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The Ubyssey Oct 31, 1968

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Array „£„ '. '*■>-'' - ,*, .*"' ****'*^--VaL..**rr,
"a-<M,«. a- .'*)K*.I' ■-* .'-ft%' 'ft***. -?<SMS
£v'M *£4r~?'!->* ''" -• •*■-*■*»*"
— lawrence woodd photo
CO-ORDINATOR ROD RAMAGE examines the damage       done to some of the  SUB  furniture Tuesday  night.  Students  tried   to   break   into   the   games   room
office, failed, and contented themselves with slashing a few chairs. Nice work fellas, 20,100 students are real proud of you. See story page 3.
Fewer
UBC Reports
More
buildings
Vol.  I, No.  22
VANCOUVER, BC, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1968
228-2305
Teach-in success  $108 million in buildings
tough to follow
Wednesday's teach-in was
fantastic — but where do we
go from here?
That was the question posed
by Alma Mater Society internal affairs officer Ruth Dworkin in an interview late Wednesday as students and faculty
wrapped up the first campus-
wide think session in UBC history.
Engineers, given a day free
frm classes by dean Bill Armstrong, roamed through the
Buchanan "building and
mingled with arts students,
their profs and their problems.
They were joined in many arts
classes by sciencemen and
foresters, and artsmen reciprocated by attending classes
throughout the university.
As an example of the issues
on which students and faculty
should maintain a dialogue,
Miss Dworkin said if it is industry that demands grades
from university courses, then
industry should set examinations.
"Why should the university
set exams just so that private
industry can have a measuring
stick to fill niches with
people?" she asked.
She added that students
should organize to boycott dull
lecturers and uninteresting
courses.
"If these classes would
organize, they could send one
person to a lecture to take
notes   and   arrange   to   have
them   mimeographed   for   the
rest of the class," she said.
She stressed that students
must take the initiative for
academic reform themselves.
Among the concrete accomplishments of the teach-in:
• Four English 200 classes
decided to act to have the
Christmas exam in their course
left to the discretion of instructors.
• A philosophy 200 class
unscrewed the chairs in their
Buchanan classroom in the
interest of better communication.
• And several courses saw
mid-terms and other examples
of authoritarian education go
out the window as students
convinced their profs the
exams were unnecessary and
worthless.
Faculty reaction to the teach-
in idea was mixed. An economics prof told his class he had
"no time for this fabulous
teach-in" and proceeded to
hand back mid-term exams.
But at least one English
prof agreed with* his class to
put aside one day each month
to discuss the progress of the
course.
Genetics prof Dave Suzuki
organized a meeting of genetics students in the SUB ballroom which decided to send
a delegate to AMS president
Dave Zirnhelt in an effort to
arrange a parent-in which
would   enable   taxpaying   par-
needed, no relief 'til '72
Continued Page 12
See: TEACH-IN
By FRANK FLYNN
Ubyssey Senate Reporter
The academic  excellence  of UBC will be
gradually lowered because of the rapid increase
of   student   population,   the  senate   academic
building-needs committee reported Wednesday.
The committee's report says at least $108
million will be required for further construction of buildings over the five year period April
1, 1969 to March 31, 1974.
But from the amount of capital funds received from the provincial government in the
last five years, the report indicated that the
space situation will be desperate.
A survey of the campus shows the university is at the moment confronted with a large
space backlog. In this committee's survey, hut
space was treated as equal to space in the most
up-to-date building.
This estimate did not take into account the
quality cf present space.
"The 5,000 additional students expected in
the next two years will create a major problem
in finding space," the report says.
"Even if a policy of restricted enrolment is
adopted, it is unlikely to significantly reduce
the pressure for new facilities up to 1970/71."
Senate, in sending the report to the board
of governors for serious study and action,
recommended that working drawings be done
for more than $20 million in capital expansion.
"The faculty of arts will experience an acute
shortage of both classroom and office space
during the next three to five years. The sheer
magnitude of numbers places a particular burden on existing space for arts students and
faculty."
The report recommends a classroom and
office block expansion to the Buchanan building.
The estimated cost will be $5,447,00*0.
The report also points out that the undergraduate enrolment in science will increase by
67 per cent by 1973/74.
The report recommends a general science
building with lecture rooms, laboratories, tutorial rooms, study areas, common rooms, and a
dean's office (dean V. J. Okulitch is presently
in the fine arts building).
Estimated cost of the building is $6,966,000.
The report then noted that the total study
spaces on campus number 3,417. This represents a 17 per cent seating capacity while a
library of a "superior residential university"
would have 35 to 40 per cent.
The report recommends the erection of a
building to seat 2,632 students. The total cost
would be $4,670,575.
The report also recommends a faculty of
law building. The cost will be $3,000,000.
But even immediate implementation of this
report will not help.
The earliest possible date for the completion
of any such building on campus as one of those
mentioned above will probably be January
1972.
Until then UBC will have to accommodate
up to 25,000 students with facilities for 13,000.
Mark Rudd  _.___ P.2
High school union._ P.2
Counselling  P.3
Teacup    P. 10
Sports P. 11 Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 31, 1968
Rudd depressed, students
go to classes, not his film
By ERIK BRYNJOLFFSSON
Mark Rudd, a leader of the Columbia University revolt, appeared at UBC Tuesday with
a call for "electric power."
Rudd had brought with him a filmed account of the disruption at Columbia University
last spring, but there was a delay while the
projectionist searched for an electric outlet.
During the delay, Rudd told the capacity
crowd in the SUB ballroom that the film was
meant to be propaganda.
"But it is also completely the truth," he
said.
He said the revolt was triggered by student disatisfaction with a gymnasium construction project in Harlem, and the university's
association with the Institute for Defense
Analysis, which does research for the American Defense department.
The film covered the events from an April
23 demonstration at the gymnasium construction site, to the take-over of university buildings, the student strike, the police invasion,
and ended with summer graduation ceremonies
from which graduating students walked out of
the official ceremony and held their own.
After the film presentation, Rudd said he
became depressed when about 100 students
left during the film to attend 1:30 p.m. classes.
"This is the first time that students have a
chance to see the film, to hear a person from
Columbia, but they leave to go to classes," he
said.
"People here don't seem to want to try
anything new."
Rudd said the purpose of the revolt was not
for student power.
"It is Utopian to expect to make a free university in an unfree society," he said.
"We were expressing our opposition as human beings to what was going on in society,"
he said.
"The gymnasium was to us a symbol of
racism, and the IDA a symbol of imperialism."
Rudd said the militant action at Columbia
made others  re-evaluate their lives.
"The revolt was an act of liberation
through struggle against people who controlled our lives," he said.
"Inside the buildings we took over we
created a community which had a task. We
were involved in a struggle for something
basic,"  he said.
"In the past, liberals fought for other
people. But the Columbia students realized
they also are oppressed — controlled, manipulated,  their  options  cut off."
Rudd criticized people who said there are
no issues in Canada such as racism and the
draft.
"Everyone knows the United States controls the Canadian economy," he said.
"Canada also supports U.S. foreign policy."
Rudd said if the ends are important, the
means are justified.
"At Columbia, we tried all other means
possible without success.
"How can you compare the little bit of
destruction and disruption we caused with the
destruction that goes on every day in society?"
High schoolers want change
but school board 'indifferent'
The Vancouver high school students' union
wants change.
Now comprising representatives from eight
BIRD CALLS are still on sale in the Publications Office, northeast SUB, 75 cents.
schools, the union's aim is to unite all Vancouver high school students in an attempt to
improve the school system.
In a recently released brief, it describes
"the present, backward situation" in high
schools and sets down measures for reform.
The brief suggests a widening in scope and
choice of courses, abolition of exams, voluntary
attendance, and the implementation of a semester system.
With respect to curriculum approach, the
brief states, "A student must be allowed liberty
to develop his own individuality by gaining
the basic intellectual skills, i.e. to be able to
analyze critically the information presented to
him. Students must have the opportunity to
relate all available information in a way that
would be relevant to everyday life."
"The enemies are apathy and the established administrative hierarchy. Most students
want little more than to be crammed full of
facts and be given a certificate which says they
have been," the brief says.
"There are many problems concerning curriculum and structure in the high schools which
the school board and council of public instruction prefer to ignore in the hope that they will
go away."
"While most Canadian universities continue
with academic reform, Canadian high schools
are faced with restrictive, post-World War II
teaching methods and no hope of change."
"While the suggested reforms are far-reaching they are nonetheless both possible and
reasonable."
"In the past, however, the school board has
been hostile or indifferent to suggestions for
change and has ignored them."
The union, which does not advocate violence as a means for attaining reform, hopes to
gain support from students in all Vancouver
high schools and bring about lasting change
and improvement in the high school system.
Wholly Smoke in SUB
Hey, do you want an obscenity trip? Today
at noon Kelly James and the Wholly Smoke
do their thing in the SUB Ballroom. Like, for
two-bits (i.e. 250) you can see it all hang out.
Dig?
AQUA SOC
is sponsoring
AN AQUARIUM TOUR
Open to All Members
Thursday, October 31, 1:00 p.m.
Meet around aqvarium doors at 12:45 p.m.
Information on club board.   Cost 25c.
AFRICA
EXCHANGE PROGRAM
July-August 7969
Information and Slides
12:30 TODAY-*Upper Lounge
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EMPLOYMENT
INTERVIEWS
Representatives of Cominco Ltd. will interview
graduates  and   post  graduates   in
CHEMICAL, METALLURGICAL, MINING
and GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING;
in HONORS GEOLOGY and HONORS CHEMISTRY
for permanent and summer employment.
Graduate students in Electrical and Mechanical
Engineering are also invited to apply.
INTERVIEW DATES
November 5, 6, 7, 8
Further details are available at the
Student Placement Office.
^tommco
PHAROAHS   RETREAT
PRESENTS
THE TRIALS OF JASON HOOVER
Swinging six nights a week
New policy — Monday thru Saturday
Admission: $1.00 (weekends till 10:00 p.m.)
Water & Cordova (behind Eaton's Parking lot)
Reservations 681-0541
FULL FACILITIES Thursday, October 31, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
*— lawrence woodd photo
TEACHING-IN  at  Buchanan  lecture,  students discuss  faculty   club occupation, student-prof relations and  general   university
reform. Some unscrewed their chairs and one  prof  reportedly cried into his hands, "Oh my God, what have I been doing?"
Counselling dissatisfaction
revealed by Math report
A report released last week by the mathematics department revealed that students are
dissatisfied with the university counselling
services.
The report stated that questionnaires were
distributed to about 95 per cent of the undergraduate students taking mathematics courses.
The students included in the total of 4574
returns were 2228 from science, 822 from ap-
Agnew stomps
on protest bag
SAN FRANCISCO (CUPI)—Spiro Agnew,
Republican vice-presidential nominee, Saturday called for a1 .crackdown on "scroungy
student dissenters".
Student protestors, he said, "should be treated like the naughty children that they are."
He drew wild applause for the remark from
some 3,000 Republican adults, who wore buttons,, waved ballons and yelled slogans.
In a strong show of Republican sympathy
with American labor, Agnew spoke at Bakers-
field, heart of the California grape boycott.
The $10 a plate Republicans nibbled grapes
from overloaded fruit bowls on the tables.
There were grapes everywhere in the hall,
hanging from the walls, festooning the entrance
way.
The United Farm Workers last year called
a nation-wide grape boycott to strengthen their
demands for humane working conditions and
wages geared to subsistence levels.
Agnew said the time had come "to protect
young minds" from the "militant criminals"
*bn American campuses. "Trying to learn from
such criminals," said the pithy politician, "is
like trying to take a bath in a sewer."
plied  science,  507  from commerce,  231  from
education, and 786 others.
The report said many students never consult
an academic advisor. '1897 consulted an advisor, and 2638 did not consult."
"Furthermore, judging by their remarks,
they found the advice quite often worthless,
and the need to be advised only nuisance at
registration time."
The report said of those students that did
see an advisor, 18.95 per cent later changed
their field of study while for those who did
not consult an advisor the figure was 16.34
per cent.
"Considering then how many students never
see advisors and how little effect the advisors
have," states the report, "it seems likely that
students rely considerably on the calendar for
their choice of programs."
But many students found the descriptions
in the calendar quite inadequate. Overall, less
than 50 per cent said they found the descriptions comprehensive.
The most astounding figure in the whole
report said almost 44 per cent of all students
have changed their field of study and interest
by the time they get to fourth year.
Student comments supported these statistics
that counselling services at this university are
inadequate and those services available are of
practically no value.
Vandals slash
furniture in
games  room
Vandals slashed two
chairs and two chesterfields in the SUB games
room late Tuesday night.
Alma Mater Society coordinator Rod Ramage
said damage resulting
from the slashing could
run into hundreds of dollars. "Each of those
chairs costs about $200,"
he said.
The vandals apparently
slashed the furniture
after an abortive attempt
to break into games area
manager Dermot Boyd's
office some time after
SUB closed at 1 a.m.
Hinges were removed
from a door leading to
the office area and strips
were taken off an office
window in an attempt to
remove  it.
'Peg campus
supports war,
slim majority
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A slim
majority of University of Winnipeg students have voted to
support the American position
in Vietnam.
In a referendum held Wednesday, 149 students agreed
the "presence of American
troops in Vietnam is justifiable
and they are fighting a just
war". 127 students voted no to
the same question. The vote
represents 13 per cent of the
student body.
Voters aso rejected condemnation of the "imperialist and
genocidal war currently being
waged against Vietnam by the
United States and its allies"
and refused to condemn Canadian complicity in the war.
Other clauses that did not
win approval were: a call for
U.S. troop withdrawal and a
halt to the bombing of the
north.
The referendum was sponsored by the Winnipeg Committee for Peace in Vietnam.
Injury aid
symposium
opens at VGH
A three-day symposium to
discuss modern techniques of
treating accident victims opens
today.
The symposium, to be held
at the Christmas Seal Auditorium, is being sponsored by
the orthopedics division and
the center for continuing education  in the  health  sciences.
Topics will range from air-
sea rescue techniques to ambulance design, with a display of
modern equipment to be held
at the Vancouver General
Hospital   in-service  center.
The symposium lasts from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
People's fish ladder cut, bleeds to death
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — The people's glorious fish ladder
suffered irreparable damage Monday when the car it was riding
in plunged off the old Georgia Viaduct, delaying the eighteenth
Zirnhelt ultimatum for at least a year.
Local hot-mouthers  to debate students
The debating union needs two experienced student
debaters to face radio personalities, Jacks Webster and
Wasserman, at noon, Nov. 6 in an Oxford-style debate.
The resolution is "Freedom and not servitude is the
cure of anarchy."
Vancouver's "communicators" will be debating the
affirmative side  of  the  resolution,   an  excerpt  from
Edmund Burke's 1775 speech on conciliation.
Webster, sputtering host of "Talk Backwards and
City Fake" on CKNW, recently apologized for publicly
interviewing Yippie leader Jerry Rubin one day prior
to the faculty club invasion.
Volunteers for the Nov. 6 debate in Bu. 106 are
asked to contact Ed after 6 p.m. at 325-8477.
,LrS Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 31, 1968
THI vmsfY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university yean
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinion! are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 31, 1968
TEACH-IN TURNS
TO SEAT SHIFT
By CLAUDIA WEINER
Guerillas attack. Swiftly. By day. The day of the teach-in.
With lightning speed and devastating clarity of purpose they
moved. Took screw drivers, muscle power, scrunched down
under the bolted-down chairs and took it upon themselves to
turn them around to form a circle.
They decided they didn't at all like the kind of learning
the physical .structure imposed.
It was a philosophy 200 class and why should the professor be way up there on the dias? Why should the students never
be allowed to see anything but the back of their fellow students'
heads? What was the rationale for that kind of decision? They
figured that the move would stimulate discussion about the kind
of physical environment and its effect on what kind of learning
goes  on  in  the  classroom.
When the bell rang and the next class moved in.there
suddenly was a confrontation. The English class scheduled to
use the room next didn't at all like the new arrangement.
"You can't suddently take it upon yourselves to change something. You've got to take action through the proper channels
and not in some arbitrary fashion."
Rather than leave a hostile situation, the philosophy class
decided to stay and have it out with the English students. There
were a lot of heated arguments back and forth, centering mainly
on who had the right to make the kind of decision that the
philosophy students had made.
Philosophy students maintained that the people who actually
use the place had the right. English students said that if
decisions were to be made—they should be made through the
administration, through the hallowed methods. Otherwise there
would be anarchy. And chaos. And all sorts of other nasty
things.
But no one really appeared to know how to go about contacting the proper channels. And no one knew who were consulted on decision such as having chairs bolted to the floor anyway. Until the revelation came.
Dr. Miller, professor of the English class, informed the
disputants that it was the janitors who had made the decision
to have bolted-down chairs. The janitors? Yes, in order to clean
the classrooms efficiently, bolted-down chairs were installed.
Moveable chairs are so messy. And that's why we look at the
back of students' heads all day. And that's why a group of
students and their professors can't sit in a circle, or a square,
or a diagonal line if they want too.
Amid the general amusement came the realization that
perhaps the proper channels aren't so proper. And not so un-
arbitrary either. There was general amusement and a lot of
satisfaction about what happened. "I really learned something,"
said one student.
Another commented that "it was really a new experience
to actually look at someone's face while in a classroom." And,
"what a pity, really, that we all have to go back to normal
tomorrow."
PANGO PROBLEMS
EDITORIALS:
Editor, The Ubyssiey, Sir:
I have been very concerned
with recent reports published
in your paper. The latest UNS
dispatch from Pango Pango is
most shocking!! After six years
on this campus the continual
decay of Pango Pango's population has been evident to all
those interested in Pangonian
affairs. Some agitate about
Biafra but ignore the senseless
slaughter and cultural genocide which threatens the very
existence of the blorg culture.
What next — will we find
out Jerry Rubin is really an
American? I propose that we
on this campus try and bring
this devastating situation to
the attention of the Canadian
people. We must do our bit to
ensure that peace and tranquility return to Pango Pango.
Every UNS correspondent who
has reported from that strife-
torn country has brought back
the same tales of dissension.
We must end Canadian complicity and stop blorg aggression into no-man's land. This
university could do worse than
set up a department of Pangonian   studies.
with great concern,
George  Blowout
unclassified
Teacup tees off at noon
Join The Ubyssey staff in a teacup. I
think we'll all fit.
Today is the day everybody lets their
hair down, or in the case of female football
players, puts it up, into helmets. For a hair-
raising spectacle, the Teacup game can't be
beat.
For the \first time in years the chariot race
will be a three - way fight — traditional
champions of brute farce, the engineers, meet
with agriculture and forestry to create, with
mud, horseshit, stinkbombs, a pastel of sound,
light, color, and odor that outdoes the most
nouveau artist.
The Ubyssey, for 49 years undefeated as
master boat-racers, again put their throats on
the line in the half-time sudsy tilt.
It's all good fun, but it serves a purpose,
too.
The first $1500 raised goes to the Chil:
dren's Hospital, the remainder to Cool-Aid,
both organizations worthy of all the assistance
students can give.
The festivities will be held in Thunderbird stadium — if you don't feel like walking,
take the PNE passenger trains from SUB.
Renew the friends you made in the faculty
club occupation. Everybody will be at *the
game, too.
Revisions mean more money
The most far-reaching proposal in recent
times to get the AMS out of its current money
morass is in grave danger of getting shot
down by student council.
Constitutional revisions proposed by vice-
president Carey Linde would allow undergraduate societies to levy, upon approval of
their members, a fee on its members over
and above the $29 AMS fee.
This fee would be outside the strict control of the AMS treasurer, as it would be
used by the undergrad society council for its
own purposes.
As everyone on campus should be aware,
the AMS, most of its money going into preselected areas, is suffering from a serious
lack of funds for undergrad societies, publications, seminars, special events, speakers,
and clubs.
Money is just not available outside a
general fee increase, rejected last time
around.
And the AMS, with any extra money it
finds, seems predisposed to pour this into
operating costs of the Student Union Building, to the detriment of other activities.
To any reasonable person, the idea of
undergrad societies being able to raise their
own funds for their own purposes would
seem highly desirable.
This would provide added funds where
they are needed and allow the societies to
establish some ongoing programs of their own
without the threat of arbitrary budget cuts
on the whim of the AMS treasurer.
The undergrad societies could arrange
their own seminars, speakers, and newspapers, or work through the existing campus-
wide organizations for these ends.
It would also give these organizations,
currently deteriorating from lack of funds
(notably special events and speakers committee) a much-needed shot in the arm, as
well as being a move away from the growing
centralization of the AMS.
But   student   council   sees   an   inherent
danger in allowing this sort of decentralization, purely because it takes away much of
the AMS's decision-making power.
Two years ago council balked at allowing
ArtsUS, which had pass by 75 per cent a'
referendum for a $2 fee hike in arts to collect the money, saying it was unconstitutional
for undergrad societies to collect their own
fees.
Arts had planned the use their money
for the arts anti-calendar, the special events
committee, The Ubyssey, and the contemporary arts festival.
The AMS at that time was concerned that -
arts would use the money for purposes the
AMS didn't agree with.
These fears must be still in their minds,
but now, as then, the question remains that
why should the AMS have supreme dictatorial control over all aspects of university
undergraduate life.
And with the expressed support for the
intent of the revisions from such diverse per-,
sonalities as arts president Ralph Stanton,
commerce president Russ Grierson, and law
president Peter Braund, it is obvious that
the desire for decentralization and need for
increased funds is quite widespread.
Perhaps council in rejecting the proposed
revisions last Sunday, was over-reacting to
last week's events in feeling that they should
exercise even more control on society funds
to prevent them from being used to bring in
such people as Jerry Rubin.
Or, as several councillors said, they did
not have enough time to study the proposals
or discuss them with their undergrad
societies.
Perhaps this Sunday, when they meet
again, they will have changed their minds,
and agree to send the revisions with approval
to the Nov.  28 general meeting.
In view of the pressing need for extra
funds, students should press their representatives to support these revisions.
Speculation has a point
Wednesday's editorial in the morning
edition of Pacific Press castigating The
Ubyssey for "irresponsible and innacurate
speculation" concerning the departure of Dr.
Hare seems to us gross hypocrisy, given the
circumstances under 'which Hare departed
and given the propensity of the fore-mentioned newspaper to engage in the same sort of
speculation when federal and provincial government leaders remain aloof from the press
in their thoughts and actions and the operation of their departments.
Throughout the entire Hare speculation,
we made it quite clear that our statements
were speculation, arising from our inability
to penetrate into the inner decision-making
sanctums of the university hierarchy.
We felt that given the political situation,
there was more to Dr. Hare's departure than
medical reason, although that indeed was part
of the problem.
And all we asked for to clear up any misconceptions involved was for Dr. Hare to
state in a letter that he had neither resigned
or been replaced, not that he should return
to his job immediately.
Indeed, it is obvious that he is ill, and it
can do no good for him personally or the
operation of the university for the president
to be working while incapacitated.
We know, however, that his return was
not entirely due to us, there being other
obvious reasons why the president should return to work at this time.
We fail to believe, however, that there
are no policy differences between Hare and
Dean Gage, given the admittedly 'liberal'*
stance of the former and the counter stance
of the latter.
But if we, and the events last week, have
made the university administration realize
that they must be more responsible to the
desires of the student body and take more
pains to explain the meaning of their actions,
we feel the speculation was worth while.
After all, we feel students have the right
to know what goes on in the decision-making
levels of this university and any action which
further   opens   tup   the   administration   &nd■'
board is justified. Thursday, October 31, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS ON OCCUPATION, TEACH-IN
Discipline
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Tuesday I attended a meeting in the
auditorium to try to obtain accurate information as to what was happening on
campus.
The only concensus achieved was that
a problem exists. From there, people proceeded to define the issue, a priority, as
one of the following: government, courses,
faculty, or students.
If this university community fails,
either through hostility, indifference, or
empire building, to constructively cope
with this problem, then it has failed in its
function. For if we cannot handle our
own conflicts, then how can we presume
to cope with conflicts within the community, the nation, and the whole world.
A university's teaching function is that
of discipline, both of self and of thought.
We have been presented with a specific
problem, difficult as it is to define. Do we
have the discipline to solve it successfully?
BETTY PYESMANY
arts 2
Contentment
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In retrospect, the teach-in at history
100, 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, was a farce.
The proposed agenda, topics of discussion
and group direction was smoothly manipulated by faculty. The only wonder is
that a teach-in took place at all, as the
self-appointed faculty chairman did suggest that perhaps the scheduled lecture
would be appropriate.
After the usual apathetic 30 per cent
of the gathering left, the remainder save
a few vocal dissident elements, contented
themselves in sitting back and absorbing
the emulating verbal diarrhea
It is pertinent that in such a case the
lack of dissident audience participation
not be misconstrued by faculty members
as a sign of contentment. These are freshmen straight out of the rigid bonds of
high school, still within the confines of
the home, in an alien environment, probably never experienced in speaking before
an audience of a few hundred, not sure of
their footing, afraid that someone will cut
the ropes out from under them; this they
are, content they are not. This being evident from the ferocity of the few who
dared speak out, and from general comments after the meeting.
It was notable that the dissidents -were
in the main second year students; their
contribution being to crystalize the views
of the virgin element. If this above evaluation proves unpalatable, then we may
assume that the majority of history 100
remains content in sweltering classes of
300-400 in the auditorium; in frantically
scribbling on knees, the factual sawdust
that is delved out with rapidily by the
majority of lecturers, sawdust which is
readily available in any history text, and
which would be better presented in the
form of mimeographed sheets handed out
at the weekly discussion groups.
Since this is the last year of this course
there may be a general feeling that bad as
it is, just get through. I humbly suggest
some improvements within the present
system:
(1) Some form of writing boards in the
auditorium.
(2) It has been shown that several
lecturers do have substantial and beneficial contributions to make; unfortunately
these are few and far between. If one
feels that a lecture is proving 'unrewarding', I suggest you exit; producing the
effects of making the lecturer aware ol an
inadequacy and allowing an otherwise
wasted hour to be used beneficially.
As for the general inadequacies described in the discussion groups, the teach-
in did propose reasonable attitudes in this
direction; direct group confrontation with
group leader, and a personal interview
with Mr. Sydel of the history department.
Both of course put a tremendous onus
on a fledgling freshman, an onus that few
upper classmen would take up.
In retrospect history 100 does have a
definite beneficial purpose. It prepares
any idealistic newcomer for what is to
follow. It dehumanizes and strips away
many preconceived ideas of higher academic freedom. As such it provides a never-
ending flow of reinforcements to feed the
festering discontent erupting in later
years. It is a boot-camp any army would
be proud of. Unfortunately the cost to the
individual is great and what it destroys
is irreplaceable.
PETER PARSONS
arts 2
Morality
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Open letter to members of the faculty
club:
I think that people who are students
today are looking to us for some moral
stand in as much as this is a community of
so called intellectuals. We know, from
"Time", that God is dead. This obviously
rests the responsibility for th© judgment
of moral issues fairly on what we are. We
are people and those of us who have an
eye to this ideal must speak up.
Now members of this community have
generally supported the faculty clubs's
attitude of restraint so as not to promote
violence. But after all if we see what the
protest is why should we not treat the
demonstrators as younger people and wait
for them to see us — we certainly do not
have to join in the game at the level the
students have accused us of, by acting
in the same manner as they did 'when they
invaded the privacy of the people in the
club. The point to which I refer is the
placing of two "Pinkerton men" at the
doors of the club (we obviously have reserves) so that we members of the faculty
can enjoy the freedom of what we imagine to be a university, under guard.
I say we can, in that we think of ourselves as people, stand above the concept
of confrontation — counter confrontation
which I submit has already led us to
where we are. We should not have the
guards to show where we are, and if we
do we are what the students say we are.
To extend this argument further, students might even feel proud to bestow
on us the privilege of having a club in
which to seek some quiet and talk to
people if we show ourselves to be worthy
of it by paying heed to the nature of
ideals; that is to what we are as people.
R. HARGER
assistant professor, zoology
Consumers
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Thursday evening I was for some time
a curious and interested observer of the
takeover of the faculty club.
I wandered out to try and draw into
discussion other students. Perhaps I was
unlucky in those I chose, for I listened
to only the vaguest generalities, composed
basically of beefs. In their insistence upon
more than they were getting, these students tied Vietnam, Biafra, and the Negro
problem in the States. I gained, reluctantly, the impression that in this glib lip-
service there was no real compassion. The
tragedies of Vietnam, of Biafra, of the
American Negros were used as pegs on
which to hand undefined, personal discontent. I heard no statements that indicated
previous research or painful mind-digging
to put together something resembling
solutions to the problems inherent in our
universities and our world society.
I went into the conference lounge
where now a professor stood and spoke
quietly, urging that the student committee
state their complaints and draw up proposals. They stared into his face, listening
gravely. Their attentiveness again made
me think of kids, somewhat out on a
limb, searching for guidance, wondering
what the hell it was all about. They were
worried; pushed too far they could be
dangerous.
So what, I wondered afterwards was
the underlying motivation of the 1000
army take-over of the Faculty Club ?
Sorting out the material, I came up with
the assessment that these young people
are simply insatiable consumers. Today
the industrialized and technological nations have beaten the problem of production. (What we now need is a method of
distribution which will not stultify imagination and continuing human productiveness.) Along with increasing productivity
for profit we concentrate on 'opening up
new markets'. To facilitate* this requirement we invite, in fact, insist, that each
and every one of us becomes a disposal
unit. From the moment a baby leaves the
womb he is sedulously oriented in his role
of consumer-disposable diapers, baby
foods, sports equipment, swimming pools,
guns, cars. Producers use every media to
this end, and every conceivable gimmick
leaning heavily on sex and killing. This is
our economy. Profitably disposing of our
production includes our production to
mount wars. All this is combined with the
new permissiveness in our homes where
'responsibility', 'loyalty', 'respect', for instance, are quaint, archaic words, and
where TV continuously hammers out 'the
message', and takes over family conversation. The ringing voice of the vote-
seeking politician is added to the chorus,
often squashing effectively youthful initiative and yearning for an original role in
society by offering the pallative of even
greater material productivity, and greater
control of the goodies of the world. Responding correctly, but with diminishing
selectivity, the growing army of youth,
like a huge river overflowing its banks
and reaching across the land, demands
MORE — more classrooms, gymnasiums,
pleasure, travel, sweets, drinks, drugs. Required for continuous consumption is pre-
sumptuosly, with the real sufferers in the
world, the hungry, threatened and dispossessed. Whoever foots the bill is really
no concern of theirs.
BETTY IREDALE
Mexicans
Dear students:
I just came from a student meeting
here at UBC.
I have been listening for nearly two
hours to opinions, from each faction of the
university, about the latest advice from
the radical students.
I have been the whole time thinking
about you, dear Mexican students. Here
we have also radical students, you know.
They used to have long hair and beards.
And some of them need drugs to think
better or to love better or to better live
life. Of course, they do not risk their lives
as you do, because they do not try to
change society as you do. But they have
important issues, you know. They want
to drink alcohol on campus and write on
the wall of a luxurious new student building. This is important, they say.
Yesterday they occupied the faculty
club. It was a big thing. For two hours
I was thinking of you, bleeding in the
streets in struggle against a dictatorial
regime.
I was thinking of Spain, my country,
and in many other countries, where
people fight for food. And I was very sad,
my dear Mexican student.
JOSE A. BEJAR
grad studies.
'!S «ttHW*t* >;*.•-
US\\X
EDITOR: Al Birnie
New*  John Twigg
Ass't News  ;. John Gibbs
City    Peter Ladner
Managing   Bruce Curtis
Wire   Norm   Gidney
Associate     Mike   Finlay
Photo      Powell   Hargrave
Sports  Jim Maddin
Page Friday  Andrew Horvat
The ugly animal WBCUP has gone, but some still
feel its presence, eh Gibbs? But The Ubyssey comes
out regardless of diminishing staff (midterms uno),
and other unavoidable ailments. Nader Mirhady wrote
a story about speeches, but neglected to name the
speakers, so his story remains as unpublished brilliance. Knox made liars of all the bettors who said
he'd be back in three or four weeks, he returned in
three days. Kris lost a friend, and The Ubyssey lost a
columnist for a while. Flank Frynn covered senate,
Conchie came fast, and left slow. Tyhurst was robbed
of something, but I haven't decided what. Elaine
Tarzwell got upset, but worked just the same, bless
5»er heart. Woodd threw things, Frizell fizzled; Knox,
Cawsey, Finlay, Twigg, Gidney and Ladner threw
things, while Dora and Dale watched.
Bill-Raver-memorial-visitor-of-the-weak award to
Paul Bodnarchuk, who dared criticize but kept his
pen shut on  press day.
FLOWERS
'Originality*    m    Flowers
For    AH    Occavons'
10°o   OFF  CORSAGES
Phone 736-7344
!l
HARVARD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
2 Year Program leading to
M.B.A. Degree
Canadian Students are invited to
apply before January 1, February
15, or May 1, 1969 for regular
September class.
For additional facts write
HARVARD B. SCHOOL,
Boston, Mass.
or telephone:
Dick  Dowrey, 684-2467
Jack Stark, 683-3261
Dick Mahoney, 731-5885
GIANT FALL SALE
of
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at- Savings up to 50%
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TUXEDOS  -  DINNER  JACKETS
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Complete Size Range
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JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 31, 1968
COUNCIL APPROVES ENROLMENT REPORT
By PAUL  KNOXIOUS
A report from the Alma Mater Society political
education sub-commission recommending that UBC
limit enrolment to 25,000 was approved in principle
Monday by council.
The report insists that the administration present
its policy on enrolment ceilings by Christmas.
It adds that the AMS is "willing to support an
immediate freeze in enrolment until such time as
the senate and board of governors are able to assure
us of sufficient finances to keep growth compatible
with facilities."
The report will be presented to students at a
noon rally Friday in the SUB ballroom.
A preamble outlining the conditions that make
an enrolment freeze necessary will be attached to
the report before it is presented to the board of
governors.
Sub-committee chairman Les Horswill, arts 6,
told council the report is a series of general principles. He said the recommendation that enrolment
should be restricted to 25,000 should not be considered as an end in itself.
(The report also recommends that council reaffirm its support for additional regional colleges
and other post-secondary institutions in B.C.)
"The immediate need in terms of UBC now is that
enrolment be frozen," said AMS external affairs
officer Tobin Robbins.
"But we also have to think in terms of the need
for other institutions. If by saying UBC won't take
any more than 25,000 students, we may be able to
convince the public that another campus in B.C.
is needed.
"If you confront them with the possibility that
their Johnny or Joey might just not get to university,
they will become concerned and receptive to our
position."
Student senator Mark Waldman said the report
is not detailed enough and far too inexplicit for presentation to the public or the UBC administration.
"It should make it clear that people come here to
get an education, not to shop at a supermarket of
courses," Waldman said.
The report also applauds the call by the Simon
Fraser University senate for an independent grants
commission for B.C.'s public universities.
"Such a commission could assist significantly in
evolving co-ordinated and planned enrolment policies," the report says.
"The greater coherence involved in the functioning of such a commission would help immeasurably in
our desire to maintain fairer and wider accessibility
to higher education in our province."
MEN LOOK TWICE
A I vJirxLj . . . wearing one of our Featherlite,
100% Human Hair Wigs or Falls, priced at only
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Mardi Gras '69
SONG & DANCE
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NOV. 4 thru 8
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To pick up this professional challenge,
you have to be highly motivated. Eager
to put your own talent to work. Aware
of the need of developing countries for
mature, competent people, ready to
lend a hand. You have to decide to
spend two years of your life working
on the world's number one problem—
development.
If we're getting to you, you aren't
just anybody.
You're somebody we need at CUSO.
Tell us what you can do. We'll tell you where you are needed.
I would like to know more about CUSO and the opportunity to work overseas for
two years. My qualifications are as follows:
I (will) hold
(degree, diploma, certificate or other verification of skill)
from
in
(course)
(university, college, trade or technical institute, etc.)
Name
Address
Pro v.
Send to: CUSO (U.B.C. Committee)
CUSO Office, International House,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Telephone: (604) 224-4535 • 228-3887
CUSO
Development
is our business
We won't take just anybody
Only qualified technical and professional
people willing to work for a low salary
under demanding conditions in any of 45
developing countries around the world
Legal aid
available
in SUB
Having problems -with your
mother-in-law?
Alma Mater Society vice
president Carey Linde wants
to remind students legal aid
is being dispensed every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
noons in Rm. 258 in SUB,
(Linde's office).
To date, a score of students
have come seeking help on an
array of problems, running
from landlord and tenant,
traffic tickets, insurance, theft,
how to collect phone bills, and
how to get your mother-in-law
in jail  for  bugging you.
The law students involved
feel they are performing a
needed service, "but wish more
students would take advantage
of it.
So, if you have legal problems, go up and see our local
Perry Masons.
m *
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LEAN BEEF PIZZA
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BLACK OLIVE PIZZA
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Thursday Oct. 31 only
These prices also
apply to deliveries
over $3 — 224-0833 Thursday, October 31, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
— lawrence woodd photo
ZOOLOGY GRAD STUDENT Udo Erasmus stands on SUB steps
with cigarette in mouth. Note sign left over from mock demonstration by engineers. Bad day for the photog, I guess.
Tokyo demo
knocks U.S.
TOKYO (CUPI) — Violence
swept Japan last week as close
to one million students and
labor unionists launched massive protests against the American government and its Vietnam  policies.
Police fought demonstrators
in Tokyo and Osaka as protest swelled over the war, the
Japanese - American security
alliance and American control
of Okinawa.
Nearly a thousand people
were arrested and many injured in the riots. No deaths
were reported.
Following rallies in different
parts of Tokyo, students massed in the heart of the city.
They trotted in tightly-grouped
masses, wearing red, yellow
and blue helmets to shield
themselves from billy clubs.
The city massed 12,000 riot
police against the demonstrators.
The fiercest battle took place
in front of thei Japanese defense department when more
than 1,000 Zengakuren (militant students) tried to storm
the building.
The students, armed with
clubs and paving stones, were
thrown back by police. The
cops used powerful water
cannons to move the students
back and then charged into
them with shields and billy
clubs.
Another group of demonstrators was driven back from
the Japanese parliament building by police tear gas and
clubs.
Teach-ins are in thing;
Loyola cancels classes
MONTREAL (CUP) The Loyola academic
community cancelled classes and met together
-for 8% hours Wednesday to plot the course of
change at their college.
The study session was only the first of a
series of "self-assessment" programs to be run
Take news' gets
editor arrested
MONTREAL (CUP) — Paul Kirby, 24 year-
old editor of the Montreal underground paper,
* Logos, has been charged with distributing false
news.
He is the second person to be charged in
•connection with the Logos lampoon of the
Montreal Gazette distributed on Montreal
streets Oct. 16. The lampoon was intended to
show the Gazette was a "death-oriented" paper,
according to Kirby.
Alvin Cader was arrested last week for public mischief while he distributed the edition.
Kirby is already charged with publishing
^obscene material in Logos and will face hearing on that charge November 12.
periodically throughout the term. The senate
approved cancellation of classes for the study
sessions originally proposed by students.
Administrators, faculty and students spent
the day in some 20 seminar groups to hash out
problems and formulate proposals.
Students came up with the following pro
posals:
e   greater emphasis on the humanities;
• 50 per cent student representation on
the college's academic personnel policy committee;
e decision-making limited to students and
faculty with a separate board of governors to
deal with finances;
• general election of deans, department
chairmen and the college president.
A. K. Velan, a governor, called for student
participation at all levels of university government.
Terry Copp, past president of the faculty
association, called for election of senior academic officials by the total community.
Loyola administration president Patrick G.
Malone said the administrator's role was simply
to carry out the day to day running of the institution and to implement policies determined
by the academic community.
The proposals now go to the senate for discussion and possible implementation.
HELP COOL-AID - GO TEACUP! Page 8
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, October 31, 1968
Berkeley sit-in fizzleout
blamed on fast, fast busts
LOCAL UBYSSEY POETS do niore than play with their yo-yos.
Ah, nostalgia, remember walking the dog, around the
world, the waterfall, baby in the cradle, triple-reverse spin-
out? Warm autumn night sees Mike Finlay anticipating
arrival of official Yo-yo Trick Master.
. BERKELEY (CPS-CUP) — Quick, repressive action by administration officials here
seems to have forestalled violent student revolt, at least for the immediate moment.
Student action may pick up though this
week as leaders have called a general strike.
The strike call comes in the wake of major
protests that resulted in over 200 arrests. More
than 3,000 people voted for the strike at a general meeting.
Thursday the campus was virtually occupied by 800 San Francisco Bay area police
called by the administration to prevent further
student  occupation  of university buildings.
The students are demanding:
• credit for Social Analysis 139X, the experimental course on racism in which Black
Panther leader Eldridge Cleaver is lecturing;
• the university regents rescind their
September 20 resolution, which denied credit
for any course in which outside lecturers appeared more than once (aimed at Cleaver) and
called for censorship of campus dramatic productions;
• an end to university racism and implementation of demands by the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) for non-discriminatory hiring practices and admissions;
• amnesty, including no university disci
pline and a dropping of court charges, for the
120 students and one professor arrested Oct.
23 in a non-violent sit-in at Sproul Hall and for
the 76 persons arrested early Thursday morning after holding Moses Hall for 16 hours.
Monday evening to consider going on strike.
The chances for amnesty seem slim. Roger
Heyns, chancellor of the Berkeley campus, has
placed on interim suspension all those who
barricaded themselves inside Moses Hall and
will recommend to the student faculty committee on student conduct that they be expelled.
Heyns has made no recommendation for
action against persons who sat in at Sprout
Hall.
He also said all appropriate steps would
be taken against each person arrested to recover the full amount of property damages and
expenses suffered by the university.
Most militant of the students, those who
took over Moses Hall, are almost all still in
jail with bail set at $1,650. More moderate
leaders who sat-in at Sproul Hall are out of"
jail, most of them having been fined $125 and
given suspended sentences of 30 days.
Although a few students, mainly from Students for a Democratic Society, are urging
further takeovers, the majority of those involved in the movement, some 4,000, are devoting themselves to the strike. Students participating in a hastily called boycott Thursday and Friday either didn't go to class or
held discussions about the issues involved.
California political leaders were quick to
react to the protests. Governor Ronald Reagan praised the administration for calling in
the police. Max Rafferty, State Superintendent
of Public Instruction and Republican candidate
for the Senate, has blamed the campus disruptions on "communists". Assembly speaker
Jesse Unruh, the state's leading Democrat, said-
that if Cleaver "provoked or counselled" the
Sproul sit-in, he should be barred from speaking on the campus.
Cleaver, whose course met Tuesday just
before the sit-ins began, told students to "do
their own thing".
Residence
rules are
made to break
NEW YORK (CUPI) —
Women at Plimpton Hall, a
Barnard College residence, defied a residence rule Wednesday and allowed male visitors
to stay in their rooms all night.
Normally men must leave
the residence by midnight. The
students intend to keep observing their version of the
rules until the college administration approves a proposal
drawn up by the residents on
October 16.
The new rules would have
men visitors sign in and out
but visiting privileges would
not terminate at any time.
Mrs. Elizabeth Meyers said
no change in the rules could
be implemented before the
women's parents were notified.
The dormitory opened last
month with the understanding
that housing rules would be
formulated by students and
Barnard staff members who
live in the building.
Interim rules were drawn up
then and approved by the administration but were scrapped
at a general meeting of residents last week and replaced
with the open visiting clause.
It's like owning
my own business'
Roger Kedwell, a London Life sales representative in Toronto
"It's true. At London Life you
get a concentrated, personalized training program that's
recognized as the best in the
industry. You can choose
where you want to work. Then
you go out and sell. From the
very first day, you have the
responsibility of shaping your
own career. You determine
how fast you grow, how much
you earn. And you have the
London Life name to help
you."
An economics graduate of the
University of Western Ontario, Roger began a three-
month London Life training
course in the summer of 1966.
Within a year he had established himself as an exceptional life insurance underwriter. To learn more about a
career in life insurance sales,
see your placement officer. Or
write to the Personnel Department, London Life Insurance
Co., London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office- London, Canada Thursday, October 31, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Power greases AMS wheels,
come, or be decided upon
By MICHAEL FINLAY
The name of the society is the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Sounds pretty good for the first line of the
formidable 27 page document known as the
AMS constitution, doesn't it?
But so what?
That's the feeling that appears to be evident
in many students. Few people seem to really
know what the AMS, of which every student
is a mandatory member, does.
Thus, this theoretical explanation. Theoretical because what the AMS, in the form of
the student council, does, and what it is supposed to do, are not always synonymous.
The AMS is the student society of UBC. It
embodies itself in the student council, thus
becoming the student government.
Dig that. Government. Which means the
26 people (more or less — it changes occasionally) who sit on student council are making
decisions that govern you, the students.
In short, what these people, for whom most
of you did not vote, decide, affects your life
at UBC more directly than most would like to
believe.
OK, so what do they decide?
Well, some for instances. It all starts when
they take your $24. (It used to be $29, but now
$5 goes directly to athletics and is administered, appropriately, by the administration.)
Then the fun begins.
The AMS first takes $15 for the construction of SUB. Then, with the rest of your
money, they buy things (art for SUB, etc.), finance clubs, send delegations here and there,
bring speakers to campus, put on films, and
basically pay for most things put on by students.
Some specifics.  They give  $13,500  to  the
Canadian Union of Students, $5,000 to World ,
University  Service,  $3,000  to intramural athletics, $23,000 to campus activities, $6,000 to
clubs, and so on.
They pay AMS executives $350 to $450 a
month to organize things during the summer.
They give The Ubyssey about $16,000 every
year. (Our critics have suddenly become alive.
Actually it's not so bad when you consider
Simon Fraser University students pay about
$2.40 each for a weekly paper. So cool it.)
At any rate, they spend your money, and
if that doesn't hit home, God knows what will.
Cool. What else do they do? Well, they call
referendums, elections and meetings of students' court. (That's another article right
there.)
They set rules of discipline. No gambling,
drinking etc. They help put on things like
Homecoming, Open House.
In an eggshell, anything that the administration or board of governors does not con
trol, the AMS or one of its subsidiary organizations likely does.
Like I said, this is all theoretical. What the
AMS really does (and doesn't do) can be seen
at weekly council meetings.
Council meetings. The shows are free and
well worth it if depression is your bag.
What happens is this. AH the councillors—
the executive, the undergraduate society presidents, representatives from the clubs committee,
The Ubyssey and maybe one or two other inconspicuous people—sit around this big horseshoe table and make their decisions.
Only it's not that simple. Like, it's democracy, see, and everybody has to, and wants
to, have his say.
And like the council is split wider than a
whore's thing on Saturday night, so there's a
lot of arguing that goes on, and the whole business becomes very depressing and boring and
pathetic.
So, most spectators, unless they are personally involved, like if council is going to send
them to students court, screw undergrad society dance or repossess their typewriter, leave
after a while.
Like, it's the same way you feel at the
laundromat when you forget your potboiler
novel. Soap suds and clothes, turning, turning,
turning. Yippetyshit.
But what's bad is that people forget that
ultimately, Allah willing and Isobel Semple
nonetheless, council is eventually going to
make a decision on pretty well everything that
comes up on the agenda, and these decisions
are going to be Law.
Frightening, I know. To bring it home, guys
like Greedy Petey Braund hold power on that
council like you wouldn't believe, and they
swing things sometimes.
Which is not to say they shouldn't. That's
what politics is all about, and Greedy is one
of the best. It just means that if you disagree
with his politics, or maybe with those of Carey
Linde, you ain't gonna stop them by drinking
coffee in SUB all days.
So, democracy is where it's theoretically at
at UBC, but it doesn't work when no one cares.
So pop into the SUB council chambers
Monday night around 6:30 p.m. The cast will
all be there and the show's so good it's been
on for years.  And it's free.
If what happened there wasn't so important
to how your life gets led (dig the phrasing) at
UBC, it'd be a real freak show, good for a few
laughs.
But those councillors have got the power,
people, whether you voted for them or not, and
the AMS council chambers, in a realistic and
not idealistic sense, is where it's at.
Dig it. It might make you reconsider something or other.
&
-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
MAN IS MAN
Bertolt Brecht's farce-parable about the
transformation of a porter into a human
war machine
with
PETER JAENICKE-ALAN SCARFE-GREGORY REID
and an outstanding student cast
Directed by DONALD SOULE
Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Music by JOHN CHAPPELL
NOVEMBER 8-16
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00 (Available for all performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, November 11 — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 14 — 12:30 NOON
Tickets: The Frederic Wood Theatre Room 207
Sfc
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
/&
The grin bin
(fM-dWtt
fofce* * <o*d*
gift* * post am»
PIZZA-tffc^
Take Out  -  Delivery
Marine    263-44401
WINE!
WOMEN!
AND
WIGGY   SYMPHONY!
AT
THE AUTUMN LEAF
Friday, Nor. 1—9-1
Couples $3.00
Guys $2.00
Gals $1.50
SUB BALLROOM
Tickets in A.M.S.
and at door
BOOTS
WE'VE
GOT
EM
*
0*#ft
548 Granville, Vancouver 2
MU. 2-1022 Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 31, 1968
TEACUP   GAME
Javyee pucksters
victimize Ladner
Home Ec vs. Nurses
The UBC Jayvee hockey
team followed the example set
by the Birds as they pulled out
a 9-4 victory over the Ladner
team on Monday night.
Scorers for the Braves were
r<a£4NCOUVERi"
SKKa,cWIN'TERJ
SPORTS ®4IR_>
0
SEE WORLD RANKED
SKI STARS IN ACTION
ON THE MOVING RAMP
SHOWMART
BUILDING, PNE
II
NOV. 1, Fri.
NOV. 2. Sat.
NOV. 3, Sun.
4-11 p.m.
1-11 p.m.
1- 6 p.m.
Co-sponsored by Western Ski Promotions Ltd. and Marpole Rotary
Ernie Lawson and Roy Sakaki
with two goals each and Terry
Elliot, Joe Petretta, Ken Lem-
men, Jack Beech and John
Miller all with singles.
The Braves next venture
onto the ice will be at the
Winter Sports centre on Monday night Nov. 4th.
The next hockey game on
campus is Friday night at 8
p.m., when the Thunderbirds
play University of Victoria.
willy van yperen
4410 w. 10th avenue
Vancouver 8, b.c.
224-5412
contemporary
jewelry
design
***** .«•-«••
■-W. *.&«'
HOMEWRECKER practising for the big game.
Aggies, gears and
all puling, pulling
All three chariots are ready
for the great race today.
The chariot race is a regular
ATTEND:
POLITICAL
EDUCATION
RALLY
-ENROLMENT LIMITATIONS
-UNIVERSITY FINANCING
-REGIONAL COLLEGES
Sub Ballroom —Friday Noon
HEAR:        Dave Zirnhelt (AMS Pres.)
Tobin Robbins (External Affairs Officer)
Faculty Members
half-time feature of the Teacup
football game between the
nursing and home-economics
faculties.
The origin of the chariot
race is unknown, and rules
were abandoned long ago.
The three chariots, pulled by
engineering, forestry, and agriculture students will careen
once around the stadium trying to avoid the subversive attempts of rivals.
These subversions have
ranged in the past from throwing burning lunch bags to heaving manure, to tackling the
drivers, to tying the chariots
to the ground at the beginning.
This should be an especially
messy race with three chariots
stumpers
chariots
competing for the first time instead of the traditional two.
A team consists of 25 pullers
and pushers and two drivers.
The first team to drag its chariot once around the field wins.
Winners for the past six
years have been engineers.
"Aggies expect forestry to
be the main opposition as the
engineers are reputed to have
a very weak team," said Dennis Perry, agriculture 4.
A boat race follows the chariot race.
The Ubyssey has won the
boat race for the past 49 years.
Engineers and aggies will
test new chariots in today's
race while foresters will enter
a used model.
Jilm. Society. fVmmnJUk
ADOLPH HITLER'S
TRIUMPH
OFTHE
WILL
'The greatest propaganda film
ever made!
Thursday -12:30,3:30,6:00,8:30
Friday - 6:00,8:30
OLD  AUDITORIUM Thursday, October 31, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
EAT IN* TAKE OUT* DELI VERY
KaphiPocdA
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1045 Robson 684-6629
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS
G. & GLmcL ObdL JuMutuhiL
4369 West 10th
228-9424 (days); 224-6346 (eves.)
WE BUY & SELL FURNITURE, RUGS, APPLIANCES
BRIC-A-BRAC, ETC.
WE BUY BEER BOTTLES ... 25c dozen
— byron nelson photo
BRUCE HARWOOD (throwing) and Doug France (landing) are practising their technique for
their first major competition this weekend. The team has been training under Doug Rogers,
Olympic silver medaiist in 1964, and has a few possible winners waiting in the wings.
Art Adams appears to be one of the top UBC contenders and he hopes to achieve his first
competition knockout. Other possible victors are Charles Maingnon, who was the 1966
college champion, and Sherman Wong or Herb Wakaskini. The tournament takes place at
the Centennial  community centre  in New Westminster with the action starting at 7:30 p.m.
Sailors Douglas Cupping
The Douglas Cup Intercollegiate sailing
regatta will be one of the most intriguing
yachting events of this year.
Eight collegiate crews will be battling in a
seven-race, 28-match series starting Friday
outside Long Beach Harbor under the co-
sponsorship of Cal State College Long Beach
and Long Beach Yacht Club.
To make the event a test of seamanship
and savvy rather than of boats, the event will
find each team drawing by lot for use of one
of eight identical, newly-launched Columbia
28 Mark II racing yachts.
Every team sails every other team on a
round-robin basis.
One challenge is between United States
teams and Canada for the right to have the
winning team's name inscribed upon the gleaming silver trophy donated originally by industrialists-sportsmen Donald Douglas Sr. and Jr.
and which is kept at LBYC.
The  University of  British   Columbia   cap
tured the championship a year ago, and is returning to defend the title under the skippering of Allen Sturgess.
The second "competition within the competition" is geographical. UBC, host Cal State
College Long Beach, national collegiate champion San Diego State, Kennedy Cup Regatta
champion Stanford, U. of Washington and USC
will represent the West Coast.
The Midwest is represented for the first
time in the series, by the U. of Cincinnati.
And Boston U. will represent the East.
The format calls for three series of races
opening day, with two more Saturday and the,
final two Sunday. The sleek Mark lis will
leave their LBYC docks at 9:30 a.m. each
morning, with first races set for 11 a.m. each
day.
Host Cal State Long Beach, with greater
familiarity with tricky breezes and currents
outside Long Beach breakwater, is a definite
threat to repeat its 1966 victory in the inaugural regatta.
Intramurals
Dual meet
results
Results
of
Dual swim meets:
Place
League A
League B
First
Aggies
ADP
Second
Eus
Ph. Ed.
Third
Betas
DKE
Fourth
Ed.      ]
Science     J
ATC   1-    tied
Forestry   J      tled
Law   J
This is
the
result of five weeks
of dual meets held
at Empire pool.
Final swim meet
The Men's intramural swimming championships will
be held in Percy Norman Memorial Pool on Friday evening starting at 7:30.
The finalists are chosen from the fastest times submitted in the dual meets with the six fastest being in the
final and the next six being in the consolation round.
The power will probably come from the Aggies who
have ex-Birds Bruce Melton, hand Gavin Young and
Dwight Brown along with Don Berry and Ron Etches
splashing for  them.
Melton has top times in most of the individual events.
The pool is on 30th and Ontario, right beside Capilano
Stadium (the baseball park).
jr$£t£&
X
EAT IN • TAKE OUT * DELIVERY
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS —
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS — 12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November  1, 2,  15,  16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14,  15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
AFRICAN  STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
2nd GENERAL MEETING
at International House
(Rm. 400)
Sunday, Nov. 3rd, 1968
at 7:00 p.m. Sharp
'THE PENMAN*
IMPROVE YOUR PENMANSHIP BY MAIL
BUSINESS
ORNAMENTAL
Write  tor  information
2373 Haywood Ave.. West Vancouver, B.C.
Phone 922-4427
" iMT If they're
U.B.C. Gals or Guys
You'll find them in "BIRD CALLS"
Your Student Telephone Directory
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY - only 75c
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, SUB - UBC BOOKSTORE Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 31, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES .. .
NDPer Levi talks,
Marx vs. freebies
Norman Levi speaks today
noon, Bu. 100, on "Socialism
and   Charity."
FILM  SOCIETY
Triumph of the Will, in old
auditorium   today,    12:30,
3:30, 8:30 p.m.; Friday, 8:30
p.m.
MAMOOKS
Need    help   with    posters,
banners,   or   anything   printable?  Cheap!  SUB   249,  any
noon.
UBC LIBERALS
General meet noon today,
SUB F, election of officers.
ALPHA DELTA  PHI
Films,   slides   and discussion
on   Biafra,   Friday   8   p.m.,
everybody     welcome,     2270
Westbrook.
WUS
General meet of world university service, SUB K,
today noon.
LIT   SYMPOSIUM
COMMITTEE
Meeting today noon, old
Ubyssey office in north
Brock, Sunday symposium
tickets on sale noon today
or Friday, or at door.
NON-SISSIES
Drop-in, (see  Oct.  18 fitness
letter) 10 a.m. Empire Pool,
Friday  2:30  p.m.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Prof. A. Wainman speaks on
Rambling Through Yugoslavia Today, noon, Bu. 104.
POLI SCI  SOC
Meeting   for   interested   poli
sci   students,   Friday  noon,
HA.  215.
PRE DENT SOC, HYGIENE
Meeting   today ■ noon,   SUIB
119  (E).   Speaker:   Dr.   Ross
Upton.
CROSSROADS AFRICA
Spend summer '69 in Africa.
Info' and slides, noon today,
IH.
UBC SOCREDS
All members attending
BCYS convention, contact
executive for transportation.
CAMPUS  CRUSADE  FOR
CHRIST
Teaching  meeting,  Ed.   201,
today noon.
ARCHAEOLOGY  CLUB
Archaeology museum beneath math building open
today, noon-2:30  p.m.
SPEAKERS
Economist Prof. Kenneth
Boulding speaks Friday noon
SUB ballroom. Admission
.35.
PHRATERES
Ail-phi,  Friday noon.
ACE
Short general meeting Monday  noon,  Ed.   201.
CANOE   CLUB
Meeting today noon, SUB
club room, for all members
interested in Skagit and
Thompson river trips.
AQUA   SOC
Aquarium tour  today.  Meet
at  Vancouver  Public  Aquarium doors, 12:45 p.m. Open
to all members. 25c.
WUS
Apologies for cancelling
Tues. meeting. Discuss results of Pemberton symposium, noon, today, SUB 205-
K.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Prof.  Parekh  speaks  on  his
experience    in   the*   London
School  of Economics sit-ins.
Hebb theatre, 7 p.m. Nov. 4.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Film,    Boy    with   a   Knife,
street    gang    work,    Friday
noon, BU. 204, 10 cents.
SUS
Science Black Cat Ball (restricted) Sat., Nov. 2 in SUB
ballroom, 9 p.m.-l a.m. Dress
in costume or hardtimes. $3
per  couple,   (liquor licence).
MUSSOC
Annual Fall banquet, Nov.
2, 7 p.m., SUB party room,
Dress: togas; entertainment
by Mussoc review. All welcome—members free. Information   228-3073.
AFRICAN STUDENTS
Second general meeting IH
room   400   Sunday.
FLYING CLUB
General   meeting   Friday
noon, Buch.  322.
SAILING TEAM
Sign up in outdoors club not
later than Monday for next
elimination   series.
POLITICAL EDUCATION
COMMITTEE
Political education rally Friday noon, SUB ballroom.
Hear student leaders and
faculty discuss enrolment
limitations, university financing and regional colleges.
(Or Prof. Kenneth Boulding
maybe?)
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Autumn Leaf, tomorrow 9-1,
SUB ballroom. Couples, $3;
guys, $2; gals, $1.50. Licensed! Tickets:  AMS and  door.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
General   meeting,   today
noon,  Bu.   204.   Frosh   rep.;
news   letter  editor  to  be
elected.
EDUCATION   U.S.
Hallowe'en bash for education students at the barn,
tonight,   9-1.  BYOB.
TEACH-IN
From Page 1
ents to participate in an ordinary day at UBC.
Several undergraduate societies were reported collecting
student comments so the teach-
in can be evaluated. Random
comments picked up by Ubyssey reporters indicate most
students found the teach-in
exciting.
"It's great to find out how
other faculties think," said one
nursing student. Said another:
"I don't think technical faculties have any real understanding of the problems in the arts
faculty. I see now that this is
a problem for the whole campus."
An engineering student,
fresh from a session with former arts president Stan Persky
and about 20 other engineers
in Buchanan lounge: "We had
a good discussion about the
role of the engineer in society.
I think people who didn't get
anything out of it wouldn't
get anything out of anything."
Dissenting students' views
ranged from the two girls who
walked out of their education
classes saying they came to
hear lectures and not "waste
time", to the girl entering SUB:
"I'm not going to fine arts,
they're just having a teach-in."
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 line*, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Ralet for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
BLACK CAT BALL - SUB BALL-
room - Sat., Nov. 2 - 9-1 - Dress:
Hardtimes or costume - Ticket*-; on
sale now - A.M.S. or Rm. 1119. Math
Annex   $3.00   Couple.   Bar.
PAISLEY POWERED MUSIC AND
Strobalized lights. The very next
thing for your dance, party or orgy.
For  bookings   call  Paul,   731-7301.
LOOSEN UP WITH BOOZE AND
Wiggy Symphony, Nov. 1, 9-1 in
S.U.B. Ballroom. Couples $3.00, guys
$2.00, gals $1.50. Tickets A.M.S. and
door.   We're   licensed!
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ARE
managed exclusively by MCM &
Associates.  731-4741.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
1956 AUSTIN A50. GOOD MECHAN-
ical shape. New clutch. $175.00 or
nearest  offer.   AM   3-4493,  Gordon.
1964   TRIUMPH    2000   SEDAN,    Excellent   condition,   overdrive.   Phone
Grant 731-9974
'64 M.G. MIDGET EX. COND. MECH.
Perfect. See on campus. $850. Call
M.W.  at   224 9769.
Automobile—Parts
23
ANDY  WORHOL'S
VELVET   UNDERGROUND
At The Retinal Circus
Halloween   Costume   Bash,   Oct.   31
 $2.60
DANCE TO THE MOCK DUCK.
Totem Park, Fri. Nov. 1, 9-1. Girls
75c,   guys   $1.00,   couples  $1.50.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST — MAN'S SUEDE JACKET,
size 38, dark brown from coat
racks, Fri. night dance, S.U.B. Urgently needed. Phone 731-1503. Reward   offered.
WOULD PERSON WHO TOOK
briefcase from Bookstore Friday
noon at least return the notes to
same  place  or phone  526-4082.
FOUND MANS GOLD WATCH NEAR
Wesbrook Cresc. Carey Hall. Call
224-9794  and  ask  for  Phil.
FOUND — ONE LADY'S WEDDING
ring. B Lot contact Publications
Office,   241   S.U.B.
BLUE RING IN SILVER SETTING.
Lost last Thurs. morning in women's washroom, Buch. Finder
please   call   434-1457.   Reward.
LOST MENS GLASSES WHILE
hitchhiking from 10th and Wallace
to U.B.C. Brown plastic case. Phone
Neil  224-5230.
LOST ONE GREEN RING BINDER,
and "Way of All Flesh" Monday
afternoon. Contains all my course
notes which I need desperately.
Phone Frank 266-6574. Reward offered.
LOST—PICKETT YELLOW METAL
slide rule in black case in Hebb
theatre. Phone Jim 266-6076. Reward.
LOST:     1-.LACK    WALLET,     WED.,
Oct.  23/68.  Phone  987-3259. Reward.
LOST(?) ONE BROWN LEATHER
Jacket Saturday night at the A.D.
House. Finder please phone 224-
6961.   Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
14
CAN YOU HELP, NINE YEAR OLD
blind girl living in loco needs daily
ride to and from Jericho Hill School
(4100 West 4th), will pay $60 per
month for sure. Transportation. Call
936-5849   for   details.
HAVE CAR NEED PASSENGERS
from New Westminster or Lougheed
highway.   Call   521-8267.	
NEED PASSENGERS TO TORONTO.
Shorter hops O.K. Leaving Thurs
day, Oct. 31 or weekend. Manuel
228-8035 evenings.	
AUSTIN COOPER EQUIPMENT: 2
Dunlop GT Mags; 2 Cooper "S"
rims; 2 (new) Firestone 2 (Used)
Goodyear racing tires. John Humphreys. 224-9029. If not available
leave   number.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71    ,
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating &  Copying
32
ELECTION HANDBILLS AND ALL
other printing: Photo - Offset or
Mimeo. Ian 228 8427, Floyd. 224-5513,
Kirk 224-4938.
Miscellaneous
33
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
BUSES FOR CHARTER
Available   in  Vancouver
For Rates  That Please
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
580 Howe 684-0522
Home  Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
RECALL KELVIN BECKETT
gastown     soul
TAKE FIVE FOR TEN
THE   BLACK   CAT    IS   HAVING   A
Booze Ball — SUB Ballroom. Nov. 2,
LET US ENTERTAIN YOU! AT
The Autmumn Leaf, Nov. 1, 9-1,
SUB Ballroom, couples $3.00, guys
$2.00, gals $1.50. Tickets AMS and
door.  We're  licenced!
DO YOU WANT A PIANO OF Exceptional sonority? Come and try
our older type Heintzman upright.
Fine appearance, perfect condition,
magnificent  sound.   224-3073.	
MUST SELL SINGLE BED AND
mattress, unused. We're roomies'
again. Apply Duke or Geoff, Fort
Camp Hut 6, Room 37 or phone
224-9880.	
ELECTRIC GUITAR, DEARMON
pick-ups, Yamaha machine heads,
$65    or    trade    for    acoustic.    Phone
 738-7462 after  6. ■
IPR." WHITE STAR RS SKIS WITH
Nevada toe rocket heel, excellent
performance,   $120.   Phone   681-0070.
WOMAN'S SKI EQUIPMENT —
buckle boots (s.8), wood skis, poles,
jacket and pants (s.12). Perfect for
beginner or intermediate. Call 261-
4164 after  5 p.m. -
LANGE   SKI  BOOTS,   8%M,   BRAND
new.  $100. 261-1009.	
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'x4' TOP,
unpainted double pedestal desks,
each $29.50. New 252 coll single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West  Broadway RE «-<m2
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
YES, WE STILL HAVE COCONUT
oil best for your hair and skin. Plus
appointment service. Upper Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
6622.
HEAD 210 GS. MARKER HEEL AND
toe $90 or offer. Phone 261-415 3 ask
for  Peter.
The Han
diest Book on
Campui
BIRD
UBC's STUDENT
CALLS
TELEPHONE
Only 75c at
DIRECTORY
Bookstore & Publication
Office, SUB
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
3rd OR 4th YEAR MALE STUDENT.
Room, separate toilet, breakfast.
738-1087.
ON     CAMPUS,     $40.00.     KIT.     PRIV.
Close   to   meal   services,    TV.    2250
Wesbrook,    224-9662    —    224-0439    —
4-6 p.m.	
MALE STUD. SEN. BED & BREAK-
fast.    $50    packed    lunch    optional.
Large,   bright  room,   desk  &  closet.
Mrs.   E.   Stone,   4545  W.   6th   Ave.,
224-9460.
BEDROOM, WASHROOM, HOT-
plate in exchange for $25 per month
care   of   3   schoolage   children.   263-
7288.
Special Notices
15
SUSAN   S.   FROM   GRAND   FORKS.
please  phone   Dave   B.   255-0790.
WIGGY SYMPHONY SETS BEAT AT
the Autumn Deaf, Nov. 1, 9-1 in
SUB Ballroom. Couples $3.00, Stags
$1.50, $2.00. Tickets AMS and door.
We're   licenced.
EXCELL.    ENG.    200    NOTES    NOW
available   Section   A.   988-0847   after
p.m
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find It across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9422.
KNIGHT ERRANT, SOLAR CROSS
plea.se   contact  224-9031  Room  10.
'68 — INVITATION — '«_
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing1 (The Village) Canteens In the
Residences and the Information
desk at  S.U.B. $2.50.	
ALL CARIBBEAN STUDENTS —
Genera! Meeting, International
House.  Noon, October 31st.	
Travel Opportunities
18
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'60 ZEPHYR, GOOD COND., NEW
brakes, 7,000 miles since overhaul,
929-1874  after 6:30.  $275.
VAN. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
Union presents "No Reason to Stay"
Nov. 2. 8:00 p.m., Unitarian Church,
49th   &   Oak.   By   donation.	
HEROIN
is one of the freakiest songs ever and
you  can experience it at The Retinal
Circus when  the  Velvet  Underground
do up for the Halloween Bash Oct. 31.
Sewing & Alterations 38
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED  TYPIST — ESSAYS,
etc.   Reas.   rates.   Phone  738-7881.	
TYPING.    PHONE    731-7511.    9:00    TO
5:00.   After   6:00  —  266-6662.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640. 	
APEX TYPING SERVICE  (Mrs. Gow)
Mimeographing,   Typing
4370   West   10th   —   224-6033
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
would like babysitting or odd jobs
for weekends. Reasonable rates.
Phone   733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CHEMISTRY,
physics lessons given by excellent
tutors.  736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
Other languages offered. Phone 736-
6923.
TUTORING IN ENGLISH HISTORY
and French First and Second Year.
Reasonable rates. 733-4394 Evenings.
Room & Board
82
PRIVATE ROOM AND BOARD. Excellent for two boys, $80. Call Mrs.
Lim,  876-9169 evenings.
ROOM AND BOARD IN FAMILY
home. All meals, home privileges,
$80.   3336  W.   2nd,   RE   8-1696.
ROOM TO RENT, BOARD OPTION-
al. 224-6035.
ROOM & FULL BOARD FOR 2 MALE
students. Close to UBC. Call 224-
9201.
ROOM AND BOARD. EXCELLENT
meals. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
736-5030.
SINGLE WORKING GIRL OR STU-
dent to babysit Sundays and some
evenings, do dishes, make school
lunches for large family in pleasant
surroundings in return for room &
board -^ live in bed-sitting room —
fireplace—private bath. Year round
UBC campus area,  after 4, 224-3565
BOYS — SINGLE (DOUBLES)
Board optional not basement; a_>
facilities available. Chinese students
welcome. 2620 W. 10th Ave. 733-3678
phone after  3 p.m.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon      Fraternity     House,     good
food,   short   walk   to   classes,   quiet
hours enforced for study. Phone 228   .
9389   or   224-9841.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
ONE GIRL OVER 22 NEEDED NOV.
1 to share furnished 4-bedroom
house. Phone 688-3155,  after 4 p.m.,-_
GRAD STUDENT NEEDS FURNISH-
ed  suite.   Types  late.   736-0857.
SUITE TO SHARE. MALE ONLY $45
month. Light house keeping, cooking facilities. Private bath. Quiet,
clean, furnished. Close to UBC. Call
224-0417   at   4597   Belmont.
BUY -— SELL — RENT
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.U.B.

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