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The Ubyssey Mar 9, 1984

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Dizzy Gillespie - the Hipster Returns
Page 3
Work Study Likely to Disappear
Page 5
Student Sit-in Continues
Page 5
Heart like a Wheel Develops a Flat
Page 8
Kinesis Bursts into Dance
Page 9
>48
—Charlie flcMman photo Page 2
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1964
Tomorrow Box is realistic
By ELENA MILLER
The Tomorrow Box is billed as a
Canadian play about feminism on
the farm, which leads one to expect
a boring, awkwardly written piece
of propaganda. Instead, it is a well-
written realistic social drama that
deals with feminist ideas on a
human level.
The Tomorrow Box
By Anne Chislett
Directed by Susan Ferley
At the Q.E. Playhouse
until March 17
The play concerns Alice and Joe
Cooper who are newly married and
living in a trailer on a farm. She is a
graduating law student, and he an
agriculture professor who is going
back to fanning. Joe's father Jack
sells his farm and house to the
young couple, but there is one
problem — Jack's wife Maureen
hasn't been told about selling the
farm.
Focusing on the situation, the
Tomorrow Box by playwright Anne
Chislett explores the result, when
the once-submissive wife stands up
for her rights.
Alice's feisty feminist sister Lisa,
who is a lawyer, helps Maureen in
her fight. Lisa's initial appearance
does not resemble an active feminist. Her attire consists of high heels,
tinted glasses and a business suit.
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC
WOOD presents...
THEATRE
THE
SUICIDE
A Comedy
by Nikolai Erdman
Directed by
Klaus Strassmann
MARCH 9-17
(Previews -
March 7 & 8)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets-$4.50
Previews — All Seats $4.00
BOX OFFICE Room 207
* GREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
But she soon shows that clothes
aren't as important as being prepared to stand up for one's ideals. Lisa
and the other four characters interact in a totally believable and interesting manner until a resolution of
the situation is achieved.
The Tomorrow Box is a realistic
play which explores an idea in the
tradition of Ibsen's social drama.
Like Ibsen, Chislett stays entirely
within the realistic mode. The set is
realistic, and all the characters behave in black and white; they all
have both good and bad qualities.
In the end, Chislett seems to advocate a strong point of view, but she
does not force the message upon her
audience.
The Tomorrow Box is also an enjoyable comedy. This makes it more
accessible to audiences, particularly
the older, more conservative set
who might otherwise be turned off
by the play's feminist point of view.
The play is never strident or abusive; it presents its theme in a gently
humorous, persuasive manner.
Susan Ferley and her cast do full
justice to The Tomorrow Box. The
directing is never noticeable, a sure
sign that the acting is done well.
The pacing was good, and all the
characters were fairly presented.
As Maureen, Doris Petrie makes
an excellent transition from a traditional, submissive housewife to an
angry, frightened feminist. She is
always convincing and conveys a
complete understanding and sympathy for her character.
As her husband Jack, Walter
Marsh does not simply play the villain. Instead Marsh plays Jack as a
strong, hard-working and traditional man who is too stubborn to
adapt to new circumstances. He
also conveys a remarkable sympathy and understanding for his
character.
As Joe, Tom McBeath shows a
nice combination of wimpiness and
cunning. He is portrayed as a bit of
rat, but when it came to the crunch
he stands up for what is right.
Miriam Smith as Alice and Merri-
lyn Gann as Lisa also play their
parts well.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
f^ 111
A&isA* $
By CHRIS WONG
Ct-ilSP*
Gillespie
The hipster saint of jazz
ver 40 years ago in several little-known jazz
jclubs in New York City, a musical revolution
took place. One of the clubs where the innovative
sounds emerged was Minton's Playhouse on 118th
Street in Harlem. At Minton's, young progressive
musicians like Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk
and Charlie Parker experimented and developed an
exciting approach to jazz that dramatically altered
traditional harmonic and rhythmic concepts.
^^00$
Gillespie still remembers the initial reaction
to his music during the forties. "(The reaction) was very bad, because the music was
different. We stuck very close to fundamentals, but we added things. Like where there
was one chord, we made three chords. It was
just a matter of evolution."
Both black and white musicians were
hostile to the radically different ideas contained in bebop, recalls Gillespie. Acceptance
was especially slow from older players like
Louis Armstrong who interpreted bebop's intensity as anger and called the music
"modern malice."
In an attempt to stifle the fresh sounds
coming out of the horns of Gillespie and the
other young turks, the established musicians
formed cliques. "You couldn't hardly get into the clique. They wouldn't give you no job
— because we threatened their job. If our
music got out and they had to play it, they'd
have to go back and learn all over again."
While this new music that eventually
became known as bebop has survived, many
of the great musicians that were instrumental
in creating it with the exception of Gillespie,
are now playing in the great jam session in
the sky.
Top bebop musicians like Charlie Parker
succumbed to heroin addiction and the
rigours of the jazz life, but Gillespie survived.
Today his playing is  still  first-rate as
demonstrated by his performances that are
winding up this weekend at the Plazazz in
North Vancouver.
In his book Jazz Is, New York writer Nat
Hentoff describes the significance of the
changes pioneered by Gillespie and his colleagues. "What they and others did was to
widen the harmonic base for jazz improvisation more challengingly than ever before and
to make the play of rhythms over the steady
meter that is jazz more intricate and subtle
than ever before.
"So challenging and intricate was their
work that for a time it took a thoroughly
'oriented ear to appreciate, or even to follow,
the involuted contours of the music's melodic
content. The new music was given a variety
of names, but the one that has survived most
persistently is modern jazz."
Gillespie's musical ability helped to make
bebop an accepted jazz style, but his comic
manner and image as the king of "hip" also
had a part in giving the music validity.
Humor was evident throughout his show at
the Plazazz. In between tunes that ranged
from the fast blues Straight No Chaser to the
latin standard Blue Bossa, Gillespie interjected his wry brand of humor. He told the
occasional droll joke and demonstrated a
bizarre singing style. "I've been doing that all
my days. Everybody likes to laugh."
Sea page 4: JAZZ
— nail lucente photos Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1984
Jazz masters all have style
From page 3
Gillespie was considered a hipster
saint during the bebop^era's peak in
the late '40s. Younger musicians
adopted his horn-rimmed glasses,
goatee and beret in the same manner that Charlie Parker's drug use
was followed and considered cool.
Gillespies' bulging cheeks and the
angled trumpet adopted in 1954
also became the jazz hipster's
trademarks.
Since those early creative days,
Gillespie has produced many
records and done endless touring —
as perhaps the only remaining
original bebop master. But the
young trumpet star Wynton Marsalis questioned Gillespie's current
role in jazz in a recent Playboard interview.
"All the guys who should have
bands — which is where the
younger cats would be educated and
learn how to play — don't have
bands," Marsalis said. "Wayne
Shorter doesn't have a band, Miles
(Davis) has a funk band, Dizzy has
a band off and on, and the list goes
on and on of cats who just aren't
contributing.
"They have contributed, and
they are giants and all that, and
they deserve the respect due to
giants — but they aren't contributing now," Marsalis said.
Gillespie has his own response to
Marsalis' comments. "He doesn't
know what he's talking about."
He notes that Marsalis is a very
good trumpet player, but still too
young to have contributed anything
himself. Gillespie, who is noticeably
irked because of Marsalis' statement, adds that style is the key to
determining a jazz musician's contribution.
"Being a good player is not
enough. If you want to be a leader,
you have to create a style and have a
lot of people follow your style. You
don't see nobody following Wynton
Marsalis. He's following
somebody's style himself.
"He shouldn't take it upon
himself to comment on the masters.
Our standards are set. He's got to
make it yet. Certainly he owes a lot
to me, Miles, Clifford Brown — all
the ones who have contributed. His
contribution is zero."
In reference to his own career
Gillespie says once you contribute a
style, you should keep playing
within that style. And Gillespie
maintains that Marsalis has attracted publicity largely because of
a good press agent.
But Gillespie proudly proclaims
he does not have a press agent.
"You don't even have to mention
my name. Just show my face, my
jaws and my horn."
All jazz images that will probably
survive as long as the music itself.
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"FREUD—THE FUTURE
OF AN ILLUSION?"
A SYMPOSIUM
MONDAY, MARCH 12
LAW FACULTY AUDITORIUM
ROOM 101/102
12:30        "THE FUTURE OF PSYCHONANALYSIS"
Dr. Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson—Berkeley, Cal.
"FREUD AND SOCIAL THEORY"
Dr. Russell Jacoby—Simon Fraser University
"FREUD AND WOMEN"
Prof. Joseph Smith—Law Faculty, U.B.C.
GENERAL DISCUSSION
Moderator: Dr. Carol Herbert—
Family Practice, U.B.C.
Co-Sponsored by the Faculty of Law and
The Office for Women Students
with the support of
The Leon & Thea Koerner Foundation Friday, March 9,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Province may axe work study
By GORDON CLARK
The provincial government may
eliminate its contribution to the current work study program by next
year, according to university
sources.
Outgoing Canadian Federation
of Students-Pacific region chair
Stephen Learey said he was told by
an awards officer the government
was planning to cancel its funding
for the work study program.
Although the government has not
officially   announced   the   move,
Learey said he believed the Socreds
would slash funding for the program.
"They are just cutting out every
item in the budget in which students
get money," he said.
Learey charged the provincial
government was attempting to
reduce access to post-secondary
education by cutting education funding, cancelling of student grants,
and now by pulling out of the work
study program.
"All these changes are linked,"
he said." Its depressing to think
they're eliminating another program."
Alma Mater Society president
Margaret Copping met with Universities minister Pat McGeer last week
and said she would not be surprised
if the program was chopped.
"After hearing McGeer's comments, it would not surprise me a
bit," she said.
"Students are a low, low
priority."
Copping said she urged McGeer
to support the program because it is
the best now available for students.
In a work-study program there is an
academic augment because students
get to work in their field and the
universities get things accomplished.
Rick McCandless, provincial
director for institutional support
services, said no decisions had yet
been made, but he added: "Work
study has a high priority with the
government."
"The   budget   hasn't    been
"WE COME TO BURY McGEER, not to praise him," say members of
students against the budget, currently occupying universities minister
Pat McGeer's constituency office, as the infamous Ides of March nears.
— nail lucent* photo
"Et tu Bill," added protester to sum up group's feelings of current
Socred education policy. Office, located just outside UBC gates on
West Tenth, was site of "Free University" which will hold a rally today.
McGeer invites students to stay longer
By PATTI FLATHER
A group of students protesting
education cutbacks will announce
toay when their occupation of
universities minister Pat McGeers'
office will end.
Spokesperson Rosemary Morris
said Thursday "a special event" is
being scheduled at 2 p.m. today for
an announcement from the
students, who have occupied
McGeer's office, at 4331 West
Tenth since early Tuesday morning.
Morris, a UBC anthropology student, said while the students consider their occupation successful in
bringing public attention to education cutbacks and increased fees,
McGeer's reaction to the sit-in is
"trivializing and callous. His comments don't take people into consideration."
In an interview Thursday,
McGeer said he encouraged
students to study material in the office, adding: "It should broaden
their outlook on economy and
society.
"Then maybe they'll wish to buy
membership in the Social Credit
party," he said.
McGeer said the students can stay
College recruits pupils
Cariboo College may hire a marketing firm to attract foreign
students — but the firm will be concentrating its recruitment efforts
solely on Hong Kong students.
Cariboo vice-principal Jim Wright said the firm, Henry International would focus on Hong Kong students so the number of English
instructors is kept to a minimum.
Wright said the college hopes to attract at least 20 Hong Kong
students. "We need a minimum of 20 students to make the operation
viable. By focusing on a market, we will hopefully make our limit,"
he said.
He denied the manner of recruitment is racist: "It is more common to accept a distinct class of students."
But the Cariboo student council passed a motion condemning the
proposal as racist.
Tuition for foreign students will be $7,500, with the school making
a profit of $2,500 on each enrolled student if the proposal to accept
foreign students is passed in Cariboo's senate. There are currently no
foreign students at Cariboo.
as long as they want. He offered to
continue paying the rent. "They
may have to pay telephone and
light. Nothing is really free, you
know."
McGeer denied he was trivializing
the protest. "I'm taking it very
seriously," he said.
The occupation began Tuesday as
20 students set up a "free university" in McGeer's office, to the
chagrin of the volunteer constituency secretary.
Banners reading No Fee Increases
and Free University were drapped
outside. Supporters picketed on the
sidewalk while sympathetic drivers
honked their horns. But one driver
yelled: "Why don't you try working?"
Students defended their choice of
an illegal action as a means of protest.
"It's become apparent the Social
Credit government doesn't give a
damn about protests and letters.
They haven't responded to the
usual methods," Morris said.
Constituency secretary David
Jacobs tried to accommodate the
students but was clearly exasperated. As the occupation
began, he was constantly on the
phone.
Jacobs said the police would be
called only if a major disturbance
occurred and promised to deliver a
letter to McGeer if the students
wrote and signed it. "They would
get a response and they won't like
the response," he said.
Ten students slept in the office
Tuesday and Wednesday nights, the
first night with three office personnel. "I hope someone brings a
guitar," joked constituency president Lynne Upton as she prepared
for the night. About 30 students
moved into the larger private part
of the office Wednesday, citing
McGeer's comments as a contributing factor.
Morris said other free universities
may be established. McGeer's office staff quickly left although invited to attend class. "I'm a bit surprised. I don't agree with it," Upton said.
Shortly after, the office's two
phones were disconnected.
By Thursday, the third day of the
occupation, the numerous
newspaper clippings about McGeer
and the provincial government were
joined on the walls by clippings of
the occupation and student posters.
Jacobs' former desk was covered
with food, a coffee maker, and
styrofoam cups. No office personnel could be seen as students flipped
through and joked about the
political pamphlets McGeer encouraged them to study.
Students heard lectures among
various topics, including the paper
compiled by the UBC committee of
concerned academics, which attacks
Socred claims of a provincial deficit
as inflated and misleading.
established. It may be reduced or
increased, it depends on funding.,"
he said.
But although McCandless suggested the program was not in
danger from cutbacks, UBC vice-
provost for student affairs Neil
Risebrough said there was an indication from the government that
funding for work study would be
"severely reduced."
But Risebrough stressed even if
the government support decreased,
the program would be continued
with university money alone. Last
year, the government paid $170,000
of the $400,000 lost of the program.
"All indication is that there will
be a work-study program next
year," he said.
Don Holubitsky, UBC student
board of governors representative
said he had not heard about the
possibility of the government cutting the work study program.
But Holubitsky said he hoped the
university would bolster its support
if the provincial funding were to
wane. Holubitsky said there was
$1.8 million of unbudgeted funds
floating around at UBC that could
be targetted at the work study program.
Acadia Camp
rent will cause
people to quit
Acadia Camp rent increases are
forcing some students to quit school
and new tenants replacing them will
be paying 37 per cent more than
present costs.
"I'll have to quit university when
the rent goes up," Carol Mallinson,
a single parent with two children
said Thursday.
"The more we pay into rent, the
less we have for groceries. We don't
even go to movies," Mallinson said.
She said she is angry that the
UBC administration is removing
the low income ceiling on family
housing rates. "Education is increasing for the rich only," Mallinson said. She said the increase,
denies female single parents the
ability to attend UBC.
She said although she has worked
part-time, she has accumulated a
debt of $30,000 attending UBC and
she cannot borrow anymore.
The UBC administration will
raise the rents of current Acadia
residents 16 to 18 per cent on July 1.
Traditionally Acadia Camp has
been for low income families.
Tanya Northcott, student and
mother of two, said, "We are
families. The more you stretch us
financially, the harder it is on our
kids."
Northcott said between school
and part-time work she now sees
her children only two nights a week.
"The people who don't want rent
increases are the ones who cannot
afford their education if they come.
We need affordable housing," she
said.
But vice provost Neil Risebrough
said, "Some people will be forced
out whether they are in single housing, family housing or off campus.
And this rent increase will be utilized to provide housing for more
students."
Starting May 1 new tenants will
pay 37.4 per cent more than at present, he said. This increase will
make $1,400 more a year per three
bedroom townhouse for the administration, he added.
But Acadia Hi-rise president Bob
McDermitt said, "The administration has botched up and mismanaged housing — in 17 years they've
put up one house. Now they decide
to put up more housing, but the
students have to pay."
See page 15: FUND Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1984
If you're a B.C. student, you could be
your own boss this summer through
the new Student Venture Capital
Program of the B.C. Government.
The program offers interest-free loans
of up to $ 2,000 to students who wish
to plan and operate their own small
business. Loans will be interest-free from
April 1, 1984 to the repayment deadline
of October 1, 1984.
Applicants must be returning to a high-
school, college or university as full-time
students in the fall of 1984. Businesses
must be operated in B.C. and applicants
must be eligible to work in Canada.
Program applications are available
from high school, college or university
placement centres, Chamber of Commerce
or Board of Trade Business Information
Centres, Royal Bank branches, Canada
Employment Centres for Students as well as
offices of the Ministry of Labour and the
Ministry of Industry and Small Business
Development.
A new initiative of the Government
of British Columbia to create employment
and to provide business experience for
students, it's a great way to ... BE YOUR
OWN BOSS THIS SUMMER!
Student \enture
apital Program 1984
Province of
British Columbia
Ministry of Labour
Hon. R.H. McClelland, Minister
Ministry of Industry
and Small Business
Development
Hon. Don Phillips, Minister Friday, March 9,1984
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 7
Profs move to protect education
By NEIL LUCENTE
National delegates to the Canadian Association of University
Teachers will be reviewing proposals designed to protect universities against further provincial funding cutbacks.
A CAUT subcommittee called
for reforms which will increase
federal jurisdiction in education
policy and financing through the
establishment of a national education policy along with measures to
penalize provinces that do not
follow federal guidelines.
CAUT executive secretary Don
Savage said all B.C. delegates on
the CAUT board favoured similar
actions as those recommended by
the subcommittee, and the support
may have been spurred by the recent turmoil over university funding
in B.C. (The Social Credit government recently shaved $60 million
from its education budget forcing
UBC to raise tuition fees an average
33 per cent, UVIC 25 per cent and
SFU 22 per cent).
But B.C. is not the only province
cutting back its university funding,
said Savage. The recommendations
proposed by the CAUT subcommittee is indicative of Canadian
academics' concerns over decreased
funding, he said.
"Cutbacks in university funding
is a trend that is happening across
Canada. In Newfoundland, the
premier has frozen all salaries for
two years while the government of
Quebec had increased university
funding by only l.S per cent.
Carleton has announced a drastic
cut in first year enrolment as well."
As provinces relax their educational committments, universities
will have to deal with reduced accessibility, a decline in the physical
state of universities, out of date
equipment, and losing faculty
because of lowered salaries, said
Savage.
"One of the worst fears is that
Canadian professors with the best
international reputations may leave
for other options in other
countries," he said.
The subcommittee's recommendations will not ask for constitutional changes, said Savage. The
■  m
recommendations will set out
specific guidelines for federal
transfer funds in education, he said.
Savage would not say what those
guidelines are.
Although education policy is constitutionally a provincial jurisdiction, the federal government's taxing authority and history of university funding combine to make
"post-secondary education,
without a doubt, an area of divided
jurisdiction," University of Alberta
sociologist Gordon Fearn said in a
speech at Simon Fraser University
March 1.
The provinces, with their con-
stitutional authority, should at least
meet the minimum standards set by
the federal government, said Fearn.
He said while federal contributions
to universities have grown, provincial expenditures in post-secondary
education has decreased. In 1981,
for instance, he said three provinces
got more money from Ottawa than
they spent on post-secondary
education.
The CAUT subcommittee will
present its suggestions to Ottawa
via the Macdonald Commission on
the economy after further discussion among CAUT members.
Government delays
funding decision
* ■
\ ..«.
'■        *■      .-■   *.v«fc
By CHRIS WONG
The Universities Council of B.C.
has yet to decide how funds will be
distributed among the universities
because it is waiting for the word
from the provincial government.
UBC secretary Lee Southern said
the council cannot allocate the
$285,943,000 set aside for universities this year until they receive a
letter from the universities ministry
confirming the exact provincial
contribution.
Southern said the government
will likely ask the council to give
consideration to certain items such
as special grants for engineering or
health sciences, adding that this is
regular practice.
"Legally the government has the
right to designate funds before it
puts it in our hands. The government caiUell us what to do with it,"
he said."
But Southern said UCBC makes
most of the decisions on the funding allocations.
Jane Burne, administrative assistant to the Universities Minister
agreed the ministry exerts minimal
influence on the council. "We
don't get involved in choosing what
they do," she said.
But Alma Mater Society president Margaret Copping said she is
disappointed UCBC is not taking
more of an "advocacy" role for
higher education.
"(After the July 7 budget), there
were signs that (UCBC chair) Bill
Gibson wanted to give UCBC more
of an advocacy role. It doesn't seem
to be fulfilling that potential by
waiting around to see if the government has any last thoughts."
But the delay in making the
allocations is not holding back
budget plans at UBC, said UBC
vice-president finance Bruce Gellat-
iy.
Gallatly said the administration is
examining reductions that may occur and assuming funds will be
cut at least five per cent from last
year's levels as indicated in the Feb.
20 budget speech.
"We're not sitting waiting, but
we need to know what the grants
are before we make the final cuts,"
he said.
Gallatly added he expects to hear
from UCBC by Mar. 15.
Southern said the Universities
ministry must receive pre-approval
on budget figures from finance
minister Hugh Curtis before sending the letter.
'  .       «■■    if if'
-patti flather photo
IN ACT OF crazed despondency mutants from around the globe met Tuesday at Robson square to discuss affairs
of common interest and the advocation of nuclear technology which they say spawned them.
Protesters query Trudeau's commitment
By WAYNE NIKITUK
About 200 cruise missile opponents protested Tuesday in downtown Vancouver, just after an unarmed U.S. bomber successfully
tested the air-launched cruise missile guidance system in B.C. and Alberta airspace.
The protest drew a mixed response
from downtown pedestrians. While
many observers expressed support
for the demonstrators, a handful
shouted abuse and insults. One man
accused the crowd of being communist subversives.
But Greenpeace spokesperson
Beverly Pinnager dismissed the
hecklers as a minority. "We want to
keep the issue in the public eye. We
want to impress upon people that
we can still stop further tests if we
keep up the intense public pressure," she said.
Pinnager said prime minister Pierre Trudeau's commitment to
peace is questionable. She said it
does not seem reasonable that
Trudeau should spend months
travelling the world in the name of
disarmament, yet still allow cruise1
testing in Canada.
The cruise missile test itself was
successfully completed a half hour
before the demonstration began at
noon. Members of the Simply No
Acronym Group (SNAG) carried a
PM candidate promises less unemployment
&XX
FEUILLE D'ERABLE
A man with more chance than Ed
Broadbent of becoming the next
prime minister of Canada came to
campus this week, promising to
reduce the ranks of the
unemployed by the grand sum of
one.
"My name is Gaeten Feuille
d'Erable, and am runneeing for da
position ev premiere ministra ev
Canada to solve unemployment
problems eeen Canada," he said.
"Ah em running because ah need
a job and eef elected, it wil meen
vun less umeployed person;
Besides, it does not reequire eny
educational prerequisites," he
noted.
Mr. d'Erable. said if elected, he
will:
• erect a great wall between
Saskatchewan and Alberta, so that
Canada can have a cultural symbol;
• legalize marijuana to wipe out
Canada's   staggering   $30  billion
deficit;
• use the cruise missile tests to
speed up postal delivery;
• and do anything possible to
prove that Alberta premier Peter
Lougheed and chronic chronicler
Pierre Berton ("I have a dream to
write a thousand great Canadian
novels before I'm senile") support
his candidacy.
Mr. Erable (French for maple
leaf) says he has a distinct advantage over other candidates because
he is a "Franco-Albertan," thereby
uniting both eastern and western
Canada under his wing.
To get the Western vote, the
unemployed vote and the French-
Canadian vote, — "dat's sewen or
eeght million already" — Erable
says he welcomes contributions
from   everyone.
yellow, six-metre long model cruise
missile through downtown to Robson Square. Another group sarcastically urged the immediate use
of the cruise, while it distributed literature to surprised onlookers. End
the Arms Race, UBC students for
peace and mutual disarmament,
and the Vancouver peace assembly
•were also among those groups participating.
Beatrice Ferneyhoueh, president
of the Vancouver peace assembly,
instructed the crowd to continue
their protests, and urged people to
focus on the military industries that
spawn such weapons. "These nuclear weapons programs must be
stopped. It's up to the Canadian
and American people to stop it. International policy should be in the
hands of average people, not in the
hands of the largely pro-military
'people of today," she said.
A former U.S. marine stood idly
by as demonstrators quietly passed
along Robson Street. The ex-marine, who declined to give his name,
said he supports the development of
the cruise. He called the protesters
"naive," stressing the need foif a
"strong defense" against Soviet aggression.
Later, the radiation suit clad
SNAG members held a mock burial
of Trudeau's peace initiative in
front of Litton Industries' Vancouver office on Granville Street. They
declared Canada's peacemaker image dead, and dropped dirt on a
small black coffin with a white
peace symbol on its lid.
Teacher teaches peace
Three steps could lead to peace in
Israel and the Middle East, a
religious studies professor said
Wednesday.
"The first step would be mutual
and simultaneous recognition of
each others' right to exist freely on
the land," Hanna Kassis told 60
people in Buchanan D239.
If the Palestinians and Israelis did
this the area would move much
closer to stability, he said.
"The second step is
acknowledgement of the ultimate
goal of a Palestinian
confederation," Kassis said.
He said the third step is the creation of a Palestinian state which
would ideally confederate with
Israel.  This  new  state  must  be
neutral and demilitarized in order
to exist, he added. These proposals
are being discussed within Palestia-
nian and Israeli circles, said Kassis.
The Middle East has become
mired in extremism and terrorism,
because of incompetent decisions in
the past by the major powers, he
said.
"The partition of Palestine was
an example of international stupidity. The Palestinians object not to a
Jewish settlement but to the principle on which it was created," he
said.
"Each group sees only as far as
their own noses. Neither side sees or
recognizes the rights of the other,"
said Kassis. Page 8
TH E    UBYS
Friday, March 9,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
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Kinesis bares suit to dance
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Paras Terezakis, choreographer of
Kinesis Dance may love dance, but most
of his works depend on stage props for
sustenance.
V
Kinesis Dance
Featuring the choreography
of Paras Terezakis
At the FirehaH Theatre
Until Saturday
The works performed at the Firehall
Theatre included Magus, the first
premiere piece of the evening, from a
larger work Circus, It contained a
beautiful sculpture by Elian Halfpenny:
the magician's mask which Steve Evans,
the dancer carried in front of his face
throughout his performance. A magi
cian without illusions only an ordinary
mortal, and the Magus sans mask is only
a dancer without the magic of dance.
Side show, the third part of Circus,
was engaging due to Daina Balodis'
remarkable performance. She was the
side show — a combination of freak and
clown, alternating fascination and
repugnance by twisting her face into exaggerated expressions, and her body into
stiff, awkward movements.
The next performance, titled The
Three Sisters, is based on the Chekhov
play of the same name. Through the ingenious use ofPink Floyd's music, the
intensity and desperation of the three are
conveyed to the audience. But without a
backup of slides portraying the sisters at
various ages, their faces superimposed
on graveyards, the Chekhov time ele
ment would not exist. In fact, without
the slides The Three Sisters fails as a
dance performance.
Similarly, Suit, another premiere, was
initially intriguing, but like The Three
Sisters was superseded by the visuals and
vocals surrounding the dance. The solo
performance by Terezakis is said to symbolize a wish for the simpler life which is
unattainable because of societal conventions, such as suits and ties.
Suit begins with opera, and progresses
to futuristic music by Peter Gabriel.
Terezakis, entering stage left, divests
himself of a two-piece suit yet retains a
skimpy body suit that crawls up his body
to highlight his cheeks at the expense of
his dance.
Meanwhile, vocalist Thomas Oliver,
See page IS: DANCE
^rafMi satire comes to campus
'?T
By LISA KELLY
If you have not yet had a taste of-
Canada's biggest and most successful live comedy show, you will
have your chance tonight at SUB
ballroom. The Second-City Touring
Company   acts   out   fast-paced
humourous satires involving well-
rehearsed sketches and audience-
inspired improvisations.
The tradition of their humour
dates back to 1959 when the first
Second City workshop opened in
Chicago. Fourteen years later, they
set up another theatre in The Old
Firehall in Toronto, which later
spawned   S.C.T.V.   The   touring
company is now bringing their onstage humour across Canada.
Christopher Bye, the general
manager of Second City and the
producer of the Touring Company
says their show consists of light-
hearted, raunchy satires based on
current   events,   social   concerns,
politics and regional pet peeves.
The show is composed of two
parts:
In the first half, there are rehears-.
ed skits, followed by an improvisation session in the second half. In
this part of the show the troupe
solicits ideas from the audience who
plays  an  active role in' creating
sponteneity. Bye says audiences do
not prefer one half of the show over
the other.
But he adds that they consider
the improvisation portion to be
"The icing on the cake."
Bye says that members of the Second City Troupe are reminiscent
of those who paved the way for
them. These include the mainstage
performers from S.C.T.V. and ther
large alumni list of comedians who
have gone onto  greater success.
Some of the alumni include Alan
Alda, Dan Akfoyd, John Belushi,
Gilda Radner and Bill Murray.
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X Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1984
ON THE Blu...
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Single parents out
of free enterprise
By ROBERT BEYNON
It seems commonplace that single
women who bear children have to
accept a life of poverty and loneliness.
But can we accept this when intelligent young women can't attend
university for financial reasons
because they gave birth?
People with the desire and talent
should be able to attend university,
but for financial reasons single parents can't. The system should be
changed to allow them to attend
university and to allow society to
share their talents.
C freest yle)
Even the free enterprisers argue
that anyone with drive can and
should be able to attend university.
But the fact is single parents can't.
Single parents in Acadia camp are
right now planning to drop out because they can no longer attend
school due to UBC administration
rent increases.
One woman said, "The more we
pay into rent, the less we have for
groceries. We don't do anything extra anyways. We don't go to
movies."
Another said, "It puts single parents right back in the kitchen."
It seems to be commonly accepted by us that single parents will
accept cheap hotel rooms with
threadbare towels and peeling
paint; that they will accept their inability to attend movies or to take
trips as far as Seattle because they
don't have the money.
And they can't even get regular
work because they can't find child
care. Many are going nowhere.
They had a child and as a result all
of society's options have been closed to them.
I spoke to an old friend in this
situation recently. Pregnant at IS, a
not uncommon incident, she chose
to keep the child and dropped out
of grade eight. Now two years later
she's going back to school and
wants to become an architect — but
the problems seem insurmountable.
Welfare will only finance her
education until she finishes high
school.
If she attends university, cares for
her child and works part-time, she
will only be able to take two courses
a year. At that rate it will take 10
years to finish a bachelor's degree.
If she borrows large loans from
the government year after year by
the time she graduates she'll have a
debt so large it will be nearly impossible to pay off.
And who says she'll find work to
pay off her debts when she graduates?
She is talented and could make it
at UBC: she's earning an A average
in high school and has both a brother and sister at UBC who succeed
at their studies.
The only thing holding her back
is money. It's too bad grants ended.
There might be those who argue,
"Tough. She had kid didn't she?
She should have known the consequences."
Who knows the consequences of
what they are doing at 15? I didn't.
Also implicit in the statement,
"She had it didn't she?" is an accusation of guilt: she sinned and had
the child and now she must bear the
consequences.
Not many people claim to believe
in sin so why do we expect people to
suffer perpetually for a decision
they made when young?
More than all these arguments,
why should a woman be handicapped for bearing a child, which we
claim is a beautiful act?
One should note single parenting
is a state that generally happens to
women. I wonder if women ran the
government whether some contingency might be made for single
parents? I don't know.
But there are options other than
expecting the state to pay out welfare to single parents perpetually
and allowing their minds and talents
to rot in some mildew eaten hotel.
Single parenthood
happens to women
Grants should be re-established
for those, like single parents, who
cannot meet the fees set to attend
university.
For those people the grant system
should have been expanded rather
than ended.
Loans, even with unlimited ceilings, no interest and the best wishes
from the provincial government are
useless to single parents. Their
debts will be too great.
And therefore these people, however hard they might desire it, cannot go to UBC.
And isn't the system supposed to
allow anyone strongly desiring a
university education to have the opportunity to attain it?
If denying women access to university because they had children is
our policy, I'm afraid to think what
the government might do to me if
they uncover my past.
Robert Beynon is a Ubyssey staffer who occasionally airs his reputable views on a variety of thought-
provoking and stimulating topics.
Freestyle is an opinion column
open to Ubyssey staffers.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 42
March 9, 1984
V.
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Wnha! Wnhal wanked Neil Lucente. "Me wanna be editor," he lamented as chocolate
decadence poured out of Chns Wong and Shaffin Shariff. Brian Jones and Robert Beynon
were sharing a Nanaimo bathtub racer together, leaving Craig Brooks and Lisa Hebert to console each other. Everyone — everyone who was anyone, that is — was indulging in stuffing
questionable substances end objects down various orifices. "Prick up your ears," Wayne
Nikituk told Ross Pink. "I can out-Americaniie you any day," referring to the competition for
the finest rag west of Bianca's Washington bureeu. "That's nothing," said Gordon "I'm a
squishy liberal," Clark. "Just ask Elena Miller and Mark Nielsen and Patti Flather what I can
stuff down your ear," he boasted. Charlie Fidelman would have none of the nonsense, preferring instead to spend 16 hours on a 10-inch review. "I'm a serious journalist," she said.
"I've seen Under Fire." Friday, March 9, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Letters
Manitoba Conservatives subvert democracy
The entire country, Quebec
especially, is watching the sour
politics of Manitoba's French
Language debacle with great interest. There is a consensus that
Manitoba's Conservative opposition is abusing democratic principles by fighting the Franco-
Manitoban Rights bill for political
reasons and not for constitutional
and moral principles. As a recent
Globe and Mail appraisal says: "It
(the conservative opposition) hopes
to ensure the eventual defeat of the
New Democratic Party Government
on false premises."
When Manitoba entered Confederation in 1870 French speaking
Manitobans represented nearly half
the population of that province.
After over 100 years of changing
demography and assimilation, francophones represent today a minority of six per cent in Manitoba The
turbulent entrance of that province
into confederation, preceded by the
"Rupert Land Rebellion under Lojis
Riel which saw the execution of an
English Canadian and the eventual
turning of English Canada against
both Riel and the Francophone
community of what later became
Manitoba, remains largely forgotten. A century ago, in 1890, the
Manitoba Legislature made English
the only official language in
Manitoba, as well as the sole
language of education in that pro
vince. That enactment remained
strictly enforced well into the late
1960's.
In 1979 the Supreme Court of
Canada found Manitoba's bill of
1890 constitutionally invalid. This
Supreme Court judgement means
that section 23 of the Manitoba Act
(part of Canada's original constitution) once again is recognized as
lawful: This judgement means the
French language will be constitutionally recognized in future in the
legislature and courts of Manitoba
irrespective who is *he government.
Why then all the fuss? Gciry
Filmon, and his opposition Tories,
are fighting a government bill not as
Some posters are more equal
Unknown powers removed 212
square feet of bulletin board space
in SUB while we were sleeping.
Open your eyes!
Look!
136 sq. ft. of bulletin board space
missing from the 3 major stairwells.
GONE.
48 sq. ft. missing from the AMS
office. GONE.
16 sq. ft. missing from the SUB
auditorium entrance. GONE.
12 sq. ft. missing from the above
AMS club mail boxes. GONE.
41 per cent of all board space in
SUB. GONE.
Freedom of expression.  GONE
March 2, 1984: AMS copy centre
covers the remaining bulletin
boards in the stairwell landings with
their promotional advertising.
TANGERINE ORANGE, eight
by 14 inch posters stapled s:de to
side spanning the entire length of
each board.
Our eyes assaulted bs the
message that we should spend our
money at the AMS copy centre.
Our emotions angered because
our messages which lie beneath the
dominating orange band can no
longer be seen.
All of those hours we spent raising money for making and putting
up posters. Wasted.
THOUGHT MONOPOLY
I've been watching it all happen.
But I can't anymore.
1 have got a confession to make
to  Gerry  Wan,  the  AMS  comp-
Greeks tell truth about fees
We, the Hellenic (Greek)
Students Association, are forced to
address you in order to tell the truth
about the imposition of differential
fees by the government and university bureaucrats on foreign students
attending Canadian universities.
We are aware of Canada's Financial depression. We have been in the
same boat, for a long time, coming
from an allied country, which is in
the progress of development. We
pay fees for the education Canada's
universities offer.
Moreover, we bring into the B.C.
economy a remarkable amount of
our parents' money for our every
day survival. Additionally, we do
pay taxes, though indirect ones,
since we are not allowed to earn income.
Many Greek students educated in
Canada are employed in Canadian
businesses operating in our country.
However, Canadian businesses are
not discriminated against in Greece.
The   imposition   of  differential
fees does not solve your economic
problems, In our opinion foreign
students may go elsewhere for their
education if fees rise by a significant
amount. Note that more than
20,000 Greek students are being
educated in East European countries (e.g. Romania) after the institution of differential foes by
England and the U.S.A.
Using foreign students as
scapegoats to balance a deficit of
over $10 million creates bitterness,
spitefulness and promotes racism.
Furthermore it is undemocratic and
inhospitable. We ask for your help
in dealing both with the government's and universities' unjust decision to pass differential fees.
We need moral support from you
and our professors to oppose differential fees and allow acceptance
of foreign students into universities
based on high academic criteria.
Helene Labroponlon
admin, council of
the Hellenic student ass.
troller, I have effectively reposted
al! of those posters which you
ordered a copy centre employee to
callously cover. I have taken down
the copy centre posters.
This is not an apology.
March 5, 1984 update. AMS copy
centre mounts TANGERINE
ORANGE posters on nearby walls
and windows. Unlike non AMS
posters, no SAC representative will
rip down these posters.
All posters are equal but AMS
posters are more equal than others.
Kathy Garneau
engineering 2
Storm the wall
O.K. sports fans ... the intramural event you have been
waiiing for — Storm the Wall —
returns March 19-22. This year we
expeel over 1,000 participants to
challenge the wall constructed on
East Mall, SUB plaza. Traditionally, intramurals advertises their
special events with the displaying of
an extremely large banner
decorated with the theme of the
particular event.
Alas, we have no Storm the Wall
banner to display this year because,
after last year's event, the banner
was so well liked that it was surreptitiously removed from its prominent position on the east wall of
SUB.
O.K. guys, we are sure it looks
terrific on one of your walls (if you
have one large enough); however,
let's spread the wealth and let us
hang it back on ihe SUB wall. If
you hive the banner or know where
it is please return it to us in room
202 of the War Memorial gym.
Oh, by the way, absolutely no
questions asked — even we can appreciate campus fun.
Thank vou and hope to see you
and your team on the "Wall."
Nestor Korchinsky
intramurals' staff
ThaV-v\a$a
bomb scare, but
you wererif really
were, vou?
>
supporters of democratic principles
but is detractors of these principles.
By refusing to enter Manitoba's
legislature to vote on French
language Legislation, Manitoba's
opposition party have left the bells
r nging hoping that procedural matters will force the withdrawl of a
major governmental bill. Friday the
three federal parties, including
Mulroney's Conservatives, jointly
brought forward a non-partisan
rssclution in parliament in support
cf French Language Legislation in
Manitoba. It appears the issue of
minority rights in Canada is still an
issue in need of resolution. In
Quebec the Parti Quebecois
separatists are pointing to the West
insisting this intransigence
represents the prevalent Western attitude towards French speaking
Canadians — nothing could be further from the truth, except when it
comes to a handful of politically
crossed opposition politicians in
Manitoba. Really just who are these
bell ringers trying to kid?
Patrick Bruskiewicl:
science 4
*-
Welcome news from
Socred illicits delight
[ cannot even Jbegift to express the sheer delight I experienced wh$p„
I found my own personal copy of the British Columbia Government:
News resting on my doorstep. I must admit that! have doubted fM.
government in the£f»l, I have even questioned its policies, butatwP
--- praise the \XR$?—y liave seen the light. - ', -.
Browsing through,, thut bastion of ethical journalism, my heart,
pitta-pattered with;' provincial pride. Those bold black headline*
bolstered my, ve# being and fiHed me with f*U%.M» the fut4#r
"Historic spendfagitdiictioii,,'' "Good news tot property oaawpA
' 'B.C. Rail debislaifriVtiped clean/' "Education emphasis va q&w-,
ty," and best of*afr, "SsHmg Br, abroad,"
But that's. noJjflfljr'Utei* wi-repierures and quotations too. TJierJrv
was that familiar; maternal, Grace McCarthy smile, reminding. nff|i
that "These are cjfcteing time»„."A»id Hugh Curtis says '*Oar iok Uftjtt j
just started." r#.S&slad to j^feto baow my M3CAabett<Sr
**»<.:.
Being astadral-WKral*} pleased to read about the. **new stude
aid program,,fwi|Jdb..s<eBis so "fair and equitable/' And, when
UN"
f/i
turned to,p*ge^j^.s*»Mhe eiwrfut face of our great premier
could not help ib>8$iink of alHtaat he has done for us; alt that he
•ta^ificed. I almost broke down and wept.
How I wish that I, a humble student, could offer something -*-
iinything — as a.loka$n of my appreciation. But alas, 1 have nothing';
left to offer, but iwi&fr. So» Mr. Bennett and friends, here are. so)tt#;;»
m<st^fTCim%^bi3j^<i(.t0MiU:: \;'-~ H«X . ?£v a.-^m
, Kladly fee*n**jmutf1uak' S^^ffjek'tibot& "'""""""- '"",
i-efirain from Vrte^m^P^f^.0me9 *®-0l type of
]pagaoda;:.fl^eai«u^:^u^^g|foy eruption" has-
created a sotidyjgnwant enjA£rjte We*K it!
Thank you for- your. Icind csHgpe|atiob. \ ' \"     - "*£|
V.
New ombuddy awaits to
hear subjects9 complaints
Cruisin' for a bruisin'
WHAT ARE YOUR COMPLAINTS?
Academic Appeals — 15
Professors/Marks — 13
Exams — 4
Financial Aid — 3
Lost and Found — 3
Aquatic Centre — 2
Drop/Add Courses — 2
Bookstore — 2
AMS Strike — 2
Miscellaneous — 30 +
Considering chese tough
economic times for students, financial aid complaints were secondary
to complaints received by the Alma
Stout reply
Assistant finance professor Neal
M.. Stoughton's criticisms of John
Hedgecock and his bookstore may
or may not be just (letter, Mar 2,).
It is unfortunate, however, that he
chooses to open his complaints with
a. stroking of his own ego. Does
Professor Stoughton really think
himself above being addressed as
"colleague" by a "non-academic"
member of the university community? Are Professor Stoughton's contributions to our institution of such
weight that he can permit himself
such an inflated ego? That opening
ivy covered remark colored my
reaction to the letter as a whole. I
hope that these feelings of faculty
superiority are not widespread.
Matt Hartman
librarian
Mater Society ombudsoffice regarding academic appeals, academic
standing and professors.
Students overall have taken the
initiative to question the hesitation
by some professors to discuss
academic standing. Several professors however were quite willing
to meet with students to discuss
marks.
I feel this student/professor rapport is very important and one of
my goals this year was to encourage
students to deal with problems at
the grassroots level.
Those students who have exhausted all possible avenues have
applied for formal academic appeals. If the number of appeal
forms we have given out are any indication, the academic appeals
committee will be busy this summer.
The competition for student aid,
entrance to faculties and certain
courses next year will depend on
academic standing and students
have indicated their concern for this
by their attention to academic
issues.
Please feel free to drop by the
ombudsoffice in SUB 100A or call
228-4846. We will have an answering machine as of Mar. 14. You
may call 24 hours a day — "' days a
week. We also desperately need
volunteers in the office. Do you
have an hour to spare next year?
Debra Bellamy
ombudsperson Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1984
W\ " >>SKA
Vancouver
after Classes ...
THE KEG
AND
Introduces
A Dinner and Dance Special
Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
20% OFF ALL FOOD
Afterwards visit Brandy's
Featuring:
- Great music
- Friendly Atmosphere
- ALL NIGHT STUDENT PRICES
(Bring Student I.D.)
The Keg Corner, Providing The Complete Night Out.
HORNBY and DUNSMUIR
^STSS!SS\    Warning: Some very coarae language;    TJJf
(MATURE/   occasional nudity & suggestive scenes
^^^mmmmmmw      D —   -.,
broadway
707 W. BROADWAY
874-1927
AT 7:00. 9:00.
BIC. CHILL
3 Acadtmy Award nominations incl.
Bast Plctura, Bast Supporting Actraaa -
Qlann Cloaa
Warning: Some very coarae language
& swearing. B.C. Dir.
^^WVg'ffe
broadway
AT 7:16. 9:15
707 W. BROADWAY
874-1927 ?_.Ac,ld.#?1>'  Award   nominations   Incl.   Beat  Actor-
By The Sea
overlookng English Bay at the
corner of Denmart and Davie.
Valet parking 6 pm   3 am.
2 'Great' Restaurants
2 'Lively' Lounges
BlBllEKS
Now a New Dining Menu
Featuring fresh seafood, pasta, chicken
and specially prepared meats
Brunch — Sundays & Holidays
11:00 am-3:00 pm
Reservations 684-5322
Plants, Brass
& Glass
. Munch on goodies
and while
'■ you sip your favorite
brew, enjoy the
Pacific Ocean with its
insets, beaches and ships
f
CMrCKED5
WLrVWrW
Restaurant & Lounge
(home of the 1 LITRE frosted mug)
DANCIN
(to an authentic 1948 Wurlltzer)
EATIN
(Broiled Burgers —
you choose the toppings)
WASH IT DOWN
(with ice cold brew
served in a 1 LITRE or
HALF LITRE frosted mug)
Full Menu Available
(Book Your Party)
RESERVATIONS
682.1831
Enjoy the Hve entertainment
at our. Piano Bar
HONG KONG
CHINESE
FOODS
Mon.-Fri
*
11:30a.m.-2:00p.m.
4:00 p.m.-10:00 D.m.
4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
EATIN
OR
TAKE OUT
LUNCH SPECIALS
$2.90
5732 University Boulevard
TEL. 224-1313
Sat. & Sun
1*
1%
IIBG Gantpas
mm    Pizza
UBC
Steak & Pizza - Lasagna
Spare Ribs - Ravioli
Chicken - Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m. — 2:00 a.m.
Fri. 11:30a.m. - 3:00a.m.
Sat. 4:00 p.m. — 3:00 a.m.
Sun. 4:0pp.m. ~ 1:00 a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
J
t
HOlg
^CHIlil1
X?
&
COOL
SUDS
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine1
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.'
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE test delivery!
228-9513
4S10 West 10th Ave.
m
AT
r,-y<3ll!fiij
Ay
All the chill
&
bread you can eat
$3.95
m ***>*
(at the back of the village)     r^r-^~
■I
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuismv
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fn   11 30 9 00 p m
CLOSED SATURDAYS      .
Sundays and Holidays
,->^  -.        4 00pm   900pm
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Authentic Greek Architecture
ROMIOS
Banquet Room
for up to 70 people:
Anniversaries
Receptions
Birthdays
Phone us today.
Enjoy our
Homemade Pizza
and Pasta Dishes!
EAT IN or PICK UP
Lunch & Dinner
Specials Every Day
ROMIOS OFFERS FINE
GREEK CUISINE & A
TOUCH OF THE MEDITERRANEAN, IN THE
HEART OF KITSILANO.
S  2272 W. 4th Ave.     736-2118
3431 W. Broadway    738-5298
"The only place to eat around Kits/Point Grey. A great,
inexpensive menu of phenomenal variety in a casually,
comfortable setting, which will please everyone with
taste. This is a very highly recommended restaurant!
Try it out."
Fully licensed • plastic accepted • 7 days a week. Early to late.
^A^
Himalaya Restaurant
The only place you can get excellent vegetarian and non-
vegetarian food at reasonable prices.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - LUNCH & DINNER
10% Student Discount
"Eat in or Take Out"
2313 MAIN at 7th 876-2911
PURCHASE ANY ONE OF OUR SPECIAL COFFEES
AND GET THE SECOND ONE FREEI
Il/J
CC/I
C/JFE
UPON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
>(C^
^ 2 FOR 1 SPECIAL
VALID FOR ONE PERSON ONLY
Lunches — Dinners — Continental Breakfast
— Desserts & Coffees — Coffees
3525 W. 4th - 731-8522
9 A.M.    MIDNIGHT DAIL Y Friday, March 9,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
*$?„-'.. X"-     •    •
X" *
. ~  „<■-'   \^< <■       *X"V •}~i>-A-. \ "
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r- H^ftr
Anti-Kissinger group responds to coverage
In light of the sensationalist coverage of the protest rally held at the
Hyatt Regency Hotel Feb. 22 and
events leading up to it, the coalition
against the Kissinger visit, organizer
of the demonstration and rally,
would like to state its position.
The coalition sent a delegation to
Vancouver city council Feb. 7, asking them to dissociate themselves
from Henry Kissinger's visit, as the
letterhead of the inviting letter
stated that the World Affairs Dinner was under the patronage of
Mayor Harcourt. The coalition asked council to clarify its position on
the visit. Council failed to do so,
adopting instead a weak resolution
to urge the Arts, Science and Technology Centre to invite an official
of the Nicaraguan government to
speak in Vancouver.
Council later made the decision
not to discuss international issues in
council meetings. At the council
meeting on Feb. 7, Harcourt stated
that the choice of Henry Kissinger
as a speaker was in bad taste, and
drew a comparison between Kissinger and the Nazi murderer Klaus
Barbie. Harcourt later apologized
to Kissinger's office for his remarks
in council.
In spite of the weak and wavering
position of city council and Harcourt, the media took this opportunity to show its support for Kissinger and consequently his policies.
Kissinger and the U.S. administration, in the name of democracy
and under the guise of "defending
Jaws revisted
I was shocked to learn that the
provincial government of New
South Wales, Australia, has
blatantly ignored environmentalist
protest and haphazardly proceeded
with a hunt of Great White Sharks
off the Australian coast. It is that
government's plan to kill off 70 per
cent of an estimated 950 sharks
.within 13 kilometres of land.
This hunt defies all logic. It has
been proven that Great White
Sharks attack only the very old and
sick, and the very young. Also, it
should be noted that the justification for this hunt is based on
government documents which show
that the ungulate fish population
has declined by 98 per cent over the
past year.
This figure, however, is not easily
proven. In fact, this entire hunt is
simply a political fish barrel for the
New South Wales government who
are simply trying to attract the votes
of all the deep-sea fishermen who
pay several thousand pounds to
catch a fish for the taxidermist.
Sports fishing is indeed a sick activity, and I feel it should be banned.
Protest is needed. Join Project
Shark, now. If necessary, we will
destroy the New South Wales
tourist industry. We need your
dollars for equipment to stop this
senseless slaughter (i.e. swim
trunks, suntan lotion, etc.). We'll
swim out to save the sharks, and
who cares if we're swimming in the
right direction or not?
Russ Brodie
arts 1
p*           c^linis
1
Xfor2
from
3 to4
cake & com r
(per person)
MUFFIN \- '. 'OlFH.
•per perwi)
or wa of t ouiif'
$2.50
$1.25
t-                         MO,VM\     FRlDA't                      ^
if—;^               (at the' back of the village'            ^"**7
the world from Soviet-based imperialism," have over the last 30 years
carried out a policy of genocide and
repression throughout the world.
Wherever people have risen, in
Vietnam, Chile, Grenada, Central
America, Africa and the Middle
East, to fight for better living conditions in their homelands and an
end to foreign domination, the U.S.
administration has, through the
Central Intelligence Agency, and in
many cases through direct intervention, fought to crush all expressions
of opposition, and to maintain repressive regimes that will bow to the
demands of the multinational corporations and the U.S. administration.
While supporting these murderous policies, the Vancouver media
was complicit in the censorship of
the other point of view. Letters and
press releases were sent to the
media, who chose not to present
them. The coalition deplores this
kind of censorship in a country that
prides itself on being democratic
and in a media that purports to be
objective.
The coalition against the Kissinger visit, representing peace, women's and international support
groups, organized a peaceful demonstration and rally on Feb. 22 to
express the opposition of many people to Kissinger and his policies,
and to express opposition to his invitation by the Arts, Science and
Technology Centre and the Junior
League. The coalition believes that
Kissinger accepted this invitation in
order to gain support in Canada for
his government's policies of genocide and repression.
It is unfortunate that the media
chose to focus most of its attention
on the reaction of some demonstrators in the Hyatt Regency Hotel
driveway to Kissinger and to the
World Affairs Dinner, and to virtually ignore the peaceful demonstration and rally organized by the
coalition. While the coalition did
not initiate the reaction, it is understandable that anger at Kissinger
and his policies will find its expression when such a man comes to
Vancouver. The coalition believes
WE NEED
YOUR ART!
The A.M.S. Art Gallery is
now programming the
gallery space for the
1984/85 school year.
Applications for 1 or 2
week shows are available
in Rm. 238 SUB from
March 7-21
Also two positions are
open on the Art Gallery
Committee. Leave name
and phone number in Box
23, SUB.
that the responsibility for such expressions of anger and opposition
rests with Kissinger and the two
groups that invited him.
of the Vancouver community outlined the devastating effects
throughout the world of Kissinger
and the policies of the U.S. admin-
G^i _.
M
PO««KFOV. APHffP&V^AC J
^\J9~
DOMMIEIR
i
AT THE rWATT REGEHCY HDTEL.
'Gr^T* biackt\s o?Tic*tfa- M*"a i^KTE'     _s~Jlr
While the media chose not to report it, 600 peaceful demonstrators
attended the rally. The coalition received the endorsation of over 40
community, peace and international support groups and trade unions. Speakers from various sectors
istration. The coalition declared the
rally an overwhelming success.
One final point bears clarification
at this time. The coalition had previously communicated with the
Vancouver police department on
several occasions. The police agreed
to consult with coalition marshals
at the demonstration. However, no
consultation took place when the
confrontation between guests and
demonstrators developed. Instead,
police officers on motorcycles
drove into the crowd, endangering
the demonstrators' safety and provoking an already tense situation.
A coalition marshal was told by a
police officer that "We'll handle it
our way, little girl." The marshal
was then picked up by another police officer and dropped onto the
sidewalk. The coalition submits
that this aggressive attitude does
not constitute the spirit of "cooperation" earlier promised by the Vancouver police department.
This statement represents an attempt on the part of the coalition to
balance the media coverage of the
events surrounding the visit of Kissinger to Vancouver. The coalition
was shocked by the biased media
coverage, disappointed with Mayor
Harcourt's vacillating position, and
appalled by the provocative action
of the Vancouver police.
Inasmuch as the media has failed
to accurately report on the coalition's position, the coalition requests that this statement be reproduced in its entirety.
Patricia Hercus
for the coalition against
the Kissinger visit
TAKE ACTION 0
OVERDRINKING.
Canada ■+
/ like the taste of a cold beer on a hot day,
but I certainly don't think you have to get the gang
together with a couple of cases of beer just to celebrate
the fact you've had
a bit of exercise."
JOHN,WOOD
Health Same el
and Welfare     Bien-eue sooal
Canada Canada
Constable Constable
Two CBC Television pilots filmed on location at UBC. It's a whole new
kind of crime when Jackson Davies as Constable John Constable is transferred
from Gibsons Landing to the I'BC RCMP detachment.
JJ25:    March 12 & 19, 7:30 pm
™:   CBC2/Cable3 Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1984
Hu#c
m
0-
CAMPUS SOUNDS
UBC Chamber Singers: March 9, noon and
8 p.m., Racltal Hall, Cortland Huhbang, <*-
ractor.
Anthon Paablaa: winner of 1st prize, BBC
piano competition. Wad., March 14, Racltal
Hat).
NIGHT LIGHTS
Tha Lincoln*: newly expanded, March 12-14,
Town Pump, Water Street.
Orand Dominion Jazz Band: celebrating
tha opening of Hot Jazz, new premjaes: 2120
Main.
freear McPharaon, Mike Taylor A weekend with Vancouver's moat distinguished jazz
veterans, March 9-11, Sunday night live radio
CFRO 102.7 FM, Classical Joint, 231 Carrall
St.
HpVU6
CAMPUS FILM
SUBFHms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3887)
March 15-18: National Lampoon's Vacation, two show* each night, 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Cinema W (SUB* Auditorium, 228-3898)
March 12: Th* Great McOinty 6:30, 8:30
p.m.; March 19: Top Hat 8:30, 8:46 p.m.
ALTERNATIVE CELLULOID
For Example: A Critique of Never, an avant
garde melodrama by Shusaku Arakawa,
March 11,2 p.m. free admission, Surrey Art.
Centra. 698-7461.
Pacific Cinematheque (1166 Wast Georgia,
732-6119) March 9: Efft Brteat 7:16 p.m.
March 14: SeniUta 7:30 p.m. March 15:
Roadla, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. March 16: Concert at the End of Summer, 7:30 and 9:30 p. m.
REPERTORY CINEMA
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 245-5466) March 9-11: Tha Outsider*.
7:30 p.m.; Speters. 9:16 p.m. March 12-13:
Ulysses 7:30 p.m.; Stappanwotf. 9:46 p.m.
March 14: Tibetan Trilogy 7:30 p.m.; March
15: Phantom India 7:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) March 9-11: Tha Man Who Would
Be King, 7:30 p.m.; The Wind and the Lion,
9:46 p.m. March 12-13: Tha Incredible
Shrinking Man, 7:30 p.m.; Tha Fly, 9 p.m.
March 14-15: Fearlera Vampire Killer*. 7:30
p.m.; McBeth, 9:15 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (3131 Arbutus, 738-5212) Experience Preferred But Not Essential, 'till
March 16. 7:30. 9:30 p.m.
ON THE TOWN
Dial M For Murder a classic mystery thriller
of blackmail, intrigue and murder, opens
March 16, 8:30 p.m. Art* Club Theatre.
Granville Island. Tha Suicide: A dissident
comedy of poet-revolutionary life in the
USSR, March 7-17, 8 p.m. Frederic Wood
Theatre. The Guys: An English version of
Jean Barbeau's battle of the saxes, March
9-31, 8 p.m., Saturday performances at 6 and
9 p.m., Vancouver East Cultural Centra.
Slater Mary Ignatius Exptalna It All For
You/The Actor's Nightmare/Piaf, Her
Songs. Her loves, until March 31, City
Stage, 751 Thurlow, 688-1436.
The Tomorrow Box: Q.E. Playhouse,
872-6622, 'tiH March 17.
She Stoops to Conquer/Kay Exchange:
held ovar the March 10/1 Dol, I Dol held over
to March 17, Arts Club Theatre 687-5315.
Les VoWna: a comedy, a day, an evening, in
the life of three couples in the suburbs by La
Troupe de la Sememe in its 10th anniversary
celebration, March 15-25, 8:30 p.m., Firehall
Theatre, 280 East Cordova.
Montgomery Cafe: (433 W. Pender, Seemed premises) Patrick Hughe* Photo-Etchings, unique prints that originate from etchings onto 36mm negatives, 'tHI March 17 Eat
To The Beet with The Beverly Sisters, a
Sunday brunch and dinner event, 3 and 7
p.m.; Neon Nltes: A slide survey of North
American and early contemporary Vancouver
neon, by Raff Ketman, Wednesdays, March
7 and 14, 8 p.m.
Dabora Klyan-Mowczan sculpture: Garden, opening March 12, 'tfH March 24,8 p.m.
Unit/Pitt Gallery 163 W. Pender St.,
681-6740.
Georglana Chappell: Double Journey, created exclusively for the exhibition space at the
Contemporary Art Gallery. 556 Hamilton
St., until March 31. Chappell, currently a sessional art instructor at UBC and Cap College,
is well known for "light in space" shows.
Clay and Concrete: An exhibition of sculpture by Charles Tupper, March 11-24,
Carnegie Centre, 401 Main St., 665-2220.
The Mechanism of Meaning: 36 drawings
by Arakawa, an internationally known painter
snd graphic artist, until april 8, at Surrey Art
Gallery, 13750 - 88th Ave., Surrey, 588-7461.
Wendy Hamlin: creator of the mural for the
extended care hospital at UBC has a drawings/collages exhibition at Centre Cultural
ALL
GRADUATES
FREE FOOD AND DRINK!!!
Time: Tuesday, March 13th — 4:00 p.m.
Place: Engineer's Cheese Factory
Event: Annual Tree Planting Ceremony &
Wine & Cheese Party
also
CAMPUS WIDE
GRAD DANCE
Place: Grad Centre Ballroom
Date: Wednesday — March 14th
Time: 8:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m.
Tickets: $3.00. Available from your grad
representatives and AMS box office.
FULL BAR INCLUDED
1984 Grad Council Committee
Colombian, 795 West 16th Ave., until March
22.
Tha Canada Packers Collection: an exhibition of 61 paintings, spanning four decades of
Canadian art, from 1910-1950, Vancouver
Art Gallery, 750 Hornby St., until March 18.
Judy Mcgillivary: Book launching for her
latest poetry book, Deep Streets, March 15,
7-9 p.m., Billy Bishop. 1407 Laburnum.
m
<U&0t*
tended a work party are urged to attend, 10:30
a.m., Jericho Sailing Cantra.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Annual variety show — kung fu, tinging, dance
acta and band contest, 7:30 p.m., International
House.
THE UBYSSEY
General meeting ot aoccer foota anon., noon,
Helen Caldtcott Memorial Park.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Street hustle leeaorw, 11 a.m.-noon. SUB party-
SUNDAY
SAILING CLUB
Fun races - members of all skill toveta ara invited, 10:30 a.m., Jericho Sailing Cantra.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise and worship and teaching, special guest
speaker Ken Vickara, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car slalom — *4 advance ticket in Room 216A,
»6 at slalom, 9:30 a.m.. Lot BS.
MONDAY
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film: What about the Russians?, noon, SUB
206.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Breakdancing level 2 workshop, fees $10, pre-
registration SUB 216E noon-1:30 p.m., workshop 6:30-7:30 p.m.. SUB 207-209.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Pin tests this week and next, during class times.
SUB ballroom.
SLAVONIC STUDIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES
AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL
Lecture by Prof. George Mink, Tha Polish Challenge — recent developments and prospects for
tha future, noon, Buch. A202.
TODAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, elections, noon, International
House — Upper Lounge.
SAILING CLUB
Organizational meeting for a spring cruise — all
those interested are invited, noon, SUB 208.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Annual general meeting, elections for dub ex-
ecutive, bring membership card, noon, SUB 212.
Mystery cendidetee end retirement dance, cheep
drinks, all welcome, 7:30 p.m.
QAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
WWne and cheese party, contact SUB 239 for info.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Bowling and pizza night, 6:30-8:30 p.m.. SUB
bowling lenes.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
AND SCIENCE FOR PEACE
National firm board's war series: Part 1, The
Road To Total War, noon, Buch. A100.
DEPARTMENT OF GERMANIC STUDIES
Exiled Czech writer Pavel Kohout on the curse
and blessing of exile, noon, Buch. A102.
Workshop on the situation of East European
writers, 3 p.m., Buch. penthouse.
Pavel   Kohout,   Horn   Bienkek   and   George
Faludy, 8 p.m., Buch. A104.
PHURSTYEER ENGINEERS
Dance with TKO, slide show and happy hour, 7
p.m., SUB partyroom.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Club  elections for next year's exec, noon, SUB
ballroom.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB
Work party — members who have not yet at-
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Will you have a job when you graduate?
Interested in SCIENCE or MANAGEMENT?
AGRICULTURAL
ECONOMICS
offering courses in
FARM MANAGEMENT
AGRI-BUSINESS
MARKETING
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
If you are interested in finding out more about an applied field
with good employment opportunities, contact:
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
PHONE: 228-2193
ADDRESS: Ponderosa Annex D
or see our display at UBC Open House, March 9-11,
in Room 348, MacMillan Building.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c Commercial — 3 lines
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.93 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
ONE MONTH ADVENTURE to a secluded
town in the Himalayas of India. Student
organized. Lv May '84. Total cost (incl airfare) $1969. Info: Pilar Brothers c/o Trent
Univ., Peterborough, Ont. (7061 743-4391.
WELSH MEN'S CHOIR - Sun., Mar. 11,
2:30 p.m. at Univ. Hill Church, S375 Univ.
Blvd. Admission $1.00 for students.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports, etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
86 - TYPING
30 - JOBS
The Vancouver Institute
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
FREUD AND TRUTH
Prof. Jeffrey Masson,
University of California,
Berkeley
SATURDAY, MARCH 10
at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS! Commerce students Et others, start your own career, earn
extra income while studying Et during the
summer. Call Charlie for appt. 738-7561.
WANTED: Au pair girl for French family
in Paris during the summer. Call 434-9737.
36 - LOST
RED SUNGLASSES (birthday gift) on Fri.
evening March 2 at Osborne Gym, Rwd,
228-2262 (Pat).
40 - MESSAGES
11 - FOR SALE - Private
RHODES   TEXTBOOK   OF   SURGERY
Principles & Practical. 5th edition by James
D. Hardy M.D. 2 vols. $75 both. 438-0466
after 7 p.m.
JOGGERSI Sony Walkman used once, must
sell. $90 o.b.o. 224-9846. Claire.
1982 SUZUKI 400E. Low insurance, very
low Km's. Garage stored. $1660. 224-2675.
20 - HOUSING	
PHYSICIAN AND FAMILY returning to
Vancouver July 1/84 looking for 3-4 bdr.
house to rent. Area around Maple Grove
School prof., but any westside area con.
furn. or unfurn. $1000-$1100 278-7260.
STUDENTS - Pass on a deall Wtd. 2 bdrm
hse/apt. UBC/Granville area to rent from
May $500 max. 872-0757 evegs till 11:00
26 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
WISHING     the  Alpha  Phis  the
best of luck on Friday.
 S.O.B.
46 - PERSONALS	
WE LOVE our pledges - Cathy,
Oenone, and Mirandal From the
Alpha Phis.
66 - SCANDALS	
PUT IT IN WRITING .... The UBC
Thunderbird Shop in S.U.B. prints personalized bumper stickers for enthusiasts.
SONGFEST "84. Just a reminder. Tonight
at 8 p.m. at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
Tickets at VTC CBO and AMS.
70 - SERVICES	
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6618.
FORMER UNIV. PROF. (10 yrs. exp.)
will critique Er edit term papers, theses,
manuscripts. Reasonable rates. Fast turnaround. 668-1284.
80 - TUTORING	
RESEARCH DONE - Library sleuthing and
help on assignments.  224-6518 before 5
p.m.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
tectums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD  PROCESSING  SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1206.
EXCELLENT TYPIST. IBM. AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0361.
NEW  SONY  SERIES  36  w/p  SYSTEM
installed. Have your essay, resumes Et
manuscripts done on the best. We have
special rates for students. Four years in
business at 266-6814.
EXPERT TYPING. Fast, accurate, reliable.
Near Arbutus/King Edward. 8.50/hr. Agni.
736-1544.
PROFESSIONAL   W/P   SERIVCES    -
24 hour turnaround, courier or drop off.
The WORDCENTRE, 106-7031
Westminster Hwy., Rmd. 276-2283.
WHAT A DEALIt Fast, accurate typing for
$1.00 per pagel Call Kathy 266-8498.
WORD PROCESSING, all jobs, tapes
transcribed, student rates. On King Edward
bus route, 879-5108.
W/P & typing: term papers, theses, mscpt.,
essays, incl. reports, letters, resumes, Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays. Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
THESIS TYPING on UBC Computer. Experienced with Data Analysis, FMT, SPSS,
etc. References available. 872-0841, 8-9:30
90 - WANTED
CHEAP one-way flight to Montreal. Date
flexible in late April. Leave message for
David. 228-1583. Friday, March 9,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Fund never created
From page 5
McDermitt said he favored more
housing but thinks a fund should
have been begun long ago so
students would not now have to
bear such a large burden.
Liam McCaughey, a parent of
two children, said "UBC shouldn't
put the burden of financing future
housing on student families."
He and wife Kathy think now
Dance 'nice'
From page 9
giving throaty way to Italian opera,
dresses himself in the shed suit. The
dance has frenetic energy rather
than exciting choreography.
Another uninspired premiere
piece called Triptych failed to convey something new about heterosexual couplings, or about homosexual
love. The dancers moved well
enough, but Triptych was nice —
and nothing more.
The evening's best work came
last: V "R" Complex, based on
Sagan's theory of human evolution
from the sea. Terezakis positioned
his dancers spatially, to create enticing visual relationships. He also
capitalized on each dancer's individual strengths. For example,
Yoo-Hyon Kim's elegant power
based on her classical training, and
Daina Balodis' spicy jazz energy.
Correction Notice
KINKO'S COPIES
In our January 24th issues,
KINKO'S COPIES was incorrectly advertised as having "self-
service typewriters". We have
been advised by Kinko's that
they do not offer such a service.
The Ubyssey apologizes for any
inconvenience caused our
advertiser.
IN A HURRY?
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high quality copies
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that the Socreds eliminated grants
they will accumulate a combined
debt of $64,000 by the time they
graduate. To reduce this debt one
of them may have to quit school, if
either can find a job, McCaughey
said.
Vicky Martin says the rent increase and other expenses will cost
her family about $2,000 dollars next
year, and she may have to quit UBC
to find a job to help her husband
complete his Ph.D. next year.
"It may mean that I will never
finish my degree," she said. When
her husband graduates he will likely
find a job outside Canada and her
courses may not be transferable,
she said.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs on this tiny island
community were shocked Thursday
to learn that island dictator Target
Dropping and Chancellor of the Exchequer Jams Hollow were planning to build a passageway between
their adjoining offices at island
government expense.
Dropping and Hollow have long
been rumored to be holding secret
meetings late into the nights in their
wing of the giant multi-national
Amalgamated Media Services
(AMS) — which they rule over.
"This would allow them to meet
each other, while making the island
residents think they were busy in
their separate offices, while actually
they were busy, well, you know
. . .," said island general Snarles
Redneck.
BE AN EDITOR IN 12 MONTHS - GUARANTEED
Well, not quite. But The Ubyssey has developed quite a reputation for churning out hot-shot reporters whose desire to fill up portfolios is more apparent than any real commitment to journalism. So
if you want to flow with the times and join the staff, come to SUB
241K. We're especially interested in students returning next September. Who knows — this time next year, you may be an editor.
We cherish the thought. ^	
MaVaVaMMBlB^B^BVa^aHa^B^B^B^B^B^MsaaVBMa^MBMB^mBa^Ha*B«HBVMM
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1984 SPRING LECTURES
KONRAD BLOCH
Professor Konrad Bloch is widely acknowledged as one of the world's outstanding biochemical scientists. His research in the area of the biochemistry of
fats and cholesterol has earned him a number of significant distinctions, including the 1964 Nobel Prize in Medicine and physiology. Professor Bloch
currently holds the position of Higgens Professor of Biochemistry at Harvard
University. His lectures should be of interest to a wide range of groups in the
basic and health sciences.
STEROL CONTROL OF PHOSPHOLIPID BIOSYNTHESIS
Tuesday, March 13 — In Lecture Hall 1. Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 4:00
p.m.
STEROL STRUCTURE AND MEMBRANE FUNCTION
Thursday, March 15 — In Room 250. Chemistry Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE CHEMISTRY OF EVOLUTION
Saturday, March 17 — In Lecture Hall 2. Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15
p.m. (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE—PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
\\
|5   with a $2.00 purchase     .
| one   coupon   per   customer
I    OFFER EXPIRES MARCH 10th     I
i !
We're Looking For A Few Good Recruits.
Test
Yourself
and See
If You
Measure
Up...
YOU HAVE A
CHANCE TO WIN
WITH POLICE
ACADEMY
Enter your
Entrance Exam
and you could
win:
• T-Shirts (100)
• Sun Visors (50)
• Posters (50)
• Sony Walkmans
(10)
Submit your
Entrance Exam,
name, address,
phone and age to:
POLICE ACADEMY
Contest,
184 Laird Drive
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 3V7
Deadlines for entries: March 30,1984
Contest Draw to take place: April 2,1984
Total Value of all prizes approx. $2125.00.
Winners will be chosen randomly from all
entrants.
Prizes must be claimed as represented.
Contest Expires April 2/84.
POLICE ACADEMY OFFICIAL ENTRANCE EXAM
6.
I want to be a cop because:
A □ I look good in blue.
B uMygrandmofrierwasacop.
C. □ I lie tree coffee and doughnuts.
When cornerino. a *^ »■•*"*
A n Shout, "Hold it right there!
b' Cj Say, "Go ahead, make my day.
C. □ Sing, "I Got Vou, Babe."
Ybur I.Q. is between:
A r. 125-175
B r 75-125 ,.„,
C. r. Don't understand the question
must police officers be quick thWws?
Why
A. r. True.
B. r Both.
C. r: Let me get back to you
your **»* tavorfc Policeman b:
A. r Pepper Anderson.
B r   Sting. j
C. f  Adam Twelve
What an Institution.
"POLICE ACADEMY" a PAUL MASLANSKY production
starring STEVE GUTTENBERG • KIM CATTRALL • BUBBA SMITH • and GEORGE GAYNES as comdt. lassabd
story by NEAL ISRAEL s PAT PR0FT • screenplay by NEAL ISRAEL & PAT PR0FT and HUGH WILSON
subject to produced by PAUL MASLANSKY • directed by HUGH WILSON A * wx> commw nus
CLASSIFICATION ..»...,-':."!3TSS5S Q
OPENS FRIDAY MARCH 23RD Page 16
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,1984
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
NOMINATIONS
are invited for the following positions:
• FINANCE DIRECTOR: to be elected from the
membership at large at the Annual General
Meeting on March 16, 1984. Nominations for this
position close at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 16.
• AMS Representatives: three (3) members to
be elected from the membership at large by the
Council at its March 15, 1984 meeting to represent
the Graduate Student Society on the AMS Council.
Nomination forms are available at the
Graduate Student Centre office.
®
Get the Best Deal at LARRY'S
WM-10
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D  SMALLEST WALKMAN 6.4 OZ.
D DOLBY D AUTO SHUT-OFF
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EXTRA 10% OFF WITH AMS CARD
STEREO
AWARENESS
2053 W. 41St Ave. (near Arbutus) 263-0878
COMPUTERS DON'T
HAVE ALL THE
ANSWERS!
NEITHER DO WE
BUT
WE, THE REDEMPTOR1STS, PRIESTS AND BROTHERS,
ARE DEDICATED TO HELPING PEOPLE MEET THE
PROBLEMS OF LIFE TO FINDING ANSWERS
WHICH GIVE SPIRITUAL MEANING AND PURPOSE TO
LIVING.
CARE TO JOIN US?
FOR 1NFORMA TION CONTACT —     FATHER JOE MURPHY
127M-lt2A«M«
Unatm. AIb«tta
TSNtMS
■ (4*3) 452-231*
P
UBC WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
ANNOUNCES
SPRING/SUMMER
CONTRACTS
TO PLAY
SQUASH & RACQUETBALL
Contracts allow you to book ahead and guarantee your court
timel Play as often as you wish.
Contracts are accepted for the Spring/Summer months only
April 1st to August 19th, 1984.
Sign up in person beginning Tuesday, March 6, 1984, during the
hours 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the Courts
Desk, UBC Winter Sports Centre.
Minimum contract amount for
players is $25.00.
CALL 228-6125 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
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