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The Ubyssey Mar 1, 2010

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Array SINCE 1918 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.03.01
MARCH 01, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XLV
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey:
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
End-to-end action at a frantic pace so
far. Virginie Menard, Annika Westpha
and Trevor Record are dictating the pace
of play right now. Andrew Bates, Kasha
Chang, Austin Holm, Justin McElroy and
an Turner need to weather these first
few minutes. Paul Bucci turnover deep
n Trevor Melanson's zone. Gerald Deo,
Keegan Bursaw, Michael Thibault and
Geoff Lister stop a point-blank shot. Jonny
Wakefield, John Bishara, and Ashley
Whillans come an inch from a goal when
the puck slides along the goal line during a
scrum in front of the net. Sarah Ling, Alice
Hou and Sarah Chung pushed the puck off
the line and under goalie Katarina Grgic
Bad pass by Tagh Sira, shot, Dorian Geiger
scores on the rebound.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \__]Q
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
• Price Reduced. 2005 Acura
TL fully loaded, 56,000 km. 4
doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior in good condition, $21,000. Contact calvin.
magic32@gmail.com.
• Vansterdam Clothing original
weed t-shirts! Coupon code
20% off: 'UBCTOKES'. For more
info, visit vansterdamclothing.
com.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every Sunday
and Wednesday, 2pm, SUB 24.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY
MUSICS MEAL'Like to play music? Just want to listen? Looking
for a sense of community? This
is for all members of the UBC
community who want to have a
good meal and great conversation. All meals are home-cooked
and are vegetarian-friendly • Every Monday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,
Chapel of the Epiphany (6030
Chancellor Blvd), for more info
e-mail revnathanwright@mac.
com.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Run for fun!
Walk for fun! Get healthy and
come run orwalkthe UBC REC
Noon "Fun" Run, hosted by the
UBC REC Health Promotions
Department which takes participants throughout many of
UBC's most scenic areas on a
course ranging from 3 to 5km.
• Every Thursday, 12:30pm,
meeting outside the doors of
the Student Rec Centre.
LIFE INTO FICTION - LEVEL 1 • Join
award-winning writer Lillian Bor-
aks-Nemetz for a workshop that
turns inner experience into ideas
for publishable stories. Learn to
write with greater awareness of
human behaviour, found beneath
the daily facade, while sharpening your writing techniques. Focus will be on recapturing the
past by a visit to the memory
bank, interviews with relatives
or a return to the place of one's
origin. • Runs until Apr. 6, 1pm-
3:30pm, Room 105, Ponderosa
Annex C, $265, register online
at reg2.cstudies.ubc.ca/course.
jsp?courseld=AW566.
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT
• Regent College Lookout Gallery presents Tantramar Gothic, a collection of work by Dan
Steeves. • Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-
5pm, Sat. 12pm-4pm, Regent
College, 5800 University Blvd.,
runs until Monday, Mar. 1.
THE SECRETS OF TRADITIONAL
ITALIAN CUISINE • This course
takes you into the kitchens of
Italian regions such as Lombar-
dy, Piedmont and Tuscany to
sample pasta, pizza, antipasti
and risotto made the right way-
fresh fish and shellfish, hearty
treatments of meat and game
and irresistible gelato. Course
materials, a chef's apron and
five multi-course meals are
included in the course fee. •
Runs from Mar. 3-31, 5:30pm-
8:30pm, Food, Nutrition and
Health (FNH) Building, $525,
includes course materials and
five multi-course meals.
MONDAY, MAR. 1
UNDERSTANDINGWINE:AN INTRODUCTION (PART1)* A wine instructor provides an introduction to
the world of wine. The instructor will be available for wine consultation for a half-hour after the
end of each class. Each participant receives a starter kit,
consisting of six wine tasting
glasses. Learn how to shop and
read label information, discover
how wines age and learn how to
choose wines to pair with different foods. • Runs until Mar. 29,
6pm-8:30pm, Room 102, Ponderosa Annex C, $395.
TUESDAY, MAR. 2
EXPLORING CULTURE THROUGH
CULINARY ARTS • Join UBC instructors as they help you explore the history and culture of
their countries through group
restaurant outings and discussions about your dining experiences. These courses are offered in English. The fee includes lectures, four dinners
at various restaurants and all
taxes and gratuities. • Runs
until Mar. 30, 6:30pm-7:30pm,
first class meets in Buchanan
D, $325 plus tax.
UNIVERSITY-WIDE ORIENTATION
FOR UBC STAFF AND FACULTY •
We invite all new UBC Faculty and Staff to the next university-wide orientation at the
Point Grey campus. Schedule
includes a welcome from Brian
Sullivan and the VP Students
office, presentations such as
a History of UBC, information
on resources such as Supply Management, Bookstore,
Sustainability, and UBC REC
and an optional guided tour. •
11:30am-3:30pm, Cecil Green
Park House, 6251 Cecil Green
Park Rd., register for free at
hr.ubc.ca/odl/most/uwo.html
(requires CWL).
STUDY ABROAD AT HERSTMONCEUX
CASTLE IN ENGLAND • Built in the
1400s, Herstmonceux Castle
is the oldest brick building of
the art of loving
j* f 1819 W. 5th & Burrard | 604.742.9988 | www.artofloving.ca
Open 7 Days a Week 110 AM -10 PM on Thursdays and Fridays
any note still standing in England. The program is available to
students worldwide who have
completed at least one year of
university study in any degree
program. The high point of each
term is the major field trip to
the cities of Liverpool and Edinburgh in the fall and to the cities of Brussels and Paris in the
Winter and Spring. • 2pm-3pm,
IKBLC, application deadline for
Term 2 is May 14, 2010.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 3
WORK YOUR BA: TOASTMASTERS •
The ability to communicate effectively gets you noticed in life
and work. Get your public speaking skills up to speed with this
workshop that focuses on applying practical strategies to help you
become a more effective and engaging public speaker. Learn the
Toastmasters method and from
the experience of veteran speakers. • 1pm-2pm, Angus 426.
THURSDAY, MAR. 4
SPARTACUS YOUTH CLUB CLASS SERIES • The Spartacus Youth Club
presents their second class: Independence for Quebec! Marxism and the National Question. •
6:30pm, SUB Room 224, more
info at trotskyist_vancouver@
shawcable.com or call at (604)
687-0353.
FRIDAY, MAR. 5
FREE FILM SCREENS AT UBC • A
free double bill of provocative cinema! Crime directed
by and starring Gemini Award
winning Asst. Professor, Tom
Scholte, is a gripping feature
length drama probing the social and psychological forces
that shape criminal behaviour.
Alyssa is a research-based fictional short film produced by
Dr Kirsty Johnston and UBC
students supports interprofessional education in cancer care.
Filmmakers on hand for Q&A.
• 7:30pm, Royal Bank Cinema,
Chan Centre, free tickets, for
more info call (604) 822-2678.
GENDERAND SEXUALITY IN LATIN
AMERICA: READING & DISCUSSION
SESSION ON "STORIES OF RACE,
GENDER AND CLASS" • The Liu
Research Group on Gender
and Sexuality in Latin America aims to contribute to ongoing discussions about Latin American gender relations,
sexual politics and feminist theories by bringing together graduate students, post-doctoral
fellows and faculty interested
in these issues. • 4pm-6pm,
Liu Institute for Global Issues,
3rd Floor Boardroom, refreshments provided.
SUNDAY, MAR. 7
OPERA TEAS IN THE GARDEN • Opera Teas bring you closer to the
music you love, and to the star
performers of tomorrow. Light
refreshments are served, as
you enjoy the magic of opera
in a comfortable setting. When
you subscribe, you can choose
one of our informative, informal
Opera Teas for only $10 more.
• 2pm-4pm, UBC Botaincal
Gardens, $20 adults, $15 students and seniors, please call
(604) 822-6725.
MONDAY, MAR. 8
SMALL (MINING) IS BEAUTIFUL-
ENGINEERING TO ALLEVIATE GLOBAL POVERTY • The UBC Faculty of Applied Science is taking part in Celebrate Research
Week. Learn from the entertaining and engaging Mining
Engineering Professor Marcello
M. Veiga. This talk focuses on
how engineering can help alleviate global poverty. The findings are a result of a six-year
project sponsored by the United Nations. • 6:30pm-8pm,
Robson Square.
TUESDAY, MAR. 9
FOUR WAYS TO COMBAT CLIMATE
CHANGE* Presented by Mechanical Engineering Professor Robert L. Evans, this talk focuses on
energy use and its impact on the
environment-one of the most
important technical, social and
public-policy issues facing humanity today. • 6:30pm-8pm,
Robson Square.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 10
AMAZING PAPER: THE HISTORY AND
ART OF PAPERMAKING • Most people take paper for granted. Learn
from Chemical and Biological Engineering Professor Mark Martinez paper's rich history and its
impact on society and understand the manufacturing process with emphasis on sustainability. • 12pm-1pm, Kaiser
2020/2030.
FROM TOY TRAINS TO AIRPLANES:
ARE WE SERIOUS ABOUT SAFETY?
• From the onset of the industrial revolution until a few decades ago, safety was a topic of great importance. But
in recent years, we have become complacent, that is, until a tragedy occurs. Explore issues of public safety with Materials Engineering Professor
Anoush Poursartip. • 6:30pm-
8pm, Robson Square.
THURSDAY, MAR. 11
MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN OUR
WORLD • UBC Faculty of Applied Science graduate students' leading-edge research
is shaping and improving the
fields of health, search and
rescue, mining and more.
Our graduate students will be
showing off their research and
talking about the differences they are making. • 12pm-
6pm, Kaiser Atrium.
FRIDAY, MAR. 12
A CONCERT FOR HAITI • Come enjoy an evening of live music performed by unique local artists.
Proceeds will go towards supporting the ongoing medical relief efforts in Haiti. • 6pm reception, 7:30pm concert, Graham House, Green College, $20
tickets.
INKJET PRINTING—FROM DOCUMENT PRINTING TO TISSUE ENGINEERING • Explore with Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Konrad Walus
the innovative concepts in
inkjet microfabrication and
the rapidly emerging possibilities. • 12pm-1pm, Kaiser
2020/2030.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 17
IMAGINE YOUR ARTS MAJOR 2010*
Attend the Imagine Your Arts
Major Fair! Join professors,
department advisors and student leaders for an amazing
opportunity to have all your
academic questions explored
and answered! Workshops by
Go Global, Arts Academic Advising, Career Services, and
Arts Co-op will be held from
Mar. 8-12. Learn about potential careerpaths, gaining work
experience before graduation,
studying abroad, and making sure that all your choices are right for your degree!
Registration is now open. •
11am-2pm, SUB Ballroom,
for more info, go to arts.ubc. 2010.03.01/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/3
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QUOTE OF THE WEEK
"1 ran down the stairs and threw him the only thing 1 could throw down: a small bag of Pocky
sticks, on which 1 wrote: 'Dear Patrick Chan, good job. Love watching you skate. You make
us Chinese Canadians proud. Hope you like Pocky sticks!'"
—Fourth-year student Ruby Law, on watching Canadian figure skater Patrick Chan skate live
Blueberry farmer strikes golden redemption
DORIAN GEIGER
sports@thesheaf.com
Canadian athletes have instigated a golden domino effect in
the quickly-dwindling days of
the Olympics, andJasey-Jay Anderson's win was no exception.
Not many of Canada's golden
athletes' backgrounds are as rural as that of parallel giant slalom snowboarder Anderson.
What does Anderson, the fastest man in the world to shred it
up in snowboard parallel giant
slalom at the 2010 Olympics, do
for a living?
Numerous top-ten
podium finishes on
the world circuit
have defined the
35-year-old s stellar
snowboarding
career.
He farms crops of blueberries.
The native Quebec's area of
employment sounds calming:
"blueberry farming." Picking
berries in warm summer weather frankly sounds pleasant—the
exact opposite of the adrenaline rush that boarders of Anderson's calibre would thrive
upon when staring down the
icy peaks of a mountain.
An ecstatic J. J. Anderson holds up his gold medal for reporters on Sunday. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
"The blueberry farm was the
project that kept my mind and
my heart at peace for all those
failed Olympics," said Anderson, addressing reporters with
gold wrapped around his neck
on Sunday morning.
After strongly contemplating retirement after a medal-
less 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics, Anderson said harvesting bountiful blueberries was
a tranquil way to transition
into a more sedentary, familial lifestyle.
When the Vancouver Olympics
were announced in 2003, plans
changed for Anderson and he reentered the snowboarding world,
all the while keeping blueberry
farming an importantpart of his
life to maintain balance.
The blueberry farm did bring
me a lot of peace," he said. "I
love being outside and creating
something.
"I was able to provide healthy,
nutritious, nature's candy to the
local area and residents of Trem-
blay [Quebec]—and I love it."
Farming, as Canada's pioneers
have done for centuries, requires
all the patience, grunt-work, gambling and determination snowboarding demands of its radical
athletes.
"Being an athlete, you work
on yourself, but you don't really
create anything—you're not productive in a tangible way," he explained ofthe difference between
being an athlete and a farmer.
Leading up to his February
2 7 gold medal grab, the veteran
boarder had accomplished everything within reach—except
an Olympic medal.
The blueberry farm
was the project that
kept my mind and
my heart at peace
for all those failed
Olympics.
J.J.ANDERSON
CANADIAN ATHLETE
Numerous top-ten podium
finishes on the world circuit
have defined the 35-year-old's
stellar snowboarding career. After four Olympics and 20 years
of disciplined snowboarding,
Anderson's taste of gold on
home soil has finally made his
athletic pursuit all worth it.
What's next for the agriculturally-minded Anderson?
After finally attaining gold
status, Anderson jokingly told
The Ubyssey that there's a possibility of "Anderson's Own" blueberry jam hitting the shelves in
commemoration of his lone-
awaited Olympic triumph. W
Two is the magic number for Hamelin
Team Canada sets international record on home soil.
DORIAN GEIGER
sports@thesheaf.com
You mighthave heard of Charles
Hamelin. He is Canada's newest
sports celebrity and he enjoys
drawing comics in his spare
time. You might also have heard
he skates circles around international athletes for kicks.
After the Canadian speed
skater was overtaken in the final stretch of the 1500m by the
Korean speed skating team last
week, Canada's skating poster
child told a nation of stunned
fans to be patient, promising
them a glorious medal later in
the tournament.
He enjoys drawing
comics in his spare
time.
So what's better than one gold
medal? Two is the obvious answer—just ask the softspoken
Hamelin.
On February 2 6 Hamelin doubled up on his promise, striking gold on the podium in both
the 500m short track and the
5000m relay.
Up until Hamelin's gold, Canada's speed skating team had only
captured two silver medals, a disappointing showing for the well-
oiled skating machine that was
expected to excel in Vancouver.
It might have been a different story for Hamelin had US
athlete Apolo Ohno—who boasts
America's most expansive all-
time winter medal collection
with eight—been fully recharged
after a gruelling ten days of international competition. Ohno
was disqualified for bumping
Canadian Frangois-Louis Trem-
blay at the Richmond Olympic
Oval during Hamelin's gold
medal skate.
Hamelin was narrowly edged
by Ohno in his fourth-place finish in 1500m short track, and
the two were fiercely competitive all week. Despite the level
of intensity between Canada-US
Olympic matchups, Hamelin was
quick to say he doesn't think of
Ohno as a rival.
"The competition has always
been there, I think, since the
world cup circuit," Hamelin told
the press on February 27.
"He's never been a big rival,"
he said. "He's just another competitor. I'm glad to be able to
race against him. It's hard to
beat him."
The 25-year-old's triumph
marked an onslaught of Canadian medals, bringing the red
and white a step closer to running away with the Olympic gold
medal standings.
He's never been a
big rival. He's just
another competitor.
I'm glad to be able
to race against him.
It's hard to beat
him.
CHARLES HAMELIN
CANADIAN ATHLETE
Less than 24 hours after
Hamelin captured gold, Canada's team pursuit skating team,
snowboarder Jasey-Jay Anderson and Kevin Martin's curling team all draped themselves
in Canadian flags as more gold
medals found homes on the
necks of Canucks.
Canada has achieved a record
for the most Winter Olympic
medals won by a host country.
With the country's 14 gold medals in the Games, Canada has
set a new record for the most
gold medals during a Winter
Olympics, tl
OLYMPICS BRIEFS
UBC PROFS SPEAK ON 2010
OLYMPIC LEGACY
Last Friday three UBC experts
discussed post-Olympic social, economical and environmental impacts at the BC Media Centre. They also presented the progress of the world's
first Olympic Games Impact
(OGI) project.
The OGI project is a study
designed by the International Olympic Committee used
to measure the long-term impact of hosting an Olympic
Games, with a particular focus on sustainability.
With 126 national and regional environmental, social
and economic indicators, the
OGI game times report—the
second report out of three—
will be finalized this December.
The final report in 2013 will
combine the 2009 pre-Games
report and the 2010 Games time
report. The project is co-led by
Dr Rob VanWynsbergh, assistant professor in UBC Human Kinetics and UBC Faculty of Education, and Bob Sparks, director
of UBC Human Kinetics.
—Sarah Chung
OHNO UPSET AT
DISQUALIFICATION
American short-track skater Apolo Ohno was having an
amazing Olympic experience
here in Vancouver, having won
the bronze in the 1000m and silver in the 1500m.
In the 500m finals, however, disaster struck. Ohno, who
was in last place for the entire
race, tried to pass Canadian
skater Francois-Louis Trem-
blay but became entangled instead. All of the skaters stumbled, and Ohno was disqualified for having pushed the skater ahead of him.
When asked about the disqualification, Ohno remarked,
"You know, it's the head Canadian referee out there and
there were two Canadians in
the race."
—Tagh Sira
PARALYMPIC COMMITTEE
PRESIDENT TO CARRY TORCH
Arnold Boldt has been selected as the first individual
to carry the Paralympic torch
when the relay begins next
week, reported the Moose Jaw
Times-Herald.
Boldt, who is President of
the Canadian Paralympic Committee, has been involved in
athletics his entire life. The
Moose Jaw native lost one of
his legs in a farming accident
when he was three years old.
Boldt has competed in five
Paralympics, starting with the
1976 Games.
—Samantha Jung 4/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.03.01
Martin finally gets his gold
Martin (far left) and his team do their part to dispel myths about curlers' physiques, gerald deo photo/the ubyssey
ANDREW BATES
western.bureau@cup.ca
Eight years after losing to Pal
Trulsen by one rock in the tenth
end at Salt Lake City, Kevin Martin finally got his gold in men's
curling with a 6-3 victory over
Team Norway.
Despite the fact that his old rival happened to coach the Norwegians, the newest golden skip
maintained that his first duty was
to his country before any personal rivalry.
"Coming in here, honestly, the
first goal was to get a medal so
that we helped Canada's medal
standings," he said. "The second
[goal], for myself, was to get up
that podium one step higher."
The 43-year-old Martin, who
didn't qualify for the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, was happy to finally be on top. "It was a
lot of years, being on the second
step ofthe podium," he said. "It
took eight years to get a second
crack at it. It felt really good."
The pressure of playing at
home was something they were
prepared to deal with, according
to Marc Kennedy, team second.
"When you play on a team with
Kevin Martin, obviously the expectations are very high, and the
target is on your back from day
one," he said.
Kennedy said that media always asked about how they were
dealing with the pressure. "We
had big wins and big losses, and
kind of experienced all ofthe ups
and downs over the last three and
a half years," he said.
Several members ofthe team
insisted that that these Games
have seen a change in the reality of curling.
"The whole image ofthe sport
[is] changing," said Kennedy. He
claimed that curlers generally
aren't out of shape beer drinkers
as the stereotypes might suggest,
"That's going away because the
guys who are doing that aren't
sucessful any more, because
they're getting beaten by the fitt-
ter, stronger, better athletes."
Team third John Morris has
written a book about fitness
in curling, and the team has
claimed athleticism as one of
its strengths.
"One of our focuses as a team
from the beginning was...just
trying to be the fittest team out
there," he said. "At the end of 11
games of working our tail off, we
were still probably the freshest
team physically and mentally."
The team said they gained
from the atmosphere of performing at home. The Vancouver Olympic Centre became one
of the hottest tickets during the
games, as 5 500 fans would regularly fill the stadium. "The atmosphere in our venue was something... we've never experienced
before," said team lead Ben He-
bert. "It really pushed us to play
better, knowing everyone's behind you."
Morris agreed. "I don't think
I've ever been prouder to wear
a maple leaf on my back and be
Canadian," he said.
"It was probably the proudest
moment of our lives," said Kennedy. "We were really really fortunate to experience what we've
experienced." tl
The pursuit team display their medals, gerald deo photo/the ubyssey
Team effort for Canada
in men's pursuit
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
"Those medals just open doors
everywhere," joked gold medalist Mathieu Giroux after taking
the gold medal in speed skating team pursuit.
Giroux and his teammates Lucas Makowsky and Denny Morrison snatched another gold medal for Canada on Saturday in the
3200m race, bringing the total number of medals won this
year in long-track speed skating to five.
The team placed only two
tenths of a second ahead of
their American rivals. Morrison told reporters that he was
pleased with their win, "especially against the US because
they're steamrolling ahead with
the medal count."
The athletes said that teamwork played a major factor in
their win.
"The first [team pursuit] race
that the three of us skated together...really opened doors for the
possibility, because we knew
how strong the three of us were,"
he said.
Morrison said that he has
wanted to win at the Olympics
since he was young. "I feel like I
was inspired in grade five when I
was tenyears old, and I thought,
1 want to win a gold medal one
day,'" he said.
Makowsky brushed aside
the negative press the Canadian speed skating team received
at the beginning of the Games
for their lack of medals.
"We saw this in Beijing. We
didn't have our strongest events
at the beginning...kind of the
same thing happened here," he
explained.
"We shone where we were the
strongest. The Games aren't over
'til they're over, and it was awesome to see the gold medals start
to come in like they did."
And as for their reflections on
the Games, the team was pleased
all around.
"I've never seen anything like
it," commented Morrison. "Everyone wanted to be part of the
Games. It's something I'll remember forever."
Morrison announced that
he would be auctioning off the
Team Canada jersey he wore that
bears his name and donating
the proceeds to KidSport Canada, an organization that provides financial support to children so they can engage in organized sport, til
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
CAMPUS + COMMUNITY PLANNING
Public Open House
DP 10002: New Secondary School
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on a proposal for the
new Grade 9-12 Secondary School on West 16th Avenue. The Vancouver School Board
plans to renovate the existing former National Research Council (NRC) Building and
build a 5,250 sq.m (56,510 sq.ft) addition on the east side ofthe building. Staff from
the Vancouver School Board and Campus + Community Planning will be available to
provide information and respond to inquiries about these projects. The public is also
invited to attend the Development Permit Board Meeting shown below.
Wesbrook Mall
(ASPAC)
Crescent
West
To,■.■"-;. no;
esbrool f ^    j! \
pac) j       n~ \K
,la2!'2,      FsmdylSUIl!   Spoil
-■.-'
Eastf
UBC Farm
Public Open House
Thursday, March 4, 2010
5:30 - 8:00 PM
Atrium, MBA House,
3385 Wesbrook Mall
* UPDATE - DATE CHANGE *
Development Permit Board
Thursday, March 25, 2010
5:00 - 7:00 PM
Maple Room, Ponderosa
Centre, 2017 West Mall
For directions: www.maps.ubc.ca
More information on this project
is available on the C+CP website:
www.planning.ubc.ca
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, C+CP
email: karen.russell@ubc.ca.
UBC
PEER PROGRAMS.
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Community, Engagement,
Involvement!
• 14 different Peer
Programs
• 17 different paid and
volunteer positions for
2010-2011
Apply today: www.peerprograms.ubc.ca
A bird in the hand is worth two in
the bush (most ofthe time).
kate barbaria | culture@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc Election
under
investigation
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
The AMS has announced that
they have launched an independent investigation to look
into what the Elections Committee has referred to as "voting irregularities."
An independent auditor has
been hired to conduct the investigation, which has been going
on for at least a week, according
to Elections Adminstrator Isabel
Ferreras, and could influence the
results ofthe elections.
Ferreras did not give The Ubyssey many details about the investigation, and would not attribute the error to any individual
or group in particular. "It's not
necessarily a fault of anyone,"
she said. "I'm still happy with
our performance [as the Elections Committee] and we'll see
how things unfold."
AMS President Bijan Ahmadian said that he and the rest of
the newly-elected executive have
taken themselves out of the investigation and stayed at "arm's
length" from the process.
When asked if he was concerned about the potential changes to the results ofthe elections,
Ahmadian responded, "I'm definitely concerned as a president,
as a student."
Thisyear's elections saw several close races that could be
affected by the changes that
could be made due to "voting
irregularities." The presidential
race saw only a 3 7 5 vote difference between candidates Natalie Swift and Ahmadian. Closer
still was the VP External race,
in whichjeremy McElroy came
out a scant 208 votes ahead of
Stas Pavlov.
The AMS Council is expecting
a presentation by the auditor and
the Elections Committee at their
meeting this Wednesday starting
at 6pm. til
Olympic experiences
2010.03.01/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
ASHLEY WHILLANS,
ALICE HOU & SARAH LING
Contributors
TORCHBEARER CITES AMAZING
EXPERIENCE
Downtown Eastside resident
Robert Milton carried the
Olympic Torch on February 12.
The Ubyssey interviewed him
about his experience.
UBYSSEY: How did it feel to carry the torch?
MILTON: It was numbing. I
couldn't feel a thing. I was
saying 'hi' to everybody, so
many people were pulling me
aside wanting photographs. I
didn't have any idea so many
strangers would love a person carrying the torch. It was
quite the experience.
U: How were you chosen?
M: I was nominated by Gregor Robertson and members ofthe MLA
office ofthe Downtown Eastside.
Upon the nomination the Olympic
board gave me the chance to represent the Downtown Eastside.
U: How does it feel to represent
such an important community in Vancouver?
M: It is kind of shocking right
now. I don't even have the
words to express how I feel
right now and I hope a lot of
things come out of this to benefit the community.
U: What are you going to do with
the torch?
M: I am going to keep it and hang
it on my son Robert's wall. It is
going to be there for a while.
U: Any final words about how it
felt to carry the torch?
M: My friends and family have
never been prouder of me, ever.
I wasn't all that good when I
was growing up, I guess I had to
prove myself and I've done it. I
guess I proved myself good, tl
ONE STUDENT'S OLYMPIC DILEMMA
During the Olympic break, Ruby
Law, a fourth-year English Language and Linguistics major at
UBC, was unsure whether or not
she should quit her volunteer
position with VANOC.
"I'm already witnessing the
dwindling number of volunteers," she said. "I've also been
thinking of quitting volunteering
next week."
After weighing the pros and
cons, she admitted that she had
already seen her favourite figure
skater Patrick Chan skate for free,
which was one of the perks and
the only reason she volunteered
in the first place.
Law reflected on the sacrifices she has made. During
the Olympic break, for example, Law had no time to buy
red Canada clothing, do her
homework or go downtown to
enjoy the excitement because
of volunteering.
With few incentives
left to continue, she
is reminded ofthe
sacrifices she has
made.
"VANOC expects so much out
of volunteers who don't get paid
to do so much," Law said.
She felt it would be "really irresponsible" not to follow
through with her commitments.
Despite the fact that her reasons
to quit outweighed her reasons
to continue, Law stayed at her
volunteer job until it was finished, u
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT GETS
INTO CANADIAN SPIRIT
Isabel Tan, an international
student from Singapore, found
a new love for Canada while
watching the 2010 Winter Olympic Games.
Tan wasn't always enthusiastic about the Olympics, however, and at first she was sceptical
about having the Games come to
Vancouver.
"Initially, all I thought about
during the time leading up to the
Olympics was how awful traffic
would be and how I'd just hide
under a rock until the madness
was over," she said.
Yet, as the Games progressed, the energy ofthe Olympics took over, Tan admitted to
becoming "swept up" in the Olympic excitement.
"I found myself checking van-
couver2010.com daily, constantly
refreshing it for the latest news
and score updates, keeping a
close eye on how Canada was faring, and even celebrating when
the Canadian athletes brought
home medals," she said.
Watching everyone rallying
around Team Canada, wearing
their hockey jerseys, gave Tan
"a sense of national pride" and
brought her closer to her new
country, she said.
"I guess it is safe to say that
the Olympics has made me a little more Canadian," Tan added. "I
now know not one, but two lines
of the national anthem.
"Go Canada Go!" tl
PATRIOTISM FROM
TWO PERSPECTIVES
Like many UBC students, Wendy Ming could not fork over the
cash it would have taken to attend an Olympic competition.
However, that didn't stop her
from taking advantage of the
free events and atmosphere offered by the 2010 Olympics.
"I think [the Games were]
amazing because I have never
seen so many people coming together, all supporting the same
goal," said the first-year Science
student, who spent the two-week
break attending free concerts
and watching the Games from
home.
Ming described "the way everyone's bonding together as a
country and watching the people cheering for Canadian athletes" was what she'll remember most from these Games.
Mike Wu echoed the same
sentiments.
"Only the Olympics have the
magical power of bringing people from all over the world together, and they all get along
here, despite what happens between their countries in politics
or even military," said the second-year UBC student and VANOC
volunteer.
Wu, who was also a torchbearer earlier this year, described the
experience as "something I never dreamed I could do."
"Itwas such an honour to bring
joy to so many Canadians. People were so happy when I handed them my torch; their expressions were priceless and made
me proud of what I have done,"
he said.
What impressed
Wu most were
Canadians and
their patriotism.
Wu undoubtedly leaves the 2 010
Games with countless memories,
what impressed him most were the
Canadians and their patriotism.
"It has been an incredible
scene to see every time the crowd
on the SkyTrains, on the buses,
or on the streets starts singing 'O
Canada.' I believe these Games
have changed how the world sees
Canadians," he said, tl
The Winter Games are coming to UBC.
Get Ready.
Follow us on Twitter ©UBCWinterGames
www. u be. ca/2010
Get Involved. Get Around. Get Smart.
UBC
W
a placeof mind
THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC   2010   OLYMPIC    &
PARALYMPIC    SECRETA
CANADA TOOK HOME 14 GOLD MEDALS AT THE 2010 OLYMPICS.
WHERE WERE YOU WHEN CROSBY SCORED THE WINNING
GOAL?
Send your story to news@ubyssey.ca and you could be
published in our paper! 6/UBYSSEY.CA/FEATURE/2010.03.01-
2010.03.01/UBYSSEY.CA/FEATURE/7
$8.7 billion
and counting
This graph represents
the ever-increasing
costs related to the
Olympic Games as
reported by federal,
municipal and provincial governments, as
well as VANOC.
$1.9 BILLION
Canada Line
$1.74 BILLION
VANOC
operating
budget
$1.2 BILLION
Olympic Village
estimate
$900 MILLION
Security Costs
$883 MILLION
Convention
Centre
actual cost
$495 MILLION
Convention
Centre
estimated
cost
$525 MILLION
Total provincial
and federal
government
extra spending
$580 MILLION
Venue
construction
budget
$600 MILLION
Sea-to-Sky
improvements
$34 MILLION
Bid process
cost
Vancouver
Olympic
Centre
$47.5 MILLION for
post-Games
conversion to
a recreation
centre
$115 MILLION
Richmond
Oval
$117 MILLION
Own the
Podium
$25 MILLION
to upgrade
Killarney and
Trout Lake
rinks
$25 MILLION
Vancouver
operations
costs
$10.5 MILLION
Games
Preparation
Centre (Surrey)
UBC Thunderbird
Arena $10.5
MILLION beyond
VANOC funding
$8 MILLION
First Nations
Cultural
Centre
Paying for the party
At least $8.7 billion spent on the Games
8.7 BILLION
S9.8M to
Industry
Canada
$11M to the
Canadian
Security
Intelligence
Service
$1.4M for
RCMP
employee
benefits
related to
overtime
$33.8 M to
Transport
Canada
$1.2M to Public
Safety Canada
$1.2M to
Citizenship and
Immigration
Canada
$0.9M to the
Public Health
Agency of
Canada
S137M
contingency
reserve
$212M to the
Department
of National
Defence
$491.9M to the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police
ntegrated Security Unit)
$900 MILLION
SECURITY COST
BREAKDOWN
VANOC LOSES FUNDING TO
CONTRACT BUNGLING
VANOC lost millions after
signing contracts with American broadcasters because
they didn't include currency
hedging in their contracts.
Such a clause would have
pegged the amount that VANOC
was paid by the broadcasters to
the value of the contract in Canadian dollars when it was signed,
protecting against fluctuations in
the value of the American dollar.
When the Canadian and American dollars shifted to close to
parity, the value of the the contracts dropped dramatically.
IT TAKES A VILLAGE
The Olympic Village in Vancouver was a construction
project awarded to real estate
developer Millenium Development in 2006.
Originally intended to serve
as a combination of market and
social housing after it was fin-
shed being used as an athlete's
village for the Games, the project quickly went over budget,
with the city liable for the completion of the project.
The city eventually had to
borrow hundreds of millions of
dollars to complete the Village,
and Penny Ballem, the new City
Manager, says it may now cost
$1.2 billion by 2013.
Although the majority of the
housing will now be sold on the
market, it remains unclear how
much of the billion-dollar project's costs will be recouped.
Mayor Gregor Robertson has
admitted that the best the city
can hope for is to break even.
A TALE OF
INFLATING COSTS
The original cost of security for the Games was pegged
at $175 million in 2002, while
construction of venues was
set to be $470 million at the
same time.
The cost of construction soon
ballooned to $580 million and beyond as municipalities stepped
in to shoulder some of the burden. Afteryears of speculation,
it was announced that the full
cost of security would be $900
million.
The VANOC operating budget for the Olympics was initially pegged at $1.3 billion in January 2003, but was changed to
$1.63 billion by 2007, and finally
to $1.76 billion,with a $77 million contingency fund, in 2009.
TREVOR RECORD
deas@ubyssey.ca
With the 2010 Olympics over,
the price of the Games is starting to come into focus.
Around $4 billion was spent
on the Games by the Vancouver Organizing Committee
(VANOC) and multiple levels
of government, before taking related side-projects into
consideration.
After adding infrastructure upgrades and related projects into
the equation, the number reaches $8.7 billion.
VANOC'S SHARE
$2.4 billion ofthe Olympic bill
has been paid by VANOC. Of
this, $580 million came from
the provincial and federal governments to build new venues
(such as the Richmond Oval)
and upgrade the ones that already existed (such as Pacific
Coliseum). In addition, VANOC
had $1.76 billion in operating
costs, which paid for the Olympic workforce and everything
else required to stage events.
This money came from private
sources, including event tickets, the International Olympic
Committee (IOC), merchandising, and advertising and broadcasting deals.
The details of most of these
contracts is unknown because
as a private company, VANOC
is immune to Freedom of Information requests. Beyond these
operating costs was a government-approved $77 million contingency fund for unplanned expenses—it remains to be seen
how much of this has been
spent.
WHAT WE'VE BUDGETED
Once the direct costs incurred
by parties other than VANOC
are taken into consideration,
the cost of venues and operations for the Olympics balloons
by over a billion dollars.
The most eyebrow-raising of
these expenses was the security price tag. It was originally expected to cost $ 175 million, but
as the Games approached it became clear that the amount would
not even come close to covering
the actual expense of policing the
Games. The cost of security had
ballooned to $900 million once
the Olympics arrived.
The construction of sporting
venues has also gone well beyond
the $ 5 80 million allowance VANOC
was given. The City of Richmond
was stuck paying $ 115 million for
the Olympic Oval beyond VANOC
financing. The Vancouver Olympic Centre, which hosted curling,
cost $47.5 million more—apparency its conversion to a recreation centre will be rather expensive. UBC's Thunderbird Arena
upgrade costs went $10 million
beyond what VANOC estimated.
Vancouver even spent $25 million to upgrade the Killarney and
Trout Lake rinks, used as practice
facilities. Although these sporting
venues will continue to be used
after the Games, there is no question that their upgrades and constructions were motivated by the
Games alone.
The most eyebrow-
raising of these
expenses was the
security price tag.
That's not the end of the
costs. $32 million was spent on
the bid process. Vancouver will
spend at least $25 million for
their Olympics operations once
the $20 million legacy fund is
taken into account, and even
Surrey ended up paying $10
million for their Games Preparation Centre. Then there's the
money other provinces have
spent on the Games—for example, Alberta spent $ 13 million
on their pavilion.
The federal and provincial governments have budgets of $ 1.25
billion and $765 million, respectively that are explicitly earmarked
for the Games. After construction
and security budgets, that's still
over $ 500 million between the two,
which has gone to various costs
such as their tourism budget, the
Four Host First Nations, the Opening Ceremonies, the Torch Relay
and non-security essential federal services.
All told, close to $4 billion can
be counted in Olympic costs, with
well over half coming from public coffers. That doesn't even include additional cash which was
poured into infrastructure that
would support the influx of vis-
tors during the Games.
ADD IT UP
There were also a number of costly projects taken on by the federal, provincial and municipal
governments.
Vancouver's new Convention
Centre ended up costing $883
million—a huge increase over its
original $495 million price tag.
And then there's the Olympic Village, which City Manager Penny
Ballem now says may cost $1.2
billion by 2013, with no clue as
to how much might be recouped
when units are sold following
the Games.
The Office ofthe
Auditor General
of BC has been
critical ofthe
province for a lack
of transparency.
The most costly upgrade
was the new Canada Line,
which came out to $1.9 billion before operating costs.
Split between federal, provincial and Vancouver governments, in addition to Translink and Vancouver Airport
Authority, its construction
was undeniably linked to
hosting the Olympics. The
same goes for Sea-to-Sky highway improvements, which totaled $600 million.
Although none of these projects have been included in Olympic budgets, they were included in Vancouver's bid to host
the Games. When it has all been
added up, at least $4.6 billion
was spent on infrastructure upgrades for the Games. That's
not including other infrastructure upgrades such as the $3 billion Gateway Program, a Lower Mainland road and bridge
development project which was
not as clearly motivated by the
Olympics.
FUDGING THE NUMBERS
Until admitting to an increase
their security funding this year,
the province had said their budget was set firmly at $600 million. After increasing the security budget, they now admit to
somewhere closer to $765 million. However, the question of
how much money the BC government will actually spend on
the Olympics has been questioned for a long time. As far
back as 2006, the Office ofthe
Auditor General of BC has been
critical of the province for a
lack of transparency, claiming
the province will spend closer to $2.5 billion on the two-
week event.
The federal government
has been more transparent
with their financing, but suffered the same criticisms. Although they recently released
a breakdown ofthe $1.25 billion they budgeted, this did
not include any infrastructure
upgrades. Nor did it include
all of their Olympic costs—the
Own The Podium project, for
example, received $66 million in federal funding over
five years, and was not included in the budget.
The actual economic impact of the Games will remain
in question for some time to
come. The provincial and federal governments still claim
that the economic benefits of
the Olympics will offset their
costs, but it has become clear
that this is questionable—even
if the Games cost the amounts
they say they will. Much of the
infrastructure that was built
up for the Games will continue to benefit our city for years
to come, but most of the other
costs are one-time expenses
and will not necessarily show
a return, tl 8/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2010.03.01
MEN'S
BASKETBALL
CANADA WEST
QUARTERFINALS
FRIDAY VS ALBERTA: WIN, 92-62
SATURDAY VS ALBERTA: WIN, 103-
WOMEN'S
VOLLEYBALL
CANADA WEST
FINAL FOUR
FRIDAY VS REGINA: WIN, 3-1
SATURDAY VS MANITOBA: WIN, 3-2
WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
CANADA WEST
QUARTERFINALS
FRIDAY @ ALBERTA: LOSS, 66-74
SATURDAY @ ALBERTA: WIN, 76-59
SUNDAY @ ALBERTA: LOSS, 78-80
UBC soars to semifinals
THE
GAME
Watson leaps to the basket on Friday, scoring two of his team-leading 25 points. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
IAN TURNER
CONTRIBUTOR
After just one game in three
weeks, did the men's basketball
team show any rust as the playoffs began? Hardly.
The UBC Thunderbirds showed
the Alberta Golden Bears why
they entered the playoffs ranked
No. 1 in the nation, sweeping
their best-of-three Canada West
quarterfinal series 2-0 to begin
the quest for their first CIS championship since 1972.
Any worries that the Thunderbirds had gotten out of practice was
soon put to rest, as UBC opened
up a 22-6 lead halfway through
the first quarter, en route to an
easy 92-62 victory in game one.
Kyle Watson led the team with 2 5
points, his most ever in his three-
year career at UBC.
"Before heading into this weekend, we knew that we needed to
bring lots of energy on the defensive end to get us off on a good
start in the game," said guard Nathan Yu, who had 22 points over
the weekend.
"Our coach demands that we
bring intensity on the defensive
end which will help us get easy
hoops on the offensive end."
On Friday, UBC's chameleon
struck, as defensive specialist
Melvyn Mayott scored 14 points
while making his opponents earn
their points. Nominated player of the game, Mayott was central in the series-clinching 103-
68 victory.
On defence, Mayott guarded
both inside the paint and on the
perimeter for the T-Birds. Weighing only 200 pounds and 6.4 feet
tall, he had a difficult match-up
against Alberta's forwards. But
the Bears' big men could never get going, with star forward
Jordan Baker only scoring eight
points in 28 minutes.
"Melvyn has been great defensively for us this year. At times
he has defended perimeter players and later in the game he will
defend the posts. He is long and
athletic and causes a lot of problems with his length at the guard
spot," men's head coach Kevin
Hanson said. "He has a relentless work ethic and this makes
him an invaluable asset."
Being relentless has its downsides: Mayott picked up three
fouls on Friday and four on
Thursday.
"I over-invest on defence," he
admitted.
With Hanson's deep bench,
Mayott's investment always nets
a return, as Hanson has people
to step on the court when he gets
in foul trouble.
"When Kyle Watson gets going, that energy just sparks everyone else, and Graham Bath, he's
a load when he's on the floor,"
Hanson said. "He's always bringing a tough game and he is hard
to defend. That work ethic is really contagious and we need that
this time of year."
Bath and Watson's energy has
helped get the team going early in
the game, with Hanson electing
to start the physical pair more oi-
ten as the season has progressed
in order to stop the slow starts
UBC has had to games in the second of this season.
"We've had some shaky starts
to some of our games lately," said
Hanson. "I've made them aware
of that the past couple of weeks. I
challenged them about it."
"We know that in playoff basketball it is important to come
out and be the aggressors and
that is what we have tried to do,"
Bath said.
"In the first half of the season
we would have a mediocre first
half and then turn it on in the
second. Lately, we've been playing full games, and it paid off
this weekend against Alberta."
Defensively, they played a full
game, too.
"We've had two weeks to practise for this matchup," Watson
said. "Really, we just tried to to focus on defence. Any time we can
keep a team under 70 points like
we've done the past two nights
is a good game for us."
With the win, UBC advances
to the Canada West Final Four,
which will be held at War Memorial Gym this upcoming weekend. Though UBC will only need
one win to qualify for the CIS
Championships in Ottawa, Bath
and the rest of the team have
a conference championship in
mind.
"Our goal since August has
been win the league title and,
then, the western championships. We hope to accomplish
the second part next weekend."
Putting on
the peacock
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubyssey.ca
Like any number ofjournalism
and communications students
in the Lower Mainland, I spent
this summer feverishly looking for a job during the Olympics. In my fantasies, I would
be working for NBC, working
out of the International Broadcast Centre (IBC).
Somehow, that happened.
The network of Hope and Carson, Seinfeld and Friends, Saturday Night Live and The Office, had,
for whatever reason, decided to
hire McElroy. The fools.
My job as a whole wasn't glamorous. I watched feeds of events
and press conferences and practices, wrote down what happened
when, and helped producers put
together highlight packages.
Everything surrounding the
job, however, was pretty much a
media fantasy camp. At the IBC, I
was in the centre ofthe beehive.
I watched Olympians funnel in
and out of hallways, the President
of NBC casually talk to co-workers and see that yes, Bob Cos-
tas is quite short. I got to be in a
skit with Jimmy Fallon, walk by
Colbert's Moose every day, and
touch the Olympic cauldron on
the day it was lit.
If I could lock myself in a crate,
move to 30 Rock as a page and
never talk about UBC student politics again, I would. But I can't.
Damn.
That was my Olympic experience, and to me, it was extraordinary. But unless you were living in a cave several miles below the Canada Line, the Olympics left a mark.
For 17 days, the world examined us through a one-way mirror
as we put on a party. It's foolish
to say everything went perfect—
a tragedy took place at the beginning, a mountain didn't have
snow, an oval didn't have zam-
bonis—but one thing that shone
through was how involved, engaged and generally awesome
the people of Vancouver were.
If you worked somewhere, if
you put on a blue jacket that you'll
never wear again, if you were part
ofthe patriotic mobs Downtown,
if you were a legal observer who
helped bring stability to tense situations, you were part of these
games. They may have cost too
much and benefited too few, but
we were asked to host the world,
and we did.
But all parties come to an
end, and today, most assuredly nursing an Olympics hangover, I return to a life of work
and school that does not involve
eating lunch in the same room
as Shaun White. The fortress of
solitude-esque Olympic Cauldron
may be extinguished, but I suspect that for everyone, the memory will stick around. With glowing hearts, indeed, tl 2010.03.01/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/9
VOLLEYBALL TEAM
ADVANCES...
The women's volleyball team
are the Canada West champions, after defeating the Manitoba Bisons three sets to two in
the conference final.
The Thunderbirds, who directly advanced to the conference championships by way of
their regular season record, defeated the Regina Cougars three
sets to one in Friday's semifinal, before running into trouble
in the conference championship
against the no. 3 ranked Manitoba Bisons.
After easily winning the first
two sets of the best-of-five encounter, the Thunderbirds let
the Bisons back into the game in
the third and fourth sets, which
were won 25-23 and 25-20 by
Manitoba.
KEEGAN BURSAW FILE PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
However, the Thunderbirds
managed to extend their winning
streak to 3 7 victories in the final
set, taking an 15-8 decision. Liz
Cordonier led the T-Birds with
16 kills, while Shanice Marcelle
added 14 digs.
"As they say, 'it ain't over until
it's over'," said UBC head coach
Doug Reimer after the game. "We
knew it would be a bit of a slug-
fest but it took awhile to materialize that way."
UBC will now go to the CIS
Championships in Edmonton,
Alberta, as they try and win their
third straight national championship. The single-elimination
tournament begins on Thursday,
when the No. 1 ranked T-Birds
face the No. 8 ranked St. Mary
Huskies at 1pm local time.
T-Bird Montanna Dunmore and Emily Bolduc battle for possession in Sunday's deciding game, pete yee photo/the gateway
BUT BASKETBALL WOMEN
GO HOME
After an up-and-down season,
the women's basketball team
ended their 2009/2010 season with a 80-78 loss to the Alberta Pandas in game three of
the Canada West quarterfinals
yesterday.
The Pandas took control ofthe
game with a 30-13 second quarter, leading 47-32 at the half.
While the T-Birds scratched and
clawed their way back into the
game, they were never able to
take the lead. The end came when
Alex Vieweg missed a three-point
attempt with ten seconds remaining in the game, putting an end to
a season that saw UBC go 11-7.
Lia St Pierre and Zara Huntley scored 17 points each in a
losing effort, while graduating
guard Candace Morisset added
15 points and a team high six
rebounds.
The game was needed after the
T-Birds and Pandas split the first
two games ofthe best-of-three series, as UBC lost 66-74 in overtime Friday before rebounding
with a 76-59 victory on Saturday.
The Pandas now advance to
the Canada West Final Four next
weekend at SFU. tl
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Need a reason
to fill yourself
with more
UBC pride?
Watch our
games and
help spread
the spirit.
JUSTIN MCELROY
sports@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc 10/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/2010.03.01
GAMES
CROSSWORD
SUSCOMIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
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(T MNNA RW WE TRAIN//A
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1. 71% is underwater
6. Slovenly person
10. Fruit-filled pie
14. luck!
15. Farm structure
16. Hydrox rival
17. Sports card name
18. Revenuers, for short
19. Highest point
20. Dejection
23. Spreads out
27. Muse of lyric poetry
28. Asian sea
29. Admonition
34. Bottom line
36. Chili con
37. Horned viper
40. Like afterschool activities
43. Coloring material
44. Rate
45. Valuable collection
46. Boring
48. Departs
49. " by any other name..."
53. Recompense
55. Remove carbon dioxide from
60. Italian wine city
61. Dash
62. Baffled
67. Turned right
68. Inter
69. Film composer Stevens
70. Bluesy James
71. Move suddenly
72. "Peter and the Wolf" bird
DOWN
1. Mischievous person
2. "You've got mail" co.
3. Hwy.
4. Half a fly
5. Sturdy
6. Grounded fleet
7. Lame movement
8. Bread spread
9. Beethoven's birthplace
10. Hard drinker
11. Concert venue
12. Hit back, perhaps
13. Capital of Japan
21. Computer key
22. Discover
23. Satisfied
24. Agent
25. Starbucks order
26. Banned apple spray
30. Sharp
31. Miscellany
32. Diamond flaw?
33. Blackbird
35. Pantry
37. Crazy as
38. Rescued
39. Squeeze
41. Automobile
42. Exhort
47. Sun -sen
49. Maxim
50. Adjust to zero
51. Eight singers
52. You mouthful!
54. Repasts
56. Glass ornament
57. Earthen pot
58. Neet rival
59. Med school subj.
63. Beverage commonly drunk
in England
64. Bro's counterpart
65. Biblical verb ending
66. Eureka!
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CROSSWORD ANSWERS
FOR THE FEB. 25,2010
PAPER!
IF YOU REALLY GOT STUCK,
GO AHEAD AND TAKE A
PEEK.
© 2008 PageFiller Ltd and Associates www.pagefiller.com
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% THEUBYSSEYxa
WHAT'S ART
GOT TO DO  '
The
First
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Dean of
Arts Prize
for the Best
Essay in Visual
Literacy
$1,000
for the best essay
EVERY UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AT UBC
is invited to participate in an essay contest considering the
relationship ofthe aesthetic and the political.
The exhibition Backstory poses the question, you provide some answers.
For more information visit http://www.belkin.ubc.ca
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
The University of British Columbia I 1825 Mair
Phone: 604 822 2759 I Fax: 604 822 6689
Open Tuesday to Friday 10 to 5 Saturday and S
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Web address: www.belkin.ubc.ca
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If you like to draw, then we like you.
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virginie menard | production@ubyssey.ca <7|J TTHIh T TRYSST''Yr 2010.03.01/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/ll
1
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "OVER 5000 PROTEST OLYMPIC GAMES [FEB. 12, 2010]":
DO YOU CARE?
WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
Blake, as you are unaware, acting in defiance of your
employer is highly inappropriate, and grounds for
dismissal.
—Alex Lougheed [Feb. 21]
What defiance? One cannot defy their employer outside of work hours since the employer has no rights
over the worker during those times.
—Blake Frederick [Feb. 28]
JOHN BISHARA GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
PODIUM STATUS: OWNED
The Own The Podium program was devised by the
Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) years before
the Games with a specific goal in mind: for Canada to win more medals than anyone else in 2010.
Despite weathering heavy criticism, it is safe to
say that the podium was successfully owned.
About a week into the Games, people started
to get a litde on edge. Canada didn't seem near
to matching even its own 2006 medal count. The
men's hockey team had just lost to the United States
in the preliminaries. The Guardian had just published an article calling these the worst Games ever.
That's when Own The Podium became the scapegoat. Even COC boss Chris Rudge suggested it might
have been a bad idea.
Some complained that it created too much pressure for Canadian athletes to win gold. You did see
some athletes feeling the strain—more than one silver medalist's media poker face cracked when they
were asked if they would have been happier with
gold. But that pressure would have existed no matter what: The Games were at home, and the pressure was largely created by the media. Jen Heill's
first Canadian medal at these Games was cast as
a failure rather than a success—because it wasn't
the first gold won at home.
Others said the program aimed too high, and that
it cast us as arrogant braggarts who never could have
backed up our talk with actions. Nobody seemed
to remember previous Games where our lack of a
commanding presence was blamed, rightfully so,
on a lack of government support for amateur athletes. Own The Podium has been heavily cited by
medalists as having a huge impact on their success. Minister for Sport Gary Lunn said it right: "I
don't know anyone who tries to get second place."
What were we going to name it? "Perhaps We Can
Do Well On The Podium, Maybe?"
Canada made it to the podium in the total medal
table; we clinched third on Saturday. Not only that,
but when it comes to gold medals, we shattered not
only the Canadian record and the record for a host
nation, but with 14 we've taken home more than
any country in a single Winter Olympics ever. tl
THE PARTY DOESN'T HAVE TO END
For a vast swath of locals, one ofthe high points
ofthe Olympics was the international party they
created. Many remarked at how exciting it was
to be Downtown; there were big crowds of people having fun, a huge amount of community and
national spirit, and lots of things to see and do.
It was so fun, the police got nervous and closed
down liquor stores early. Despite a 2pm closing
time for liquor stores on the final day it seemed
like no-fun Vancouver was finally a place where
you could go out and do things.
Guess what? It doesn't have to end. You just have
to start going out more often.
If every Vancouver resident went out just once
or twice a week there would be a similar number of people out in public as there were during
the Games. There were thousands more citizens
Downtown than there usually are, but the majority of them were still locals.
Sure, without the Cultural Olympiad it'll be harder to find free performances. However, the $ 10 you
can pay to go to a local concert or play is nothing
compared to the amount you'll be paying through
taxes for the Olympic party for years to come. And
the best part? You get to decide what performers
you'll be seeing, not some government employee.
For those that were going out, part of the allure
was a common experience to bond over. True, the
sort of high-energy mass experience like the one after the hockey game yesterday doesn't come along
too often. But finding a community spirit similar to
the one you'd find in pubs Downtown for the majority of the Games won't be as hard as you'd think.
Wouldn't you know it—if you start going out to see
things you like often enough, before long you'll find
thatyou are part of a larger community of people
who like those same things.
Yes, it is easier to stay home, and many of you
are no doubt terrified of the idea of going out frequency without a massive carnival to rely on. But
all it would take for a fun, community atmosphere
is for people to all be there wanting it. Believe it
or not, government and corporate intervention is
not required, tl
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
DEAR TOO SEXY,
I wouldn't go the distance to say
I'm head over heels, but there's
this girl who has definitely
caught my attention. She's a really nice girl, and that's what is
confusing me. You know that girl
every guy falls for, at one point
or another, because she was giving you strong indications of interest? Yeah, that's the girl. Is
she showing signs of interest?
Is she just being too nice?
Every time she shows up she
does more damage to my mental
logic than I'm used to. Normal
girls (if there is such a thing) will
realize when I'm pursuing them
and either accept or reject my attempts. With the overly-nice ones
though, well, they don't know—
they think I'm just a really nice
guy. But at the same time, everything they do comes off as
a false-positive. This causes a
whole string of messy emotions/
misinterpretation, and well, you
know how that story ends.
Magical.
How do I tell if she's giving indications of interest, or just being nice? How do you even go
about pursuing a girl who may
be clueless to the fact thatyou're
pursuing her?
—She's Hinting Interest Too?
HELLO SHIT,
Okay so before we even begin
to try to answer this question,
we have some things we need
to talk about.
Decisions about
who you get freaky
with should not be
decided based on
a first-come-first-
serve basis.
First off, ifyou're falling for a
girl simply because you think she
may or may not be down for some
nookie down the road, you've got
bigger problems. Decisions about
who you get freaky with should
not be decided based on a first-
come-first-serve basis. Often it
is the latecomers who really deserve attention. Don't just hand
out the keys to your heart to the
most recent floozy (and/or very
sweet, intelligent young lady) who
so much as bats her eyelashes at
you. She'll end up crashing the
damn thing near the first sharp
corner on the highway of love.
Looking at it more pragmatically there's also the issue that
many girls might have a hard
time respecting and/or sleeping
with you if you fall for the first
young lady that shows any signs
of interest. For both your emotions and your wang, you must
learn to set the bar higher.
Secondly you follow with an
assertion that every guy has had
this issue. The fact thatyou have
apparendy gone through this before casts a seriously grave shadow on your future. Although mistakes can occasionally be fun to
make, they serve the purpose of
teaching us not to make them
again. So do yourself a favour
and avoid the obvious danger-
learn from your past.
Thirdly, you finish with the
question, "How do you go about
pursuing a girl who may be clueless to the fact thatyou're pursuing her?" Our answer to this question is simple: don't. If you can
flirt with someone exhaustively,
and still never be a big enough
deal to them that they take a moment to consider whether or not
you may be interested in them
as a romantic partner, then it's
game over, buddy. You've been
Friend-Zoned*. Save yourself the
pain and seek greener pastures.
Now that that's done with, let's
answer your main question. How
do you know if a girl is being nice
or naughty to you? The answer is
to try to interpret what kind of interest she seems to have in you.
A girl is being nice
if she smiles at you
sometimes. A girl
is trying to get into
your pants if she
laughs at all your
jokes, even when
they aren't funny.
A girl is being nice if she
smiles at you sometimes. A girl
is trying to get into your pants if
she laughs at all your jokes, even
when they aren't funny. Nice is
paying attention to you when
you talk. Attracted is trying to
get your attention. Nice e-mails
you the readings you missed in
class. Attracted sends you silly texts for no real reason. Nice
calls you every now and then for
coffee. Attracted calls you, drunk,
at 3 am to tell you how nice your
hair is and how—OMG—you totally should have come to club
with her because she misses you.
Attracted girl is more touchy-
feely than nice girl. Attracted girl
wants to know what you do. Attracted girl gets nervous around
you. Attracted girl gives you the
sex panther eyes.
It may just be thatyou're looking at this list and thinking that
the girl in question probably is
just a nice girl. That's not bad.
Nice girls are (truism alert) nice.
Ifyou're really lucky though, the
girl in question is pretty much
all ofthe above. And if that's the
case, you've met a nice girl who
is probably attracted to you. We
recommended you don't wait to
find out if she is really clueless.
Ask her out, be confident in yourself, and give her a kiss if a moment presents itself. As you already seemed to have figured out,
a yes or no is far better than sitting around wondering, tl
Anyways that's it for this week
Sendyou letters to toosexy@ubys-
sey.ca or to our webform at ubyssey.ca/ideas.
*Either that or she's got remarkably terrible self-esteem. In which
case, you should at least start as
justfriends 12/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.03.01
The perfect ending
A tense atmosphere at The Pit gave way to elation as Team Canada defeated the US to win the gold medal in men's hockey on Sunday afternoon. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
amS Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
01.03.10
iHUMfMicr 'i'tnifi'iitttrni!!
May. 9th, Vogue Theatre
FINAL
FANTASY
(OWEN PALLET)'
I
E
o
u
u
.a
3
VI
Mar. 5th, St James Hall
BASIA
BULAT
with KATIE
STELMANIS
JMar.5TH,PitPub
•
FAIRT6
March 17th-18th
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Main Concourse, SUB
WANTED 5
Have a dispute with the university?
We can help. The AMS Ombuds Office provides
assistance in dispute resolution to students and
AMS staff. We operate independently, neutrally,
and confidentially. Call, email or click today.
«
SURVEY
The AMS is conducting a organizational review on systemic
discrimination in the AMS. Help us address this issues by
completing the following survey.
http://www.surveymonkey.eom/s/C6XQGC5
This survey elicits information about:
Member satisfaction with AMS governance pertaining to
diversity and discrimination • Strengths of the AMS in addressing
systemic discrimination • Systemic barriers in the AMS faced by
AMS members • Opportunities for the AMS to develop
strategies of inclusion and anti-oppression
RESPONSIBLE
CONSUMPTION FAIR
MARCH 10th & 11th
SUB, MAIN CONCOURSE   _
aivd NOiidwnsNo
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/student_government/category/
ams_ombuds_office
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9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
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