It was all very laid back. You chose from
the six coffees, nine teas and other beverages;
from the cakes, breads, date squares and
bagels. There were absolutely no junk foods.
Repast in hand, you sat down at a solid
maple table in the large, airy dining or just
plain eating room. No floor plan, no rows of
tables with chairs, cutlery and napkins at
exact spots. You talked, ate or played a game
of backgammon, chess, othello, cards or
whatever you happened to bring. When you
finished, you packed up and sauntered out.
That was it. There were no tips, no
bouncers, no weary waiters ignoring you, no
smiling managers politely shoving you out
the door so the next group could charge
forward. It was pure leisure.
The professional people, doctors, or
lawyers would change into jeans and relax in
Soft Rock's fresh atmosphere. There was no
alcohol served. There never had been any.
You could bring your neighbor, your kids,
your grandmother, your boss, your prof,
your parson and dressed as they were in
jeans, sandals, cut-offs, dresses, suits,
platform shoes, tuxedos. There was no dress
code whatsoever.
turn to PF 4
SOFT ROCK CAFE . . . premises closed until further notice from city council
Sky cellar artists find home in 'Soft Rock9 basement
jr- ,
ALEX . . . enjoys freedom of expression
By PETER MENYASZ
Another oasis of artistic expression is in
the final stages of preparation to offer
creativity and service to the residents of
Kitsilano. In the basement at 1921 West 4th
Avenue is a crafts centre now called the
Skycellar, a name agreed upon by the artists
and artisans, who with meagre resources, but
a lot of individual effort, are attempting to
create an environment for themselves where
their talents can be best used.
Until recently, the sounds of the Soft Rock
Cafe could be heard overhead. As a matter
of fact, in the last few weeks, the Soft Rock
has hung over these people's heads in a very
real sense. When the Soft Rock was closed,
the new crafts centre in its basement was
threatened. However, the artists are certain
that they wiH survive and are continuing their
preparations on that assumption.
The founding members of this tiny
community represent a cross section of crafts
pursuits. One of the first to set up shop was
B. Bison Banana, nicknamed "Buffalo."
His studio, which he has named Banana
Central, specializes in custom-made
leatherwork. His business consists mostly of
custom-ordered sandals in the summer, but
during the rest of the year he concentrates his
efforts on large bags and leather clothing.
In his spare time, he is also also experimenting with wood and leather furniture.
The work on Banana Central began in April,
and took six weeks to complete. Two well-lit
benches are the central core of the work area,
and the walls' are hung with an assortment of
tools, materials, and pieces of work in
varying stages of completion.
Although he is one of the few remaining
leatherworkers in the Vancouver area,
Buffalo's commissioned work does not
provide a full-time living.
"I'd rather bang in nails a few days a week
than have to mass-produce work to pay the
rent." And Buffalo's unwillingness to
compromise the quality of his craftsmanship
is characteristic of the Skycellar community.
Skycellar has a resident artist, Alex. Once
an art teacher, Alex now enjoys all the
freedom of expression that his studio
provides. Alex produces some of his work on
a commission basis, but he prefers to create
spontaneously. His studio is brightly lit, and
filled with a variety of projects that make
movement difficult.
Barry is another artist at Skycellar and
while not truly an artist performs therapeutic
massage. He works mostly with patients
referred to him by physicians. His studio is
completely soundproofed and will soon be
filled with complex electronic equipment for
biofeedback therapy.
As well as his Shiatsu techniques, or
therapeutic massages, Barry has a strong
interest in nutrition as a healing element. He
also devotes some of his time to working with
senior citizens and retarded people.
The Town Waytes are another group in the
Skycellar and they provide the music at the
centre. The six musicians that make up the
ensemble have recreated a Renaissance town
band in the tradition of the 16th Century. In
keeping with that tradition, each of the
musicians can play any of the instruments.
Their instruments vary from such well-
known ones as the lute, viol, and recorder to
more exotic ones such as the shawm, dulzian,
cornett, sackbut, and krumhorn. ,
Most of the members of the Towne
Waytes, including leader David Skulski, have
been UBC Faculty of Music students at one
time. Most of them have also been involved
with major orchestras, and for them the
group is a form of escape from making a
living in the traditional way of classical
musicians.
But even with such rare talents, it is not
easy for the Towne Waytes to make a viable
business of performing, so each of the
musicians is forced to maintain a part-time
job, at least for the time being.
Their new studio space helps because there
is a room where the musicians can
manufacture the reeds for their instruments.
They are going to use the space to teach
music lessons as well.
The Towne Waytes perform anywhere,
"schools, churches, even parking lots,
wherever there are people to play for," says
Marilyn, the manager of the group.
According to the manager, the Skycellar is
an ideal location. "We moved from
basements to cultural centres, with nowhere
to rehearse and lots of complaints about
noise. We needed a solid business-like
purpose and a permanent location."
Now the Towne Waytes can practice
without interruption or complaint and the
soft sounds of Renaissance music in the
background make the atmosphere better for
the other artists.
One studio just beginning to take shape is
Carrie's. Her main interest is making
clothes although it will be a little while
before she will be ready to begin.
Specifically, she intends to design costumes
comic book covers surrounding a central
Wonder Woman motif. Also in the area of
woodwork, he makes custom frames for
photographs and paintings and he even
makes lamps from Phillipine fishing baskets.
"After 2 1/2 years in the bush, I decided
that the independence of working for myself
creates the feeling of creativity that I need. I
think that most of us don't really care if we
make money at what we're doing, as long as
we're doing what makes us happy."
He is the most optimistic about the future
of Skycellar and insists that it "really is a
community. All of the people work well
together and the atmosphere is definitely
very positive," he says.
The atmosphere of the Skycellar is indeed
very positive, but this is not difficult to
understand, considering the multi-faceted
talents of the artists involved. For each of
BARRY, LARRY, BUFFALO AND LARRIE
for exotic dancers, cocktail waitresses and
theatrical performers.
LG Studio is Larrie's creative space and
showcase for his varied talents. His primary
interest is photography, and he has been
actively involved with it for ten years. Larrie
was producing giant blow-ups of
photographs, but now is concentrating on
portraits.
Larrie has a secondary interest in
woodworking. He works mostly in yellow
cedar, and crafts tables that are absolutely
unique. One that stands almost complete in
his studio has a laminated top that features
them, the community is at least a temporary
escape from mundane life into creativity, and
the genuine atmosphere of co-operation and
artistic expressions is reflected in the cheerful
attitudes of the artists.
They have made plans to completely
decorate the common hallways, and Alex is
creating a sign for the street entrance.
Skycellar is an interesting place to visit,
even with no particular need or purchase in
mind, but simply to view the displays of
creativity and soak up some of the positive
energy that abounds there.
Friday, October 6, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 I/mme I
Heartless rendition mars premiere
BY KERRY REGIER
The Vancouver Chamber Choir
which is one of Canada's only three
professional choirs opened its new
season last weekend with a fine but
not flawless performance.
Featured on the program were
Bach's Magificat and Mozart's
Coronation Mass. In writing his
Magnificat, Bach carefully
balanced the soloists with the
chorus, while Mozart aimed at a
predominantly choral effect, with
solists and orchestra supporting.
This may be the reason that the
Mozart work came off better than
the Bach on Friday, as the soloists
and orchestra were weaker performers than the chorus.
After certain loquacious ladies
had finished their conference and
music was audible, a lack of
dedication on the part of the orchestra was the first impression.
Bach's soaring trumpets-and-drums
opening fanfares have surely
brought joy to many faces, but
none were in the orchestra that
night.
Not even a Bruckner symphony
could produce such deadpan expressions in the stringplayers. All
the notes, finely and carefully
played, were there, but not the
heart — and so for the rest of the
program.
We might mention here that
Berlioz invented the cloth-covered
timpani stick almost exactly a
century after Bach wrote his
Magnificat. Berlioz was looking for
a rich, round boom that would
complement the thick orchestra of
the day. On the other hand, Bach
knew only wooden timpani-sticks
which yield a clean, clear tap,
delicately pointing up the
characteristically simple Baroque
rhythms.
Rarely do we find timpanists who
observe this and Paul Grant was no
exception. Berlioz rumbled, Fafnir-
like, through the subtleties of the
bass. Perhaps Mr. Grant might
learn from such orchestras of note
as the St. Martin's Academy or the
Munich Bach.
This aside, the orchestra
balanced well with the choir,
producing clear articulation, so
important in Bach. Some very fine
instrumental solos, notably the
flutes, were heard as well.
The vocal soloists were a
mismatched group, none complementing the other. All seemed to
have their own approach to Bach.
Tenor Bruce Pullan was predictably
the best. His voice, once at King's
College Cambridge, was clean and
strong. Of the others Ingrid
Suderman's soprano was very fine,
expressive, subtle and of lovely
tone.
Ray Nurse, a member of the
Choir, was a powerful and vigorous
bass, giving the distantly martial
Quia Fecit an exciting cast although
flawed by his odd tone which might
have been more appropriate singing
Fafnir in Das Rheingold. Alto
Marjorie Biggar was bored and
boring.
Some surprisingly fast tempi in
the choruses were no doubt aided
by the small size of the choir and
orchestra. The chorus was sharp
and precise and it was very
pleasurable to hear Bach's original
proportions unblown to Romantic
grandeur. One irritation, however,
which is common to many choirs:
the explosive "t". The emphasis in
the word "Magificat" is not on the
the final "t".
A very important, but largely
missing factor was dynamic range.
The prevailing mezzoforte tended
to weaken this dramatic and exciting work.
Mozart fared better than the
Bach piece when the Vancouver
Chorale added their voices and the
orchestra was enlarged. It gave
more a Mozartian dimension to
their   forces.   With   these   greater
resources, much broader dynamics
were displayed and some very
exciting choral climaxes.
As earlier mentioned, in the
coronation Mass the choir tends to
dominate the orchestra and
soloists. So the best performers, the
choristers, were given a chance to
shine, while the lesser were placed
further in the background.
Though more imagination might
have been shown since even peaches
and cream can get boring, it was a
good beginning to a promising
season evidence for the Vancouver
Chamber Choir.
Soft Rock Cafe
from PF 3
Fiedler summed up Soft Rock as
being an international living room.
Everybody   was   welcome.
I realize now how evident the
philosophy of the international
living room was. My first visit to
the Soft Rock Cafe was in early
August, on a Friday night.
The first thing I noticed upon
entering were two guys at a table by
the window, peering so intensely
through the steam rising from their
coffee cups at a chess board, it
would seem they would play right
through Armageddon. I thought
that such concentration in a
restaurant was impossible. I was
impressed.
I was impressed by this ethereal
place in the heart of what was once
west coast Canada's Haight-
Ashbury, yet did not carry the
overtones of a hippie's drug
hangout. Entertainment could be
jazz one night, folk or classical the
next, with poetry, ballet or nights
of mime blended in and never hard
rock.
Coleman told me of full, attentive and enthusiastic audiences
for every show scheduled and of the
bands sending letters that praised
this place for "actual vibes." And
Coleman told me of the night that
the entire audience jumped up and
did the bunny hop and that some
bands actually cancelled other gigs
to play at the Soft Rock.
It was a fascinating place with
creative comfort and unique.
The Soft Rock Cafe can soundproof its walls and windows for
sound, but it cannot do the same
for its patrons if and when it
resurrects itself. The onus is on the
people   who   appreciated   the   in
ternational living room style of the
cafe to police themselves.
There is no other solution short
of inviting some of the boys in blue
down whenever they please to bust
the offenders, and that would
definitely tarnish Soft Rock's image
and philosophy of being a place for
everyone to go without hassles. The
Soft Rock Cafe is too good to lose
but with a little work if can come
back to stay.
CANADA'S LEADING STEREO CENTRE
z
<
<
at
Ui
UI
Z
2
a!
X
m<
X
u
<
a
UI
Urn
<
THE MUSIC SYSTEM
FEATURING THE MASTERS OF HIGH FIDELITY SOUND
SONY STR-V2
25 watts per channel minimum RMS at
8 ohms from 20Hz to 20KHz with no
more than 0.3% Total Harmonic Distortion
FEATURES
• True complementary DC powf
• Uni-phase IF filters
• PLL in multiplex decoder
• FM frequency linear dial scale
• FM inter-station muting
• Tape input and output
• Professional stepped volume con
i 11-position stepped tone control
> Loudness compensation switch
• Signal strength meter
» Stereo
t AC convemenc
, Stereo heaciph;
i Wooden side p,
dicator i.ght
let    -
utpu
KLH
331B
SONY PS-TI
Semi-Automatic
Direct Drive Turntable
ACOUSTIC SUSPENSION
8" WOOFER IVi" CONE TWEETER
The Dedicated loudspeakers are a family with a family sound. KLH's main goal
in the development of the Dedicated Series was to design loudspeakers for the
acoustic reproduction of music, whether the richess of the concert hall, the inescapable beat of the rock group, or the bubbly sound of champagne music. All
KLH Dedicated loudspeakers have the same characteristics: an ability To make
music that sounds as real as the original performance. We proudly present the
Dedicated Series — loudspeakers dedicated to you the listener.
RHODES
PACKAGE
PRICE
$59300
CANADA'S LEADING STEREO CENTRE
RHODES
2699 W. BROADWAY        733-5914
BANK FINANCING
We ship anywhere in B.C. and Alberta prepaid
H
m
O
X
n
(SI
>
z
X
o
z
>
n
x
CO
O
Z
-<
''THE FINIST FOR LESS'
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Owen Barfield
Owen Barfield has had a far-reaching impact on the humanities in our time, as both a
writer and a literary critic His Saving the Appearances, Worlds Apart and other books
have explored the relationships between science, religion, philosophy, history —
almost the breadth of human thought Owen Barfield, now 80, continues to explore
new patterns of thought after his careers as lawyer, writer and literary critic from his
home in Kent, England.
MODERN IDOLATRY: THE SIN OF LITERALNESS
Thursday, October 12 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE FORCE OF HABIT
Tuesday, October 17 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
HISTORY OF IDEAS: EVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUSNESS
Saturday, October 14 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCED
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978 I films |
Foul Play repeats wellknown format
By THIERRY Le BRUIN
Foul   Play,   the   film   being
currently shown at the Vancouver
Centre theatre, is slim fare.
"Foul Play"
Starring Goldie Hawn and Chevy
Chase
At the Vancouver Centre theatre
A nice, and rather naive, female
divorcee played by Goldie Hawn
seeking a relationship meets a nice
young cop, Chevy Chase by way of
accidental   involvement   in   an
assassination plot against the Pope.
Besides portraying the unfolding
of the inevitable love affair, the
film depicts a battle between a
super team of Goodness stereotypes
representing Law, Order, Justice
Freedom, Kindness and Sweetness
of the one side, and another team
of Evil stereotypes on the other
side.
In the first camp we find among
others the charming homicide
detective,   the   humane   well-
n
ir
"THE PLANET MARS EXPLORED
NASA Scientist,
CONWAY SNYDER
speaks on
THE PLANET MARS AS EXPLORED
BY THE VIKING EXPEDITION"
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10     12:30 - 1:30
HENNINGS 200
Sponsored by the SUS and the Science Faculty
RICHARD DREYFUSS
.the
BigFix
SHOWS AT: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:40
SUNDAY: 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:40
VOGUE
918  GRANVILLE
6-8 5-54 34
WARNING:
Occasional Violence
— B.C. Director
EVKD\H
MCETT
MAJQQS
SHOWS 2:15, 2, 4, 6, 8, in|
SUNDAY 2, 4, 6, 8, 10
ooeon
881 GRANVILLE
682-7468
"Ifyou're just ready hr tome wild college humor
you will hive a laughing good time at
'Animal House'
Just Below the Surface Comes the Most Dangerous Threat of All
SHOWS AT: 12, 1:40, 3:45, 5:25, 7:30, 9:40
SUNDAY: 2, 3:45, 5:25, 7:30, 9:40
GENE SHALIT, NBC TV
NATIONAL
LAMP««N
ANIMAL
iMunr
A comedy from Universal Pictures
Warning:
Occasional
Nudity.      Coarse
language
throughout.        B.C. Dir.
Times: „ „
CORONET     8:05     8:05
'12:10   Sun.  10:05    10:0S
S   2:05      2:05     VARSITY
4:05     4:05        7:30
6:05     6:05        9:30
CORONET 1
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
VARSITy
224-3730
4375 W. 10th
T
J-La
CORONET 2
«51   GRANVILLE
685-6828
SimoneACADEMY
Signoret'
AWARD
WINNER
French
7-30       with English
Q^n subtitles
9:30
MADAME
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
GIANCARLOGIANNINI
The
Sensual
t   Man
Warning:   Frequent
nudity and sex.
Shows at: —B.C. Dir.
7:30
9:30
dlJNbAR
DUNBAR at 30th
224-7252
BUDDY HOLLY
STORY
GARY BUSY
DON STROUD
DROAdwAV 1
Shows at:
7:15
9:15 70 7   W. BROADWAY
874-1927
.  n^*>7 */■&'■'' BURTREYNO
Jl ^dX&idsL*^    SALLY FIELD
^  iM^wf        JACKIE GLEA
BURT REYNOLDS
MELD
GLEASON
SHOWS AT: 7:30 - 9:30
WARNING: Some coarse
language — B.C. Director
DROAdwAV 2
70 7 W. BROADWAY
874-1927
intentioned fatherly landlord, the
sweet heroine, her basically kind-
hearted girl friend. In the other
camp we encounter a tall albino
killer, a middle aged Lady MacBeth
who masterminds the entire plot, a
weak and complex-ridden tiyin
brother of an Archbishop.
Like its cardboard figures, the
situations are on the whole rather
uninspiring and tend to verge on the
cliche. The heroine unwittingly
finds herself in a super sex pad with
psychedelic lights flashing on the
wall, mirrors, blue movies and
mannequins. Another case in point
is a sequence showing the
protagonists driving through the
city at a mad pace in an attempt to
prevent the assassin from committing his crime. Have we not
witnessed that scene many times
before in Bullit, The French
Connection and What's Up Doc?
Indeed, Foul Play displays at
moments   a   rather    fashionable
tendency to rely on spectacular
gimmickry, including the odd use
of gadgets ex machina, rather than
on sheer context and language.
In this universe of one dimensional characters and for the most
part flat situations, we witness a
rather neat and pat resolution in the
favor of the forces of good, the
hero saves the heroine's life by
killing the assassin.
I found particularly offensive the
fact that all the characters who
suffered from a physical stigma,
such as the albino and the dwarf,
were clearly portrayed as either
psychopaths or outright losers.
In some respects there is nothing
wrong with Foul Play. The acting is
reasonably good in spite of
whatever personal prejudice one
may have against the public images
of Goldie Hawn and Chevy Chase.
The photography is more than
acceptable. And the film contains
the    odd    undeniably    funny
moments. The characterization of
the Pope as a benevolent, paternalistic bon-vivant who taps his
foot along with the beat of Opera
music may offend some, but is
nonetheless successful. And so is
the encounter between the heroine
and a dwarf bible salesman whom
she has previously injured, having
mistaken him for the other killer-
dwarf.
One of the major criticisms that
can be made is not so much that the
characters and the situations arc
contrived, but that we see oversimplified and distorted experience.
We have almost come to expect that
from most comic thrillers anyway.
The criticism is that Foul Play is
painfully faithful to a rather
commercially successful recipe for
film-making.
Even if you will never go to see
Foul Play, you have already seen it
on numerous occasions and will
again.
Seedy reality hailed as rare
By LARRY GREEN
Any film that contains a superb
performance by Simone Signoret
can be hailed as an event on that
basis alone. In Madame Rosa, her
tough, witty presence absorbs the
character and dominates the film to
such a degree that it becomes hard
to separate the two. Yet the film is
far more than a charactet piece
buoyed up by a single star, it is a
moving and solid piece of work.
"Madame Rosa"
in French with English subtitles
Starring Simone Signoret
and Samy Ben Youb
Directed by Moishe Mizrahi
At the Park Theatre
Madame Rosa as played by
Signoret is a dying Jewish
Parisienne and former prostitute
who remains faithful to her trade
by raising the children of whores in
a crowded slum. She remains faithful to their parents by raising each
child in its parents' religion.
Mohammed, Samy Ben Youb, a
beautiful Arab boy of undetermined age, is raised a Muslim
at her insistence.
As she closes up her home to her
charges, Mohammed-stays with her
and watches her illness grip her
mind. Later, as she stumbles from
painful lucidity to reverie to insanities,  he becomes emotionally
Because there's going to be nothing straight
about a CHEECH & CHONG film.
Every generation has had their own comedy duo:
the 30's had Laurel and Hardy.
Abbott & Costello broke up the 40's
and Martin and Lewis really fractured the 50's.
CHEECH & CHONG have helped make
the 70's go "UP IN SMOKE."
CHEECH & CHONG are the comedy team
that gave birth to rock comedy
and in the process of turning on
a whole generation, sold ten million albums,
picked up numerous awards, including
Cash Box and Billboard's best comedy duo,
and a Grammy for their album,
"Los Cochinos."
Now it's time for a
CHEECH & CHONG movie.
C & Cs "UP IN SMOKE"
will make you feel very funny.
So don't go straight to see this movie!
V
bound to the old woman as he has
never done to anyone before.
His passage from being the oldest
in a house of children to confidante, confessor, and last friend
of Madame Rosa, marks the
turning point of the picture. It
begins with interlocking vignettes
that attempt to show daily life in
the streetwalkers' slum of Belleville
and progresses to longer scenes of
intimate dialogue.
Madame Rosa and Mohammed
come to understand their love and
dependence on one another, and
when she dies, he prefers to act out
his own death alongside her corpse
rather than leave her memory
behind him.
The director, Moishe Mizrahi, is
an Egyptian Jew who understands
the interaction within a teeming
melting-pot ghetto. The movement
of the actors and the atmosphere he
creates feel genuine and alive, a
difficult feat for action that is often
housebound. This effect was not
completely carried off in the Ettore
Scola film A Special Day Which
Madame Rosa beat out for the 1977
Best Foreign Film Oscar this year.
Simone Signoret seems a natural
inhabitant of this seedy world, and
the gritty reality and dark humor
that underlie the film are brought
out in her performance with style
and feeling. Madame Rosa paints
no pretty images and makes no
escapes or excuses. Its directness
makes it a rare story.
Patomuunf Picture* Presents,
A low A«8« Pnxtuoftm
iUpin
Starring Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong
Tom Stalin Edie Adams Strother Martin
and Stacy Keach as Sgt. Sledenko Written by Tommy Chong & Cheech Marin
Produced by Lou Adler & Lou Lombardo Directed by Lou Adler   Panavision
£I97BPm»tkmi> P>riui«C»n»rM<<m Ml Rights Rnrrvrd
now showing
at a theatre near you
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
Friday, October 6, 1978
THE      U BYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 VSO improvements encourage support
By ROBERT JORDAN
Haydn's Surprise Symphony received a
neat and tidy performance by the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra at its second Main
Series concert of the season last Monday
night. It is one of his most charming, amiable
and deservedly popular works. Kazuyoshi
Akiyama conducted a rendition that was
almost beyond serious reproach.
Technically, all the passage work in the
strings was orderly, wind solos delightful and
ensemble most cohesive and well balanced.
The most serious flaw was the utter inability
of the upper strings to play a true pianissimo.
This was most blatantly revealed in the
important repeat of the first theme of the
slow movement.
That the players had also felt somewhat
shackled by the proportionate restraint of
Haydn's classicism was evident by the
tremendous alacrity with which they laun
ched themselves into their role in Richard
Strauss' Horn Concerto No. 1.
Martin Hackleman, the VSO's first horn
player, was the soloist. His playing if
vibrant, exciting and dramatic. However,
although exhibiting a surprisingly sensitive
control when soft, his tone was also
somewhat brash and flatulent in the loud
passages. On the whole, Hackleman
delivered the essential excitement and verve
of the concerto with elan and gusto. Shortcomings were minimal, most of them from
the orchestra in the last movement, where the
players sounded very busy scrambling
around trying to maintain a semblance of
order amongst themselves.
In any composer's development, there is
the process of shedding outside influences
with which to contend. This is accomplished
more readily by some than others.
Canadian composer Michael Baker, in his
Symphony No. 1, seems to be experiencing
great difficulty emerging from the shadows
of such composers as Ralph Vaughan
Williams, Ernest Bloch and Alan Hovhaness.
Little, of any, Baker seemed to cohere and
emerge from the perpetually thick and over-
orchestrated textures.
This was the World Premiere of the work,
commissioned by the VSO and dedicated to
Akiyama. The orchestral performance, as far
as could be determined from a first hearing,
seemed to be at least adequate though en-
thrallment by the players themselves for the
work was not evident from their playing of
it.
The piece was greated very warmly by the
audience. This was probably in no small part
due to or in spite of the sudden blossoming in
the full brass of Loch Lomond near the end.
What "specific musical need" the composer's own words dictated the appearance
of this well-worn melody is open to conjecture. Its rather incongruous presence in
the work was quite a disappointment for at
least one listener.
Shrewdly placed at the end of the concerto,
was Siegfried's Funeral Music and Rhine
Journey from Wagner's Die Got-
terdammerrung. The orchestra lent itself
with great ardour to this glorious misic.
music. A most impressive wash and swirl of
sound filled the Orpheum.
The brass section shone particularly
brightly. In fact, as a section, it was just too
powerful for the rest of the orchestra, amost
almost too much for the Orpheum Theatre
itself.
Improvements in any orchestra are
inevitably gradual and cumulative. Such is
the case with the VSO. Make no mistake
though, results are already apparent. It is
well worth going to hear them.
Circle Gallery stimulates diverse art displays
by MAYO MORAN
In place of a now-defunct second hand
store at 4609 West Tenth Avenue is the Circle
Art Gallery, an intimate gallery which
houses a range of art from the traditional to
the modern. Various genres such as painting
and sculpture are displayed in this gallery
which is an experiment in blending the
culturally and temporally diverse in art.
Vancouver, being a port city which links
the east with the west, is, in many ways an
ideal location for The Circle Art Gallery. The
Circle indicates an encompassing of several
traditions and this is proved accurate by
venturing inside.
The exhibit includes the ancient traditional
Chinese forms of art, in conjunction with the
work of many contemporary West Coast
artists. The Circle Art Gallery is an attempt
to combine traditions from different cultures
and different periods, in a manner which is
both tastefully and artistically relevant to our
own "pot-pourri" culture.
The Circle Art Gallery is in many ways, a
reflection of the taste and philosophy of its
owner/director, James T.C. Wu. His rich
cultural background is obvious upon inspection of the gallery.
While this is his first formal excursion into
the business of art, Mr. Wu's interest has
spanned over many years. It was calligraphy
and other forms of traditional Chinese art
which first awakened his interest. However,
during the ten years he spent in London, he
developed an appreciation for modern and
experimental art forms.
CIRCLE   GALLERY
new   displays of art works trom bast ana West
In the period since he first moved to
Vancouver six years ago, Mr. Wu established
many contacts in the Vancouver art world. It
was this active participation which eventually
led to the establishment of The Circle Art
Gallery in April of this year. One of the
main focuses of this gallery is to promote
local artists who may be relatively unknown
to the public. However, the gallery is
definitely a business enterprise, in that
careful consideration is given to the potential
saleability of the art. For this reason, the art
that is available is mostly moderate in size,
and, while modern, could not be called truly
experimental.
"Showing very large work experimental
art should be done by the Vancouver Art
Gallery, which is not a commercial enterprise," says Mr. Wu. While the concern of
The Vancouver Art Gallery is strictly art, his
gallery's concern is with bridging the sizeable
gap between business and art.
The Circle Art Gallery, with its simple
tasteful decor and modest location, bridges
that gap gracefully. The present show is
composed predominantly of the works of
Raymond Ng. Pieces included in such major
exhibits number about thirty, and change
once every four weeks.
On October 10, the gallery will feature the
works of UBC Creative Writing professor
Michael Bullock. In addition to these major
exhibits, the gallery also features paintings
and sculptures by: Susan Beniston, Paul
Chui, Chung Hung, Yukiko Kageyama,
Peter Lee, Lin Chien-Shih and Anne Pop-
perwell among others. Some shows from
England and Eastern Canada are also being
arranged for later this year.
In spite of the quality of the exhibits, the
traffic through the gallery has not been
heavy. This is partially due to the location,
which does not attract many people who are
simply passers-by. In addition, the gallery
has not been heavily advertised, with ads
appearing only in "The Vanguard" and
"YVR".
However, the location and the lack of
advertising do have certain advantages. As a
result of its relative obscurity, it is the serious
lovers of art who usually frquent this gallery.
In addition, the artists receive a greater
proportion of the revenue from the sale of
their art works, as a result of the low
overhead. Since the reputation of an art
gallery relies on performance, rather than
advertising, it is performance which is the
primary concern ot The Circle Art Gallery.
If you are interested in what is going on in
art, venture outside the campus gates to 4609
West Tenth. The stimulating and diverse
display and the intimate gallery of The Circle
Art Gallery make it well worth the trip.
Brass rubbings shine with pronounced singularity
By HOLLY NATHAN
Brass rubbing is not a spiritual or sensual
experience, as Pat Hindmarch-Watson of the
Vancouver Brass Rubbing Centre often
explains to curious customers. But neither is
it a pursuit for stoop-shouldered
medievalists. In fact in North America,
where it is becoming an evergrowing activity,
objects for rubbing can vary from the usual
commemorative brasses of olde England to
manhole covers and petroglyphs.
The Centre is located at 4390 West 10th
Ave., and boasts a selection of brasses in a
more medieval vein. One can create a
reproduction of a small, saintly Marguerite
de Scornay, an elegant, medium-sized
Margaret Peyton or an elaborately armoured
seven-foot Sir Robert de Bures. These are but
three of the twenty assorted knights, ladies,
skeletons and foundations the Centre offers
for rubbing although the collection is
continually expanding.
Most of the brasses date from 1300 to the
early 1500's when the quality of the brass and
skill of the work was still quite high. Using
memorial brasses to decorate one's tomb was
a middle class activity in those days and none
of the characters thus represented are world
famous historical personalities. However,
the brasses provide a valuable commentary
on the costume, style and life of the times.
Many original brasses suffered or were
HINDMARCH -WATSON
brass   rubbing   craze  sweeping   North America
destroyed during the Cromwellian raids, but
those that survive have become the objects of
an England-wide brass rubbing fad. Until
recently, English churces served as sites for
people to furiously rub brasses hidden under
floors, carpets, pews and organs, but
repeated rubbing of the originals began to
wear them down. Consequently, casts were
made of the brasses, reproducing in minute
detail both the form and lines of the work
and and the stone in which it was set. It is a
sampling of these facsimile brasses that
Hindmarch-Watson displays in her store,
which is the first of its kind in western
Canada and rivalled only by one other in
Montreal.
The actual rubbing requires limited time
and talent although there is room for artistic
interpretation as Hindmarch-Watson
helpfully suggests.
"Rubbing is a form of copying, but a truly
creative person can do something with it,"
she said. "It doesn't have to be a
monoprint."
A wide range of colored waxes and papers
contribute to making a wall-hanging unique
but the subject itself pronounces its own
singularity. For a price of between $2 and
$18, with a 10 per cent student discount, the
Vancouver Brass Rubbing Centre saves
customers a cross-continental trip and offers
an unusual opportunity for individual input
into a reproduction.
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978 \short story]
The   Reticence of Ms. Lucy
Dick Bale is a fifth year transfer
student in the faculty of Education. He was born in London,
England and has spent the last
five years in Canada. "Ms Lucy" ■■
is one example of his peculiar
dry wit.
By DICK BALE
The cat, with a glint of something in its eye
that might have been labelled integrity, and
an air of natural superiority having been
dragged down by circumstance, stopped
licking its paw and raised its head with lazily
half-closed eyes as Big Joe entered the
fashionably dilapidated dump that he passed
off as Home Sweet Home.
"Back at last," mewed the cat to itself.
"Have a hard day overcharging people at the
Health Food Store?"
This cutting remark, no doubt induced by
too many years of living too closely to Big
Joe, and not related in any way whatsoever
to objective truth, signaled the return of the
cat to its task of attempting to clean itself of
the dirt that it inevitably accumulated
hanging around this place.
Big Joe, unaware of the cat's rather
supercilious remarks, came in timidly,
uncertainly, like one of those army men who
defuse bombs and don't know if the next
brown paper package will explode in their
faces or just turn out to be a harmless box of
chocolates from Auntie Maud on
somebody's birthday.
Joe's wife, Juicy Lucy, seated in the
rocking chair facing the fireplace, was giving
no clue as to the contents of the package; she
didn't even bother to acknowledge her
husband's prescence by so much as a slight
turn of the head or raising of the hand.
Apparently Joe still could not be sure
whether their minor domestic tiff of that
morning — as to how thick he liked his joints
rolled — had been resolved or not.
The cat, languishing indifferently at
Lucy's feet, scratched its ear and threw Joe a
glance that said, "Look at yourself! Why
don't you clean up a bit before you come
back to my apartment?"
The point was certainly well made. Joe's
long hair was tied back so that it wouldn't
escape and crawl all over his face and into his
ears and up his nostrils. But he'd forgotten to
shave for about the last eighty-four mornings, so instead his beard was crawling all
over his face and into his ears and up his
nostrils.
His Health Food Store uniform, the
epitome of mellow, consisted of a tattered
old plaid jacket, denim shirt and overalls (to
give the genuine working-class look) and the
latest natural footwear (with soles shaped
like rocks since that's what cavemen walked
on.)
Joe hovered awkwardly for a minute by
the door, but since Lucy did not deign to
open the conversation, he decided that it was
up to him to take a step toward the salvation
of their relationship, even if it did mean
sacrificing his own dignity in the process.
"Why don't you put some more goddamn
wood on that fuckin' fire?" he ventured.
Lucy, of course, made no reply, since Joe
had been making the same carefully considered remark every evening for years. The
cat seconded her policy of turning the other
cheek, stretching itself and then curling itself
up into a ball as if Joe wasn't even there.
Perhaps this affected superiority on the part
of the tabby was in reaction to its having
been named Shabby when only a defenceless
kitten by the same talented, poetic spirit who
had decided that Joe was Big and Lucy was
Juicy. Joe and Luicy had always made a
point of mixing with the best company.
Joe, a superlative tactician, decided that if
he wasn't to incur the further wrath of his
good woman, he ought to concede once and
for all and admit that maybe he had been
unjustified in his explosion of anger that
morning.
"Look ya bitch, I said I was fuckin' sorry,
didn't I?"
Again, no reply. Lucy was in no mood for
the parry and thrust of her hubby's refined
wit.
Following a pattern common to all those
refused attention by both wife and cat, Joe
turned to alcohol. Picking his way carefully
through the shattered remnants of the plates
that his spouse had been playfully tossing at
him that morning, he reached the liquor
cabinet and poured himself a tall glass of
their best gutrot. The cat was now regarding
him smugly but Joe resisted the temptation
to hurl a half-empty bottle at it. Had it been
half-full maybe things would have been
different.
"Goddammit ya bitch! Why don'tcha get
down off yer high an' mighty fuckin'
pedestal an' say somethin.'?!" he shouted at
the top of his voice, having abandoned all
pretense to subtlety and as if the lady in the
rocking chair across the room were practically deaf.
But by her decision not to reply, one might
also have reasonably assumed that she were
dumb.
"Fucking shit!" exclaimed Joe with a
remarkable degree of lyrical eloquence.
Accustomed as he might have been to coming
out from an argument with his spouse as the
beaten partner, he had never before met with
such intransigent silence and determined not
to be on the losing side of a monologue in
which he was the speaker. He prepared
himself for a massive effort to induce his
better half into speech.
"Look, ya jumped-up piece of no-good
goddamn horse-shit, don't come on all
fuckin' superior to me! Don'tcha remember
me? Joe? Ya fuckin' husband! The one
that's been married to ya for several years
too fuckin' long!"
He took another slug of mouthwash ('78: a
good year) to lubricate the logical continuity
of his argument.
It looked, the cat mused to itself, as if
rather familiar ground was being covered yet
once again.
Lucy, though, remained on the defensive,
silence her most powerful weapon. For a
moment it occurred to Joe that maybe Lucy
was unwell. But no, Lucy didn't like to keep
to herself the fact that the cross she bore was
an awful lot heavier and less comfortable
than that of anyone else. But in that moment
of concern, Joe, like a man automatically
giving a quarter to a panhandler before he
can rationally decide not to, allowed a
concession to slip out once more.
"Goddammit Lucy, I'm sorry," he said,
scratching the fleas in his beard. One day if
he had the time he'd have to train them; get
an act together and head down to Gastown
and play to the tourists in the summer.
The cat bit at its tail thoughtfully and
looked back up at Joe, momentarily lost in
dreams of greatness...
"Lucy, don'tcha remember the early days
... the first time we met ...?"
So it was the heartstrings approach. How
low was he prepared to go?
But the silence continued. Evidently such
absurdly maudlin reminiscing was not
adequately different from their normal
conversational diet to jolt her out of her
uncommunicative mood.
A clever interrogator, Joe switched tack
once more.
"Well I'm goin* to the fuckin' goddamn
bar!"
His patience was all used up, he'd taken as
much as he could (he'd had it up to here) and
he couldn't take it any more.
He wrenched the door towards him,
forgetting in his sublime indignation that it
was not in fact, completely closed. An interestingly coloured bruise of sorts developed
on his forehead where it had arrested the
door in mid-swing.
Belittled by the awsome powers of fate
which had momentarily turned against him,
he conceded for one final time to hold out
the hand of reconciliation.
"Aren't we being rather silly?"he pleaded.
"Positively idiotic," thought the cat,
momentarily distracted from the absorbing
task of cleaning its nose.
The be-rocking-chaired Lucy, curiously
enough, was not letting on whether she
agreed with husband or with cat, maintaining
her rigidly uncommunicative posture in the
chair. Joe crunched toward her over plate
remnants in an effort to catch her eye, but
the consumption of excessive quantities of
the aforementioned liquor had made him
quite disequilibrious and he was unable to
discern the expression on the face of his
interlocutor. He decided to sober up over a
beer and return in an hour or two.
The exit of Joe now an episode in the past,
the cat leapt gracefully up onto the stereo
cabinet. It sat, intrigued at human capacity
for invention, watching a scratched old
record which all this time had almost imperceptibly been playing. The needle was
stuck so that the same short passage was
repeating itself over and over again.
"Rather like a microcosm of married
life," thought the cat, who was really quite
perceptive for a small furry creature
domiciled, patronised and condescended to
by humans. It recommenced the task of
cleaning itself, hooking one of its hind paws
behind its head in that strange way that cats
have. Joe probably hadn't noticed the
skipping needle since all the old songs
sounded repetitive now anyway. Lucy
probably hadn't noticed since she had been
dead the last three hours.
Humour and empty virtuosity underscore concerts
By PAUL HODGINS
Why is it that every good concert
in this city must be immediately
counterbalanced by an equally bad
one? Why is it that audiences
persist in giving wild ovations at the
bad ones as well as the good ones?
These are questions I continue to
ask myself after seeing' both
Stephane Grappelli and Maynard
Ferguson recently at the Orpheum
Theatre.
Grappelli played with the Diz
Disley Trio last Thursday to a large
and appreciative audience. French-
born Grappelli is the undisputed
master of that rarest of jazz instruments, the violin. This concert
tour marks his seventieth birthday
and the culmination of a long and
varied career.   It is indicative of
Grappelli's talent that he has
become one of the "grand old
men" of swing on an instrument
that many purists consider to be
unsuited to jazz.
Montreal-born Ferguson
unleashed his big band in the
Orpheum on the following Sunday,
Oct. 1. Ferguson has gained fame
and considerable fortune as a
screech trumpet player whose
blasting high notes and
pyrotechnical showmanship have
become an almost patented
trademark. His most successful
recent hit was the brash and brassy
arrangement of Rocky that almost
everyone is familiar with.
The secret to Grappelli's success,
besides his 50 years of experience, is
his total lack of musical preten
tiousness. Nothing is forced;
nothing is overstated. Playing with
a trio consisting of two miked
acoustic guitars and string bass,
Grappelli's violin balanced perfectly. I was surprised to find this
ostensibly small sound filled the
Orpheum without any trouble. And
while Grappelli held the limelight
for most of the evening, there was
plenty of room for everyone to solo
extensively. Disley        him-
self,"Yorkshire's finest" and the
leader of the trio, was an unobtrusive but rock solid rhythm
guitarist. While leaving most of the
virtuosic single-line playing to his
younger and wilder fretboard
counterpart, Disley ultimately
impressed with his own assured and
full-bodied chording.
In Maynard Ferguson's
menagerie he would have been a
pussy cat. The battle of musical
egos on Sunday night was resolved
according to which player was
closest to the solo mike. Most of the
time it was Ferguson. He started the
evening with a characteristically
high, harsh solo, leaning well'back
in his wide-lapelled leisure suit to
make sure we knew it was hard to
play. Yes, I know that's his style.
Yes, I know there are just as many
fans as critics. But bad sound is bad
sound, no matter what its register.
And that, more or less, was the
story of the evening — empty
virtuosity, and lots of it,
masquerading as creative jazz.
Solos were fast, high, and loud.
Some,   notably   the   flautist's,
remained nearly the same since
Ferguson's last concert here. The
trumpet section was allowed to
show off, one man at a time, at the
end of the evening. Kind of like a
competition. Ferguson jokingly
referred to them as the guys so good
he was "just about ready to fire
them all." They didn't laugh.
Grappelli and his trio stuck
mainly to older jazz standards.
There were Gershwin tunes such as
Fascinatin' Rhythm and The Man 1
Love, as well as a clever, witty
version of Chattanooga Choo-
Choo. We heard some recent
material as well, including a piece
written expressly for him by fellow
jazz violinist Jean-Luc Ponty. Solos
were never long and always in-
Turn to PF 8
Friday, October 6, 1978
UBYSSEY
Page Friday' I energy feature I
Co-op uses active solar system design
from PF 2
Through this process the interior
of the building is space heated by a
combination of radiant heating and
hot air heating.
By placing a Trombe Wall on
Broadway, at the south end of the
KHS property, Mattock suggested
he building could have a solar
heating system and a thick concrete
vail to act as a noise buffer to the
street traffic at the same time. Two
problems solved at once.
The Solarplace Co-op also incorporates an active solar system
into its design. Active systems are
those using the familiar solar
collector panels and other
associated hardware such as water
pumps. They also differ from the
passive system by maintaining the
conventional distinction between
structural, architectural and space
heating functions.
Combined with the passive
system and a small backup electrical heating system, the heating
system will eventually provide eight
units with cheap renewable heating
and hot water.
When the designs of the new
building were complete, Khouri
submitted them to the National
Research Council who eventually
approved a seventy thousand dollar
grant to the KHS to carry on with
the project. The provincial
government followed through with
a grant of the same amount as a
result of the N.R.C.'s approval
But in order for construction to
begin, the KHS needed the support
of the Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation, the federal
body of funding for such projects.
It was the CMHC that held the key
to allowing the Solarplace Co-op to
become a reality. Only through
mortgage money could the project
be completed.
Dealing with the CMHC, its
bureaucracy, its red tape, its
constant change of decisions and
design specifications, constitutes
the major part of the struggle by the
KHS to get the Solarplace Co-op
off the ground.
For close to a year, Khouri, Schmidt and the construction contractor went without salaries
because any payment they received
depended on the CMHC's support.
The development group was
constantly called upon by the
CMHC to explain various aspects
of the building's design or of the
solar system itself. It was constantly
told a decision was not far off only
to receive word shortly afterwards
that there were further things that
needed explanation.
In June, 1978, the CMHC finally
approved the project, the construction contracts were signed and
construction was begun immediately. Its completion date is set
for April, 1979.
Already, the City of Vancouver
has taken an active interest in Solar
Housing as a result of the KHS
Solarplace Co-op. Also under
construction in the city is a housing
development in Champlain Heights
that is based on Solar design. The
city has hired Chris Mattock to act
as the project co-ordinator as a
result of his involvement in the
KHS project.
With such an immediate response
by a government body, it is conceivable that more widespread use
of solar heating systems cannot be
far off.
Future projects of this nature will
be better off because of what has
been demonstrated by the KHS in
this project. In the past, building
inspectors and lending institutions
have tended to create mythological
obstructions to such projects to
cover their skepticism.
The KHS has broken ground in
this area by proving to these institutions that new housing
developments do not have to be
large money-making ventures as are
the conventional less humanistic
projects. The Andre Molnar
developments, for example.
Banks   and   other   lending   in
stitutions are only concerned with
making their 10 per cent interest on
loans or mortgages. Any
organization as committed as the
KHS, is capable of returning the
interest. The climate has improved
because the organization has shown
this.
"If the people can control
housing the way we have," says
Khouri, "then there would be more
satisfying housing for people. If
you fix the costs, it has to be more
reasonable for the average person.
This is definitely an alternative that
more people should know about."
Interested In CA Employment
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1979 graduates
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Mail (or
bring in) an original or photocopy of your personal
resume (UCPA form is suitable) by October 23,1978 to:
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
2300—1055 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6E 2J2
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 31st regarding campus interviews which will take place November 6 - 9th. Additional information is available at the U.B.C. Placement
Office.
Jazz sound
from PF 7
ventive, imbued with a constant
undertone of humour. Grappelli
has a talent for making you laugh
with his music.
The moment of truth in any
concert is the encore. It leaves us
with that all-important final impression. Grappelli treated his
audience to a delightful surprise:
"And now I would like to play the
piano for you". He demonstrated
an incredibly beautiful and facile
style reminiscent of Art Tatum. The
appreciative audience was treated
to at least two quick encores of the
violin as well. Ferguson had a
"surprise" of his own for the
encore — what else? — a loud, fast
version of Rocky.
Save $5°°
OFF THE REGULAR RATE
ON CAR OR TRUCK RENTAL !!
AVAILABLE ONLY AT:
610 S.E. Marine Drive
Vancouver, B.C.
(Fraser & Marine Dr.)
324-5122
OFFER EXPIRES APRIL 30, 1979
PHONE FOR RESERVATIONS
Budget
rent a rar    •#«
rentacar
^
S
\
\^
10% off
FOR
STUDENTS
WITH THIS AD
POINT
YO£S
Est. 1930
3771 W. 10th (at Alma).
224-3536
Tasting
is believ*
Yon wont
find a better
Rfcbeer
Isn't it the best beer you've ever tasted?
Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978 vista
BY MARY-ANN BRUNORO
Waiting for something new and
different to happen? Then don't
miss the DOA concert this Friday,
Oct. 6, at SFU, South Court
Lounge. Also featured will be The
Dishrags and The Pointed Sticks.
All three are new wave/punk rock
bands. The concert starts at 8 P.M.
and admission is $2.50. No age
limit.
You might want to see a good
movie this weekend but if you've
seen all the ones on Theatre Row or
if they are a bit beyond your
budget, you should take advantage
of what different film societies in
Vancouver have to offer.
The Pacific Cinematheque, 1155
W. Georgia Street is a non-profit
educational society devoted to the
appreciation and study of the film
medium. An international selection
of movies is offered this week: Fri.,
Oct. 6 — Lubitsch's Trouble in
Paris, U.S., 1939 Oct. 7 — Sunday
Too Far Away, Australia, 1975;
Oct. 9 — Visconti's Senso, Italy,
1954. Running through October
and November on Wednesday
nights, is the series Soviet Montage,
a selection of Russian films from
the 1920's. Showing this Wednesday, Oct. 11, will be Vertov's
Man with a Movie Camera.
showtimes are usually 7 & 9 P.M.,
admission is $1.50 or $5.00 for an
annual membership.
The Ridge Theatre, 3131 Ar-
bustus Street, which changes its
double features every few days or
so, offers a fine array of movies,
both old and new. Oct. 6 & 7 —
Truffault's Day for Night and
Fellini's Amarcord, Oct. 8 — The
Turning Point and The Prime of
Miss Jean Brodie. Showtimes are
7:30 & 9:45 PM, respectively.
Admission is $2.50 per double
feature. And of course there are
always the Subfilms shown in the
Sub theatre. This weekend's feature
— Led Zeppelin: The Song
Remains the Same, Fri. & Sat. 7 &
9:30 PM, Sun.
mission.
7 PM. $1.00 ad-
Oct. 2-10 has been designated
Venice Lives Week by a special
committee formed to publicize the
restoration of Venice. In conjunction with the other events
organized, the Towne Waytes, a
musical group which specializes in
Renaissance music, costumes and
all, will perform at the Italian
Cultural Centre, 3075 Slocan
Street, on Oct. 6, 8:30 PM fhe
concert is entitled La Serenissima
— Music of the Italian
Renaissance. Tickets: $3.50 for
students.
A.M.S. - E.U.S.
presents
NOW PLAYING AT SUB THEATRE
Thurs., Sun.  7:00
Fri., Sat.  7:00 & 9:30
$1.00
BURTON CUMMINGS
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets:   $6.50 UBC Students AMS Office
$7.50 Non Students Woodward's Concert Box
Offices, Ernie's Mot Wax & Quintessence Records
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
RED LEAF .-
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
in the I/Vest at a
Reasonable Price
FREE DELIVERY
from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
cash pickup orders
.   Mon. - Fri. 11:30-9:30 p.m.
■        Sat., Sun & Holidays
4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
    2142 western Parkway
vis*     U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
HEY GUYS!
DINNER
FOR TWO
UNDER
$10.00
ELEPHANT & CASTLE
PACIFIC CENTRE	
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
Open For Lunch
Open Till 2:30 Weekdays
3:30 Weekends
12:30 Sundays
738-9520        I  DOWNTOWN
or 738-1113     I   1359 Robson
3611 W. Broadway |       688-5491
Dinin9 lounga- Pull Facilities •
Take Out or Home Delivery
Late delivery call V; hour before closing.
BMunwed
11 in ii jimHmm1"
CABARET :
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
HONG KONG KITCHEN
1*
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
Eitt in <£   Tuke out
OPEN  EVERY DAY
4:30 P.M. TO 10:00 P.M.
PHONK 221-6121
WW BIG Tl
p SCOOP n
Surprise yourself and try one of
the Big Scoop Sundae Palace
Restaurants' very special
burgers. You all know about our
exclusive ice cream and 24 exotic sundae extravaganzas —
now it's time you found out that
our food is of the same high
quality.
4401 W. 10th at Trimble
Just 4 blocks from the gates.
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
^224-3934 224-6336/
THIS
WEEK
"1
« L
>AIR show
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
fTiriiiiiiiiiiixxrrr:
WARREN BEATTY — JULIE CHRISTIE
GOLDIE HAWN
SHAMPOO
9:20
Some Sug. Lang.
ROBBIE BEN80N-ANNETTE OTOOLE
ONE ON ONE 730
ADULTS 12.00
{mkHwc
^e&bo
[<m
OWASSA
KJLJmw KITMH
LUNCH
11:30- 3:00 Mon. - Sat.
DINNER
5:00   1:00 Mon.- Sat
5:00 - 11:00 Sunday
417*w.I0th.Av4.
RENOS
Pancake House & Restaurant
FULLY LICENSED
Breakfast Special
2 eggs, pancakes
with bacon or sausage
$1.90
Chargex Accepted
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00-11:00
Sun. & Holidays 9:00-8:00
2741 West 4th Avenue
 738-3814
CAFFE ESPRESSO
LA BOCA BAR
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL DAY TILL MIDNIGHT
3625 W 4th at Collingwood
For the
good times.
GRANVILLE ISLAND - 685-4735
Friday, October 6, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 9 "SAY HELLO TO
YAMAHA
AUDIO
FULL FIVE YEAR
WARRANTY
The CR220 is YAMAHA'S lowest priced receiver, yet it still produces less than 0.05% total
harmonic distortion, with 15 watts per channel RMS. Also features: terminals for two sets
of speakers, FM muting, and stereo headphone jack. The YP211 is a special blend of all it
takes to make a good turntable: Attractive styling, precision automatic controls, powerful
motor and sensitive S-type tonearm. And the NS220 Rock monitor speakers provide solid,
accurate music at any level from a whisper to disco-loud!
NOW COMPLETE •
M
Am
YAMAHA STEREO AMPLIFIER
CA-61011
Natural Sound Integrated Stereo Amplifier Super-
Low-Noise Phono Equalizer tor 97dB S/N Ratio Wide
100W—54W Nolse/Distortlon Clearance Range.
Clean 45w RMS per Channel at 0.05% Total Harmonic Distortion. MAIN DIRECT Switch to Bypass Tone
Control Amplifier
AUDIO
NOW
$329
95
Wm&Pn TURNTABLE
P-D6
Natural Sound Stereo Turntable. Direct drive 12-pole.
24-slot DC servomotor. Ultra low wow and flutter.
Auto return and auto cut convenience features. Sensitive S-type static balance tonearm.
NOW
YAMAHA STEREO TUNER
CT-61011
Natural Sound FM'AM Stereo Tuner Hlgh-Perform-
ance IF Amplifier with Selectable DX Mode Low-Dls-
tortton NFB-PLL FM Multiplex Demodulator Recording
Calibrator Built-in Signal Quality Meter.
now *"ivC95
$299
95
$235
The Model 2216. Why settle for just any receiver
when you can have a Marantz. The Marantz 2216
delivers a minimum continuous output of 16 watts
RMS into both channels. It delivers this with only
0 ; 0' total harmonic distortion The 2216 offers an
impressive number of features found only in
more expensive models.
WALNUT SLEEVE
OPTIONAL
NOW
$
199
95
YAMAHA
STEREO TAPE DECK rcaooD
professional-level stereo cassette deck performance
less than 0.06% wow and flutter, Dolby noise reduction system. Unique features Include pitch control
memory rewind, automatic tape shutoff, OTL-IC
headphone and amp and mbc/llne switchover.
NOW
$339
95
PjPfiabe Wlneai
Phase Linear has always had the reputation for producing good, cheap
POWER AMPS and PREAMPS. Check
out these prices:
MODEL2000 preamp..$359.95
MODEL 200B EST... $489.95
MODEL400 EST.. ..$699.95
MODEL5000 tuner...$499.95
MODEL 1000^tr°peuuop,$399.95
WALNUT CABINETS $39.95
0&6 sound SPECIAL PURCHASE
YOU SAVE!
BISH - STEPHEN BISHOP
1065 HOLD ON — DAN HILL
50183 AIA - JIMMY BUFFETT
758 CAN'T BUY A THRILL — STEELY DAN
914 HAVANA DAYDREAMIN' — JIMMY BUFFETT
1068PRISM — PRISM
1006 AJA — STEELY DAN
1043 BERK SHIRE — WHA-KOO
990 CHANGES IN LATITUDES, CHANGES IN ATTITUDES
JIMMY BUFFETT
1079 FROZEN IN THE NIGHT — DAN HILL
1067 STILL HERE — IAN THOMAS
7022 YEARS OF THE CAT — AL STEWART
1073 LONGER FUSE — DAN HILL
52029 YOU'RE GONNA GET IN — TOM PETTY
508 TALES OF MYSTERY AND IMAGINATION —
ALAN PARSONS 	
1068 ARABESQUE - JOHN KLEMMER    NEW
1010 SIZZLERS   —   VARIOUS  ARTISTS   (A5"T£)V.   ON   TV)
1002 20 ORIGINAL HITS — BILLY VAUGHN (AS ADV. ON TV)
1075 SEE FOREVER EYES — PRISM
1046 SON OF A SON OF A SAILOR — JIMMY BUFFETT
9827 CAN I HAVE MY MONEY BACK — GERRY RAFFERTY
6058 MORE SONGS ABOUT BUILDINGS AND FOOD —
TALKING HEADS
1063 BURNING THE BALLROOM DOWN -
AMAZING RHYTHAM ACES
50150 A WHITE SPORT COAT & A PINK CRUSTACEAN —
JIMMY BUFFETT
52009 NATURALLY — J. J. CALE 	
562 URBAN DESIRE - GENYA RAVAN    NEW 	
1078 THINGS ARE LOOKING UP - MOE KOTFMAN    NEW
1076 ERUPTION — ERUPTION
THOUSANDS OF DELETED ALBUMS FROM 39c AND UP
LARGE SELECTION OF 8 TRACKS at $1.99 ea.
CASSETTE SPECIAL - HUNDREDS OF TITLES at $3.99 ea.
SONG FOR ALL SEASONS- RENAISSANCE LPs 4.99 EA
AMERICAN GRAFFITI -
ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK
2   LP   SET
TAPES 8.99    LPs 7.99 EA
DON'T LOOK BACK
DOG & BUTTERFLY
BOSTON    (Tapes
HEART new 4-"ea->
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144
Page Friday' 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6, 1978

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128630/manifest

Comment

Related Items