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The Ubyssey Sep 11, 1975

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Array UBC housing head quits
By GARY COULL
Amid a shroud of secrecy,
residence director Les Rohringer
has resigned for "personal
reasons."
"I resigned for purely personal
reasons and I don't wish to discuss
it," Rohringer said in an interview
Wednesday.
' 'I would like to leave it at that.''
An employee of the UBC administration for 14 years, the 57-
year-old Rohringer has been
residence director since 1967 when
he succeeded former classics head
Malcolm McGregor.
Campus sources interviewed by
The Ubyssey Monday were uncharacteristically    silent,    in
dicating they knew more about the
issue but couldn't say.
Some students close to UBC's
housing operation feel Rohringer
was "shafted" by the administration but declined to
discuss details of his departure.
Rohringer submitted his letter of
resignation   Friday   to   new   ad-
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LVII, No. 2     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1975
228-2301
—matt king photo
SEARCHING  FOR  TRUTH  or at least some bus route directions that a person.can understand, Nancy
Sutton, phys ed 4, and Ross Fraser, dentistry 1, puzzle over mysterious B.C. Hydro sign-
Council fixes beer prices
Pit draught beer will be cheaper,
bottled beer will remain at the
same price and Pit employee
wages will stay at existing levels.
That's the result of an Alma
Mater Society council decision
Wednesday to approve recommendations made earlier Wednesday by its finance committee.
The price of a pitcher of draught
beer will be lowered to $2 from
$2.10, but bottled beer will remain
at the summer high of 60 cents.
Pit workers will continue to
receive $3.25 per hour while
doormen and head cashiers will be
paid $3.75.
The decision ends fears that beer
prices would be hiked considerably
this year while wages for those
serving behind the bar would be
reduced to the minimum $2.50
hourly rate and to $3 for doormen
and head cashiers.
After the finance committee
meeting, committee chairman and
AMS treasurer Dave Theessen
blamed the fears on "misunderstanding and a breakdown in
communication between the
finance committee and Pit employees."
"There was never any intention
to cut back pay rates of established
help," Theessen added. "We
simply thought it would be
preferable to start new help off at a
lower rate rattier than have to
See page 2: COUNCIL
Electronic dick blows job
By MARCUS GEE
A casual test of the new $44,000 Tattle Tape security
system in Sedgwick undergraduate library has
revealed the system is far from fool proof.
A Ubyssey reporter was able to pass an unchecked
book through the system turnstiles three times
Wednesday without activating the alarm.
Sedgwick library head Ture Erickson, who witnessed the demonstration, said the system has not yet
adjusted to the "electronic environment" in the
library. Erickson said a bell should sound and the
turnstile lock when a sensitized book which has not
been checked out triggers turnstile scanners.
The system often makes mistakes, according to
Erickson. He said briefcases, three ring binders and
electronic calculators turned to the "on" position
frequently set off the alarm. In other cases the
scanner will fail altogether to pick up the electronically sensitized unchecked books.
"We were told by 3M that it (the system) would hit
and miss for a few weeks. They said it might even
activate the alarm when nobody was passing
through. All this is supposed to be due to the system
adjusting to the library's electronic environment,"
Erickson said.
The 3M company installed the system this summer
and the library began using it Sept. 5, said Erickson.
The $44,000 cost of the system does not include ad
ditional labor costs for renovations to the Sedgwick
turnstile area, he said.
Erickson said borrowers must give books to the
library workers at the turnstiles for desensitization.
Unless a small machine there wipes out the book's
electronic sensitivity, the book will set off the alarm.
UBC head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said
Wednesday he considers the Tattle Tape system a
success.
"The two main advantages (of the Tattle Tape
system) are to reduce the numbers of books being
taken from the shelves without being checked out and
to speed up lineups."
"The greed of people who take books is amazing.
Maybe this will stop that."
Erickson said he is sure the Tattle Tape system will
reduce book thefts. One to two per cent of Sedgwick
books were stolen last year.
"If the alarm sounds and we find someone with a
book we assume he has forgotten to charge out the
book or that the machine has made a mistake.
"If a person consistently sets off the alarm with no
explanation and we were pretty sure thievery was
involved, we would contact the authorities,"
Erickson said.
"Response from students has been overwhelmingly
in favor of the system," he said.
ministration vice-president Erich
Vogt who is responsible for campus
residences.
The resignation was effective
immediately.
Vogt said Rohringer resigned
"suddenly for personal reasons"
adding that "it would be completely improper to comment on
the situation."
Assistant residence director
Michael Davis has been appointed
acting director and Vogt said he
will begin discussions with
students, staff and faculty as to
how a new director should be
chosen.
One indication Rohringer's
resignation was perhaps not
without internal university controversy is that no one seemed to
want the issue publicized.
' There was. no administration
announcement   informing    the
"students although one way of
finding out was to simply phone
Rohringer's office.
"Mr. Rohringer is no longer with
us," an efficient sounding
secretary told a Ubyssey reporter
calling the campus housing office
Wednesday. "Can someone else
help y.ou?"
Board of governor's member
George Hermanson, a chaplain at
the Lutheran Campus Centre, said
he was asked in a "ministerial
capacity" to become involved in
the issue.
He said that upon the urging of
several students he investigated
the departure but declined further
comment.
"As far as Les's resignation
goes, what he has said stands,"
Hermanson said.
See page 2: ROHRINGER'S
CMHC denies
housing money
By MARK BUCKSHON
The Central Mortgage and
Housing Corp. doesn't have any
money for student residence
construction this year and
probably won't in 1976, a senior
corporation official said Wednesday.
Robert Adamson, chairman of
the CMHC corporate secretariat,
said recent fund requests by B.C.
education minister Eileen Dailly
and housing minister Lome
Nicolson have been denied.
"It doesn't look good at all for
student housing," Adamson said in
a telephone interview from Ottawa.
Adamson said the corporation's
budget has increased from last
year but demands — especially
from B.C. — on it increased even
more rapidly.
As a result, he said, funds for
special housing projects across
Canada are scarce but they are
especially scarce for B.C. projects
because of the greater demand for
assistance here.
Adamson said a similar request
from Simon Fraser University for
financial help for residence construction was rejected last spring.
Dailly said Monday she was
asking the CMHC for assistance
through the" federal housing
minister because "student housing
is a particular concern to B.C."
Adamson    said    when    SFU
requested help "our capital budget
had no funds for student housing."
At first, he said, it was hoped
SFU could get some funds
allocated to other programs. But
none were available and the
request fpr assistance was
rejected.
"That hope (for fund reallocation) is now far less than it
was three months ago (when the
SFU request was rejected),"
Adamson said."
Meanwhile, UBC administration
president Doug Kenny indicated
Wednesday he will press for on-
campus residence construction if
the various governments do not act
to alleviate student housing
problems. „
"I think in the first instance I
would like to encourage the various
layers of government to try to find
money that could make places for
students and others off-campus,"
he said.
"I think the ideal solution would
be some form of integrated housing
development near campus."
Kenny said the governments
"must be given an opportunity to
come up with any plans" but indicated if none is forthcoming
within the year he might press for
construction of additional "non-
dormitory" residences.
He called construction of additional   student   residences   his
See page 2: KENNY'S
REPORTER GEE AND BOOK
... sensitized but undetected.
—matt king photo Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 11, 1975
Council hits reduced caf hours
From page 1
reduce wages if expenses ran too
high."
Council also voted to advise food
services that students find reduced
cafeteria operating hours,
especially  in SUB,  inconvenient.
It recommended hours for SUB
cafeteria be changed to provide
full service from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
and snack bar service between 7
and 10 p.m. weekdays.
Council also requested snack bar
service from. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturdays and from noon to 6 p.m.
Sundays.
In other business, council voted
to support next spring's open house
at UBC, and to release $2,500 from
its open house reserve fund, to be
allocated by the open house
committee.
Council stipulated that at least
$1,500 of the money be used for
AMS clubs to set up displays.
The decision followed a lengthy
and heated   discussion  of  the
philosophy of UBC's open house.
"It's a hell of a waste of our
money," said arts undergraduate
society rep Bruce Wilson.
Wilson said he objected to open
house as an administration public
relations gimmick, and suggested
council spend the money to send
UBC   students   to   high   schools
Rohringer's job 'extremely difficult'
From page 1
Rohringer said he has no definite
plans for his future at the moment
but he's "still looking around."
Asked about the state of the
residence office, he said: "As far
as I'm concerned, I leave it in good
shape." Terming the director's job
"extremely difficult", Rohringer
said he was happy with the
university.
"I'll miss students and hopefully
some of them will miss me. I will
never forget the university."
Although he said things  were
Kenny's 'second choice'
From page 1
"second choice but the reluctant
choice."
In August, Kenny, responding to
Vancouver   mayor   Art   Phillips'
Ubyssey?
Today is clubs day.
It's your chance to see what kind
of activities are available and what
kind of people run them. Both can
be revealing.
And while you're touring through
SUB don't forget The Ubyssey
office upstairs in SUB 241-K where
you're welcome to brouse, chat and
meet the staff. Join us.
charge that the university wasn't
doing enough to alleviate the
student housing crisis, said the
university doesn't have the funds
for student housing and plans no
action on building new student
residences in the immediate
future.
Meanwhile, Dave Johnson,
manager of the UBC off-campus
housing service, said about 150
persons inquired at the SUB office
Wednesday.
Johnson said he had expected
demand to slacken by this week as
students found places but it hasn't.
An estimated 2,000 UBC students
are still without housing, he said.
unlimited
9IO ROBSOO
688*9136
If mother
nature didn't
give you curly
hair . . .
WE CAN
SPECIAL DISCOUNT
10%
U.B.C. STUDENTS
(with A.M.S. Card)
bn£rove_«oXiL
WRITING SKILLS
The University of British Columbia offers a Writing
Improvement Program for people in the community and*
secondary, college and university students. Classes begin the
week of September 29 1975, and meet during the evening. For
a detailed brochure and registration form, call 228-2181, local
220.
Centre for Continuing Education
University of British Columbia
Panhellenic Association
Welcomes You To "Rush Week"
Sept. 21-30
[
Come Meet The WOMEN'S Half
.  of Fraternities at U.B.C.
1
Further information phone: -
Genine McCurdy - 266-2629
Rush Chairman
Lynne Pollock - 261-3452
Panhellenic President
"ship-shape" in the office, he
added: "The administration will
have to- decide if the structure is
the right one or not."
While the statement raised the
possibility of a disagreement
between himself and the administration, Rohringer declined
to comment further.
Two students who have worked
with Rohringer on the housing
problems this summer, Dave
Johnson and Lake Sagaris, praised
the former director for his help.
"He was very helpful and extremely    co-operative,"    said
Johnson, who is off-campus
housing service manager.
"I'm sad to see him go."
Sagaris, the Alma Mater
Society's co-ordinator who has
worked on student housing
problems, said Rohringer was
"very open" during the summer
and "told everything."
Rohringer joined the housing
administration in 1962 and in 1967
was appointed acting director
when McGregor went to Greece for
academic study.
In 1968 he was confirmed as
director.
across the province and "r.eally"
tell students about the university.
AMS secretary Ellen Paul said
she supported the motion. She
added that the open house committee "is a student committee,
and is open to any student."
Treasurer Theessen pointed out
the reserve fund contains mostly
administration money given to
students for some of their contributions to the open house activities.
"If we were to allocate the
money elsewhere we would be open
to serious questioning by the administration," he said. Theessen
added that council's obligation to
spend the reserve fund money on
open house is "moral, bordering on
quasi-legal."
Councillor Johan de Rooy said
the open house provides an opportunity for all kinds of people in
the community to look at the
university and what it offers.
"If we are spending the* money,
we should try to show the
university as we perceive it," he
added.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
TEAM
TRYOUTS
1975-1976
i rv I KmJKj i o
featuring
SPORT
DATE & TIMES
PLACE
Badminton
Mon. Sept. IS; 6:30 p.m.
Bym A&B
Basketball
Mon. Sept. 22; 4:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Wed. Oct. 1; 5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Fencing
T.B.A.
Field Hockey
Sept. 8-10; 4:30 p.m.
Warren & McGregor fields,
Sept. 11; 12:30
south campus
Golf
T.B.A
Gymnastics
Mon. Sept. 15; 4:30 p.m.
Gym G
Skiing
Tues. Sept. 30; 5:30
Gym E
Swimming & Diving            Mon. Sept. 15; 12:30
Room 25 Memorial Gym
Tennis
Sept. 16 & 18; 4:30
Tennis courts, south
Sept. 21; 2:30
of Winter Sports Centre
Track & Field
Tues. Sept. 23; 5:30 p.m.
Armoury
Volleyball
Tues. Sept. 16; 7:00 p.m.
Gym A
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Room 208 Memorial Gym - 228-2295
NOW OPEN
HAIR
a c / STUDIO Inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
x
Bernard, formally of U.B.C. Vikings is pleased to announce
the opening of BERNARD LABROSSE HAIR STUDIO INC.
located in the village on University Blvd.
5784 University Blvd. (Next to Bank of Commerce)
For Appointment
224-1922 Thursday, September 11, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Dayan to make guarded visit
Moshe Dayan, former Israeli
defence minister and army chief of
staff, will visit UBC Oct. 6 as part
of a tour of North American
universities.
But the Alma Mater Society is
having no part in paying the $6,000
necessary to bring him here, a
large percentage of which will be
used to pay for his entourage of
bodyguards.
Hillel House, a Jewish club af
filiated with the AMS, had hoped
the AMS would pay part of Dayan's
fee as part of its speakers'
program.
"Dayan is not that important a
person ... so we 'canned' it in
council on my recommendation,"
AMS treasurer Dave Theessen said
Wednesday. "It was decided that
Dayan's visit would not generate
enough interest to draw a crowd."
But Rabbi Marvin Hier, whose
UBC credit union
seeking business
UBC's credit union is now open
and offers loans and a savings
service for UBC students, faculty
and staff, and university endowment land residents.
But it's hard to find. The Alma
Mater Society denied the
University Community Credit
Union space in SUB because it is a
commercial venture so it has a
temporary office in room 28A,
Instructional Media Centre.
The credit union offers loans at
12 per cent interest and short and
long term deposits at higher in:
terest rates than chartered banks
offer.
No passbook savings service is
currently offered but the UCCU
hopes to have one soon, said office
manager Karl Liu Wednesday. A
chequing service may become
available after the credit union's
assets reach $300,000. Current
assets are close to $60,000, said Liu.
Members pay $5 for a share in
the union. All deposits and shares
are guaranteed by the Provincial
Credit Union Share and Deposit
Guarantee Fund, said Liu.
"It's generally easier to get a
loan from the credit union than it is
from a bank," Liu said. "Here, we
are more sympathetic. We can
afford to be more flexible."
He also said the credit union's
low overhead (it pays $510 a year to
the university for office space)
allows it to make loans more accessible than at a bank.
Interest at UCCU is calculated
on a declining balance basis, unlike
banks, which calculate interest on
the full amount of the loan, said
Liu. .
Thirty and 90 day deposits pay
seven per cent interest, one year
deposits pay eight per cent and
interest rates increase with longer
deposits. Members may withdraw
money before the end of the deposit
term at one per cent interest, Liu
said.
The UCCU office is open from
Monday to Friday from 11:30 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m., except Tuesdays,
when it closes at 2 p.m.
Senate votes
for apple pie
Senate voted Wednesday for
what one senator described as a set
of "motherhood and apple pie"
resolutions about women at UBC.
But senate rejected the idea of
establishing a "corporate ombudsman" committee to see the
resolutions are implemented.
In the end, senate accepted 13
resolutions proposed by the ad hoc
committee on enrolment of women
undergraduate and graduate
students. (See story on committee
report, page 5.)
One contentious resolution —
"that faculties facilitate the formation of women student groups"
— was amended on the recommendation of academic planner
Robert Clark to remove the word
"women." It was defeated.
Among the resolutions approved:
• the university continue to
implement part-time courses of
study;
• the university continue to
provide and expand support services to mature students; and
• the university, through the
board of governors and the
Universities Council work toward a
program of financial aid from all
levels of government to single
parent families.
Science rep Ron Walls, after the
resolutions passed (several were
amended to make their wording
even less contentious than when
first presented), said senate had
"systematically gone through the
women's recommendations and
taken all the teeth out."
"I don't understand why we're
going through this and taking all of
the trouble out of the resolutions
being made," he said, referring to
Clark's move on women student
groups.
Several other resolutions approved were what some senators
said are recommendations which
have already been implemented.
Ad hoc committee chairperson
Gene Errington said the
resolutions were written to avoid
controversy so the university could
"set guidelines."
But senate rejected Errington's
request that a permanent "committee on the status of women at
UBC be established."
Clark, in debate about his
proposed amendment to delete
"women" from the recommendation, denied the result of his
amendment would be to dilute the
resolution. He said women, as well
as men, could be members of
student groups facilitated by
faculties.
As debate continued, senators
began asking what business
faculties have in establishing
student groups for men or women.
Errington said several women
students approached the committee who said they feel it is
important that faculties encourage
formation of special women's
groups.
On another motion, applied
science dean W. D. Finn and
medicine dean David Bates opposed Clark when he tried to
similarly amend a resolution
calling on faculties to make a
special commitment to ensure that
female graduates find employment.
Bates and Finn, representing
faculties that traditionally have
had low women enrolment, also
defended the committee's proposal
that they "attempt to recruit more
qualified women as faculty
members, particularly in those
areas where women are
significantly    underrepresented."
Finn proposed the university
assist the applied science faculty
by letting it hire female
engineering teachers, allow them
tenure, and provide paid leaves of
absence so the new instructors can
attain assistant professor status.
MOSHE DAYAN
. .. well guarded.
Schara Tzedeck synagogue is
bankrolling the visit, said he expects a large student attendance
and a significant outside interest.
Dayan's speaking fee is $1,000.
But Hier, director of Hillel House,
said another $5,000 is needed to pay
expenses of bringing Dayan and
his Israeli bodyguards to Vancouver for the one-day stay.
"Dayan's purpose in coming is to
address university students," Hier
said. The rabbi said Dayan wants
to explain the Jewish position to a
"well informed and concerned
audience."
Dayan, born in what is now
called Israel, was educated at Tel
Aviv university and joined the
Hagganah, Zionist guerilla
movement, in 1929. In 1939 he was
arrested by the British and held for
two years before he was released
and trained as an intelligence scout
in Syria.
He was a leader in the 1948-49
Israeli war against the Arabs, and
in 1953 became army chief of staff,
a position he held until he was
elected to the Knesset in 1959. He
served as agriculture minister
from 1959 to 1964, and as defense
minister from 1967 to 1974.
He resigned Feb. 21,1974, rather
than join Golda Meir's minority
government.
Dayan is expected to offer his
personal views on the Middle East
situation as well as discuss the
topic: "Peace in the Middle East."
Dayan will speak in the SUB
ballroom.
CHECKING FOR CRAWLIES. ...students peruse offerings. -andrew snearon photo
Prices up, hours down in cats
By CHRIS GAINOR
Hungry students returning to
UBC are paying more to eat on
campus, and until at least the end
of the month, are finding less time
to do it.
Prices of several items in UBC
food services cafeterias rose June
9, while most students were away
for the summer. Food services
director Robert Bailey blamed
rising labor and food costs for the
increase.
Bailey said Wednesday that
prices were increased on the basis
of recommendations by the
university's presidential committee on food services.
The committee, which includes
one student, recommended the
price increases in May. "Surprisingly, the committee suggested
higher prices than (food services)
did," Bailey said.
Labor costs have risen 31 per
cent since 1974 and food and supply
costs have gone up 20 per cent, he
said.
Budget burgers have risen to 35
cents from 30 cents and
cheeseburgers have risen 15 cents
to 45 cepts. Quarter pounders have
jumped to 85 cents from 70 cents
and with cheese to 95 cents from 80
cents.
The budget burgers and quarter
pounders, which are the same size
as McDonald's hamburgers, were
introduced in November after a
Ubyssey food price survey
revealed food services prices had
increased more rapidly than at
food outlets off campus.
At the time they were introduced, the food services burgers
were priced the same as McDonald's burgers. Prices Wednesday at the McDonald's
Kerrisdale outlet were still the
same price as last spring.
Food services milk shakes were
lowered in price last November to
bring them in line with McDonald's
price of 35 cents. McDonald's
shakes are now 40 cents while food
services shakes have jumped to 50
cents.
The SUB snack bar is currently
operating within reduced hours but
Bailey claimed they are the same
hours as last September. The
snack bar closes at 4:30 p.m. instead of 9 p.m. as it did throughout
most of the last academic year.
Hours will be extended to 7 p.m.
next week, but the snack bar will
remain closed weekends.
He said food service hours for the
remainder of the year will be
decided next week. "We haven't
really determined 'whether hours
will be changed or not," Bailey
added.
Students upset over rising food
costs will be able to drown their
sorrows for the first time this week
in the Ponderosa cafeteria.
The Ponderosa is serving beer,
priced at 60 cents a bottle, from
noon to 2 p.m. Monday to Friday.
Bailey said the university administration has developed a
"liberal attitude" towards alcohol,
and is "experimenting" with beer
service. The service may be extended to other food services
outlets, depending on demand, he
added. >
Bob Smith resigns
UBC Bookstore manager Robert
Smith has resigned the position he
has held since 1971 for another job.
No successor has been named for
Smith. His resignation is effective
Oct. 31, but he will actually leave
Sept. 30 to accept the position of
assistant executive director of the
Canadian Arthritis and
Rheumatism Society.
Smith landed the Bookstore job
in 1971 after graduating from UBC
that same year with a master's
degree in commerce. Operation of
the UBC bookstore was the subject
of his thesis, and he was hired by
the administration partially on the
strength of its contents.
During his tenure as manager
Smith aimed to make the bookstore
more economically efficient. Many
university students and professors
allege that to this end he regularly
ordered fewer textbooks than
requested by professors so the
bookstore wouldn't be stuck with
any extra unsold or unsellable
texts. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 11, 1975
Scandalous
silence
Why did Les Rohringer really resign as residence
director?
The polite answer both from the man himself and
from the administration is "personal reasons."
But why does a guy who has worked at UBC for 14
years, who is apparently respected by the students he deals
with and who cares about the university suddenly decide
to quit?
From what The Ubyssey has learned the decision was
made in a hell of a hurry.
Old Les hasn't always been res students most favorite
administration character. Just remember the turfing out of
a few tenants each year for the sake of setting examples.
Still, there is more to this issue than can or should be
tucked away behind a nebulous label.
The university community is entitled to some answers
on this one.
UBC has a number of people who might be considered
political watchdogs. They mouth off for causes of all sorts,
some of which don't really exist.
They aren't quiet. They don't cover up. You usually
don't get "polite" answers to questions.
Usually, that is. In the case of Rohringer, everybody is
shutting up.
Why? If Rohringer was forced to resign, the university
community is entitled to hear why. Pressures coming from
the change in administration, alleged wrongdoing, different
philosophies — whatever it is, let's hear it.
This kind of chickenshit silence from the supposedly
active people at UBC is dangerous. If Rohringer has a
legitimate case then fight it in the open, not privately.
It might reveal some interesting things about our new
administration.
Good riddance
Rec UBC has finally been wrecked.
And it's about time too.
Ever since the silly program was put into effect in 1972
it has been unpopular. For years students got the same thing
for free. It took three years for the administration to come to
their senses.
Happy, yes. Ecstatic, no.
While the program's free next year we still have to pay
this year. That's $5 per student too much.
Besides, some of us won't be around next year to enjoy
the freebee.
The board should have picked up the tab for this year's
program as well if it thinks it should be paying at all.
Now the next thing the board should do is eliminate the
compulsory $5 athletic fee which sends extramural sports all
over the place. If they put that fin into intramurals which all
students can participate in then we'd all be on the right track.
WE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 9, 1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
Gary Coull and Doug Rushton pumped the five sweaty hands of UBC
veeps as- Ralph Maurer, Chris Gainor and Marcus Gee reclined on plus
faculty club sofas, eating grapes. Mark Buckshon dodged a swat from the
grinning president, bumping into Sue Vohanka as she dodged a grab from
an impish PR man. Greg Edwards, Nancy Southam and Steve Morris spied
the dinner beef first and sank slavering jaws into the carcass. Meanwhile
Charlie Hill and Barry Jensen surreptitiously dropped hors d'oeuvres into
brown doggie bags and stuffed'silver ashtrays into their pockets. "Geez
these profs sure have it rough," said Pete Stockland handing Boss Barlow a
Quadruple Martini. Len MacKave gasped as he saw Woody draw an obscene
representation of the president on the faculty club's picture window
smeared in caviar. Andrew Shearon and Matt King thumbed their noses
derisively as the motley crew made their retreat.
GOTTA     MATCH ?
History-
speaks
Mike Sasges' piece in your issue
of Sept. 9 encapsulating the history
of your illustrious newspaper
makes mention of the fact that in
19501 had the dubious distinction of
having my fair body kidnapped by
the revolting engineers "for
refusing to run the engineers'
annual faculty newspaper."
Not so.
The engineers had been running
their "Red Rag" as an insert in the
paper for years and far be it from
me to tamper with tradition. It was
one issue that was sure to be read
by the entire campus community.
The betting in The Ubyssey office — in those days located in the
darkest reaches of Brock Hall —
always revolved around what steps
a malevolent administration would
take in response to the Redshirts'
latest outrage.
So, far from retaliating against
BANHAM . . . contented.
me for refusing to include the Rag
in The Ubyssey, the engineers
simply decided to kidnap myself
and another staffer, Hugh
Cameron, and spirit us off to a
grotty motel out on Kingsway,
where we spent the day lounging on
a bed reading naughty magazines
and eating fish and chips out of
newspaper. About midnight a task
force of law students ransomed us
for two bottles of beer.
All during the day my companion
Letters
Cameron stomped around the
bedroom of the motel thinking up
the most incredible reprisals
against the Redshirts. When we
arrived back on the campus the
next day I called the editorial
board together and pulled rank. I
threatened to cut off their beer if a
single line about the kidnapping
appeared in the next edition of the
paper.
I made sure I was in The
Ubyssey's offices shortly after the
next issue of the paper appeared. It
wasn't long before my kidnappers
appeared, totally crestfallen, to
protest the fact that I had refused
to print a line about their escapade.
That act hurt them more than
any editorial comment we could
have printed. There is a lesson in
that for the current staff of The
Ubyssey.
There is a sequel to the story.
The Red Rag was used to publicize
the annual Engineer's Ball, which
took place shortly after the insert
appeared.
Naturally, the Redshirts
provided us with free tickets for
the two-night affair and we
dutifully showed up in the Commodore downtown on the first night
for a bit of gladhanding and back-
slapping with our former captors.
On the second night of the ball a
group of Ubyssey staffers showed
up at the home of the then
president of the EUS as he was
dressing for the second night of the
ball, kidnapped him, and held him
incommunicado somewhere out in
New Westminster until about
midnight.
Then we all drove to the Commodore and I made a touching
speech from the bandstand about
how we had learned that poor old
Cy White — the EUS president —
had deserted his family and The
Ubyssey had winkled him out of a
skid road pub and returned him to
the bosom of his family.
Then we all had another drink
and called it square.
Jim Banham,
UBC information officer.
Eat my shorts — MJS.
Tulips
I have just finished reading the
first edition of this year's Ubyssey,
and much was the tumult thereof, I
should think.
What I would like to know,
sirrah, is whether there is anyone
else on campus your reporters
know beside Jake van der Zalm?
Every time I looked around, there
he was — that hairy hound from
Budapest.
I couldn't seem to get through
any story without stumbling across
an irrelevant quote from this failed
antidote to Dutch Elm disease.
All I want is the facts, ma'am,
not the rantings of a raving luny
from Cluny.
I appreciate that this Rottendam
worthy was elected student
president on a campaign of dental
reform but reading what he has to
say about every little campus item
windmills to tulips is like pulling
teeth in an idiot's wind.
I really feel down in the mouth
about the hole thing. The Yanks
are coming, etc.
Seriously, I'm very proud of all
you youngsters for putting out such
a lively little journal and even
managing to get that nasty four-
letter word "snap" in a headline,
but come now, you can surely do
without that man van der Zalm in
every single story.
It gets a bit tedious seeing his
name every time I turn the page.
Remember, the pallindrome of der
is red.
One thing I did like about the
paper, though, was the new look
you gave vice-president Chuck
Connaghan. It's amazing what
getting away from unions has done
for his appearance.
Keep up the good work, kids.
Rod Mickleburg h [1960-69]
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241 K. Thursday, September 11, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student senators plot ahead
Student senators met Tuesday
night in what one student senator
called the first of a series of
regular, informal meetings to
develop "a united student voice on
senate."
Student senator-at-large Ron
Dumont said 12 of the 17 student
senators   attended   the   Tuesday
meeting at Dumont's home.
"We went through the senate
agenda and tried to decide a plan of
action for what we're going to do,"
he said.
"We hope to keep these
(meetings) up before every senate,
meeting to organize some sort of
opposition or response to what
comes up at senate."
Dumont said many student
senators elected for the first time
are "naive and not aware of a lot of
problems facing students."
"However, faculty members and
deans have been on (senate) for
years and know all the ins and
outs," he added.
He said he hopes the meetings
will give student senators more
confidence, allowing them to speak
more often and "get more done."
"We're not united on everything,
but it's important to support other
student senators." .
Dumont said some of the student
senators agreed to work on
problems concerning students,
such as housing and financial aid,
and get the topics on the agenda to
be discussed at senate meetings
during the year.
"To get any kind of respect from
the other senators, we've got to
show that we've done our
homework," Dumont said. "Even
if motions fail they can set the
wheels rolling."
Summer job search futile for many
By STEVE MORRIS
The search for summer jobs this
year was long and arduous for
many students in Vancouver and
throughout the province.
"Slowest in three years," UBC
placement officer Cameron Craik
said Wednesday.
"It was not a very good summer."
Craik's sentiments were echoed
by other student placement officers.
Simon Fraser University
Manpower counsellor Bert Hillmer
said it was a particularly bad year
and Dick Forbes-Roberts of B.C.
Institute of Technology's Manpower office said job offers were
down from 1974.
Lydia Gledhill, regional coordinator of the federal student
summer employment. and activities program, blamed the job
shortage on the slow economic
situation in B.C.
Gledhill said Wednesday only
18,400of 51,518 students across B.C.
registered with Manpower found
work. In metropolitan Vancouver,
only 7,071 of 24,150 students were
placed.
Throughout Canada, more than
520,000 students pounded the
concrete in search of summer
employment.
However,   Gledhill   said   the
numbers may be misleading. Job
placement figures include students
who found more than one job, thus
one student may account for two
"jobs," he said.
"I can definitely say that at least
5,338 students found jobs in Vancouver," Gledhill said. "These
were the number of summer-long
jobs filled."
Gledhill said significantly fewer
job offerings came into the Vancouver Manpower office this
summer than last year.
"Job vacancies in 1974 were 37
per cent higher in Vancouver, and
28 per cent higher throughout B.C.
as a whole," she said.
The majority of Manpower jobs
were manual labor and service
tasks, she said.
"I believe the poor economic
conditions were responsible. The
strike situations, particularly in
the smaller communities, cut down
on many jobs," she said. "The
managers of local industries who
normally hired students for the
summer didn't this year.
"The best opportunities for work
existed in the Okanagan, which
had the tourist trade to fall back
on. But if the student was not
skilled, Vancouver was no better or
worse for finding a job than any
FOUND ACCOMMODATION YET?
Try Us For
CARPETING
REMNANT SALE
SPECIAL
DISCOUNTS
FOR U.B.C.
STUDENTS
COLOR TREND
DECORATING CENTRE
4429 W. 10th Ave. 224-6331
SUBFILMSOC presents
He sold his
soul for
rock n'rolL
THURS./SUN.
7:00
FRI./SAT.
7:00/9:30
SUB
THEATRE
75*
Please show AMS cards
People who ride bikes are
very quiet, don't mess up
the air, and stay skinnier
and sexier. So ride a
bike. We'll peddle
you a neat one.
.-the Peddler.
620 E. Broadway
874-8611
peddler
bicycle centre
other B.C. area."
Craik was not able to say how
UBC students fared in the summer.
He   said   reliable   figures   are
unattainable.
"The employers don't tell us if
they hire a student,'nor do all UBC
students contact us upon finding a
job," he said.
He said more than 3,300 students
were registered with the UBC
placement office.
Hillmer said his SFU office
placed 621 students from 766 applicants. Most jobs were in the
Vancouver area, and labor and
office-type work predominated.
Roberts said BCIT students
suffered from the stagnating
economy as well.
"Exploration work in the
province, in oil or mining and
surveying was practically nil.
"The impeding strikes and
uncertainty was a factor. The only
exploration work available was in
the Prairies," he said.
He said BCIT does not have a'
general placement office for
summer employment. The only
jobs handled are career-oriented
employment and, in this case,
employers contact the school to fill
particular positions. This year, 169
BCIT students were placed, he
said.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Jake
van der Graaf generator today said
he was impressed with the rookie
crop on his Pango Patriots,
defending champions in the Pango
Pango Cheese Sucking League.
"Young Thrice Witless will more
than fill the hole left by our retired
hall-of-famer Gerald de Mon-
tignorant," he said.
"And Soup Salade has all but
sown up the left right out position.
"Now all we need is some cheese
to suck. Know anybody who's
available?"
CAMPUS WIDE DANCE
 2 BANDS	
Flair & Zenith
Time: Friday Sept. 12
8:00-12:30
Place: S.U.B. Ballroom & Sub Party Room
FULL FACILITIES
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
* COLES NOTES
100 Titles
* MONARCH NOTES
300 Titles
*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
60 Titles
* PLAID-PROGRAMMED
LEARNING AIDS
50 titles
All available from
BOOKS
(BETTER BUY
^Vancouver. B.C.
Welcome Back
We wish you a
successful year
^£M^ui*L.
YOUR OFFICIAL U.B.C. GRADUATION
PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHERS SINCE 1969
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
lutheran   campus  ministry
5885   university    blvd.
phone:   224-1614
Opening Worship, Sunday, 10:30
A community for students, faculty, and people
of other stripes to gather to offer thanks and
encourage each other in the task of following
the Christ.
Womens
Intramurals Unit Managers
First Meeting-12:30, Friday, Sept. 12
Room 213 WAR MEMORIAL GYM Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 11,1975
Hot flashes
Pauline
available
In case you weren't on campus
during registration week, or just
plain never got around to reading
the Ubyssey's highly acclaimed
introduction to UBC, a limited
number of copies are still available
in our office.
The issue follows the
adventure* of Pauline, a
freshperson in her first brushes
with     various     university
institutions and includes some
excellent, true-to-life cartoons by
Kula. It's free, and can be had in
room 241K, in the northeast
corner on the second floor of
SUB.
The introductory issue was
recently awarded the Golden
Gonfallon, Grand Prix de le
Xllieme Exposition des Fromages
et Brouhahas in Nice, France.
Polluted
w
W.      Eckenfelder,
environmental science and
engineering professor at
Tennessee's Vanderbilt University,
will give his perspective on
pollution noon today in IRC
lecture hall 2.
Eckenfelder has written or
co-authored five books, three of
which are standard texts for
pollution control engineering
classes. He also co-edits a series of
publications on water technology.
'Tween classes
TODAY
ROWING CLUB
Rowing display, noon to 4:30 p.m.,
SUB conversation pit.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Introductory   meeting,   noon,   SUB
207-209.
PANHELLENIC
Luncheon, noon, Cecil Green.
UBC LIBERALS
Clubs    Day   booth,   11:30   a.m.   to
2:30 p.m., main floor, SUB.
CONSERVATIVE MIDDLE CLASS
NEW STUDENTS
Organizational      meetmg     and
demonstration,    noon,   SUB   south
plaza.
FRIDAY
MY-JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Demonstration,     noon,
ballroom.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Steve    Watson    on    Working    Class
Political  Action  in Canada,  8 p.m.,
1208 Granville.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Organizational   meeting,  noon SUB
215.
UBC LIBERALS
Party, 8 p.m. to midnight, SUB 212.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Opening worship for new term,
10:30 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
MONDAY
UBC MENS' TENNIS TEAM
Tryouts,    4:30   to   6   p.m.,   winter
sports centre.
TUESDAY
GOLF TEAM
Organizational   meeting,  noon, War
Memorial Gym, room 211.
LSA LEGAL ADVICE
Free    legal   advice,    noon   to    2:30
p.m., SUB 234.
INDEPENDENT SOCIALISTS
Antonio   Silva   and   Joel   Geier   on
Portugal,   8   p.m.,   Carpenters'  Hall,
2512 — 2nd Ave., Seattle.
WEDNESDAY
SHITO-RYU KARATE
Demonstration,     noon,     SUB
ballroom.
MEN'S TENNIS TEAM
Tryouts,   4:30   to   6   p.m.,   winter
sports centre.
WHITE TOWER PIZZA & SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
Steaks - Pizza - Spaghetti - Lasagna - Ravioli - Rigatoni • Chicken
Lobster - Ribs
GREY
KITS- DUNBAR - PT.
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
4:00 p.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4:00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sun.
4:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
738-9520
or 738-1113
3618 W. Broadway
W. VANCOUVER
1552 Marine Drive
926-8521
DOWNTOWN - WEST END
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11:00 a.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sunday
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
688-5491
1 359 Robson
CHARGEX —
MASTER CHARGE
Dining Lounge- Full Facilities - Take Out or Home Delivery
"Late delivery call V2 hour before closing time."
^22SSSfc2lSS6£ESSSlSS2!i——2—2—Ss
USE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIEDS
To Sell - Buy - Inform
The U.B.C. Campus Market Place
Write your Ad below and mail to:      The Ubyssey Advertising Dept.
Student Union Bldg.
UBC-
Name
Aridrp<;<;
Phnnp
Please run my ad for days under classification
 1 enclose £ in full navment.
.
CLASSIFICATIONS
STUDENT RATES
COMMERCIAL
RATES
5—Coming Events
10—For Sale - Commercial
11—For Sale - Private
15—Found
20—Housing
25—Instruction
30—Jobs
35—Lost
40—Messages
50—Rentals
60—Rides
65—Scandals
70—Services
80—Tutoring
85—Typing
90—Wanted
99—Miscellaneous
Per Day
3 lines                          1.00
Additional lines           .25
1" display                    3.50
2" display                   6.00
1 Day Add'l Days
1.80            1.50
.40              .35
5.50            5.00
9.75             9.00
ONE
WORD
IN
EACH
SPACE
1
2
3
4
5
6
SPECIAL THIS
WEEK
ON
HOUSE
TRAINED
PLANTS
PISTIL & CALYX
Finest Selection
of
TROPICAL PLANTS
POTTED FLOWERS
FRESH CUT FLOWERS
in Vancouver
Open EVERY day
of the year
STUDENT & FACULTY
DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
2325 CAMBIE
at 7th
874-7932
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
on every bicycle
POINT
YCtfS
3771 West 10th Avenue
224-3536
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
Th*
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
f(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)]
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes- Gifts, etc.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 line's, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable m
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
*
5 — Coming Events
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11— For Sale — Private
1972 RENAULT SS. Rally prepared.
Modified engine. 30 M.P.G. $1,600.00.
Roger.  985-7018  or 987-5138.
1964 SUNBEAM ALPINE substantially
restored No rust. No bumps. Hardtop.
Soft-top tonneau wires. Will need
engine work shortly $599 OBO —
929-1068.
FOR   SALE:   1968   TOYOTA   COROLLA.
Automatic, good condition. $985 o.b.o.
Phone 261-3998.
VALIANT 196S SLANT, 2 door. Excel,
cond., city tested. $650 o.n.o Phone
224-6647.
1968 DATSUN 1600, 4-dr. sedan. New
battery, 7 good tires, 81,000 miles.
$750 o.n.o 988-3676.
30 — Jobs (Continued)
MARKET RESEARCH — No experience.
Part-time. Car asset. Evenings .Week-,
end work. Phone 298-4867.
TYPIST/CLERK required for 2 hours
per day Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays.   Publication  Office,   S.U.B.  241.
35 - Lost
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
60 - Rides
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
PEG'S   PLACE   POTTERY  SCHOOL
27S0 Alma at 12th
Fall clases start Sept. 20. Morning
and evening classes for 'wheel throwing. Tuesday afternoon children's
class. Phone and register now —
738-2912.
30 — Jobs
ROOM AND BOARD plus, $75.00 a
month for assistance to faculty family
in preparation of evening meal and
some supervision of children, 9 to 14.
Mostly between 3:15 and 7:00 p.m.
Ten minutes from campus. Non-
smoker. 224-5056.
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and nights.
Phone 681-9816 for appointment.
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
FOR RENT: London (Central) England.
Luxury furnished flat with balcony,
two bedrooms, fully-equipped kitchen,
dishwater, deep freeze, linen. 100 yds.
Kensington Gardens, £200 (sterling) a
month. Available for 18 months. Contact Currie, 12 Elm Road, Hereford,
England or phone Weybridge, England
42817 (evenings). Thursday, September 11, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Sexism in high schools blasted
A senate sub-committee has
blamed, high school career counsellors for the "significantly low"
enrolment of women in many UBC
faculties.
The report by the senate ad hoc
committee on enrolment of women
blasted     high     schools     for
segregating students according to
sexual stereotypes.
In a section titled "Pre-
university problems, in counselling," the report says ". . .only
boys were allowed to attend a
discussion on architecture, for
instance, while girls were chan
nelled  into   lectures   on   home
economics or nursing.
One committee member found
on a tour of B.C. high schools that
". . .many counsellors (were)
completely unaware that women
would be considered for admission
into a faculty that was seen to be
traditionally male."
Group pushes bus petition
A group pushing a King Edward
Ave. crosstown bus service is
circulating a petition on campus in
an effort to get student support for
the idea.
The petition is sponsored by the
traffic and transit committee of the
Conference of Local Area Councils,
a coalition of lower mainland
citizens' groups.
There is currently no east-west
bus   service   offered   between
Careers 75 hires 25
Twenty-five UBC students found
some relief from summer job
worries through the Careers 75
program.
The provincially funded
program sponsored 11 three-week
projects on campus in August.
Total money granted was
$13,116, which paid administrative
costs and provided salaries
ranging from $416 to $520 for three
weeks of work.
The Alma Mater Society contracted seven of the 11 projects.
Three people were hired to clean
up and organize the AMS's central
filing system and another was
hired to conduct a feasibility study
of the student dental plan proposed
by the Student Unity slate as part
of its election platform (it would
cost $424,000 to operate in its first
year, the study found).
Two women were hired to study
the possibility of establishing a
rape crisis centre for the university community and two men had
the job of compiling a program for
the AMS speakers committee.
The AMS hired two students to
write a student handbook section
for this year's edition of Bird Calls,
the campus telephone directory,
and two others examined the
question of garbage recycling in
the lower mainland.
And AMS secretary Ellen Paul
was hired to do preliminary
research for this year's open
house.
Other recipients of grants were
the B.C. Students' Federation and
the engineers' electric car project.
The most noteworthy BCSF
project was a guide to the Canada
Student Loan plan which will be in
print later this term but can be
viewed right now by going up to
their offices on the second floor of
SUB and bugging someone.
Develop your
READING POTENTIAL
The University of British Columbia offers Reading
Improvement Programs for people in the community and for
secondary, college and University students. Classes begin the
week of September 29 1975, and participants have the option
of taking classes during afternoons, evenings or Saturday
mornings. For a detailed brochure and registration form, call
228-2181, local 220.
Centre for Continuing Education
University of British Columbia
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
Hear Ye! Hear Ye!
The Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia is pleased to
announce openings on the
following committees:
PRESIDENTIAL COMMITTEES
1. Traffic & Parking
2. Bookstore
3. Food Services
4. Master Teacher
5. Safety, Security & Fire Prevention
6. Charitable Donations
7. Men's Athletic Committee
AMS COMMITTEES
1. Elections
2. Eligibility
3. Student Court
4. Speakers
5. Special Events
6. Restructuring of the AMS
7. Housing
8. War Memorial Gym Trust
Advisory
N ominations for the above positions close Monday, September
15, 1975. Applicants are asked to submit a short letter, stating
their name, address, telephone number, past experience and
reasons for their application. Please contact AMS Secretary
Ellen Paul, SUB 250, 228-2050 for further information.
N.B. Those students who have previously applied for these
Committees in the spring are now asked to reapply as
some applications were lost.
Broadway to the north and Forty-
first to the south.
"The petition will likely succeed
if we can accumulate as many
signatures for it as we did for the
Forty-ninth Ave. bus route
petition," said Nathan Davidowicz,
Alma Mater Society transit liaison
officer, Wednesday.
B.C. Hydro began running a
Forty-ninth Ave. crosstown bus in
March (despite protests by a
number of area residents) after a
petition similar to the one
currently being distributed
collected more than 4,000
signatures.
Davidowicz said the petition will
be circulated until mid-November,
at which time it will be presented
to Vancouver city and Burnaby
municipal councils.
The proposed route runs between
UBC and Burnaby Municipal Hall
and follows Gilpin, Moscrop,
Twenty-ninth, Slocan, Kingsway,
King Edward and Sixteenth.
But the report could offer no
immediately effective remedies to
correct the situation.
It recommended that faculties
involved in the training of teachers
and counsellors "include in their
curricula a consideration of the
processes resulting in sex-role
stereotyping."
It also suggested counsellors and
teachers be made aware of this
situation through continuing
education courses and education
workshops.
The committee also blamed the
difficulty many women have in
financing their education on their
sex, and blamed university
literature for "reflecting the
assumption that certain fields will
not be of interest to women, or that
others will be of particular interest
to women."
Other recommendations include:
• The university should make
clear in all of its publications
having regard to courses,
programs and recruitment that all
courses and programs are open to
men and women.
« Hiring more qualified women
as faculty members, especially in
those faculties where women are
significantly     under-represented.
9 The university should
"facilitate the implementation of
child care services."
« The university, through the
Universites Council, should
establish a program of financial
aid to single parent families.
In the 1974-75 winter session,
12,664 men and 8,736 women were
enrolled in graduate and undergraduate programs. In the science
faculty, men outnumbered women
2,846 to 979.
UBC GRADS
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB WELCOMES YOU BACK!
AT CECIL GREEN PARK
SEPTEMBER 11 -OPENING DAY
THURSDAYS - 8 p.m. -12:30 a.m.
FRIDAYS - 8 p.m.-1 a.m.
A gathering place for alumni and UBC students who are graduating in
1975-76.
Yearly   membership  $5  at  the  door.  A UBC Alumni  Association
program.     ^ormation: 228-3313
Auditions for the
Theatre Department's Production of
DOCTOR FAUSTUS
by Christopher Marlowe
to be presented October 29-November 8
Directed by Donald Soule
will be held on
THURSDAY, September 11 (1230 230,
FRIDAY, September 12(230 530)
Hn Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building\
(19 Men and 8 Women Required)
Auditions Open To All UBC Students, Faculty and Staff
FREDERIC WOOD THEATREE
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
SEPTEMBER 12-20
(Previews Sept. 10 & 11)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by John Brockington
Settings by Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes by David Lovett
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $6.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 10 - 20 MISALLIANCE by Shaw
Oct. 29 - Nov. 8 DOCTOR FAUSTUS by Marlowe
Jan. 14 - 24 SCAPINO by Moliere
March 3 - 13 SPRING'S AWAKENING by Wedekind
BOX OFFICE   *   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   •   ROOM 207
rSunnnrt Your Campus Theatre. Page 8
i  n c
t  o a c  I
■ nursaay, jcpicniuai   i i, jj/v
1975-6 enrolment is up
OTTAWA (CUP) — Advance
statistics on education released by
Statistics Canada snow that
university and college enrolment is
expected to increase this year.
Estimates for the 1975-76 school
year indicate university enrolment
will be up about 3.5 per cent and
college enrolment 4.4 per cent
while the number of elementary
and secondary school students
continues to decline.
University enrolment is
estimated at 363,000 and college
enrolment at 220,000. The number
of full-time post-secondary
teachers is estimated at 47,600 up
1,300 or 2.9 per cent from 1974-75. i
Elementary-secondary school
enrolment is expected to drop 1.3
per cent to 5.5 million in 1974-75.
The decline is expected to continue
into the early 1980's, reflecting the
low birth rate of the last decade.
Full-time teaching staff is expected to be 271,800, down 800 from
1974-75.
Total national expenditure on
education for 1975-76 is estimated
at $12.2 billion, up 15.5 per cent
BCASU now BCSF
The B.C. Association of Student
Unions has become the B.C.
Students' Federation.
BCSF membership will be
basically the same as that of the
BCASU — representatives of
student councils from B.C.
universities and colleges.
The BCASU was disbanded at a
March 19 meeting at Simon Fraser
University.
Alma   Mater   Society   internal
Senators in
Six new students were voted to
the university senate # April 1,
joining 11 others on the 77-member
body.
Elected as senators at large for
one-year terms were Gordon
Blankstein, unclassified; Gary
Moore, commerce 4; Ron Dumont,
arts 4; Brian Krasselt, science 4;
and Brian Higgins,   unclassified.
Garth Sundeen won the right to
represent grad students on the
senate, outpolling Bernie Bischoff
10 votes to eight.
affairs officer Jennifer Fuller said
Monday federation members intend the new organization to be a
more organized and forceful
lobbying group than was the
BCASU.
BCSF objections are universal
accessibility to post-secondary
education, democratization of
education and unity of air B.C.
student movements.
A provincial government grant
enabled the federation ot hire three
staff members for the summer.
Their job was to research student
housing, financial aid, feasibility of
a dental plan for students, student
unemployment, day care and the
organization of a lottery to raise
funds for the BCSF.
Reports will be made at the
federation's next general meeting,
Sept. 20 and 21 at Malaspina
College in Nanaimo.
Unlike the BCASU, the BCSF
intends to incorporate, but when it-
does it is likely to change its name
because the B.C. Sports Federation
already uses the same initials.
THE "HEW"
PONDEROSA SNACK BAR
ON THE WEST MALL
Now Open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday
CHAR BROILED BURGERS
SHORT ORDERS
SANDWICHES
SNACKS
CURRY OF THE DAY
Bottled beverage available to those 19 years and over
from 12 a.m. to 2 p.m.
DR. W. W. ECKENFELDER
of
Vanderbilt "University
world authority on pollution
engineering
will  hold a
free public lecture entitled
A PERSPECTIVE
ON  POLLUTION
Thursday Sept. llth  at 12:30  p.m.
Lecture   Hall   No. 2
Woodward. Instructional
Resources Centre UBC
Sponsored   by
Cecil H. & Ida Green
Visiting Professorship
Fund
from a year earlier. But spending
on education as a percentage of
personal income and gross
. national product has declined since
1971 despite the increases in
dollars spent. Education costs
have not risen as quickly as those
for other social services.
Per capita spending for
education in 1974 averaged $472
nationally. The breakdown by
provinces: Alberta $497, Ontario
$489, Quebec $479, Manitoba $450,
Prince Edward Island $449, Nova
Scotia $441, Saskatchewan $415,
British Columbia $412,
Newfoundland  $396,   New   Brunswick $396.
CANADA STIDENT LOANS
AT THE
ROYAL BANK
the helpful bank
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Charlie Mayne, manager
. Audrey Budlow, Senior Loans Officer
Tina Verveda, Loans Officer
10th at Sasamat — 228-1141
HELENE
0P$&
MARINE
HAIRSTYLINC
FOR MEN
SALON
JACQUIE
Helene and Jacquie formerly of U.B.C. village wish to invite our many friends from
U.B.C. to our new hairstyling salon in the Marine Building corner of Burrard and
Hastings. Why not drop in the next time you are downtown or call for an appointment.
MARINE HAIRSTYLING
355 A BURRARD (MARINE BLDG.)
Monday -
688-9214
Friday - 9:00 - 5:30
Commerce
At the Commerce, we offer a complete
range of student services, to help you
with your banking needs. Services
that you'll need now, and after
graduation.
Like savings accounts, to help
your money grow. A variety of loan
programs, including Bankplan and
student loans. Chargex, and more.
Get to know the people at the
Commerce on or near your campus.
Drop in and ask about opening a
savings account with us.
We think you'll find our people
are tops, too.       — ■«
<»>
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE

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