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The Ubyssey Feb 13, 2009

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Array Celebrating 90 years!
February 15,2009
Opinion Editorial Piece
ON
LEADERSHIP
by Elizabeth Bennett
It's midnight on a weeknight and I
should be either writing resumes
or dead to the world and dreaming. Unfortunately, the repetition
-r .L„  F„„m^^ io nnt aln.1  to COUnt-
25
THINGS
THAT ANNOY ME
ABOUT THE 25 THINGS
FAD ON FACEBOOK
UBC
PLAGIARISM
POLICY
GUILTY
UNTIL PROVEN
RANT
Special Edition
Supplement Coordinator: Pierce Nettling
HEY, I'M
WALKING
HERE!
ead the original scientific pro-
:edure or ethical guidelines
wi were to be summarized,
the iceberg. I have a long list of
reasons to dissuade prospective
applicants   from   pursuing   a"
A LESSON IN
ETIQUETTE
WHAT ARE
YOU
GOING TO
DO AFTER
GRADUATION?
by Trevor Record
AFFILIATION
IS NOT A
FOUR
LETTER
_WORD_
| MISCONCEPTIONS
BYSSEY
February 13,2009 \ www.ubyssey.ca
putting in shout-outs to imaginary girlfriends since 1918 | volume xc, number 38
UBC's official student newspaper is published Tuesdays and Fridays
ONE
MORE YEAR
DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE PARODIES 2010
HIGHLIGHTING HOMELESSNESS, POVERTY
"End Poverty. It's not a Game" reads the slogan of the
2009 Poverty Olympics, a parody ofthe 2010 Olympics that took place last Sunday This is the second
Poverty Olympics. The event aims to bring attention
to social housing and poverty issues in Vancouver
while simultaneously criticizing the Olympics.
BY TREVOR RECORD, NEWS STAFF
The Poverty Olympics began at the
Vancouver Area Network of Drug
Users (VANDU) building on Hastings. A marching band dressed
in outdated athletics wear began to play at
noon outside the building and people gathered around. Just a half hour later the group
had ballooned to well over a hundred and
the torch-carrying ceremony began.
Snaking out into the street, the gathering formed a great procession sweeping
through the intersection of Main and
Hastings before doubling back toward the
events venue. At intersections along the
way the "torch" (a prop) was passed from
one bearer to the next. Passing Oppen-
heimer Park, the torch was passed to Jacob
Rickley, an affiliate of the Carnegie Action
Project and a director at VANDU.
"I'm feeling really positive that I'm helping the community in this necessary action,
promoting issues which desperately need
to be focused on," Rickley said.
Eventually, the parade reached its
destination—the Vancouver Japanese
Language School. Inside the venue's main
hall, attendees hectically found seats as the
band continued to play. Representatives of
several local media outlets were setting up
cameras near the front ofthe venue. When
everyone had finished milling about and
were nnally seated, the ceremony began,
introduced by a man in a bedbug costume.
"This isn't the six billion dollar Olympics,
this is the six dollar Olympics," he said, opening the ceremonies.
He called himself Itchy the Bedbug (his
real name is Bob Sardie). He introduced
the other two Poverty Olympics Mascots:
Chewy the Rat, and Creepy the Cockroach.
Creepy the cockroach (real name Robert) is
part ofthe Carnegie Action Project, and was
one ofthe organizers the first year.
"The cockroach, the rat, and the bedbug, that's a part of everybody's life in the
Downtown Eastside. Those are the things
they deal with," Robert said after the events.
"People think that all they have to do is sit
around and take drugs, and that is such a
misconception."
Sarah Goode, from the Coast Salish Nation, took the stage and sung an anthem in
Salish, which was followed by a parody of
the national anthem titled "Poverty Olympics Anthem."
Wendy Pedersen the Carnegie Community Action Project (CCAP) explained that
the International Olympic Committee had
recently declined to put pressure onto the
city and province to put more funding into
social welfare projects.
"Hey Canadian governments," Pedersen
said, "just imagine all your peers tuning in
next year to watch a hockey game, and see
a bit of Canada. When the world comes to
Canada what will they see indeed?
SEE "POVERTY" ON PAGE 3
Participant carries symbolic torch, goh iromoto photo/the ubyssey
Lawsuits at UBC
Mind control, dead sperm
and parking tickets.
Page 5
Events
News
Features
Supplement
Culture
Editorial
Streeters
Letters
Games
Comics
Sports
2
3
5
6
8
10
10
10
11
11
12 2    EVENTS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
FEBRUARY I 3, 2009
Events
If you have an event, e-mail us at events@ubyssey.ca
February 13
Jazz Ensemble I • UBC's School
of Music's Jazz Ensemble 1 wil
present. • Feb. 13 @ 12- 1pm,
Location: Recital Hall, UBC Music
Building, 6361 Memorial Road,
Free Admission •
Heart Beat: Building Healthy
Relationships • The Canadian
Red Cross and AMS Sexual Assault
Support Centre are putting on an
afternoon of film and interactive
displays. They also have a chal-
enge: to break down the "wall
of relationship violence" through
personal pledges. • Feb. 13 @
1 - 4pm, Location: SUB Main Concourse and Norm Theatre, Free
Admissions •
Playoffs: Women's Volleyball •
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Brandon
Bobcats. The women will be
looking to capture their second
consecutive CIS Championship.
They will play a best-of-three playoff series against Brandon. This
series is the last time they will play
at home this season. • Feb. 13 @
4 - 6pm, Location: War Memorial
Gym, Cost: $10 adult/$4 youth &
senior/$2 UBC student •
Playoffs: Men's Basketball •
UBC Thunderbirds vs. SFU Clan
The Thunderbirds are looking to
garner their third consecutive CW
Championship. They are ranked
second in Canada and first in
the Canada West. • Feb. 13 @
7 - 9pm, Location: War Memorial
Gym, Cost: $10 adult/$4 youth &
senior/$2 UBC student •
Men's Hockey • UBC Thunderbirds vs. Regina Cougars • Feb.
13 @ 7:30 - 10pm, Location:
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre, Cost: $10 adult/$4 youth &
senior/$2 UBC student •
Interview Skills for International
Students • Learn how to sell your
self in an interview. Learn the best
methods of preparation. Also,
the workshop will provide you
with tips and tricks on answering tough questions. Find out
what employers are looking for
and how to make a great first
impression. • Feb. 13 @ 1 -2pm,
location: International House, Free
Admission •
A Masked Ball • UBC Opera
Ensemble will provide dinner
and entertainment and there wil
be opportunities for dancing on
stage. • Feb. 13 @ 7 - 9pm, Location: Chan Centre, Cost: $150
(includes $100 tax receipt) •
Zack and Miri Make a Porno *
Two lifelong platonic friends (Zack
and Miri) seek to ensure a steady
cash film by making an adult film
However, in the process of filming
they begin to discover that there
may be more than just friendship
between them. • Feb. 13 - 17 @
7-9 pm, Location: Norm Theatre,
Cost: $4 general admission, $2
members •
Australia • As Darwin, Australia
is being bombed during WW II by
the Japanese two individuals are
herding upwards of 2,000 head
of cattle across northern Australia
An English aristocrat reluctantly
came there to ensure she could
ward off a hostile takeover plot. •
Feb. 13- 17 @ 9-11:45 pm, Location: Norm Theatre, Cost: $4 general admission, $2 for members •
February 14
Exploring Christianity * An informal discussion group for those
seeking to explore the Bible. You
will not be required to read aloud,
pray or sing. Free coffee and
snacks will be provided. • Feb. 14
@ 9 - 11am, Location: SUB 113,
Free Admission •
UBC Botanical Garden Course:
Pruning • Learn how to prune
bushes, shrubs, and trees. Gain
confidence and knowledge and
ensure that your plants are in
good health. Advanced Registration for this event is required. •
Feb. 14 @ 9:30am - 12pm, Location: Botanical Garden Reception
Centre, 6804 South West Marine
Drive, Cost: $33 Garden Member
and $40 General Public •
Playoffs: Women's Volleyball •
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Brandon
Bobcats. The women will be
looking to capture their second
consecutive CIS Championship.
They will play a best-of-three playoff series against Brandon. This
series is the last time they will play
at home this season. • Feb. 14 @
4 - 6pm, Location: War Memorial
Gym, Cost: $10 adult/$4 youth &
senior/$2 UBC student •
Playoffs: Men's Basketball •
UBC Thunderbirds vs. SFU Clan
The Thunderbirds are looking to
garner their third consecutive CW
Championship. They are ranked
second in Canada and first in
the Canada West. • Feb. 14 @
7 - 9pm, Location: War Memorial
Gym, Cost: $10 adult/$4 youth &
senior/$2 UBC student •
Men's Hockey • UBC Thunderbirds vs. Regina Cougars • Feb.
14 @ 7:30 - 10pm, Location:
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre, Cost: $10 adult/$4 youth &
senior/$2 UBC student •
Jon Hassell & Dhafer Youssef
• Jon Hassell, composer and
trumpeter, will play music he
describes as mysterious, unique
hybrid of music both ancient and
digital, composed and improvised,
Eastern and Western. Dhafer
Youssef will present music rooted
in the Sufi tradition, along with
other mystical music. Youssef is
one of the most impressive voices
to emerge in the musical field
in recent memory. • Feb. 14 @
8pm, Location: Chan centre, Cost:
$54.50, student and senior prices
are available •
February 15
Off-Campus Work Permit Workshops • International students
seeking to work off campus
should come to learn how to gain
eligibility and complete required
forms. • Feb. 15 @ 1 - 2pm,
Location:lnternational House, Upper Lounge, Free Admission •
Playoffs: Women's Volleyball
(if necessary) • UBC Thunderbirds vs. Brandon Bobcats. The
women will be looking to capture
their second consecutive CIS
Championship. They will play a
best-of-three playoff series against
Brandon. This series is the last
time they will play at home this
season. • Feb. 15 @ 4- 6pm, Location: War Memorial Gym, Cost:
$ 10 adult/$4 youth & senior/$2
UBC student •
Playoffs: Men's Basketball (if
necessary) • UBC Thunderbirds
vs. SFU Clan The Thunderbirds are
looking to garner their third consecutive CW championship. They
are ranked second in Canada and
first in the Canada West. • Feb.
15 @ 7 - 9pm, Location: War Memorial Gym, Cost: $10 adult/$4
youth & senior/$2 UBC student •
February 16
TAs: Get New Ideas • Are you
an experienced TA looking to do
something new in the classroom?
Are you a new TA seeking to
develop an interactive classroom?
This program will provide a 3 hour
session on several topics geared
towards improving the classroom
environment. • Feb. 16 @ 9:30-
12:30pm, location: second floor
of Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Free Admission •
Work Your BA: Finding Summer Work • Career Services will
provide you with a new approach
when it comes to seeking a
summer job. Learn also how to
make the most of your summer
experiences and how your job wil
prepare you for the future. • Feb.
16- 18 @ 9:30 - 3pm, Location:
Scarfe 208, Cost: $15 before or
on February 11, $25 after •
February 1/
TAs: Marking & Evaluation * TAs
often evaluate student work but
do not define the form of assessment methods. The workshop
will explore the effectiveness of
common types of assessment
in university courses and their
equitableness. Also, the impact of
teaching and learning assessments
will be discussed • Feb. 17 @
1:30 - 4:30pm, location: second
floor of Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre, Free Admission •
Pre-Tenured Faculty: Build your
Teaching Portfolio • Teaching
portfolios document the teachers
have accomplished. These records
might inform teachers of what
has and has not "worked" in the
classrooms. These records can
mprove a teacher and aid the
development of your students. •
Feb. 17 @ 2:30 - 4:30pm, Location: TAG Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Free Admission •
February 18
TAs: Ethics & Effectiveness of
Group Work* Have you struggled
to get credit for your contribution
to a group project. Have other
members not carried their weight
in past group projects? Have your
struggled with evaluating a student's individual performance in a
group project? Come and discuss
the benefits of group projects and
how to maximize learning while
having student work in groups. •
Feb. 18 @ 1:30 - 4:30pm, Location: 2nd floor, Irving K. Barber
Learning Centre, Free Admission •
February 19
Meditation • Learn how to train
your mind to remain calm and
keep your mind focus on the task
at hand. • Feb. 18 @ 5 - 7pm,
Location: Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre Rm 157, Free Admission •
2009 CIS SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS • UBC is hosting the 2009
CIS Swimming Championships
25 universities will bring their top
swimmers to UBC to compete for
Canada's crown. UBC's women
will seek to capture their 12th
consecutive CIS championship
The men lost year to the Calgary
Dinos. Prior to the loss they had
won the men's CIS championship
for 10 consecutive years. • Feb.
19 - 21 @ 10am - 6pm, Location:
UBC Aquatic Centre, Free Admission •
Thh Ubyssey
February 13"', 2009
volume xc, n"38
Editorial Board
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We re on
Twitter!
We Want You!
Are you a UBC distance student
with a learning disability?
Want to be part of a research
study?
Contact PhD candidate Nancy
E. Black to receive an information package:
ruby77@interchange.ubc.ca
This could be your ad! Contact
our Advertisement Department at advertising@ubyssey.
ca for rates and availabilities!
Follow
us at:
twitter.com/
ubyssey.
COORDINATING EDITOR
Kellan Higgins: coordinating@uhyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Stephanie Findlay & Justin McElroy :
news@uhyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : culture@uhyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Shun Endo : sports@uhyssey.ca
FEATURES & PERSPECTIVES EDITOR
Joe Rayment: features@uhyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Goh Iromoto :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Paul Bucci:production@uhyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Celestian Rince: copy@uhysseyca
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Vacant: volunteers@uhysseyca
WEBMASTER
Adam Leggett: webmaster@uhyssey ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : multimedia@uhyssey.ca
Editorial Office
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.uhyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @uhyssey.ca
Business Office
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@uhyssey.ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Gerald Deo
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of British Columbia. It is published every Tuesday
and Friday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an
autonomous, democratically run student organization, and
all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey Publications
Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial
content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adherestoCUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please
include your phone number, student number and signature
(not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with
all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off atthe editorial officeofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and are run
according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written
by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is time
sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the identity of
the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissionsfor length and clarity. All letters must be
received by 12 noon the day before intended publication.
Letters received after this point will be published in the
following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or
other matter deemed relevant bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified
advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to
publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the
liability of the UPS will not be greaterthan the price pa id for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes
or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the
impact ofthe ad.
Contributors
Tara Martellaro and Samantha Jung both noted romantic
air that filled the Ubyssey office thisThursday. Reminiscing
about Valentine's Days past, Gerald Deo, Stephanie Findlay,
and Kathy Yan Li cut out pink and red cupidsto decoratethe
room. Meanwhile, Paul Bucci and Trevor Melanson poured
over Men's Vogue for six hours, devising their outfitsforthis
Saturday night. Celestian Rince, Shun Endo, Justin McElroy,
and Shawn Li discussed perhaps the most beloved Valentine's Day movie, Space Jam. Zoe Siegel, Megan Stewart,
Kellan Higgins and Trevor Record took turns on the karaoke
machine, competing for the best rendition of "At Last." In
the production room, Joe Rayment, Adam Leggett, Goh
Iromoto, and Ian Turner passed the tissues while watching
Pride and Prejudice for the seventeenth time. Kyrstin Bain,
Elizabeth Bennett, Isabel Ferraras and Katarina Grgic spent
the evening rebuffing the stream of suitors that came into
the office and Jorge Amigo, Belinda Li, and Claire Hanna
photographed them as they tearfully ran away. Kate Barbaria and Sarah Eden found Kristine Sostar, Charlyn Cruz
and Pierce Nettling in the broom closet dethorning roses
in a Naylorly fashion and applying glitter to Valentines for
all the Ubyssey staffers. At the end of the evening Jesse
Goodall, Alyzeela Khani, Shane Joshua Barter, and Keegan
Bursaw surprised all of the contributers with homemade
chocolate souffles. Tragically, all but one collapsed.
V
Canadian
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
printed on^100%
'recycledpaper FEBRUARY I 3,2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
Poverty Olympics play to record crowd
Event a lighthearted way of drawing attention to housing issues
CONT'D FROM "POVERTY" ON
PAGE1
This is what they will see: Hello
world, welcome to the third annual Poverty Olympics."
The first event was "Sweeping
Poverty Aside," a curling skit put
on by Streams of Justice, a Christian social justice organisation.
A team of "winning parties from
the 2010 Olympics" representing security, business interests,
VANOC and government partners
faced off against "team poverty"
representing the homeless, working poor, single parents and
disabled. The Olympic winners
continually "cheated" by using
"bylaw brooms" and other props
to clear their own impediments
such as "homelessness," while
blocking the path of the other by
putting down "red tape" and other
challenges which make things difficult for the poor.
Housing Hurdles, put on by
the Downtown Eastside Women's
Centre's "Power to Women," was
the next event. Single parent families and poverty-stricken women
struggled to get past hurdles including long wait lists and Downtown Eastside gentrification. Between the events, vocal quizzes on
statistics pertinent to the Poverty
Olympics were given by the mascots. "Over 9000 people go to the
Greater Vancouver Food Banks
each week," they said. "The same
number of families are on the wait
list for subsidized housing."
The third event was "Skating
around Poverty." It was put on
by volunteers from the Carnegie
Community Action Project (CCAP).
The event saw two men with paper
masks of Gordon Campbell and
Participant carries symbolic torch, goh iromoto photo/the ubyssey
Stephen Harper "skating" around
homeless people, representing
housing and poverty issues as
they rambled off 2010 Olympic
buzzwords and claims to BC's
greatness.
"Community Wrestling," was
the final event put on by the Four
Sisters Housing Co-op. Concord
Condos, represented by a full
grown man, fought "Community"
and the "Downtown Eastside,"
represented by Agnes and Joey,
two children. As he fought them,
he got frequent backroom kickbacks from his allies, villains Mr
and Mrs Con Dough.
Awards were given out during
a closing ceremony. Finally, two
cakes in the shape of a cockroach
and another in the shape of a rat
were presented. Although the
2009 Poverty Olympics attracted
some community members, it
was primarily put on to attract the
media to a set of issues. And with
a dozen or more local media outlets represented, the risk it poses
next year for the public image of
the Olympics was clear.
"The other thing we're doing
here, besides rallying our own
feelings, is we're putting the other
Olympics on notice," said Bob
Sardie, cake in hand, still in bedbug costume.
"We're getting set up for...
when all the international media
are here. They're going to be looking for other things to do than
cover....If [parties affiliated with
the Olympics] don't clean up their
act within the next year, we're going to come back and we'll put on
quite a show."
Wendy Pedersen says that if
there was a significant welfare
raise, it would "take the wind out
of their sails," negating the need
for third Poverty Olympics. A
welfare rate of $1300 per month
is what she is hoping for, a number she claims is the minimum
required to live, eat and have bus
fare in Vancouver. This would be
more than double the current welfare rate, $610.^3
Student Legal Fund Society comes to the radar
Thousands of dollars are put into the fund by students every year—for what?
by Megan Stewart
Culture Writer
An ideological tug-of-war could
generate ropeburn for the six
representatives elected to the
Student Legal Fund Society
(SLFS)—a semi-independent
AMS board controlling roughly
$300,000 collected from student
fees over the past decade.
Eleven candidates ran for
six board positions during a
campaign that had many voters
scratching their heads and asking, "SLFS—what's that?" Before
putting their name on the ballot,
some of the candidates asked
themselves the same question.
Aaron Sihota was re-elected
to the society for a third term
following the AMS elections last
week. He said the unexpected
rise in the number of candidates
is political and is partly tied to
April's KnollAid protest and the
campus group, Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS).
"From reading their platform
statements, [some candidates]
seem a bit radical in their approach and are focusing on a few
issues regarding that particular
incident [KnollAid]," Sihota said.
"They may not be representative
of the issues representing the
entire student body.
"It's a bit of a concern, I'd say."
However, the SLFS has a history of social justice and is mandated to both advocate and litigate on behalf of education and
access to education. The found
ers pursued the need for student
representation in a legal arena
following the 1997 APEC summit at UBC, which resulted in 42
arrests and a Public Complaints
Commission Inquiry. Also during the fall of 1997, four students
took UBC to court for violating
the province-wide freeze on tuition. The students won, and the
university was ordered to return
more than $ 1 million to students.
Amir Attaran was one of the
four who sued UBC. He also
campaigned for the fund, which
was established in March 1998
following a student referendum.
The fund is mandated "to
provide advisory, legal, and
financial assistance to fund, initiate and continue advocacy [...]
to improve education and access
to education at UBC and [...] set
broad precedent and concern
UBC students."
The fund collects $1 from
each student per year and has
done so for ten years. Sihota,
who was the only board member to run for re-election, said
roughly 40,000 students contribute each year and said the fund
hasn't spent more than $2,000
a year for several years. It's unclear how much money the fund
controls, but estimates hover
around $300,000.
Ed Durgan campaigned for a
seat on the SLFS after he learned
in May about the fund's legal services, deep pockets and potential
for social justice. An organiser
with both KnollAid rallies, Dur
gan was present when 20 student activists were arrested on
campus last April during a protest near the old bus loop. Neither Durgan nor any candidate
for the SLFS was arrested.
Durgan was not elected, but
campaigned on the promise "to
legitimise" the fund and initiate
litigation—as opposed to relying
on student groups to file an application for funding and advice.
The 20 arrested students had
lit a bonfire and the vast majority were eventually charged with
obstruction of a peace officer.
They eventually reached a deal
whereby the incident would be
erased from their criminal record in exchange for community
service and a written apology.
Several students had family
support, but a group of 12 are
represented by the non-profit
Pivot Legal Society and now face
an approximate total of $ 17,000
in legal fees.
The students filed an application to the SLFS for financial and
legal aid. They were denied. Sihota questioned whether the application fit the mandate of the
fund. But Stefanie Ratjen said
KnollAid was focused on access
to education, which is at the core
ofthe SLFS's mandate.
"The protest was fundamentally about campus development
and the corporatisation of the
university," she said. "That is
directly linked to issues of accessibility to the university, affordability to the university at large."
Ratjen, the outgoing AMS VP
External, also drew a number of
parallels between the APEC and
KnollAid protests, including the
reality that the RCMP's legal fees
were paid by the state in both cases.
Sihota campaigned to broaden
the mandate of the fund, which
is currently seeking legal opinion on RCMP jurisdiction over
liquor licences issued to campus.
"There has been a lot of talk and
opinion about the fun war on
campus," he said. "We find—in
terms of expanding our mandate
to the social issues—that groups
having more access to [places
where students can drink legally]
can create a more positive atmosphere on campus."
Durgan and Ratjen, who cited
a conflict of interest in her decision not to run for the SLFS, both
questioned Sihota's intention
to broaden the mandate and
criticized the seeming inaction
of the fund despite an estimated
$300,000 in student dollars.
With three of the six elected
representatives coming from a
group of candidates the Knoll
magazine endorsed, it seems
that there will be a sharp divide
within the SLFS this upcoming
year.
Sihota said it's only prudent
to head to court with ample financial resources, however, the
Fund's own bylaws cap spending
at $60,000 for any individual
case. The SLFS cannot amend its
mandate and some bylaws without approval of the AMS.
Oxfam UBC
raises food
awareness
by Chris Malmo
News Writer
Guests were certainly left hungry
for change the evening of February 10th at an innovative banquet
organized by members of the Oxfam UBC club to build awareness
about global food inequalities.
About 150 UBC students and
Vancouverites arrived for the
sold-out dinner at Performance
Works on Granville Island, choosing a playing card at random
from a table as they entered. This
draw determined where they
sat. Once inside, it appeared that
there were not enough tables to
accommodate the crowd. Two
tables stood on a raised platform,
surrounded by a few others at
ground level, while half a dozen
long rows of chairs stretched
out facing the stage. The silent
auction items, such as fair-trade
roses and local artwork, were laid
out along one wall. All proceeds
from these items, and the evening at large, went to Oxfam.
The nature of the gala became
clearer once everyone had been
seated and things got underway.
The bulk of the guests sat in the
rows of chairs while a lucky few
were at tables. As emcee Stephanie Gloyn explained, this was to
"provide an example...of how food
and other resources are inequitably distributed around the world."
The inequalities were borne
out on the menu as well. Each set
of diners represented a segment
of the world population, divided
into income brackets. The top two
tables, as the richest 15 per cent,
enjoyed a full three-course meal
from the Raincity Grill. The audience learned that this small proportion of the world's population
consumes 70 per cent of all grain
produced. The "middle-income"
group at the tables below them,
representing the next 2 5 per cent
of the world, were served squash
soup. This left the other 60 per
cent of the guests (including this
reporter) as the world's poorest,
who had to serve themselves a
modest plate of plain rice and
beans.
Oxfam UBC president Andra
Dediu said the stark contrast
between the high and middle
income menus was intended to
draw attention to the steep dropoff in wealth and access to food
that exists in the world.
This theme was further emphasized by Dr Shafik Dharamsi,
the keynote speaker for the
night and an assistant professor
of medicine at UBC. He challenged guests "not just to see the
world differently, but to be in it
differently.
"What does it mean to be hungry?" he asked.
For much of the world, the
reality is "a type of hunger that
most of us would never be able
to imagine," Dharamsi said. Gala
coordinator Caitlin Ohama-Dar-
cus provided a sobering picture
of this reality: about one child
dies every five seconds from lack
of proper nutrition.
Dediu offered some ideas for
following through on Dharamsi's
challenge. UBC students could
make a difference, she said,
by speaking to their local MP
about Canada's commitments to
foreign aid, fair trade and food
insecurity worldwide. She also
echoed speaker Colin Dring's
suggestions to buy equitable, local and sustainable food. *2I 4 | NEWS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
FEBRUARY I 3, 2009
News Briefs
UBC ENDOWMENT LOSES 20
PER CENT OF ITS VALUE
UBC president Stephen Toope
announced in a letter to the university released this Wednesday
that the university endowment
fund has lost roughly 20 per
cent of its value over the past
nine months due to the global
economic downturn. The net
amount available for spending
will decline by about 50 per
cent in the next fiscal year. The
endowment peaked at over $1
billion before the financial drop
in 2008.
The endowment fund is comprised of monetary gifts to the
university and land revenue
from the University Town community. To combat this loss,
the Board of Governors has
revised the Endowment policy
on February 5. This revision
"commits UBC to a stable payout of Endowment income that
preserves the gift against inflation," and will drop annual payments from the endownment
from five per cent of its total
value to three and a half. The
university anticipates individual endowments to regain their
lost value in the next ten years.
Toope also assures that student financial aid will not be
affected, although the budget
for funding is dropping by
$6.5 million. He also cites a
reduction of about around $ 15
million for various faculties
and colleges, with Tim Blair, a
student representative on the
Board of Governors, claiming
that Forestry and Graduate
Studies will be the only faculties
seriously hit.
"People ask me if the current
economic climate will knock
UBC off the remarkable upward
trajectory that our community
has travelled with enthusiasm
over the last few decades,"
Toope wrote. "My answer is
clear: not at all."
Toope also wrote that UBC
has a "sound financial base to
weather the global economic
storm," and that "prudent management of our endowment
funds has also allowed us to
fare better than most North
American academic institutions. Our new Endowment
Management Policy will help
us emerge even stronger when
conditions improve."
ATHLETIC FEES GO DOWN,
WAY DOWN
UBC athletic fees have been reduced for the next school year,
thanks in large part to outgoing
AMS president Michael Duncan
and Neal Yonson, a member of
the University Athletics Council.
Fees have been reduced in
a number of UBC REC categories, the most significant being
BirdCoop memberships, which
have been reduced from $148
to $25 for a four-month term.
These are the only two options
available for membership to the
gym, and they match up with the
academic school term. Students
must renew them each term.
Public skating at the Thunderbird Arena is now free as
well. Fees for hockey, figure
skating and drop-in skating
have also been reduced, from
$3.50 to $2.
A number of UBC REC event
fees have also been cut, including a reduction from $163 to
$100 for the annual Day of the
Longboat, and in various rates
for REC team sports.
These fees will be frozen for
three years. The mandatory athletic fee will go up two per cent
this year, but be frozen next
year.
ENGINEERS TO APPEAL TO
UNIVERSITY
The five engineering students arrested last week for their failed
attempt at their annual prank
are appealing to the President's
Advisory Committee on Student
Discipline.
The committee mainly deals
with academic disciplines, such
as cheating, according to dean of
Engineering Bruce Dunwoody—
but he said that it can also deal
with "non-academic" disciplines.
Dunwoody plans on meeting with
the students and preparing the
documentation necessary to present to the committee.
"The EUS wishes its members
the best in their legal proceedings
andhopes that they will be treated
in accordance with the light spirit
of their actions and not to the
full extent of the law," said EUS
president Chris McCann. "We will
continue to track the status of this
process and offer support where
possible."
—Samantha Jung
How much
money will you
save next year
on athletics fees?
BIRDCOOP 4 MONTH
MEMBERSHIP
$148.00
DAY OF THE LONGBOAT FEE
$100.00
$163.00
REC INTRAMURAL
$215.00
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fSWHf
i
m
The AMS hopes to gather information from forums to address international student issues and concerns, shawn li photo illustration/the ubyssey
AMS heads international
student initiative
First in a series of forums to
identify and address concerns
by Zoe Siegel
E-MAIL COORDINATING
US AT: (AT)UBYSSEY.CA
News Writer
Do you know what the AMS is doing for international students?
On Tuesday, January 27, AMS
VP external, Stefanie Ratjen and
Sneha Sethi, an student research
intern, led a forum for international students highlighting
important issues in an effort to
better address the needs of the
population who have come from
outside Canada.
UBC students from countries
all over the world attended the
forum and gave their input on
how the AMS can improve the
experiences of international
students. Some of the problems
that were raised were regarding
tuition costs, the Language Pro-
ficency Index (LPI), and health
insurance.
International students expressed concerns regarding
housing and the housing lottery.
Some of the students' concerns
were that they were unaware of
guaranteed housing at UBC or
they didn't know what to if they
did not get into the housing lottery. "It's just a totally different
world when you move to a different country from your country,"
stated third-year psychology student Nazanin Moghadami.
The LPI was a particularly
emotional subject. Students felt
that there is very little support
for students who have difficulty
passing the exam. Other students mentioned that the LPI discriminates against non-English
speakers. "UBC prides itself on
being an international school,
but the LPI is so prejudiced,"
stated Phoebe Wong, a first-year
Arts student.
"This is an ongoing issue. I'm
not convinced that it is a fair
representation of how well a
person speaks English. If it has
to happen there are other ways
of determining those. I know it's
a big issue," said Ratjen.
International students already must pass the TOEFL or
another English speaking equivalence test. AMS student senator
Azim Wazeer said that the LPI is
"redundant [and] taxing to international students."
Wazeer argues that the LPI
should be replaced with a higher
TOEFL score requirement. Wazeer and many other students
are working hard to change the
requirements for the future.
Students find the yearly raise
in tuition frustrating and difficult to adjust economically. For
domestic students, there is a 2
per cent cap on yearly tuition
increases, but the already expensive international student tuition
has no cap and can therefore
increase however much UBC
deems necessary.
Ratjen said "there is a mandate promoted by our current
government that views international students. It's a full cost recovery model. Because our government doesn't see it as their
duty to support international
students, they haven't posed any
restrictions as to how much they
can increase tuition."
According to a representative
at UBC Enrollment Services, international students are already
paying at least four and a half
times more than domestic students. "They know what they're in
for. It's a sacrifice, but they made
their choice," said an Enrollment
Services representative.
"The current method of international student fees do not
reflect the contributions that
international students make, I
don't think its fair and I know
that there are viable alternatives," said Ratjen.
The two per cent cap for domestic students may not continue beyond May 2009 depending
on the results from the provincial elections.
Ratjen hopes that this forum and forums like this will
facilitate dialogue and "fill the
gap that currently exists between
administration and current international student body."
Sethi, as part of her position as international student
research intern, is going to be
synthesizing all of the information gathered at forums like this
and preparing a document that
will be used to address some of
these issues. Thato Makgolane,
AMS Connect internal assistant,
was very motivated by the event,
"This is what we should be moving towards. [Ratjen and Sethi]
are working hard to create this
table where we can go and talk
about these issues."
Although there was not a large
turnout for this forum, Ratjen and
Sethi plan on having more forums
in order to better incorporate international student voices. Ratjen
encourages all international students to come to the next forum,
"The most people we get the better
it can be." Xi Features
Editor: Joe Rayment \ E-mail: features@ubyssey.ca
February 13,20091 Page S
by Joe Rayment
We fought the law
Ten years of lawsuits against UBC
Features Editor
2008: MIND CONTROL
Jerry Rose Jr sued UBC, along
with the RCMP, Microsoft,
Google, Telus, and Wal-Mart,
for, among other things, using "invasive brain computer
interface technology" on him
without his written or oral consent. The Nanaimo man sought
"$2,000,000,000,000 Billion" CAD
or USD, a red Ferrari and a black
Lamborghini. The case tied up
six people, all acting as counsel
for the various defendants, until
the judge ruled in their favour on
the basis that Rose's case made
no reasonable claims, and was
"frivolous and vexatious."
2008: TAKE THIS PARKING
TICKET, AND 30,000 OTHERS,
AND SHOVE IT!
In 2004, UBC towed and impounded accountant Daniel
Barbour's car. When Barbour
looked into it he found that the
university wouldn't release his
car until he paid $350, something he thought he'd already
resolved. He also found that UBC
might not have the right to issue
parking tickets in the first place.
Barbour launched a class-action
lawsuit, which includes every
person who UBC has given a ticket to since 1990, when UBC gave
itself the right to give tickets. A
judgment's expected soon.
2004: TUITION THAWING
Two MBA students sued the
school when their tuition went
up $21,000 between when they
were accepted to the school and
when they graduated. The rise
was only made possible after
the provincial government lifted
the tuition freeze in 2002. UBC
won this one. "Honestly, we were
surprised at the lawsuit because
the law is so clear in our favour,
and the courts vindicated that,"
Dennis Pavlich, UBC's VP external and legal affairs told the University of Waterloo Gazette at the
time. In the university's defence,
they did go to the bank to negotiate a very reasonable loan for the
students.
2003: POWERLESS AND ALL
DRIED UP
UBC lost 150 men's sperm during a May 2002 power outage.
The sperm was being stored by
UBC's Department of Obstetrics
and Gynecology. Eight months
later, when UBC finally notified
the affected sperm donors, it set
off a lawsuit. The original plaintiff put his sperm in UBC's bank
before going in for radiation
treatment for skin cancer. He
was worried the treatment would
make him sterile. He argued that
UBC was at fault for not having
proper backup generators. After
his story got out, others joined
the action. As far as we can tell,
this one's still going through the
courts.
1998: SCREW YOU, STUDENTS
Four UBC students forced the
university to refund $1 million
to students. The university had
raised its fees in violation of the
tuition freeze, which had been in
effect since 1996. The university
learned its lesson forever. y|
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J Culture
Editor: Trevor Melanson | E-mail: culture@ubyssey.ca
February 13,20091 Page 8
The Cromoli Brothers
Club PuSh hosts awkward but hilarious show
CD REVIEWS
by Kate Barbaria
Culture Staff
Last Tuesday Lukas Myers
showed the audience at Club
PuSh a comically tear-jerking
good time with "The Cromoli
Brothers Present: HELLO VANCOUVER! A Vaudeville Act for
These, Our Modern Times," his
one-man show, which he wrote,
directed and acted in. Myers
padded out onto the stage in a
tuxedo and fuzzy red socks,
ready to send us on a rollicking
journey through 15 hilarious, often awkward, and always embarrassing vignettes.
While the second Cromoli
brother never bothered to show
up (maybe he got tired of playing
with nude sock puppets), Myers soldiered on through skits
chosen at random by assholes
shouting from the comfortably
boozed-up crowd. These included the gems "Pilot Talk," a
heart-rending dialogue between
two bi-curious balloons sporting
Mexican wrestling masks, and
"Interview with Jesus," where the
audience realized they were actually totally unprepared should
the savior suddenly appear.
The peak of the evening was
when a friend was coerced into
coming on stage and blowing
into Myers's melodica for the
entirety of Bowie's "A Space Oddity," complete with white helmets, a ukulele solo and a spaceman in a tin can. We were at the
mercy of his excellent comedic
timing and caustic commentary.
But the vaudeville act was
really just a vehicle for a much
more sophisticated experience.
Myers created an environment
COURTESY of pilot.co.pilot
where the show sometimes fell
flat, or a joke didn't quite work
out. He deliberately put the audience in a state of confusion,
and the vignettes became self-
reflexive observations about the
nature of performance.
To end the night, Myers ran
through the crowd selling "Cum
Cloths," the label reading "For
When It's Love And A Little Bit
More." They came in assorted colours including beige, sandstone
and snow white (use the bleach
on that one, folks), and were sold
for two dollars each. It's in these
little deadpan moments that the
Cromoli Brothers come to life.
The Cromoli Brothers are a singular character, escorted in by
awkwardness and asked firmly
to leave for lewd and lascivious,
but altogether entertaining, behaviour. *2I
CARLOS DEL JUNCO
STEADY MOVIN'
If you like the harmonica, you're
probably going to like this album. Del Junco even includes
harp keys and positions in the
CD jacket, so that you can have
a jam session with your buddy
Carlos, I guess.
Steady Movin' gets off to an
unsteady start with an anaemic
boogie, followed by a jazz/surf-
rock fusion track that brings to
mind beach bums moving from
Santa Barbara to Napa and opening a vineyard.
The low point of the album
is when Havana-born Del Junco
attempts a Motown-infused
tribute titled "Mashed Potatoes
Canada," where he proceeds to
list various locations in Canada,
occasionally inserting the phrase
"mashed potatoes." Do they not
have starches in Cuba, comrade?
The second half of the album
picks up with a harmonica-based
rendition of "Amazing Grace,"
seemingly arranged for placement in a Cohen brothers' film.
The tracks that follow lack the
high concepts that fall flat on
their face in the first halfs execution. As a result the sound is
more robust and enjoyable.
The problem with Steady Movin' comes down to an emphasis
of showmanship and technical
skill over real passion and song
crafting.
MATT AND KIM
GRAND
Grand, by Matt and Kim, is an
album tailor-made for couples-
couples like Matt and Kim. With
their rhythm section pumping
out eclectic beats ranging from
clapping hands to trashcan
rattles, Grand is an upbeat journey through the streets of New
York, riding out a 12-hour White
Russian bender and skipping
school.
The lyrics range from obvious to nonsensical, but it doesn't
really matter since Matt mostly
mumbles. Kim's vocals shine
through in "Lessons Learned,"
when she sings "da, da, da."
Those are the most important
parts, anyway.
Since Matt and Kim get a little
precious, they throw in "Grinders," a chiptune track calculated
to appeal to males aged 18-36.
The unnecessary but highly
amusing NES throwback must
have been added to the mix as a
pacifier between the ladies and
their coke-bottle glasses-wearing
boyfriends.
It's by-the-book, keffiyeh-
adorned indie rock, pumped out
by the Brooklyn sound factories
to compete with electronica imports. But, oh man, it makes us
want to dance. *2I
—Trevor Record &
Kate Barbaria
CULTURE
Culture meetings are at 4PM
every Wednesday Come on by
AU ADVANTAGE 217: FLEXIBILITY
culture© Ubyssey.ca
Courses to keep you on the right course.
AU is the place to pick up the classes you need to get your degree.
Athabasca University is the perfect plug-in for your academic
career. Whether you need additional credits to graduate from
your institution, or prerequisites to complete your degree, we
can help.
AU offers over 700 courses and nearly 90 undergraduate and
graduate programs. With over 37,000 students across the
country and around the world, AU has helped numerous
standouts
www.athabascau.ca/standout
1-800-788-9041
individuals pursue their academic goals. And we'd love to
help you.
So why not take the next step? Research your options online,
view a university calendar, or contact AU's Information Centre
at 1-800-788-9041 for advice on how to get started.
Flexibility. Another reason why AU stands out as a global
leader in distance learning excellence.
Athabasca University^ FEBRUARY I 3,2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
CULTURE I 9
Championing Asian art in Vancouver
An interview with Hank Bull, director of the Asian art gallery Centre A
by Jorge Amigo
Culture Writer
The sole barrier separating
West Hastings Street and the
gallery space at Centre A is a
long glass wall that can be penetrated through a small door.
The interior, it seems, wants to
permeate the glass and fuse
with the outside. To a person
walking along the street, the attraction is inevitable. No lineups, no reception, no ticket
counter, no coat check, not a
single flight of stairs or even a
wall between the newcomer and
the art displayed at the Vancouver International Centre for
Contemporary Asian Art.
With a friend, I entered the
small door for the first time last
year to interview Hank Bull, the
director of Centre A. My first impression was that of a man who
feels uneasy in large spaces. As
we sat waiting on a couch in the
corner of the gallery, we realized that the size of the gallery
and the height of the ceilings
make it suitable for any type of
exhibition.
Bull appeared and, after a
brief explanation of our mission,
we began asking him the questions we had previously agreed
upon. But Bull is not a person
that can be easily bound and he
immediately escaped our script.
Almost apologetically, Bull
began by saying that Centre A
exists to break down barriers.
His intention is to facilitate
the transgression of traditional
museum roles by expanding the
field of cultural intervention. In
other words, the art should not
stop abruptly behind the doors
of the gallery, and the artist
should not bow to the traditional labour structure that hangs
over larger institutions. Bull envisions a place without hierarchies, where multitasking is the
norm, and where the artist and
his art are in constant dialogue
with the viewer, the bystander,
and with the street.
A decade ago, Bull took a
year-long trip to Asia to escape
the Paris-New York syndrome
and he came back with the
dream of creating an art go-to
centre in Vancouver that truly
reflected the ethnic composition of the city. He dreamt of
a place for new Asian artists
to legitimize their art, but also
for established artists to have
a platform for interaction with
the public. "Art is about people,"
Bull said as he explained that by
enabling residencies, the gallery
becomes a workshop for artists
who develop their art through
a constant interaction with the
gallery's visitors.
The door of the gallery
opened suddenly and a homeless resident of East Hastings
appeared behind us. She gave
us a joyful greeting and Bull
introduced her as one of the
honorary visitors to Centre A. In
an instant, the life of the streets
fused with the space of the gallery, marking the absurdity of
the outside/inside boundary.
"Our location is crucial," Bull
continued. The gallery is located
at the cultural heart of Vancouver, on the corner that divides
Gastown from Chinatown, West
from East. The street outside
is always vibrant, with people
walking or pushing shopping
carts. Anyone can walk in;
the door is always open. This
enables Centre A to receive
constant feedback from the
community it serves and, thus,
live up to the director's vision:
to build a pluralistic democracy
through art.
I was interested in knowing
how Centre A relates to the more
traditional Vancouver Art Gallery (VAG) and Bull explained
that partnerships are very common in this city. This led me to
ask how was Centre A different
and he was quick to deliver the
central response in our conversation: the VAG does not reflect
the ethnic reality of Vancouver.
Even if they cooperate, Centre A's main drive is to boost the
Asian presence in the city in order to fulfill its mission: "push
the boundaries of contemporary
art that question and complicate the construction of Asian
and Asian-Canadian cultural
identity."
Centre A does not settle on
a particular construction of
"Asian." It is crucial for the gallery's survival to maintain an
edge of transgression because,
as Bull puts it, "you don't want
to be an agent for liberation
and then become an instrument
of control." In this sense, "we
don't tell you what Asian is....
We're here to open the door to
exponents   of   'Asian'   without
defining it." After hearing this I
began to understand that Bull's
vision includes a constant battle
for ideas to redefine the cultural
environment of Vancouver.
Centre A is not only the setting,
but also the moderator and the
debater in this fight.
Bull is on a mission to reinvent the museum and to save the
Vancouver art scene from the
bounds of Western paradigms.
Luckily for us, he won't stop until
cultural diversity is sufficiently
represented in this city. *2I
We don't tell you
what Asian is....
We're here to Open
the door to exponents of Asian
without defining it.
—Hank Bull
8H1S Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
02.13.09
Last Day!
th
February 13
The AMS Valentine's Fair
has over 30 different vendors
with unique gifts and more!
SUB Main Floor
ams
sf Annual \
General
^Meeting^
February 26th, 12:30 p.m.
in the Norm Theatre.
Thank your outgoing Executives for
all their hard work and welcome
your incoming Executives!
Refreshments provided.
Annuals
February 24th, 8:00 p.m.
Pit Pub, UBC
Tickets:Ticketweb, Zulu, Outpost
$13.00 advance
Plants & Animals
March 18th, Biltmore Cabaret
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu,
Scratch, Red Cat
Great Lake
Swimmers
with Kate Maki
March 29th, St James Hall
March 30th, Norm Theatre
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu, Outpost
$15.00 advance
amseventsubc.com
O ROGERS
SAVE^^FARM
JOIN     THE    TREK
GREAT FARM TREK09
APRIL 7th
The Trek will depart from the
UBC Farm on south campus at
9:30 a.m. and trekkers will walk to the
Board of Governors meeting on campus.
Please join us at this family-friendly event to support the
farm remaining in its current size and location.
MINI STORAGE RENTALS
ON CAMPUS
Secure storage units
Variety of sizes available
Located directly on UBC campus
604.742.1052
Westpoint@Bastiondevelopment.com
6005 Walter Gage Road   Vancouver, BC Editorial
If you'd like to submit a letter, please contactfeedback@ubyssey.ca
February 13,2009 \ Page 10
AUS s wet dreams of ACF
The AUS council has got its knickers in a knot over a supposed
reincarnation of the most fantastically drunken, disorderly party
UBC has ever seen. The Facebook statuses ofthe most intimate Arts
hacks insinuate the return ofthe Arts County Fair could be near.
Regardless, this isn't your triumphant Dark Knight sort of return—it's more like kids playing with their Batman and Joker toys,
saying "the only sensible way to live in this world is without rules!"
This would be a lukewarm ACF at best, something that most would
sheepishly acknowledge.
There is no conceivable way that the AUS could host an event
of the magnitude of ACF. For one, seven weeks from the tentative
event date of April 3 is far too little time to plan a gargantuan
bash—planning for the stadium-sized ACF used to start in October,
not February. Support for another ACF is diminished in council, as
many council members are acutely aware of the financial hangover
from the last 16 years of partying.
Epic came at a price. Event costs—including first aid, ambulance, and security services—dramatically increased since ACF's
inception. Add a long-standing deficit to the equation with declining
ticket sales and voila: The AUS is still in debt $32,000.
In its day, ACF was the experience of a year for thousands of
students. We in our glorious mess were the envy of students across
the nation.
ACF wasn't just for Arts students, Commerce students, or Science students, it was for everyone of all faculties and all years.
Despite all those burger-flipping jokes about an Arts degree, the
AUS footed the bill for a year-end party that defined a unique UBC
experience 16 years running.
We recognize that ACF isn't coming back this year. Until this
whole debt thing is sorted out it probably won't. However, it's great
to hear that at least one student group is down to party in the name
of a good time. *2I
Blaming the budget
Popularity for the minority Conservative government has declined
approximately four points since October's election. Consequently,
Stephen Harper's party is now dead even with the opposition Liberals,
each having about 33 per cent ofthe nation's backing. It appears digging your head in the sand about the economy, starting a parliamentary crisis, and then flip-flopping on how much government intervention
is needed causes a drop in popularity. Who would've thunk it.
Desperate times require desperate changes, and the Conservatives
will have to create positive economic change if they want to stay in government for much longer. Harper has a lot to worry about, especially
from the opposition.
Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff has done well for his party so far,
galvanizing the public more than Dion ever did, and made the right
decision to support the budget conditionally—overturning the government at his first chance would have probably led us to another identical parliament.
Additionally problematic for Harper is the new budget itself, which
has been somewhat unpopular—although not unpopular enough to
take down the government. It will sink Canada into a rather sizable
deficit: $64 billion over two years, $40 billion of which will go toward
efforts to stimulate the economy. The massive deficit is in "anticipation
of significant economic challenges—including significant job losses—in
the year to come," the prime minister said.
But is it necessary? In 1945, then Prime Minister Mackenzie King
faced a debatably similar financial crisis after the war. His solution
was to create money and give interest-free loans to provinces and
municipalities, which proved highly, if a bit surprisingly, effective. An
economic boom ensued.
Whether or not something similar would even be feasible is probably impossible to say, and it's certainly a risky move. However, the
point is that there are always alternatives, and that putting the nation
$64 billion in debt is a risky move itsefl. For the last 15 years, we've
been told that fiscal responsibility is the most important thing the
government can do, and that no way, no how should we go back to
the spiralling deficits ofthe 70s and 80s. And as most of us university
students are young Canadians, we'll be the ones most responsible for
cleaning the mess.
In general, the budget has been problematic for university students.
It was revealed that the only agency that gives significant funding to
scientific research was left out of this year's budget. This combined
with the deficit resonates a common theme: a lack of consideration for
our nation's future—a future that current university students will be
largely responsible for.
All that being said, the country is amidst an economic crisis that has
no easy or obvious solution. This is a global crisis, and to paraphrase
Joe Biden, even if our government does everything right, there's still a
30 per cent chance it won't work. The Conservatives will live or die by
which way the economy moves in the near-future. And frankly, odds
are that they'll be playing the scapegoat—whether it's entirely warranted or not. *2I
Quote of the Day
When I heard about the
disqualification I was watching
the Vagina Monologues...so I
was shocked.
—Michael Duncan
by Katarina Grgic
Letters
IN RESPONSE TO OUR PRIDE
SUPPLEMENT
Dear Outweek Ubyssey
Coordinator,
Having admired last year's empowering and well-constructed
Pride Week Issue of The Ubyssey
for its diversity, honesty and realistic expression of queer issues
and joys, I was infuriated by this
year's attempt. With hundreds
of queer voices and writers on
campus, how could you fail so
profoundly? You explained the
numbingly generic theme "Out
and Wild" as an order for on-
campus queers to flaunt their
sexualities. This is extremely
problematic and disturbing:
having been co-opted by Cosmolike magazines which strongly
feminize the word, flaunt has
come to describe flippant, self-
exploitative and ostentatious
sexuality. It is offensively anti-
masculist and irresponsible to
Streeters
have a word usually reserved
for self-assertive and boastful
behaviour used to describe my
sexuality, especially when no
further explanation is provided.
The last thing we need is someone throwing the effete blanket
over all of queer sexuality again.
Even more enraging are
most of the articles that follow.
Grgic uses the words "gay" and
"queer" interchangeably with
negligible regard for their actual
(different!) meanings. Grgic and
Molly D both highlight Davie St.
as a so-called gaybourhood, even
further exemplifying a thick understanding of queer identity in
Vancouver. While the Davie village has a higher-concentration
of queer businesses, asserting
that Davie is more gay than
Robson is misinformed and moronic. Molly D goes on to position a lesbian politician's 'wife,'
'family' and political 'victory' as
strange and alien by using single
quotes persistently around these
terms; there are no words to describe this viewpoint but homophobic. In a paper that's meant
to give students a voice, specifically in this case LGBT students,
the presentation of these fought-
for rights as strange or unusual
is enraging and vehemently
empowers homophobia.
Molly D, whose anonymity is
troubling, goes on to muse that
"[t]he statement that the gay and
lesbian community are simply
like other people eases the fears
in many. It is a counterpart to
the multiculturalism in Canada."
Such a rashly backwards, misinformed, heterocentric generalization cannot be presented
as representative of any point-
of-view that is not inequitable,
homophobic and unabashedly
hateful.
—Parker McLean
English and Geography 4
What is your pet peeve?
Chrissy Taylor,
Psych/Family Studies 4
"When people
come outside
of buildings
and they stand
in big groups,
and they don't
move; so you
can't get in and
nobody else can
get out."
Matthew Doucette Riles
Arts 2
Marco Firme
Visual Arts 3
Kevin Chau
Science 1
Heidi Loos,
Arts 1
"You know those "People who "Definitely "When people
little cards...and don't throw slow walkers, walk really
they have puppies their recyclables because some- slowly up the
or kittens doing in the recycle times when stairs in front of
cutethingson bin...cause it's you're really in me...because
them, those make so easy to do a hurry...there's I'm trying to get
me so angry.... it and some some couple to class...and it's
They're cop outs; people still right in front of really frustrat-
they're not cute, don't." the stairs taking ing."
they're not funny, up the whole
no one wins, not thing, and you
even the puppies can't really get
or kittens." around."
—Coordinated by Tara Martellaro & Kathy Yan Li, with photos by Gerald Deo FEBRUARY I 3,2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
GAMES & COMICS     11
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SUScomic.com
by Michael Bround
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solution, tips and computer
programs at www.sudoku.com
HARD #2
su|do|ku
© Puzzles by Pappocom
Are you interested in making some comics?
Then e-mail us at production@ubyssey.ca
Crossword
ACROSS
1. Trio of goddesses of destiny
6. Detailed description for critique
10. Play divisions
14. Buddy, in Costa Rica
1 5. Lotion additive
16. The second largest denomination
of Islam
17. Alcoholic iced tea
19. Blood, in Quebec
20. Picnic pest
21. Borrowed money
22. Spider genus
24. into a false sense of security
25. Plait
26. Have a lofty goal
29. Supermodel characteristic
32. A row of strong cilia whose bases
are fused
33. Conversation connector
34. A grassy field
35. An undertaking
36. Look forward to
37. Belly button finding
38. A painter's output
39. Chiefly Mexican plant with a large
rosette of thick fleshy leaves
40. Distrustful
Aveeno's use
Growler
A Scottish landowner
Seeded
Daily planner
Chunk
Egg layer
41
43
44
45
46
48
49
52. Lady's man
53. The Ubyssey's Photo Editor
56. Competition
57. Unkn.
58. A major French river
59. Greek god of war
60. Horrible scent
61. Certain cactus
DOWN
1. la la la
2. Tolkein's Sindarin word for hill
3. Dye
4. Breakfast staple
5. Dirty something
6. Small North American evergreen
shrub
7. Blueprint
8. A long long time
9. The seed of a pine
10 "
11
12
13
18
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
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by Kyrstin Bain
36. Algae extract, used as a gelling
agent in foods
37. Skinny
39. Stomach feature that breaks down
food
40. Of humble birth
42. The capital of the Pays de la Loire
region of France
43. Lion's cry
45. Steal
46. Former capital of the Mogul empire
47. Sports stuff
48. Standard piece of footwear
49. Hula-_
50. Inactive Sicilian volcano
51. French word meaning Christmas
54. Single
55. An inverse ohm
Attack
Ornate ceiling light
Part of a fork
Narrative
Only
Intense anger
Part of a chain
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Function like
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WAY TO GO
EINSTEIN!
ICBC
autoplan
The ICBC Autoplan logo is a trade-mark of the Insurance
Corporation of British Columbia. All rights are reserved by the
Insurance Corporation of British Columbia.
Einstein was actually a genius who knew
squat about auto insurance. Sure he could
have figured it out by himself, but who has
the time to understand Extended Third Party
Liaibility when you have to get E to equal
that mcthingy?
We won't have the answers to your physics
questions, but we will have the relative facts
about the risk of being sued by a person
who holds you responsible for injury or
property damage.
Don't wait for your policy to expire. See your
on-campus ICBC Autoplan broker today.
University
Insurance Brokers
autoplan | tenants | condo | travel | medical
From UBC to Yaletown for your ICBC Autoplan and more, visit
University Insurance Brokers orYaletown Insurance Services.
University Insurance Brokers
5727 Dalhousie Road
Vancouver (University Village)
604-221-7080
Yaletown Insurance Services
1283 Pacific Blvd (corner of Drake)
Vancouver
604-899-0511 Soorts
Editor: Shun Endo | E-mail: sports@ubyssey.ca
February 13,20091 Page 12
Athletes ofthe Week
by Claire Hanna, Thunderbird Athletic Council
KELLAN HIGGINS PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
JODY SCHUURMAN,
WOMEN'S ROWING
At the Indoor Rowing Championships this past
weekend, Jody Schuurman of the UBC Women's
Rowing team helped her team to a victory in the
UBC Alumni and Corporate category. Not only
did she attain a personal best time in the event,
but she won the Premier's Athletic Award for
Women's Rowing, an award that will provide
funding and support to the UBC crew. Schuur-
man's performance this past weekend earned
her a spot at the Senior "A" Women's national
team training camp. *2I
SARATRELOAR,
WOMEN'S SOCCER
Sara Treloar of the UBC Women's Soccer team was a
major contributor to the UBC effort to defeat the Capilano Blues soccer team over the weekend. UBC dominated the Blues with a 4-0 shutout. Treloar scored two
goals, including the game winning goal, which was on
a breakaway. Not only is Treloar a tremendous soccer player, but she's also a major contributor to the
UBC athletic community, and holds a job in the athletic department. You can catch Treloar and the rest of
the Birds this weekend in Langley at Trinity Western
(TWU), where they take on the TWU Spartans and the
University of Alberta Pandas on Saturday. *2I
Birds crush Wolfpack     Playoff Schedule
Leanne Evans beat two Thompson Rivers defencemen for one of her
16 points in UBC's victory, keegan bursaw photo/the ubyssey
The Thunderbirds struggled through the first term of the 2008-09 campaign, as many teams failed to
meet expectations. The soccer team let go of their title as national champions and the football team
missed the playoff spot once again. But this term has been different, with all basketball and volleyball
teams qualifying for the playoffs. In particular, the Men's Basketball team has been displaying their
dominance in the Canada West, holding an astonishing 21-2 record and a proud first place in the Pacific
Division. The squad will head in to the playoffs this weekend with a clash-up against cross-town rival SFU.
Basketball Playoff Schedule (Men's and Women's)
Feb. 13-15 UBC vs. SFU (Best out of three) - At UBC. Division 1st Round
Feb. 20 - 22 Winner of SFU and UBC vs. Trinity Western and Victoria - Division Finals
Feb. 27 - Feb. 28  Division Winners and one Wild card - Canada West Final Four
Mar. 13-15        CIS Men's Championship - Carleton
Feb. 13-15 UBC vs. Victoria - At Victoria. Division 1st Round
Feb. 20 - 22 Winner of UBC and Victoria vs. winner of SFU and Trinity Western - Division Finals
Feb. 27 - Feb. 28 Canada West Women's Final Four
Mar. 6 - 8 CIS Women's Championship - Regina
Volleyball (Men's and Women's)
Feb. 13-15 UBC vs. Brandon (Women @ UBC, Men @ Brandon-best out of three) - 1 st Round
Feb. 20-21 Canada West Final Fours - Alberta
Feb. 26 - 28 CIS Women's Volleyball Championships - UNB
Feb. 27 - Mar 1    CIS Men's Volleyball Championships - Alberta
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