UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Apr 10, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128615.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128615.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128615-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128615-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128615-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128615-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128615-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128615-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128615-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128615.ris

Full Text

Array STEREOTYPES IN GENDERED GYMS P8
TEACHING POLICY P3
UBCO CUTS MANAGEMENT COURSES, DEAN WALKS OUT P4
/
f // Page 2
WHAT'S ON J    THISWEEK,MAY
THURSDAY   10
BANG! FESTIVAL
LAPTOP ORCHESTRA
12:30 P.M. @ MACINNES FIELD
It's an orchestra fit for the 21st century. Laptops are instruments in this
cefebration of works by UBC student
composers. They also play at 12,
12:30 and 2 p.m. Free.
FRIDAY ' 11
TERM 2 EXAMS START
8A.M. @ UBC CAMPUS
Classes are done, and now there
are just a few exams in front of
you until summerfreedom. Give
yourself plenty of time to get to
campus, don't stress out and
remember to set two alarms the
night before so you don't sleep
through it.
The cost of your tuition.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
SATURDAY ' 12
AUTHENTIC LISTENING
PLUS
7:30 P.M.® 1KB
To calm yourself during this
hectic time of year, explore the
true nature of listening through
meditation, reflection and active
participation. Listening skills may
help change the way you perceive
the world and yourself.
$75
ON
THE
COVER
We found out you can spend
$20 to get one thing from each
major food outlet—and still have
35 cents left over. Photo Carter
Brundage.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^|THE UBYSSEY
APRIL 10, 2014 | VOLUME XCV| ISSUE LIV
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams,
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
Mehryar Maalem, Jack Hauen,
Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers,
Nikos Wright, Milica Palinic
Jovana Vranic, Mackenzie
Walker, Kaveh Sarhangpour,
Steven Richards, Gabriel
Germaix, Jaime Hills, Jenny
Tan, Kaidie Williams, Rachel
Levy-McLaughlin, Maura
Forrest, Paul SJon
BUSINESS
Business
Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@
jbyssey.ca
604.822.668l
Ad Sales
MarkSha
advertising®
jbyssey.ca
604.822.1654
Ad Sales
Tiffany Tsao
webadvertisinc
@ubyssey.ca ~
604.822.1658
Accounts
Graham
McDonald
accounts®
jbyssey.ca
Editorial Office:
3UB24
SO 4.822.2301
Business Office:
3UB23
Student Union Buildinc
6138 SUB Boulevard ~
Vancouver. BCV6T1Z1
Web: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rritish Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
editsubmlss I ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
t is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society fails to
aublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
aaid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponsible for slight changes or ty-
aographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Urban studies prof Elvin Wyly stands in front of an aerial photo of Vancouver taken in 2002.
Elvin Wyly, man
about towns, cities
Ming Wong
Managing Editor, Print
Urban studies and geography
prof Elvin Wyly's course site is a
maze of information — a mix of
quotes he likes, urban geography
he finds interesting, movies and
songs that catch his attention. It's
an online extension of Wyly.
"Well, normal people are on
Facebook. For me, I just have
that," said Wyly, half-joking.
Wyly is the chair ofthe urban
studies program, an interdisciplinary area of study that deals
with the changing landscape,
problems and possibilities of city
life; this research is especially
important at a time in which the
majority ofthe world's population lives in cities. He started
teaching at UBC in 2002 and
helped restart the urban studies
program, which has been around
since 1971.
Growing up in a white, middle-class suburb in Washington, D.C., Wyly said cities were
problem areas that his parents
encouraged him to avoid — so
naturally, that's where he wanted
to go.
Wyly started out in civil
engineering at Penn State, but
after the first semester, he realized it wasn't for him. Instead,
he dove into a variety of arts
courses — history, philosophy,
art history — and what stuck was
human geography.
"It just dawned on me. The
story of being able to analyze and
tell a story [about] how places
develop in distinctive ways really
connected with me." Or, as he
says on his webpage, geography
to him is like music that "really reaches you — the stuff that
makes you get all Spinal Tap-y as
you turn up your amp to 11."
As an urban geographer,
Wyly's main research focuses on
gentrification, as well as housing-mortgage lending practices
in the U.S.
As a teacher, he doesn't shy
away from course evaluations.
He posts them on his course
page, not just because his mean
scores are in the high 4.5 range,
but because he finds the comments amusing. And they are;
one dating from 1999 said Wyly
is reminiscent of "Ned Flanders,
very perky, makes class interesting."
The comments are largely
positive and attest to Wyly's
passion for cities. However, this
positivity could also be attributed to the way Wyly trusts his
students. For instance, he asks
all students to write a promise
on the first page of their assignments that their work is not
plagiarized. "Take credit for your
hard work by declaring your honesty and integrity," he writes.
Wyly has reservations about
"academic robocops" like Turni-
tin; for him, they may grade
papers and catch plagiarism on
the surface, but take away the
human aspect of reading through
a person's ideas. He tells his
students to "write for an audience of humans," not for some
Internet program.
Another interactive element
in Wyly's teaching is the optional
walking tour of Vancouver he
leads, which passes through
downtown, Chinatown, Olympic
Village and more.
"All cities are unique, but Vancouver seems to be particularly distinctive," he said ofthe mix of past
(unceded Coast Salish territory)
and present (new buildings and the
hi-tech sector) in Vancouver.
As both an academic and a
Vancouverite — and in particular, a denizen ofthe 99 B-Line
bus — Wyly sees Vancouver as
a challenge.
"This is a problem with academics: we over-analyze everything.
Any good academic who's interested in cities [and] who spends
time in a rapidly changing city
will be constantly on the lookout
for remarkable new things,... and
Vancouver provides quite a few of
those." XI
o
fe
Read all of our previous Our Campus profiles online at
ubysseY-ca/features
Classes are done but we still
have one more print issuel
Pick it up on Apr. 14 to read
our top stories, people ofthe
year.
p^l Need to boost your income?
^"^ * W^Earn extra $$$ renting your dormant stuff
%£>Get up & running in minutes
\/r   Managed from your iPhone/iPad/iPod
B322EQ2HQ(!lDHiBBr
, ^*'»«^   ^gfft GB 6fi EOT
rrcemersi // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
TEACHING »
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
The policy encourages UBC instructors to distribute their teaching materials freely.
Faculty Association opposes new policy
Jovana Vranic
StaffWriter
The UBC Board of Governors has
recently approved a policy that
would make it easier for instructors
to share and use teaching materials,
but some faculty members oppose
the policy.
Policy 81 encourages, but does
not mandate, UBC instructors to
distribute their teaching materials
freely to other UBC instructors. The
policy was drafted in summer 2013,
and some voiced criticisms ofthe
policy during a comment period
from September to November.
The UBC Faculty Association has
expressed major concerns.
"The biggest issue is that the
policy allows the university to
basically share in ownership of an
individual's teaching materials,"
said Nancy Langton, president of
the Faculty Association.
Professors have always owned
the copyrights to their intellectual
property, and have had the option
to share their materials with colleagues. Things like syllabi, lesson
plans and exams created by UBC
professors canbe freely distributed
by the owner.
The Flexible Learning Initiative team says that Policy 81 will
not change any of these current
practices.
One major aim ofthe policy is "to
state clearly in the case of teaching materials that professors own
the copyright," said Hugh Brock,
the associate provost of academic
innovation at the Flexible Learning
Initiative.
"The second thing that happens
is that people share their teaching
materials," said Brock.
Brock said that in cases where
professors are frequently rotated,
instructors exchange their teaching
materials in order to easily transition into new courses. For those who
do not want to share, the new policy
will allow them to make their intellectual property completely private.
In order to restrict the sharing
of materials, professors will need to
fill out a form to opt out. Otherwise,
their name will be put down on a
searchable public database. From
there, interested individuals may
contact them to seek out materials.
"We would prefer if there was a
teaching materials repository," said
Langton. "Then any faculty member
that wanted to share teaching
materials simply depositfs] that
material into the repository."
A database of teaching materials
is only good if it is up to date, searchable and well-used, Brock said. "Professors are updating their courses
every year. The likelihood that we
could keep, curate and get people to
send to a repository is zero."
The Flexible Learning Initiative
team believes that the only necessary change would be to give instructors the opportunity to restrict
access to their materials.
"The point is, if you wanted to
share, you'd put it in a data bank,
and that would be the signal,"
said Langton.
The Faculty Association has
resisted the policy since its approval by the Board of Governors on
Feb. 20. It will be implemented on
the first day ofthe summer term
this year.
"On that day, the university
will have deemed that individuals
have given consent to have their
teaching materials used and revised,
unless they explicitly state that
they have not given this consent,"
said Langton.
The Faculty Association hopes
that the policy will be revoked in the
coming months. 31
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC study finds illegal fishing
source of up to 33 per cent of
U.S. wild fish imports
A UBC study found that between
one-fifth and one-third of wild-
caught seafood imported by the U.S.
may be caught by vessels engaging
in "pirate" fishing.
These vessels regularly ignore
domestic and international fishing
laws, fish in areas closed or restricted to commercial fishing, target
endangered and at-risk species, or
use illegal gear.
"This study reinforces what the
fishing industry, governments and
conservationists have been saying
for a long time: illegal fishing is a
major global problem and threatens
the long-term health of our oceans
and the livelihoods they support,"
said Michele Kuruc, VP for marine
conservation at World Wildlife Fund,
which helped underwrite the study.
The National Fisheries Institute
said it supports efforts to fight pirate
fishing, but is skeptical about the
numbers reported in the study.
How exercise boosts memory
A UBC study has found that brisk
walking for two hours each week may
help boost the hippocampus, the
area ofthe brain involved in learning and memory, in women at risk
of dementia.
Study particants were assigned to
twice-weekly, hour-long sessions of
brisk walking or resistance training.
Aftersix months, those in aerobic
training had better results.xi
CRIME »
Vehicle drives into
Staples, several
laptops stolen
Will McDonald
News Editor
Someone broke into the Staples in
the UBC Village after driving a car
into the building's doors, according
to campus RCMP.
The break and enter occurred
on April 5 around 5:30 a.m. RCMP
spokesperson Drew Grainger said
several laptops were stolen, but
police have yet to determine the
total value ofthe merchandise
and exactly how the break and
enter happened.
"It looks like a car was driven
into the rear doors," said Grainger.
Grainger said the car was gone
when police responded and they do
not have a description ofthe car or
who is responsible.
Staples confirmed the break in
occurred and items were stolen,
but refused to provide any more
details. XI
FIRST NATIONS »
Bacteria,
carcinogens in
traditionally
preserved meats,
study finds
A temporary door has replaced the one wrecked by the vehicle.
RTER BRUNDAGEAfflE UBYSSEY
PHOTO CHIAVATTI/FLICKR
The study found a large amount of bacteria in smoked meat products.
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
A recent UBC study looked at the
safety of meat products produced by
several First Nations communities
in B.C.
Spearheaded by UBC food
scientists Kevin Allen and David
Kitts, the two-year research project
examined the risks of eating meats
that have been prepared through
traditional preservation methods.
Many of these preparation styles,
including smoking salmon over a
fire in a wooden smokehouse, have
been part of First Nations culture
for centuries.
Patricia Hingston, food science
Ph.D. student and one ofthe students heading the microbiological
side ofthe research team, said
that her research team studied the
instances of pathogenic bacteria
in food.
"We were looking at how much
bacteria overall are present in dried
foods, smoked foods, raw foods and
some ofthe food that they produce
commercially," Hingston said.
According to Hingston, the study
found large numbers of pathogenic
bacteria, including E.coli, listeria
and coliform species, in many of
food products.
"This tells us that there's a problem in the handling method and in
the smoking method in general,"
Hingston said.
The study also showed that the
high heat in the smokehouse can result in the formation of polyaromat-
ic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chemicals
that have been shown to cause
cancer in laboratory animals.
While commercially used smokehouses have external generators
that control temperature and help
diminish the risk of carcinogens,
most ofthe traditional smokehouses
used by these First Nations communities do not have the technology
needed to control for PAHs.
Further research is expected to
show whether the PAHs released
through traditional smoking methods are at a level that is high enough
to pose any significant risk.
But since many of these traditional preservation methods are
central to the way of life of First
Nations communities in B.C.,
members ofthe research team
have been working with members
ofthe Lake Babiche Nation and
Nee Tahi Buhn communities to
examine catching, preparation and
preservation practices.
"What we're hoping by the end of
the study is to be able to work with
the communities to help improve
their food safety and look at some
ofthe methods that they're using
to see where these problems are
occurring and how they can get the
levels of dangerous bacteria lower,"
said Hingston.
The final study results are expected to be released in June 2015.31 4    I    NEWS    I   THURSDAY, APRIL 10,2014
UBCO»
Approximately 100 students waited for the dean to speak.
PHOTO COURTESY DAVID NIXON3THE PHOENIX
UBCO students angry after Faculty of
Management cuts three courses
David Nixon
The Phoenix
KELOWNA — At approximately 4:40 p.m. on April 7, the dean
of UBC Okanagan's Faculty of
Management, Roger Sugden, got
up and walked out of a room full
of management students, without
discussing what he came there for.
The move prompted negative
comments from students, including
one who yelled, "You're embarrassing, Roger!" as he left the room.
Those management students,
close to 100 in number, had been
waiting to hear why the faculty
announced on the last day of classes
that three fourth-year accounting
courses were cut. The meeting never
even began.
"I'm asking for this meeting, and
I'm only prepared to undertake it
this afternoon with students," said
Sugden, after he became aware of
the presence of two parents and two
reporters (one from the Phoenix and
one from Castanet).
Students said they'd like it to be
on public record, and that parents
who were supporting their children
should be included. Sugden refused
to budge on his position.
"Why does it matter?" said Jesse
Shopa, a fourth-year accounting
student. "The lack of transparency is
astounding right now. If you're such
a proponent of this move, you should
be able to support it in a public
forum."
Not five minutes after arriving,
Sugden walked out.
The parents in attendance had
happened to be on campus when
they heard about the cuts, so they
decided to attend. They asked that
their names not be included for their
children's sake. "For us as parents,
this is the third year.... I don't expect
this kind of decision to happen at
all in year three," said one mother.
"If they need to make changes,
especially management, they should
know b etter what kind of money
they have. It's very odd to all of
the sudden say, 'Oh, we ran out of
money'... What kind of dean is he?"
Many students stayed and
discussed the issue with each other
after the dean left. "I think for any
student who comes from outside
of Canada, or who has loans or
parents who are paying for their
education, it is questionable to make
such a decision without having due
information passed onto students
or any sort of communication or
consultation," said one international
student who preferred to remain
anonymous. "That is the basis of
this institution: communication and
consultation, and that's what we
expect from the faculty. But it is not
[being] received."
The meeting was on the heels of
the first formal announcement of
the cuts at 2:30 p.m. that day, in the
last third-year managerial accounting class ofthe year. There, Sugden
announced that the fourth-year tax,
audit and assurance, and advanced
financial accounting classes will
no longer be offered. Instead, one
accounting course, "Accounting
Savvy," will be added; it aims to
help management students work
in the professional world with
accountants. The cut was explained
as being due to "scarce resources."
Sugden also said the faculty lost
a key member in the accounting
program and would continue to lose
faculty members. That key member
was Sandy Hilton, who left UBCO
in the summer of 2013 to work with
Chartered Professional Accountants
(CPA) Canada.
Sugden said the program is not
cut despite the dropped courses, and
the faculty will help students find
other B.C. post-secondary institutions that offer the same courses.
This means students will either
have to complete three of their
accounting courses by correspondence, or go elsewhere for a semester.
Tutoring for those three courses
will also be made available.
Students were not receptive to
the announcement at the second
meeting, either; comments and
questions that protested the
faculty's decision were punctuated with room-filling applause,
table-banging and loud murmuring
from the 300 students there. They
questioned why the decision was
being announced so late, why there
was no phase-out and why it had to
happen at all. Students repeatedly
accused the dean of not answering
their questions properly. One
student also asked about co-op students, who will return in 2014 for
the second half of fourth-year accounting. Sugden said they would
address that individually with the
co-op students.
The accounting program was
set up to give students all ofthe
necessary prerequisites to start
their professional designation with
the CPA Canada program after
graduation, which is almost always
done in conjunction with working
for an accounting firm. Accounting
firms are the largest sponsors of
student-run business events like the
JDC West competition, as well as
the Provincial Rival Case Competition, which the Management
Student Association hosts. These
firms sponsor events because they
are interested in recruiting the best
of graduating accounting classes.
One UBCO student expressed
worry that this move would chase
away those firms.
The decision most affects
third-years enrolled in the
management degree, who were
supposed to choose their specialization over the summer. No one
was ever guaranteed a spot in the
accounting specialization, but
some students chose the faculty
specifically so that they could
focus on accounting and get their
professional designation.
Further information sessions
will be hosted at UBCO on April
8, 9 and 10. Sugden has stated that
neither press nor parents will be
permitted to attend those sessions
either, though he is willing to
meet individually with parents at
other times. The dean could not be
reached for comment as of press
time.
'ssss/jjfffiiiiititneittn* in     * mu%*\\\v*\\\\\\\^v\v\xxv\N>^^ II Culture
)R  RHYS EDWARDS
PARTIES »
A higher
education
6 life lessons we experienced and learned at this year's AMS Block Party
PHOTO STE ~ '
Rebel on a Mountain preached the power of side-parted hair.
Kent Loewen of The Crackling drummed for Dan Mangan after taking the spotlight.
Former English student Dan Mangan convinced the crowd to flip off an audience member.
Senior Lifestyle Writer Reyhana Heatherington shot some hoops with Shad before the
show.
PHOTO STEVEN RICITARDS,
Dan Mangan and co. supported this blowdoll as it deflated toward the end of the night.
DSAfflElfbKsW
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
A small white sheep flies through
the air, its legs frozen. A boisterous girl perches on her friend's
shoulders, high above the crowd
(maybe in more ways than one),
brandishing a small potted plant.
Much like the plant, fortunately,
the sheep was fake.
It could only be AMS Block
Party at UBC.
After a last-minute switch
back from Matthews to Maclnnes Field, the seventh annual
Block Party took place this past
Tuesday. Though the forecast
called for rain, the brilliant sun
shone down on the throngs of
students rejoicing in the symbolic start of summer. If the haphazardly applied neon face paint
and cliched festival garb weren't
enough evidence that classes
were finished, the impromptu
beach ball soccer brought a real
August-y flavour to the day. As
much as formal classes were
over, however, it was truly a day
of lessons for this Ubyssey writer.
Lesson #i: Part your hair
on the right to show you
are marriage material.
This advice came from the
winner ofthe AMS Last Band
Standing competition. Rebel on
a Mountain opened the event
with their indie-rock set. Lead
vocalist Kristian Wagner maintains that the way you part your
hair contributes to the quality
of relationship you are capable
of maintaining. For the record,
right-side parts are equated with
long-term partner material. So
keep that in mind as you search
for a mate.
Lesson #2: Jocks don't
respond well to mockery.
This lesson was courtesy of The
Crackling frontman Kenton
Loewan. In an effort to entice the
not-yet-drunk-and-wild crowd
closer to the stage, Loewan imitated a jock who stood near the
back ofthe field with his arms
crossed. Though it was an admirable attempt at crowd engagement, the dude stood his ground.
Lesson #3: Not only can
Shad make a crowd rock,
he can ball.
One ofthe few things I share
with hip-hop great Shad (apart
from our Juno nominations,
natch) is that we played basketball in high school. Yes, I managed to get a few baskets off him
during our one-on-one showdown in the Rec Centre, but man,
can he sink threes.
Lesson #4: Inflatable
advertising is always
funny
UBC alum Dan Mangan and his
friends did their best to hold up
the giant blow-up Molson beer
bottle backstage as it slowly
deflated.
Lesson #5: Stage crew
work harder than anyone
and see weird sides of
performers.
The coolest dudes were the stage
crew hired to take down the
stage as soon as Adventure Club
stepped away from the turntables. It would take them somewhere between four to six hours
to disassemble the stage. But
when your job includes talking
to Billy Joel about his motorbike
collection, it can't be all bad.
Lesson #6: Avoid staring
at drink-cup carnage.
On my way out, the satisfying
crack of crushed drink cups
beneath my boots served as a
reminder ofthe brain cells lost
to alcohol that fateful night. So
if you wish to remain blissfully
unaware ofthe amount of alcohol
you consumed, when the last
note echoes over the field, run,
and don't look back. Vt
Online Graduate Certificate Programs
JUSTICE
INSTITUTE
O/BRITISH COLUMBIA
INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS
TACTICAL CRIMINAL ANALYSIS
Expand your credentials and advance your career with
these online graduate certificates. Learn through real world
challenges, current cases, curriculum and techniques.
Gain the specialized theoretical foundation and applied skills
to function successfully as an analyst.
JIBC.ca/graduatestudies
604.528.5843 ■**..
25%
■3
^
75%
33%
A
^
67% THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014    I    CULTURE
PHOTO RHYS EDWARDS/THE UBYSSEY
Famed local bar chain BierCraft will be opening at the Wesbrook Village in July.
Belgian brews
BierCraft comes to Wesbrook
JESSICA-CHRISTIN
HAMETNER
Food
With over 120 Belgian and craft
beers, local cask beer pourings and
a regionally inspired menu of tapas
and bistro food, popular beer purveyor BierCraft is set to open its
doors at UBC's Wesbrook Village
at the end of July.
Dean Mallei, the brain behind
BierCraft, regards the brand as a
catch-all that appeals to everyone
rather than singling out certain
individuals. From people strolling
from Wreck Beach on a summer
day to the Wesbrook Village resident across the street fancying a
bite to eat, BierCraft hopes to fill
the gap in UBC's pub scene.
"The way we're going to do this
is by not only providing moderate
price points that — and I don't
want to say we're cheap, because
everybody has to make their
margins — provide good value for
everybody that's here," said Mallei.
Right now, the Wesbrook
Village BierCraft is a vast, empty
space. As Mallei guided me
through the concrete expanse,
I was taken on a visual journey;
Mallei described walking into a
vestibule with a window to the
right, through which one could
glimpse a space inspired by
1930s Parisian smoking rooms.
Flocked wallpaper, big chandeliers and reclaimed flooring from
Squamish add a touch of kitsch
and cool to the dining room, which
will serve hearty comfort foods
like burgers and mac n' cheese.
Mallei says it will be comfortable
and unpretentious.
As we continue wandering
through the hollow space, Mallei
pointed out a large expanse that
will be oriented towards students
and socializing. He described a
industrial-1940s-meets-beerfest
theme, with big columns and
Bavarian-inspired beams meant
to make visitors feel as if they are
in a slice of Munich's Oktoberfest,
singing along to folk songs and
drinking good beer.
Of course, the bar will be the
focal point. With 32 draft taps and
a further 200 beers in bottles, the
Wesbrook BierCraft will offer 50
per cent northwest craft and 50
per cent import beer, largely from
Belgium and Germany.
"We understand that students
have limited means and budgets,
so we offer a variety of products at
a variety of prices so that people
can experiment," said Mallei. "So
what we try and do is push the
local craft and offer beers like
33 Acres or Bomber and all-new
microbreweries so that people can
actually drink high quality beer
that is competitively priced."
While BierCraft may seem like
a potential threat to UBC's own
future brewery at the Farm, UBC
Brewing Club president Kerry
Dyson disagrees.
"It's something that's really exciting. For a longtime, UBC didn't
have a lot of places to go and get a
pint, and now it's getting a lot better. There are places that you can
go get good beer as opposed to just
cheap beer," said Dyson. "With
BierCraft, it's one of those really
nice opportunities that you can try
beers from around the world that
are really hard to find in British
Columbia, let alone on campus."
While imported beer is sophisticated and in demand, its prices
are often not quite as popular.
Mallei assures students, however, that there will be discounts
for the UBC community to look
forward to.
"We'll make sure students are
included, and we really believe in
community involvement, and in
that regard particularly sponsorships with UBC athletics or
with any local sports team here.
We'll work with everybody to try
and integrate ourselves into the
community," said Mallei.
Community is at the heart
of both BierCraft and the UBC
Brewing Club, and rather than
seeing each other as competition,
working together is the recipe for
success, Dyson said.
"We're all working together for
a cause. We want to educate the
public and we want to provide an
excellent product that we'll be able
to appreciate, so right now you see
a lot of collaborations with different breweries working together,"
said Dyson. "It is not so much a
competition but working together.
If anything, we're looking forward
to have another place to go out for
a drink."
We certainly are, and as Mallei
said to UBC students hungry for
a little more fun: "We'll give you
guys something to do. I promise
that." V
THEATRE»
Love isn't blind in Optica Delusions
Wife of UBC prez stages musical with opera
Gabriel Germaix
StaffWriter
Two countries torn apart by war
and bigotry. Between them stands
a tree — Reverend Sym. A. Tree, to
be precise.
In her family-friendly musical,
playwright and director Paula
Rosen separates right from left
in a pun-intensive performance.
Baptized Optica Delusions, it will
be performed by the cast of UBC
Opera on April 11 and 12 at the
Old Auditorium.
"I decided it would be fun to
have a play where there is a tree
that is a lead part," explained
Rosen. Overturning the traditional "third tree on the left" stage
role is not the only original idea
in this production: Rosen's pop
take on a Romeo and Juliet-esque
love story sees Seymour, prince of
a country where people have only
a left eye, fall in love with Iris,
right-eyed princess ofthe Kingdom of Right. Supporting characters include Seymour's best friend,
Emmett the robot, who breaks
down when he reads illogical data,
and of course Sym. A. Tree, who
sings, "Bigotry is the biggest tree
of all."
Rosen, who is outgoing UBC
president Stephen Toope's wife,
said the idea for the musical dates
back to her and Toope's engagement. She worked in an elementary school at the time, and the
story was a hit with the kids — and
with Toope.
"We come from rather different
backgrounds,... and the story came
to my mind about a right-eyed princess who comes from a community
and a left-eyed prince who comes
from a different community," said
Rosen. "Stephen... allowed me to
adapt the story into a song, which
In Optica Delusions, a prince and princess from opposite kingdoms overcome their
differences to see each other on equal terms.
we sang in a duet at our wedding,"
Rosen said, laughing.
When she came to UBC, Rosen
decided to devote herself to the
difficult path of writing musical
theatre. Nancy Hermiston, head
of UBC Opera, helped her fulfill
her dream.
"Nancy knows how hard I have
tried in many different areas....
This is her way of letting me see
what I have achieved."
Optica Delusions is Rosen's
second full-length musical. It was
first staged by Kitsilano High
School four years ago, with the
help of Hermiston.
UBC Opera music director Richard Epp is conducting the piece.
It is his first foray into musical
theatre, after staging operas
such as The Magic Flute. During
rehearsals for Optica Delusions,
he saw the initially skeptical UBC
opera students become more and
more involved as the musical
took shape.
"[The students] were a little
perplexed by it," Epp said. "It's not
Mozart, it's not Verdi. Now that
we are running it, I think they are
enjoying it more,... seeing what the
whole show is like."
Of course, the elementary
school kids who saw last Friday's
$5 matinee don't care — they will
just sing the catchy tunes. Vt
BCJ>CSW
British Columbia
College of Social Workers
Attention Social Work Students
The BC College of Social Workers, the regulatory body for
social work in the province of BC, is changing the requirements
for registration. This change may affect students in the school
of social work and your ability to become a social worker in BC.
Effective September 1, 2015 all applicants for registration will
be required to successfully complete a licensure examination
to become registered. Details about the exam may be found at
www. aswb.org/exam-candidates.
We encourage students, who wish to become registered,
to speak with advisors and faculty so as to ensure appropriate
preparation for the examination.
For more information visit:
www.bccsw.ca or contact the College office.
BC College of Social Workers
in Vancouver 604-737-4916
Toll free 1-877-576-6740 EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
// Sports + Rec
FITNESS »
Gendered gyms: how equipment layout reinforces stereotypes
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Are you fat or thin? Fit or flabby?
Healthy or unhealthy?
The fitness industry, like wider
society, is built on binaries, and
gender is just another one of them.
From the way gyms are laid out to
how fitness classes are marketed
to patrons, the workout industry often separates the male and
female experience.
Victoria Felkar is a personal
trainer, bodybuilder and UBC kinesiology grad student who focuses
on sociocultural issues in fitness in
her academic work. She has been
in the fitness industry for nine
years, including nearly two years
at the UBC BirdCoop.
Felkar competed in ballet for a
decade, but switched to weight-
lifting when her body type didn't
conform to the ballet norms.
In bodybuilding, she found her
niche and experienced an "almost
cathartic output" while training. Through bodybuilding, the
self-described "meathead" said her
physical appearance matched her
internal strength.
"The body that I had embodied
how I felt," Felkar said.
"m now sitting on that
bike and I'm looking
over the field of men
traning weights
and grunting and
growling and all of
the bromance. That's
not exactly the most
inviting environment,
especially if we're
trying to break down
these cultural binaries
ofthe gendered gym
environment.
Victoria Felkar
UBC kinesiology grad student and
personal trainer
Unlike many gyms, the UBC Weightlifting and Powerlifting Club fosters a team mentality that actively encourages women to lift weights.
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
"Within the subculture of gyms,
though, a lot of it goes back to how
the actual body is gendered in the
form of 'men lift weights to become muscular, women do cardio
to become skinny or fit,'" she said.
The organization of space
in gyms can contribute to this
stereotype; in many gyms, cardio
machines are lined up on one
side ofthe room and face the
large weight machines. Through
a gendered lens, this can be seen
as reinforcing the gender binary,
particularly for females who focus
exclusively on cardio in an effort
to avoid "bulk."
Summer - Co-op Terms - Studying Abroad?
k Visit our website.
www.onestepstorage.ca
age
*
Student Storage Solutions
One Step's Mobile Locker
simplifies storage for
students:
^ Convenient delivery
>- Affordable
>- Secure
E-mail: info@onestepstorage.ca Hotline: (604) 204-0001
"I'm now sitting on that bike
and I'm looking over the field
of men training weights and
grunting and growling and all
ofthe bromance," Felkar said.
"That's not exactly the most inviting environment, especially if
we're trying to break down these
cultural binaries ofthe gendered
gym environment."
"It's guys on this side, girls on
that side," said Mitchell Kong,
second-year kinesiology student and
a regular at the BirdCoop, gesturing
to the two opposite sides ofthe gym.
Depending on designers and
management, gyms can break
down these problematic binaries
through open-concept spaces. In
a functional layout design, mixing
equipment is one way to encourage
camaraderie in gyms.
"If you think open concept,
you don't have segregated areas....
Everything is a lot more dynamic,"
Felkar said.
NAVIGATING THE
GENDERED SPACE
Amanda Wanner, a library and
information sciences grad student,
does powerlifting and weight-
lifting at the gym three to five
times per week. Exercises in these
activities include squats, deadlifts,
bench presses, the snatch and the
clean and jerk.
Wanner and her workout
buddy went to Felkar to create a
workout plan.
"The reason that we went to a
trainer is because I think we felt a
little bit intimidated going into the
'men's' section of a gym," she said.
Felkar's plan helped them gain
confidence and begin weightlifting
in gyms as well as with the UBC
Weightlifting and Powerlifting
Club. At the BirdCoop, though,
Wanner noticed the equipment
layout can be problematic for
certain workouts.
"I find it difficult sometimes, because the layout ofthe gym is really
confusing at the BirdCoop, because
the free weights and the dumbbells
are split up in two," Wanner said.
Like Felkar, Wanner noted
how the spatial factors in the gym
affect the social constructs of how
we think about gender.
"The light weights are all the way
across the gym, so you have to lug a
set of weights all the way across the
gym," she said. "The implication of
that is that if you're over here you
do light weights, and if you're over
there you do heavy weights."
when the Ubyssey spoke recently with yoga instructor Michael
Olivotto ("Practising safely with
the UBC Yoga Club," Feb. 27), he
described the gendered experience of many gyms, saying, "We're
so used to having, especially in
our workout environment, a very
male-dominated space."
Newer exercise fads also
shape the demand for certain
workout regimens.
"Because of Crossfit and that
kind of thing, I think a lot of women
are really interested in lifting heavy
weights. It has become a bigger
cultural thing," Wanner said. "But I
think people still are nervous to go
into those sections ofthe gym and
they don't know how to start.
"I think there's a real opportunity
for the BirdCoop, being on an educational campus where we have all
sorts of people with expert knowledge in these areas, to be offering
strength training for women [and]
weightlifting for women," she said.
As a female weightlifter of smaller stature, Wanner was excited to
see new equipment appear at the
BirdCoop recently — particularly
the lighter-weight bumper plates
that make Olympic weightlifting
possible for smaller people.
"It was like Christmas, Halloween and my birthday all in one. I
was so excited," she said.
In an effort to break down
stereotypes around gender, gyms
can include programming opportunities that benefit from the
"untapped market" that includes
beginner weightlifters, especially
on university campuses like UBC,
where many gym patrons are
students who don't have money to
spend on programs like Crossfit.
MOVING FORWARD
AMS designer Michael Kingsmill
said the repurposed Student Union
Building, or the Student Life
Centre, will contain an offshoot of
the BirdCoop.
"Because the BirdCoop ... has
such an overwhelming demand,
they're goingto create an area in
the lower level just where the current CopyRight is located," he said.
"That area is goingto be turned
into an extension or an annex of
the BirdCoop."
For now, the 5,000-7,000
square-foot rectangular area
on the plan is reserved for this
additional fitness area. The
layout inside will be decided by
operational staff.
According to Kingsmill,
equipment layout planning in the
BirdCoop annex will happen in
the next few months and the space
will be finished around September
2016 at the earliest.
Perhaps with an increased
awareness ofthe existing binaries in gym layout, UBC can move
towards a more fluid continuum
of how gender is constructed in
the gym.
When Felkar works out, males
often approach her with concerns
for her safety, saying, "You're lifting
too much," or questioning why she
bodybuilds without competing. She
responds with the question, "What
is too much?"
The constant questioning of space
we take for granted is a powerful tool as we go about our daily
routines. For people like Felkar, it
doesn't have to be about fat or thin,
male or female, but rather individual
experiences and overall health.
"At the end ofthe day, the
fitness industry's main goal should
be about working with people,
helping people, creating knowledge ... and not recreating stereotypes about the female body, [but]
breaking them down." XI
The BirdCoop did not respond to
requests for comment by press time. THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014    |    SPORTS + REC
VOLLEYBALL»
Former T-Bird Blair Bann making most of pro volleyball career
Noah Derksen
Contributor
After a successful varsity career
with the UBC Thunderbirds men's
volleyball team, Blair Bann has
gone onto become a professional
athlete with enough widespread
exposure to be recognized with a
page on Wikipedia.
"A fan and media person made
it for me last year [in Germany],"
said Bann. "Volleyball is a lot
bigger in Europe and there are a
lot of fans."
Three years after donning the
Thunderbird jersey for the last
time, the former UBC kinesiology
student finds himself doing much
ofthe same in a new environment.
Since being named UBC's graduating athlete ofthe year in 2011,
Bann has continued his streak of
excellence and has now landed
himself a professional volleyball
career overseas.
Self-described as a "competitive and loud" child, 26-year-old
Bann had high aspirations of
becoming a professional athlete
from a very young age. Exchanging the hardwood of JH Picard
School in Edmonton, Alberta for
UBC's War Memorial Gym was
instrumental in his path towards
athletic prowess.
Upon arriving at UBC, Bann
showed great skill and enormous
potential. He immediately found
himself filling the role of starting
libero on the team, where he flourished throughout his university
career. During most of his five seasons with the Thunderbirds, Bann
led the CIS in every statistical
category feasible in his position as
a libero, widening the margin over
his competitors each year. For his
dominance, Bann was named the
Canada West conference libero
ofthe year four ofthe five years
he played and the nationwide
CIS libero ofthe year for three of
those.
"Volleyball isn't who I am, it's
what I do. But I want to be great
at everything I do," said Bann,
who to this day holds the Canada
West and CIS record for all-time
career digs (1,018) — over 250
more than the next player in the
record books.
After graduation, Bann spent
a year at Volleyball Canada's
full-time training centre in
Gatineau, Quebec. Since joining
the Canadian national team in
2009, he has travelled around the
world with the sport. He's competed at two Universiade Games
in Serbia and China, the 2011
Pan Am Games in Mexico and
most recently the International
Federation of Volleyball (FIVB)
World League, with which he has
toured Brazil, Finland, Japan and
Argentina.
Despite matches in many exotic
places, one of Bann's favourite
memories ofthe sport happened
right here in Canada. When the
North, Central America and
Caribbean Volleyball Confederation Championships were hosted
at the Langley Events Centre this
past fall, Bann returned to B.C. as
a starter for Team Canada.
"My parents, my sister and some
other relatives from B.C. came
out," Bann said. "[It was the] first
time that a lot of them have even
seen me play. That was a pretty
cool experience."
Bann's family and friends were
able to watch him compete against
the U.S.A. in front of a capacity
crowd in the tournament finals.
Canada ultimately fell to the team
from the south in a hard-fought
match, but the future is bright.
Team Canada currently holds the
11th spot in volleyball world rankings, and Bann intends to play at
the 2016 Summer Olympic Games
in Rio de Janiero.
While he has adjusted well
to the high level of play on the
international stage, the one thing
Bann has not yet gotten used to
is stepping on the court against
his childhood idols. "If I told this
guy how many times I've seen this
video of him on YouTube, he'd
probably slap me in the face, or
tell me to get a life," Bann said,
laughing.
For other UBC athletes who aspire to play professionally, Bann's
advice is simple: take part in as
many high-level training camps
and tryouts as you can. "Play as
much as possible, watch as much
as possible and learn as much as
possible," he said. "It just opens
your eyes to a higher level of training and commitment that will help
to become a professional."
Bann's impressive resume
aided him in the daunting task of
signing a contract with a professional team. Although several
volleyball agencies exist within
Canada — and some players even
choose to represent themselves
— Bann opted to team up with
an agent based out ofthe Netherlands. Having an agent with
concrete relationships and in
closer proximity to the professional leagues paid off, as he
quickly signed a contract for the
2012-2013 season with Duren
Volleyball Club in Germany.
With the increased calibre of
play and the expectations that
come with a paycheque, the first
year playing overseas can be a very
difficult one, but Bann was up to the
task. A stellar inaugural season in
Europe opened up doors on higher
=ILE PHOTO COURTESY RICH LAM/UBC ATHLETICS
Former UBC volleyball standout Blair Bann holds the CIS record for all-time career digs (1,018)
— over 250 more than the next player in the record books.
levels, and he was offered a starting
spot on the Nantes Metropole Reze
Volleyball Club in western France
for 2013-2014. "It's different than
playing CIS, [where] you're goingto
play four or five years, and you're
going to come back every year. Here,
you go where you have the best
opportunity financially and quality
ofthe league."
Staying in one place for an
extended period may be the end
goal, but climbing up to the top
European leagues happens one
step at a time. Thus far, for Bann,
each year has come with heightened quality of play and thus
many more challenges. He has
embraced these challenges, saying
that they motivate him to continue
to improve his skills. "Challenging
situations are always helping me
work hard and grow as a player,"
he said.
Bann intends to keep pouncing
on opportunities as they arise.
Although not typically as lucrative as some ofthe major North
American professional leagues,
European volleyball does provide
a paycheque. Top players in the
world easily earn a seven-figure
salary, even after the typical 5 to
10 per cent sports agency fee.
In regards to the future, Bann
only focuses on short time scales
and does not allow himself to be
too distracted by thoughts of life
after volleyball. For him, the only
way to go is up. XI
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
CIS CHAMPIONS
1. What would be your team's theme song
thisyear?
We like the classics. We
"sing" Frankie Valli's "Can't
Take My Eyes Off You"
after everywin.
It seemed that bythe
endoftheseason,
"Timber" was definitely
a favourite.
"Birds Flying High" by
Dough Boy.
Probably "Timber." Our
entire team went nuts
when it came on the other
night.
Frankie Valli's "Can't Take
My Eyes Off You" — which,
ironically, is whatwe
serenaded the missing
trophy to.
2. If you could spend a day in the life of an
athlete on another UBC team, who would it be
and why?
I'm a fan ofthe basketball
team. I've always wanted to
be able to dunk. So I'd have
to see a dunk competition to
decide. The gym is also way
closerthan the stadium.
would love to spend a
day being on the quidditch
team. I don't know much
about this newlyformed
activity that UBC seems to
bedoing quite well in.
used to play soccer, so
thatwould be fun to play
again.
I'm going to have to go with
Kareem Ba, because he's
theonlyguyonthefootball
team I've met, and what girl
doesn't want to spend a day
with 50 guys in tight pants?
AsahugeCanucksfan,
field hockey star Kate Gillis
is probably the runaway
favourite.
3. What's your favourite way to procrastinate
Work. And Game of
Procrastination is a talent
Binge-watch Suits.
At the moment it's playing
I'm a very committed
during exams?
Thrones, of course.
of mine when itcomesto
2048.1 can't stop! But
sports junkie during exam
exams. Ifeel like napping
considering I'm writing
period. The fact that it's
and baking are mytop
this from Vegas when
baseball season is going
two, though.
1 should be at home
studying...
to come in handy.
4. What's your favourite summer beverage?
don't drink, butanything
out ofthe CIS trophy tastes
good. Oh, wait...
Myfavouritesummer
beverage would have to
be homemade lemonade.
Chai tea frappuccino.
Iced chai. Yum!
Whatever is on sale,
mostly. A litre of Palm
Bay isn't the worst way to
start things off, though.
I'm a real connoisseur.
5. What are you most looking forward to this
summer?
Hopefully getting back
on the field after being
injured all season. But
mostlyjust Came of
Thrones.
I am super excited to stay
in Vancouverthis summer.
I can't waitforthe warm
beach days!
The weather!
Looking forward to
travelling around and not
being tied down anywhere.
Hitting up Banff and
Kelowna fortwo different
friends'weddings will be
the biggest highlight.
Can I be corny here and
say long days at Kits
Beach with great friends
and whatever number
fourhappensto be? II Opinions
TIME TO FfNISH >y
THIS CONSTRUCTION I
ONCE I FOR fli-L!     A
I LLUSTRATION J ETHRO AU/THE UBYSSEY
Outgoing UBC President Stephen Toope tried to accelerate campus construction to distract from his opera-wife-related nepotism (not really).
LAST WORDS //
NEPOTISM ON FULL
DISPLAY IN UBC OPERAS
NEW PRODUCTION
The circumstances surrounding
UBC Opera's production of Optica
Delusions, written by outgoing
university president Stephen
Toope's wife, seem sketchy, to say
the least.
Aside from the quality ofthe
musical itself — which, to be blunt,
sounds like the sort of parody
theatrical production a scriptwriter inserts into a high school
romcom in order to make a fool out
ofthe protagonist, so that he can
redeem himself later — the context
for the performance is dubious.
The UBC Opera program is a
rigorous, world-class educational
program, which, as conductor
Richard Epp points out in today's
article on the production (P7), is
used to staging works by Verdi and
Mozart, not a former elementary
school teacher who happens to be
the wife of a top university administrator.
Why, then, are some of its
students being made to perform
in the show? The incentive for
the production seems ambiguous;
it's not part ofthe opera department's main performance schedule, it's not a fundraiser, nor is it
intended to showcase the work of
a student.
At most, one could suggest that
playwright Paula Rosen intends
to philanthropically spread an anti-bigotry message with the musical, which is laudable, except that
conveying twee messages about
promoting tolerance shouldn't be a
key component of opera students'
training.
It's most likely the case that the
opera program was "gifted" the
production due to Rosen's connection with Toope. Regular readers
will know of our intense infatuation with Toope, but being married
to the guy shouldn't give you the
excuse to appropriate the resources and talent of an entire school
for your own personal benefit.
Furthermore, such appropriation is injurious to the opera
industry as a whole. There are undoubtedly many talented, educated
young composers and playwrights
who are waiting in the wings for
their work to be staged; it's despicable that they should be ignored
while an individual far more
senior than them, who happens to
have powerful connections, gets to
promote her work.
PRO-STUDENT
INTELLECTUAL
PROPERTY RIGHTS
SCARES PROFESSORS
Some faculty members are really, really concerned about UBC's
new policy regarding the use of
teaching materials.
The policy encourages faculty
to distribute their teaching materials freely. For us as students,
this is good: we get access to
more, potentially better teaching
materials. But several faculty
members are concerned that this
takes away their right to their
intellectual property.
UBC is adamant that nobody is
being forced to share. The policy
confirms that teaching materials
are owned by the people who
created them, and instructors
are able to opt out of sharing
their teaching materials as long
as they were created without an
investment of UBC's resources —
meaning compensation, facilities,
equipment, "or other resources
beyond those ordinarily provided to all UBC instructors in the
course of their normal duties,"
according to the document describing the policy.
UBC Opera is used
to staging works by
Verdi and Motzart,
not a former
elementary teacher
with big time
connections
The university is giving professors who believe they should
maintain exclusive rights to their
work an opportunity to opt out of
the program. This is evidently not
enough for the Faculty Association, which is demanding an opt-
in rather than opt-out format. The
university should stand firm in its
decision to encourage the sharing
of professors' work.
NEW FITNESS FACILITY
SHOULD PROMOTE
INCLUSIVITY
Gyms are meant to be a place
where people can push themselves and improve their physical
fitness. If they aren't set up in a
way that's inviting and encouraging for everyone, that purpose
is defeated.
Rather than lift society to a
healthier and more inclusive
place, many gyms, including
the BirdCoop, reinforce gender
stereotypes and barriers: there's a
perceived "guys' side" and "girls'
side." With a new campus fitness
facility being developed, we hope
the university considers how to
improve gym layouts and avoid
segregated areas.
Remember the lunch tables in
Mean Girls? Well, this isn't high
school anymore, so let's avoid
making the same mistakes. 31
Silley: I voted to raise tuition because the budget
demanded it, government funding is lacking
MIKE SILLEY
Op-Ed
Dear Editor,
I would like to start by thanking Bilal Shamsi for writing the
Ubyssey about his tuition concerns.
Two years ago, when I first
campaigned to serve on the Board,
I stated that I would vote against
any tuition increase. That was my
opinion, given my experience as a
student. But in last year's campaign, I made no such promise.
This is because over the course
of my first term on the board, I
became aware ofthe financial
pressure the institution has been
under as a result of reduced government funding and a provincial-
ly imposed debt ceiling.
The role of a student Board of
Governors representative is not to
push for lower tuition fees at the
cost of a diminished education. We
have a responsibility to do what is
in the best interest ofthe institution as a whole. I believe that
the tuition issue is one that the
university and students should see
eye to eye on: provincial funding
in advanced education should be
increased to alleviate the burden
of students paying unfairly high
tuition.
But if this doesn't happen,
students and the university should
agree not to compromise the quality of education through reduced
funding. The university should
also actively lobby the government
to improve access to education.
Instead of looking at just
one part of picture, I looked at
post-secondary education affordability being influenced by three
main factors: quality, cost and who
is paying for it.
WHAT IS THE QUALITY
OF EDUCATION WE
WANT?
One of UBC's core values is to
"strive for excellence and educate
students to the highest standards"
and I do not believe students
should be forced to sacrifice this
excellence in any way.
Unfortunately, in just one example, we are already seeing these
sacrifices due to increased levels
of deferred building maintenance
as a result ofthe province no
longer funding these expenses;
it now falls on UBC to cover all
maintenance costs. UBC's deferred
maintenance costs currently stand
at over $500 million.
HOW MUCH WILL OUR
EDUCATION COST US?
Domestic students paying $5,000
in annual tuition are receiving
an education that costs $23,000.
Domestic students cover only 22
per cent of their education's total
cost. Approximately 60 per cent
is covered by way of government
subsidy, and 18 per cent is being
subsidized by UBC's general
operations, according to UBC's
2014-2015 tuition report.
If we were to decrease tuition,
we would need to increase government subsidies to maintain the
quality of education we are used
to. If we were to see a decrease in
government subsidies, UBC would
need additional contributions
from domestic student tuition or
additional contributions from UBC
operations.
The latter has been the case
with UBC over the past number of
years. The university has faced fiscal pressures over the past number
of years. In 2012-2013, the provincial government stopped funding
the maintenance of university
buildings, which caused the university to reallocate $12 million
of tuition dollars to ensure the
safety of students and faculty. As a
result ofthe 2009 financial crisis,
the endowment spending rate was
reduced, further impacting the
university budget by $22 million.
Since then, provincial funding cuts
have reached $15 million, and the
province required that any wage
inflation be funded through savings, resulting in another $32 million cut to the university budget.
Despite these immense fiscal
pressures, UBC is still subsidizing
18 per cent of domestic student
tuition through ancillary oper-
I struggled with the
question of doing what
I promised... over
what I came to believe
was right.
ations, endowment returns and
cross subsidies. Yet, the creative
ways UBC has been financing
education for domestic students
may soon reach its limits. One
revenue block decreasing without
another increasing would invariably result in the decreased quality
of our education.
The two per cent domestic student increase helps cover the cost
of year-to-year inflation along with
reduced provincial funding, though
it doesn't even fully cover this. In
fact, next year alone, the two per
cent increase in tuition, worth $4
million, will be more than offset by
an $8 million reduction in provincial funding. With this in mind, I
concluded that last year's two per
cent domestic increase was critical
to the university's mission of providing academic excellence while
maintaining a balanced budget.
I struggled with the question of
doing what I promised — to vote
against any tuition increase — over
what I came to believe was right:
to determine tuition policy in a
fair manner that does not compromise the quality of excellence
we enjoy and grow from on a daily
basis. When it came to last year's
tuition vote, I did what I believe is
right in voting for the two per cent
domestic tuition increase. I do not
apologize for this.
What I do apologize for is not
publicly explaining my change in
rationale before last year's tuition
decision. I can understand this
lack of explanation being perceived as adding insult to injury.
It was wrong of me not to provide
this explanation.
It is important to note that
student board members advocate
for what they believe to be right
day in and day out. The successful
work by student board members
and the AMS has saved students
in individual programs like the
bachelor's of international education
from unjustifiably high fees. Last
week alone, a 46.7 per cent tuition
increase proposal for the master's of
management program was sent back
for review after I brought the issue
up as a concern, and my student
board colleagues, Curtis Tse and
Matt Parson, brought up two other
tuition and fee concerns that have
also been sent back for review. We
are not hypocrites, nor are we liars.
It is important for students to
have their voice heard and get the
information they are entitled to. If
anyone has any further questions
or concerns, please do not hesitate
to contact me at bogl@ubc.ca. XI
Mike Silley is a student representative on UBC's Board of Governors. II Scene
COMIC »
How far we've come  ^«»
Week One
First Midterm
Second Midterm
2014 - Julian Yu
CATCULTY
LAW
LLUSTRATION LUELLASUN/THE UBYSSEY
13 THINGS
you lost at Block Party
O  Phone
A  Keys
A  Purse/murse
A  Memory
A An hour of your time waiting in the beer
" ticket line
A   A beer ticket
A   Beer, after someone bumped into you and
™   spilled it
A Dignity
A Shoes /sandals
^ Your friends in the crowd
A Cells (brain, liver, etc.)
ff% Passport
@ All the stress from the previous semester,
even if it's temporary
■
1"
iH
■ ii
*B
IL*
' I I'F
kv^         |t
frfr,
?•   ,
n i    '.''-■   i
_
—la
TTirTHt—Jii i n2E5—S5P"
agf?aiTTga ■*»»-^[J   HwaESSfa"
■  ii iiiii   1    mm 11     in i   ■'" •
■rn^=T..' -. 'ib—rr^MWMnrrTOM!
sr^'TTn-i^-mUWfT!\'SiWKAywriss^^^--
— MP        — ^*        ■!--: 4       ' W   ''J=!
™|„' .Lhi"'!
at     "^n
£:;;&»
The exhibition everyone is talking about.    Experience it.
22 March - 18 May 2014
Open to the Public 11am-5pm
1460 Howe Street at Beach Avenue
GWERK.CA #GWERK 604 893 8958
For anyone interested in art, architecture, urbanism, sustainability,
transportation, engineering, landscape or even just your city in general ■
you will find this to be an hour well spent and a meaningful experience.
Salon Series
Leslie Van Duzer, April 8, 5:30-7pm
Director of UBC School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture
Larry Beasley, April 15, 5:30-7pm
Planning Consultant and former Co-Director of Vancouver Planning
Chris Phillips, April 22, 5:30-7pm
Founding Partner, PFS Studio Landscape Architects
Scot Hein, April 29, 5:30-7pm
Senior Urban Designer, City of Vancouver Urban Design Studio
Jeff Derksen, May 6, 5:30-7pm
Poet + Urban Critic, Simon Fraser University
RSVP at GWERK.CA/salon-series
westbank        BIG 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, APRIL 10,2014
CROSSWORD
1
2
3
4
S
1
"
7
S
3
"
|
"
12
13
14
15
a
17
,.
a
■ 20
21
■ 22
23
24
25
26
27
■ 23
29
■ 30
31
32
1
"
34
K
36
37
38
39
■
40
■
1
.
42
a
44
"
■ 4G
47
48
49
50
51
52
■ 53
54
■ 55
5G
57
1
,
53
1
GO
61
62
63
64
E5
EG
"
68
"
"
PU
IZLE CO
JRTESY
ESTCRC
SSWOR
JS.COM.
USEDW
TH PERA
MISSION.
ACROSS
1- To talk, usually in a pompous
manner
6-Radioactive gas
11-Strike caller
14- Pertaining to the moon
15- Liquid waste component
16- Paulo, Brazil
17-Compact
18-Large drinking bowl
19-UFO pilots
20-Benjamin
22-Chapter's partner
24- Nuclear-fission apparatus
28- Official count of population
29-Nearly
30-Mistreat
32-Small amounts
33- Duck with soft down
35-Pi followers
39-Gossip bit
40-Alphabet trio
41-Electrical unit
42-Able was ...
43- Actress Witherspoon
45-Bhutan's continent
46-It's human
48-Shooting star
50-Moving around
53-Filmic
54-Paris "thanks"
55-Watch over
57-Altar answer
58- Breathing organs offish
60-Fall bloomer
65-Gangster's gun
66-"Goodnight" girl
67- South American ruminant
68-Washington bill
69-Grannies
70-Water lily
DOWN
1-Nolongeryoung
2- Regret
3-Abby'stwin
4-Univ. aides
5-Puts up
6-Gossip
7-1 smell I
8-Stun
9-Suffix with Capri
10- The communication system of
the body
11-Software buyers
12- Island in the East China Sea
13- Assumed attitudes
21-E or G, e.g.
23-Weaken
24-Spokes
25-Gladden
26-The color of honey
27-Skin preparation
28-Junkyard dog
30- One who uses an abacus
31-Honey producers
34-Bakery worker
36- Old Testament book
37- Mixed bags
38-Kick off
43-Fam. member
8
2
6
1
5
3
8
7
2
7
2
6
4
4
5
7
8
9
3
2
5
8
4
6
2
6
4
9
9
5
1
7
4
6
1
3
2
^UZZLE COURTESY KRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.
44-Bahrain bigwig
47-Source
49-Ultimate purpose
50-Compadre
51-Family car
52-Penned
53-Lawsuits
55-Secluded spot
56- Humerus neighbor; 59- 401(k)
alternative
61- -mo
62- Rat-a-	
63-Big bird
64-       Tafari (Haile Selassie):
APR. 7 ANSWERS
M
'a
N
S
S
A
H
1
"b
1
"s
M
0
G
0
p
A
L
E
L
E
V
E
I
0
R
E
P
E
R
U
S
T
R
A
D
I
L
E
E
E
X
C
E |*P
T
1
0
N
A
E
L
E
|'s
E
m H H'z
A
P  1
c
A
P
1
T
A \L
1
Z
A
T p
0
N
A
R
1
A
S 1  I'll
A
L
i. Id
U
0
T
0
D
o H'i
N
A
N
E  Hi
E
N
A
T
0
E |o
N
U
s I |c
0
A
C
H
U
N
D \E
R
S
T
A | N
D
A
B
L
E
In
I
A 1 lo
0
H 1
M
A
G
N
E
T
1
C
N  pO
R
T
H
s
W
A
M
1
1
L
1
S
E
L
0
R
1
L
A
T
E
•L
I
N
E
N
E
L
0
N
0
N
E
L
S
E
A
S
T
C
E
N
T
CAT MAZE TIME
Connect the green arrow to the red arrow. You
know the drill.
VOLUNTEERS
WANTED
Sticking around campus
this summer? Spend
some time with us!
We're publishing online
throughout the summer
months, so learn the
tricks of the trade before
school year hits.
Agooi
I
i
by all!
EMAIL
COORDINATING@UBYSSEY.CA
^UZZLE COURTESY KRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128615/manifest

Comment

Related Items