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The Ubyssey Mar 30, 2015

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Array  // Page 2
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EVENTS        II THISWEEK, CHECK!
TUESDAY ' 31
UBC DANCE TEAM YEAR-END SHOW
7:00 P.M. @ THE NORM THEATRE
Some of U BC's best dancers will be showcasing a wide variety of styles at their
end-of-year show. Come out to watch some very talented performers and
support a good cause. By donation
SATURDAY ' 4
GOOSEHUNT~#i
APril 4th 201SS6       WOODSTOCK EWTION.201S
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GOOSEHUNT 2015: WOODSTOCK EDITION
6:00 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
Do you harken back to the days of hippies, Hendrix and tie-dye? BVP is
offering you the chance to experience your own Woodstock, albeit featuring
some slightly more modern music of all genres. $5-10
SUNDAY' 5
THE CALENDARS SPRING FORMAL
8:00 P.M. @ CHAN CENTRE
Are you a person who jumps at any chance to put on a tux or ball gown? Then
this is the event for you. Featuring a Rose Garden photo booth, chocolate
fountain and magicians, this party is sure to scratch your formal itch. $20-25
ON
THE
COVER
Still as ugly as ever. Love it anyway.
- Photo Kosta Prodanovic
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
^THEUBYSSEY
MARCH30.2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEL
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OUR CAMPUS //
iiWiVflafewwifcwlsml
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO AU^EN ERHARCTT/THE UBYSSEY
Borland-Walker is the current coordinator of AMS Speakeasy.
Kyra Borland-Walker ensures students can speak easy
Leo Soh
Senior StaffWriter
The AMS strives to support
students in various ways: hosting
events, making executive decisions and offering various student
services. Speakeasy is the AMS'
most storied student service, and
Kyra Borland-Walker is currently
at the helm ofthe ship.
Although Borland-Walker grew
up in Vancouver, she attended
high school in the Netherlands
and did not know many faces
coming into UBC.
"I kind of fell into Speakeasy.
My first day as a first year, I was
late for Imagine Day and I only
went to the main event. Honestly,
I was feeling a little discouraged
about being on campus, making
friends and finding something
that felt like home for me. I was
looking for community."
At the Imagine Day main event,
Borland-Walker came into contact
with Speakeasy and decided on the
fly to apply for a position there.
"I read a little about what it
was, and immediately I was thinking to myself, 'wow, that is what to
do; I want to support people and
be part of a community that helps
other people feel supported.'"
We were started by a
group of students who
were concerned with
campus loneliness.
They wanted to give
students a place
to come and feel
connected to other
students."
Kyra Borland-Walker
AMS Speakeasy Coordinator
In the past, Borland-Walker
had personally experienced
some mental health issues and
started a gay-straight alliance
at her high school. Therefore,
she felt a personal connection to
Speakeasy.
Each year at UBC, Borland-Walker's involvement with
Speakeasy increased further. In
her second year, Borland-Walker applied to be a team leader,
in her third to be the assistant
coordinator and in her fourth
to be the coordinator: she was
hired all three times.
Through her involvement in
Speakeasy, Borland-Walker is contributing to an AMS tradition.
"We were started by a group of
students who were concerned with
campus loneliness. They wanted to
give students a place to come and
feel connected to other students."
To describe it in a
nutshell, you could
call [Speakeasy] free,
confidential, one-
on-one drop-in peer
support with a trained
volunteer."
Speakeasy has served students
for over 45 years. "We were started in 1970, and as such we are the
oldest student service." Throughout its history, it has taken on several different forms, but has never
strayed from its mission to provide
peer support. "We've offered a lot
of services throughout the years:
drop-in peer support, peer-support over the phone, tutoring
referrals, club space. Our mandate
has always been to further the
well-being of students."
In its current form, Speakeasy
provides peer support for students
facing a wide variety of challenges. "To describe it in a nutshell,
you could call [Speakeasy] free,
confidential, one-on-one drop-
in peer support with a trained
volunteer."
However, Borland-Walker
stresses the importance of recognizing that Speakeasy volunteers,
despite being carefully chosen and
well-trained, are not professional
counsellors. "I think one ofthe important distinctions to make note
of is that we are not professionals.
We don't pretend to be professionals, and as such we have unique
advantages and limitations."
Volunteers at Speakeasy are
peers who can relate to students
on a personal level that perhaps
professionals cannot, but are not
trained to treat physiological or
psychological disorders. "We are
short-term service, and we only see
students one time [per issue]. Our
ultimate goal is to refer out so that
students can continue to deal with
their stress long-term."
If you feel the need to speak to
a peer support counsellor, making
use ofthe Speakeasy service is
straightforward and easy.
"There are two ways of accessing our service. The primary way
is to approach our desk, which
is in the north concourse ofthe
SUB." The second way is a more
discreet approach that students
are encouraged to take if they feel
uncomfortable approaching the
front desk.
If you're passionate
about Speakeasy
you're the right person
to volunteer here. You
may not feel like you
have the base skills,
but we have really
intensive training."
"Behind that wall to the left
ofthe desk there is a doorbell."
Speakeasy volunteers are listening
for the sound ofthe bell, and will
come to assist you. All sessions
take place in a private room.
Borland-Walker encourages
those interested to apply and
volunteer at Speakeasy.
"If you're passionate about
Speakeasy, you're the right person
to volunteer here. You may not feel
like you have the base skills, but
we have really intensive training."
With empathy and a willingness
to learn, Borland-Walker believes
any passionate volunteer can
become an effective peer support
counsellor.
A spot is not guaranteed, as "we
typically have about four times
as many applicants than we have
positions, but at least apply and
get your name in there as we have
a lot more positions opening up
next year [for the opening ofthe
new SUB]."
Speakeasy provides peer counselling to those in need of social
support, and also plays a role in
protecting mental health at UBC.
Furthermore, it has provided
countless numbers of students like
Borland-Walker with a welcoming
and inclusive campus community
since its inception. There is no
denying that Speakeasy has become an integral part ofthe UBC
community. Xi // News
EDITOR VERONIKA BONDARENKO
MONDAY, MARCH 30, 20
ISRAEL-PALESTINE »
BDS referendum doesn't pass,
but receives more 'yes' than
'no' votes
Boycott
Divestment
Sanctions
FADAMS^HE UBYSSEY
The BDS referendum did not meet the eight per cent necessary to pass.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The referendum on BDS did
not pass due to a failure to
meet quorum.
Earlier in the month, Solidarity
for Palestinian Human Rights
raised the 1,000 signatures necessary to hold a referendum on
whether the AMS should divest
from companies that support
the Israeli military's actions in
Palestine. BDS had previously
passed at McMaster, York and
Ryerson University.
The words ofthe referendum
question read as follows: "Do
you support your student union
(AMS) in boycotting products and
divesting from companies that
support Israeli war crimes, illegal
occupation and the oppression of
Palestinians?"
Accordingto AMS President
Tanner Bokor, the referendum
question received more 'yes' than
'no' votes, but failed to meet the
CRIME »
eight per cent of students quorum
necessary for it to pass.
The referendum received 3,493
'yes' votes, 2,223 'no' votes and
435 abstentions. A total of 4,130
'yes' votes (eight per cent of 51,614
elegible students) was necessary
for the referendum to pass.
Following the results ofthe
referendum, SPHR released a
statement on the number of 'yes'
votes that the question received.
"SPHR would first and foremost
like to thank the thousands of
students who took the time to vote
yes to our boycott and divestment
campaign, as well as the numerous
student groups, professors, and
allies who endorsed and supported
our efforts over the past several
months to push this important
social justice campaign forward,"
read the statement. "Despite the
fact that the referendum did not
pass as it did not meet quorum, we
are very proud and touched that a
majority of almost 3,500 students
voted in favour of disassociating
from Israeli human rights violations and illegal occupation, which
shows that students on our campus
have not only been engaging with
this vital issue, but are also becoming increasingly more critical of
the violence and marginalization
that Palestinians face on a daily
basis. The referendum results
show that despite the immense
discrepancy in resources and
funding between ourselves and
the no campaign and the AMS's
decision to officially oppose the
referendum question, that UBC
students are nevertheless standing up for justice and asking our
student union to do the same. This,
to us, can be seen as a victory."
UBC's Hillel branch, who have
been the most vocal proponents of
the 'no' side, also released a statement following the referendum.
"We are tremendously proud
ofthe UBC community for
rejecting BDS," read the statement. "Whether they voted no,
or simply abstained from voting
yes, students clearly recognize the
importance of keeping our campus
safe and open to all people of
various opinions and backgrounds.
We hope this will put the hateful
and damaging BDS campaign to
rest, so that we can all turn our
attention to positive initiatives
that will bring students together
instead of those that divide them.
We understand that not everyone
will be happy with the referendum's results and we extend our
hand in the hope that we can work
together through open dialogue
and mutual respect to make the
world a better place." Xi
Woman sexually assaulted near campus
early Thursday morning
A woman has been sexually assaulted while jogging near 16th and Discovery Streets on March 26.
MAPCOURTESYOFGOOGLEMAPS
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
A woman was sexually assaulted
near UBC Thursday morning.
Accordingto Vancouver Police
Department Constable Brian
Montague, the assault took place
shortly after 6 a.m. on Thursday, March 26. A 30 year-old
woman was jogging near 16th
and Discovery streets in the West
Point Grey area when she was
grabbed from behind, pushed to
the ground and sexually assaulted. She was able to fight off
her attacker.
The victim was taken to the hospital with minor physical injuries.
"She was taken to the hospital,"
said Montague. "She did receive
some minor physical injuries. Obviously, [she was] very shaken and
upset about the incident, but her
physical injuries were fairly minor."
Montague also said that the VPD
conducted a search ofthe area with
a police dog, but were not able to
locate the suspect. Details on the
attacker's age and physical appearance are not available at this time,
but the VPD will be putting together a description once the victim is
ready to sit down with them.
The VPD is continuing their
investigation for the suspect.
"We're canvassing for video,
we're going door to door knocking on people's homes to see if
they have any information they
can share, if anyone saw or heard
anything suspicious," said Montague. "We're asking if they did
so, that they give us a phone call
at (604) 717-0600."
A week ago, the RCMP arrested a suspect in an attempted
sexual assault case at Totem Park.
On February 23, an 18 year-old
woman was also assaulted near
UBC's Mundell Park. Xi
COUNCIL »
AMS months behind on
posting Council minutes
LLUSTRATION CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
The last AMS Council minutes have been posted on October 14.
Moira Warburton
Contributor
The AMS has not posted Council
meeting minutes since October 14,
2014, despite the minutes having
been regularly approved at every
Council meeting since then.
This is in direct violation of
AMS Code which states that
minutes must be posted in public
within 48 hours of being approved
by the AMS Council.
"Mostly that's an'oops! Sorry
folks!'" said Daniel Levangie, executive director ofthe AMS. "We're
way behind schedule."
The process for posting notes is
two fold: at each Council meeting two note-takers take down
minutes, then these two copies are
combined for clarity and to ensure
nothing is missed. The polished
minutes are then posted on the
AMS website.
"Basically it just takes a while
and we're backlogged," Levangie
said. "Anybody can access the
information so if they want to see
what's been said, Sheldon [Gold-
farb, the AMS archivist] has all
the raw, unfinished, unpolished
minutes. It's more that we're back-
logged for getting them finalized.
They all exist, they just haven't
been polished up."
Levangie cited other projects
— such as the AMS centennial
yearbook and the new SUB opening — as reasons for the backlog
in posting.
"We recognize that it's super
important, and that obviously
students care. If there was one
student who was paying enough
attention to notice then that's
awesome, that's great news for us,
people care."
Levangie said that after the
move to the new SUB is complete
students can expect minutes to be
posted in a more timely manner.
"We have a new system set in place
so that as soon as the projects
have been completed ... [it] will be
more efficient and sharp in getting
things turned around." tJ
Want to cover the news? Sent
an email.
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website for more information NEWS    I    MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2015
"HE WAS THE KINDEST GUY... HE
WAS ALWAYS HERE, SMILING
AND HE WASN'T SPEAKING BUT
ALWAYS MAKING SMALL JOKES
SUDDENLY AND THEY WERE
FUNNY"
REMEMBERING
TIM DIXON
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
When friends thought about Tim Dixon, 'kind' was
always the word that came to mind.
An exchange student from the University of Edinburgh, Tim had a passion for the outdoors and came
to UBC to study geology. He would often go hiking in
the mountains with the classmates and friends he had
met during his time abroad.
On March 12, the flag at the intersection between Main Mall and Agronomy was lowered in his
memory. Earlier in the month, Tim had passed away
suddenly in his room at Fairview Crescent. He was
only 20 years old.
After starting his year at UBC in September, Tim
quickly grew close with a group of other exchange
students from all over the world. Most of them lived
at Fairview and would get together to hang out,
explore Vancouver or go out for drinks in their spare
time after classes.
Friends described Tim as quiet, reflective and kind
to just about everybody he met. He was there for his
friends in a constant, silent way that would sometimes
go unnoticed by those around him.
Leo Theobaldt, who also met Tim through the
Fairview crew, said that Tim was the type of friend
that you grew close to over time spent together,
without even realizing it.
They would see each other often to work out,
go swimming or watch soccer games. Tim's favourite team was the Celtic Football Club, based
in Glasgow.
"That's what happened," said Theobaldt. "You
just realized, at some point, that we just kind of sat
somewhere, just the two of us, and it wasn't uncomfortable and we actually were friends."
Lucas Bernar first met Tim at the Samesun Hostel before both of them would move into Fairview.
They knew that they would be roommates for the
year and began to talk.
One time, in mid-September, Tim tried to explain
the details around the Scottish independence
referendum to Bernar. He was passionate about
Scotland's independence and would talk about it
with excitement.
PHOTOS COURTESYTIM'S FRIENDS MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2015    |    NEWS
PHOTOS COURTESYTIM'S FRIENDS
'ALTHOUGH WE ARE STILL TRYING TO COPE AND
UNDERSTAND HIS PASSING, HIS INFLUENCE AND
HIS MEMORY WILL ALWAYS LIVE FOREVER.... TIMBITS — AS ONE OF OUR DEAR MATES ON EXCHANGE, AS PART OF THE BEST TIME OF OUR
LIVES, AS ONE OF US."
"He was trying to explain [to] me why he thought
Scotland should be independent, and how the
whole UK Government structure is," said Bernar.
"I couldn't quite understand half of what he said
because his accent was too strong and he spoke too
fast, but I remember him being very excited to tell
me."
Tim also liked to enjoy Vancouver's nightlife
— visiting pubs across the city with his friends.
Accordingto Theobaldt, Tim would endup at The
Bimini on Fourth Avenue so often that his friends
had nicknamed it "Timmini's."
During those nights, Tim would often sit back,
drink a beer and talk to those around him while
observing the action at the club.
"He was the kindest guy," said Baptiste Savary,
another exchange student at UBC. "He was always
here, smiling and he wasn't speaking but always
making small jokes suddenly and they were funny."
Almost all of Tim's friends remembered the time
that he shocked everyone by jumping into Coal
Harbour after a night spent hanging out at Granville Island's Backstage Lounge as one ofthe most
memorable moments from their exchange.
"It was in November so it was freezing but he
just did it and I took a video of him," said Linda
Lilly, who currently studies at UBC. "And every
time he saw me he jokingly told me 'Linda don't
show this to anyone,' but I know that he was really
proud of that secretly."
Tim would often not respond to the various
party and event invitations that he received
through Facebook, but could always be counted on
to show up at some point during the night.
Many ofthe people that Tim met during their
time on exchange wished that they had gotten to
know him better. In the excitement of coming to
a new place, meeting other people and getting to
know the city, there was often not enough time to
pause and talk.
But no matter where he went or what he did,
Tim's thoughtful and compassionate presence was
felt strongly by those who knew him. He was always
looking out for his friends and acquaintances in small,
thoughtful ways.
"He was a really nice, quiet guy who was always
there for you and who you would take for granted sometimes because he was always there and
always helping out when you needed something,"
said Theobaldt.
After many from the original group of friends left to
go home following their first term at UBC, Tim grew
especially close with those who stayed behind in Vancouver after December.
Along with Theobaldt and Savary, Chi-Wai Kou was
among the group of friends who had gone on a trip to
Whistler with Tim over reading week. Four of them
had booked an apartment for two people and had to
sneak the other two in unnoticed. It was during the
time they spent snowboarding, partying or just hanging out that their friendship truly cemented.
On an average day in Fairview, Tim's passing still
doesn't feel real. As time goes by, the initial shock of
his death has been replaced by the feeling that Tim
will walk through the door at any moment, will still
be there in person or on Facebook the next day. And
although the circumstances of his death remain a painful mystery to his friends, his quiet warmth and good
nature live on in hearts and in thoughts.
Kou said that, despite all the pain of losing a good
friend, he's honoured to have met Tim and shared in
his kindness and positive outlook on the world. As
friends from exchange begin to scatter and go home to
different parts ofthe world, Tim's memory also travels
far and near.
"Although we are still trying to cope and understand his passing, his influence and his memory will
always live forever," said Kou. "Timbits — as one of our
dear mates on exchange, as part ofthe best time of our
lives, as one of us." 31 NEWS    I    MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2015
STUDENT FEES»
KUS referendum prompts controversy and speculation
Kinesiology students voted to help fund a new student building.
Kosta Prodanovic
News Administrator
A referendum to secure $5 million
for the construction of a building
for the School of Kinesiology has
passed.
The referendum asked students
from the School of Kinesiology
to approve a $250 student fee increase to be handed in its entirety
to the university. The fee will go
towards funding the building of
the Community Health Sciences
Centre, to be used by the School of
Kinesiology, the Faculty of Education and the School of Nursing, but
the onus is falling directly on Kinesiology undergrads to pay for it.
Although the project is still in
its preliminary stages of develop
ment, it is slated to cost $88 million in total; $78 million of which
will come from the government, $5
million from donors and the rest
from Kinesiology students.
The campaign has been headed
by Make Your Mark (MYM), a
student-led organization that
launched earlier this year with the
intention of securing funding for
a space for kinesiology students.
Accordingto Robyn Freiheit, who
spearheads MYM, the need for a
Kinesiology building was identified by the Executive Council of
the KUS four years ago and has
been a point of discussion ever
since.
The proposed fee increase
has faced a lot of criticism and
speculation from observers, who
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC^HE UBYSSEY
have framed it as a money grab
on behalf of the School of Kinesiology. An article posted by UBC
Insiders called the referendum a
"sham," stating "It's being driven
by the School of Kinesiology, using
the KUS as a shell organization
through which to institute the
fee."
The rationale behind the claim
is that MYM Special Projects
Coordinator Robyn Freiheit is on
UBC's payroll to push the building
project forward.
When approached for response,
KUS President Jason Quach
explained why MYM has been
organizing the project.
"[The CHSC has] always
been on the plate ofthe KUS but
unfortunately it's just because of
the way the KUS is structured we
don't have the capacity to move
this project forward."
As a result, a former KUS Executive Committee decided to reach
out to the School of Kinesiology
about hiring a "non-voluntary"
person to help with the project, so
they found Freiheit, who proposed
a job description to the school
through which she could assist the
KUS and Kinesiology students by
taking the lead on this student-led
project. The school accepted Frei-
heit's terms and she is currently
paid for her work with MYM.
When Freiheit was asked if she
saw her position as an employee of
the university and the coordinator
of a "student-led" organization as
a conflict of interest, she said her
"motivations to stay involved in
this project have come from [her]
personal experiences as a Kinesiology student displaying a dire need
for a new space for our program."
Freiheit reiterated that the
MYM student action committee
and the KUS represent the interests of students.
"The purpose of this position
was to assist the KUS, and give
students a voice in building planning while providing a platform
for expressing their views ... the
information flow was always from
the students (KUS and MYM
Action Committee) onwards to
the school, never the other way
around," said Freiheit.
Others have criticized the fact
that Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) regarding the referendum was presented to AMS
Council without giving councillors time to digest the information. The motion was added to
the agenda the day ofthe meeting
and the MOU was not circulated
in advance.
VP Finance Mateusz Miadlikowski said that the MOU
felt rushed.
"I was uncomfortable signing it
due to the amount of fees collected
and the importance ofthe MOU
and the direction it sets," he said.
The motion was postponed
until March 25. KUS president
Jason Quatch was noticeably
absent from the meeting and
councillors moved to postpone the
motion once again.
This did not stop MYM from
publishing that the building features had been confirmed in the
MOU "by all relevant positions at
UBC," specifically citing the AMS,
in a Q&A on March 5 — prior to
the referendum.
The post is misleading. It refers
to the fact that, at the time, the
referendum question had been
brought up at a series of consultations with various student leaders
on campus, including members of
the AMS, but it had not previously
been brought to Council.
Aside from observer speculation and backroom chatter, the
bottom line is that Kinesiology
students want a building to call
their own. They have voted in
favour ofthe student fee increase
to fund the CHSC.
According to Freiheit, moving
forward will involve "working to
develop a strategy to keep the momentum going as we engage with
other stakeholders ofthe project
and work towards a potential
donor campaign for our building."
It will also involve pushing the
controversial MOU through the
AMS Council chambers, along
with the results ofthe referendum
itself.
For that to happen, all parties
involved must remain accountable. Xi
TRANSIT »
Summer students to receive Compass
Card before start of term
=ILE PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
The Compass Card should come into effect in
September.
Bill Situ
StaffWriter
With the academic term coming to
a close in two weeks, the next UBC
students to replace their U-Pass
with Compass Cards will be those
who are enrolled in the summer
semester.
Jude Crasta, associate VP external, said that students enrolled
in the summer semester should be
receiving their Compass Cards just
before the beginning of classes.
However, Crasta did not release a
specific date as to when this will be
happening as the AMS is still in the
process of finalizing the details.
"We are working through the
Compass distribution process and
in the next step, UBC's summer
term students will be receiving
their Compass Cards," said Crasta.
"We'll [have] the dates finalized
with TransLink and with the uni
versity for distribution sometime
soon."
After the summer, the next and
final distribution phase will effectively mark the discontinuation of
the U-Pass as almost all students
transition to the Compass Card.
The first distribution phase took
place back in January, when the
850 students from UBC's various
affiliated colleges became the first
group of students to receive Compass Cards.
Accordingto Crasta, neither the
AMS nor TransLink received any
reports of problems from students
during the last distribution phase.
"The students who have their
Compass Cards are, as far as we
have been informed, pretty satisfied with their travel," said Crasta.
Crasta said that he does not
anticipate any major problems
for transitioning to the Compass
Card during the final distribution
phase.
"I'm pretty confident that if
any issues arise, there shouldn't
be any problems for us to handle
them when they come along,"
said Crasta.
The Compass Card system
should be in full implementation
by September, in time for students
who begin the new academic
term. Still, Crasta also said that
this schedule is only tentative and
not certain.
"At any time, depending on
if any issues arise, the schedule
could change, but as far as we
are planning right now, that's the
process," said Crasta. tJ
Public Open House - April 8
University Boulevard Precinct Planning
UBC is updating plans for the University Boulevard Precinct. In February 2015,
we gathered feedback from the University community on how to complete the
precinct vision. This feedback, in combination with further design analysis was
used to develop draft planning and design concepts for the precinct
Please join us at a public open house to review the emerging planning and design concepts for the precinct.
Place: Main Concourse, Student Union Building (SUB), 6138 Student Union Boulevard
Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2015      Time: 11:00am - 2:00pm        Refreshments will be se
erved.
Can't attend in person? Online consultation
will run from April 7 -19. Visit planning.ubc.ca
to learn more.
For additional information on the project, contact:
Aviva Savelson, Senior Manager, Consultation,
Campus + Community Planning
at aviva.savelson@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
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campus+communrty planning II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
DAY, MARC
POETRY»
TRAVEL»
ASA and Hillel commemorate
Armenian genocide through poetry
PHOTO JO NAYLOR/FLICKR
Students today are still affected by the 1915 Armenian Genocide, the contest intends to raise awareness of the atrocity.
Adam Waitzer
Contributor
In remembrance ofthe 1915
Armenian Genocide, Hillel B.C.
and the Armenian Student Association (ASA) jointly organized
a poetry contest on the theme
of genocide.
Carried out by the Ottoman
Empire, the genocide saw the systematic decimation of its civilian
Armenian population — modern
estimates put the death toll at
approximately 1.5 million. And
yet this atrocity, often dubbed
the "forgotten genocide," has
received limited international
attention. What is more, Turkey,
the successor state ofthe Ottoman Empire, denies the legitimacy ofthe genocide to this day.
Avetis Muradyan, president
ofthe ASA, contends that the
Armenian Genocide remains
highly relevant in modern times.
According to Muradyan, Turkey's
denial ofthe genocide stands
both as an affront to the tragedy
ofthe event and as an obstacle
to dialogue.
"Turkey, being a NATO ally,
usually pressures other western
countries into avoiding any conversations or any public discourse
on the Armenian Genocide," said
Muradyan. "There's very little
coverage."
While some see this issue as
distant from Canada, let alone
UBC, Muradyan disagrees. "We
feel that even though there is
official recognition, Canada's
foreign policy does not act as
though that recognition is in
place," Muradyan said.
Although Canada has officially
recognized the Armenian Genocide, the government continues
to tiptoe around the history of
the atrocity.
For the ASA, international
acknowledgment ofthe genocide
is not the only goal. According
to Muradyan, remembrance of
the tragedy is also a preventative
measure against future abuses of
human rights.
"I'm a descendant of a survivor
ofthe Armenian Genocide. We
feel this form of moral obligation
to stand up for human rights,
especially when it comes to extreme situations which deteriorate very quickly," said Muradyan.
"We saw it happen in Darfur."
The partnership between
the ASA and Hillel evokes the
parallel between the Armenian
Genocide and the Holocaust.
While the latter has drawn more
awareness, Muradyan believes
that both incidents stand as cautionary tales ofthe consequences
of hatred.
"You see a lot of connections
between the Holocaust and
the Armenian genocide," said
Muradyan. "It's very obvious, it's
very stark."
The poetry contest aims to
raise awareness and encourage
activism, said Muradyan, who
believes that student activism regarding human rights is lacking
at UBC. Entrants competed for
the $200 Lemkin-Tehlirian Prize
for Poetry, named after Raphael
Lemkin, the man who coined the
term "genocide," and Soghomon
Tehlirian, a survivor ofthe
Armenian Genocide.
"What this is all about to me
is grievance, an extreme sense
of grievance for everyone who
has died in genocide," said
Muradyan. "We're grieving even
more that it happens over and
over again without any engagement from our governments."
The genocide commemoration
poetry contest took place on Sunday,
March 29. Xi
Students organize trips
to India to promote
intercultural dialogue
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Aadil Brar, Asad Ali and Amiteshveer Mann want to introduce students to India.
Tisha Dasgupta
Contributor
In India over 23 official languages
are spoken, along with over 1,000
minor languages and dialects, each
belonging to a different culture.
The best way to experience this
cultural diversity is through travel.
Destinations India UBC is a
program founded by three UBC
students who want to present
India as a travel destination,
and share their own experience
of touring through the country.
Founders Aadil Brar, Asad Ali
and Amiteshveer Mann are all
from the Indian sub-continent —
and hope to introduce it to other
students.
With this program, participants will be able to experience
India without having to deal with
the stress of planning a trip to a
foreign country.
"We are going to show you
places [in India] that you don't
usually get to see as a regular
tourist. It's not any conventional
tour, there's also a social work
aspect to it," said Brar.
The first trip is planned for
August 2015, spanning approximately two weeks. The
intended itinerary involves visiting all the major cities in North
India: Delhi, Amritsar, Agra,
Bombay and Jaipur as well as
visiting the famous tourist spots.
Additionally, this trip provides
an opportunity for humanitarian
work in the country as the organizers have collaborated with
established NGOs in the cities to
create day trips to rural villages,
allowing insight into both urban
and rural life ofthe country.
"India is just so diverse in
itself. Each city has its own language and culture. For us India
is like a mini-Europe," said Ali,
when asked about the inspiration behind choosing India as
the destination.
India celebrates its 69th year
of independence on August
15 — providing an ideal time to
experience what the country has
to offer, according to the founders. The parade in New Delhi,
the country's capital, is both a
solemn and a jubilant event.
"We are familiar with this
part ofthe country. We already
have an existing network there,
so we will be able to organize
a trip specifically designed for
you," said Brar. "It is something
different and special — to see
a new place through someone
else's eyes. It will be a lasting
experience."
Destinations India UBC hopes
to initiate an ongoing dialogue
between Canadian and Indian
students, and aims to organize
two trips every year to the country. 31
Student tickets only $12 per
show, or $29 for all 3 shows!
radius
at the
Telus Studio Theatre
The city's top vocal and instrumental ensembles weave
elements of medieval courtly entertainment, into playful
concerts that explore the full spectrum of sound.
The Nu:BC Collective
Thu April 9 2015 at 7:30pm
Turning Point Ensemble
Fri April 17 2015 at 7:30pm & Sun April 19 2015 at 2:30pm
musica intima
Fri April 24 2015 at 7:30pm & Sat April 25 2015 at 2:30pm
Telus Studio Theatre Chan Centre at UBC
Tickets and info at chancentre.com/radius
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On March 13, amongst cheers of "Phi Delt! Phi Delt!" and a
shower of champaign and beer, Aaron Bailey was elected as
the 106th AMS president.
The Gallery, packed -with cheering friends, frat
brothers and Ubyssey staff, played host to yet another
AMS elections announcement and celebration — a
tradition -with an unknown beginning.
"It -was never a designated thing, it -was just something, it -was like Pit Wednesdays — nobody ever
decided that -we -will make our Wednesday nights the
big night on campus, it just happens," said Nancy Too-
good, former AMS food and beverage manager.
The AMS elections announcement is just one of
many different events hosted at the Gallery throughout its lifetime in the SUB. However, after almost 36
years, the Gallery -will close its doors permanently on
April 10.
HISTORY
BY    JENICA    MONTGOMERY
The history ofthe Gallery goes back to 1979, -where,
for the first -week of classes, the SAC turned the SUB
Art Gallery into a temporary lounge. The gallery -was
located in the space -where the current Gallery Lounge
is located and the temporary arrangement -was originally pitched as a coffee shop, but predominantly
served as a cocktail lounge.
The temporary lounge, dubbed the Art Gallery
Lounge, -was so popular that the AMS brought the
lounge back, again on a temporary basis, in 1980 and
1981. In 1981, the lounge lasted for the first two months
of class and -was known solely as the Gallery Lounge.
The art gallery programs committee and the fine
arts department -were opposed to converting the original art gallery into a lounge, fearing smoke damage
to the art and loss of a space for students to share
their art, eventually opting to form its own space in its
current location next to the SUB conversation pit in
the mid 1980s.
Students outside ofthe fine arts department felt
differently about the matter. In March 13,1980's issue
of The Ubyssey Merike Talve wrote "The student gallery is being used by a minority of students. The space
should be a lounge. We need a lounge.... I mean, you
people can still put art up on the -walls." At the time,
Talve -was a second-year art history student.
Talve and many other students had their -wishes
granted in May of 1982, -when the Gallery Lounge
reappeared, and again on June 2 -when the AMS voted
to permanently change the art gallery into a lounge
— changing the social landscape ofthe SUB for years
to come.
The Gallery existed as it -was until 2012 -when
it merged with the Pendulum — an AMS owned
and operated restaurant that focused on local and
sustainable services.
"The gallery used to be phenomenally popular
... but the gallery -was getting a little bit out of hand
-with a little bit of overcrowding and ... a little bit of
noncompliance, so -we needed to get a handle on that,"
said Toogood. Toogood retired in January after almost 25 years -with the AMS.
The rowdy behaviour didn't start during Toogood's
time in the 1990s, but in the Gallery's early years. In MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2015    I    CULTURE
PHOTOS THE UBYSSEY
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1982 -while performing, guitarist David McKay leaned
forward off the stage, falling and landing on three
Lutheran ministers. While the ministers only suffered
minor injuries, McKay was more seriously injured
and sought compensation from the university and
the AMS.
In 2007, The Ubyssey reported on a large brawl that
broke out in the Gallery for no discernible reason on
February 16. The fisticuffs involved approximately 30
individuals, according to AMS security staff. The fight
had escalated to the point of individuals throwing
rocks and beer bottles.
Then AMS President Jeff Friedrich said "my understanding -was that it -was a big fight. These things
happen I guess." The article noted that only one individual -was arrested.
NEW GALLERY
In 2012, -when the construction ofthe Nest began,
Toogood and the AMS -were surprised to learn that the
Pendulum -would not only lose its patio but its -whole
space. The knuckle point that connects the new and
old SUB, beside the Pit, is -where the Pendulum used
to reside.
The Pendulum -was a student favourite, often full of
people studying and eating.
"It -was kind of, I think, one ofthe first places on
campus -where students really felt that it -was their
place," said Toogood.
To keep -with the spirit of providing local, sustainable food options and to calm the Gallery, the AMS
merged the Pendulum's menu -with the lounge — creating the Gallery as students know it today.
The feeling of having a space of their own -was
mirrored in the new Gallery's open and -welcoming
environment. After the 2012 renovations to include the
Pendulum's food menu, the Gallery got rid ofthe black
-walls and silver railings, opting for a lighter, cozier feel.
"I think it's like a living room, like if UBC's your
home this is your living room. Like you come for food
[and] you just sit down, it's so cozy, old couches, old
tables, everything's very... homey. It's our place," said
current AMS VP Finance Mateusz Miadlikowski.
Miadlikowski -worked as a bartender for the Pit
and the Gallery for two years before stepping down
to take the position of VP finance. He still visits the
Gallery regularly.
After the Gallery and the Pendulum merged, the
atmosphere in the lounge changed — adjusting to the
interests of students.
"It -was a cozy place but it -was really ... -weird,"
said Miadlikowski on the pre-2012 Gallery. "Then
the Gallery became the Gallery as -we know it and
everything changed a little bit more towards the
cozy side. So I think it -was a great change because
it's more chill, it's a very relaxed atmosphere."
The Gallery, much like other AMS businesses,
suffered from an identity crisis prior to the merge
-with the Pendulum, a result of a shifting collective student mentality. Miadlikowski noted that in
comparison to -when he started at UBC in 2010, the
Pit and the Gallery seemed dead. Toogood said that
student drinking culture changed as the students'
focus shifted to academics. She also noted that student's food and beverage tastes have changed.
"Students have become a lot more sophisticated.
They're more interested in food and drink, and
microbrews and microbreweries and cottage industries and craft beers and all of those sorts of things;
their tastes and level of sophistication in -what they
-want.... I think all of these things is just a sign of
the times," said Toogood. The current SUB does not
offer options for student's changing tastes — a problem the AMS hopes to solve in the Nest -with businesses like the Perch and the modernized Pit Pub.
"I -was thinking everybody's like 'let's save the
Gallery,' but then you can't move all the couches
that are falling apart... you cannot move it to the
new SUB. The new Pit is the attempt to bring the
coziness as -well and combine it -with the more modern ideas," said Miadlikowski.
FIN
The Gallery, though closing permanently,
-will be fondly remembered by current and past
UBC students.
"It -was the perfect place to just grab a pitcher, sit
down on a couch and -work on something and then
friends -would pop by, I knew I -was going to bump
into someone," said Jonathan Elmer, a fifth-year
unclassified student. "I'm going to be curious to see
-what Captain R.J. ends up doing on Tuesdays now ...
he's a very serious karaoke guy."
Toogood and Miadlikowski echoed that -while the
Gallery, and older institutions found in the old SUB,
-will be closing soon, the AMS intends to adapt to
changing student tastes -with the Nest and the new
AMS businesses.
"It is the end of an era. It's the beginning of a
great new beginning, but it's the end of an era and
I think there's a little bit of a bittersweet nostalgia
for many students and I hope that they fondly -wish
fare-well to the old SUB and then embrace the new
building, the Nest, as -well," said Toogood. tl // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
LLUSTRATION JULIAN YUfTHE UBYSSEY
'Everything's coming up Milhouse.'
LAST WORDS//
BDS, BUREAUCRACY AND
NOT TAKING A STANCE
Although much of UBC's student
population has been largely
unaware ofthe goings-on ofthe
past few weeks, the BDS movement has played a significant
role in campus politics (and The
Ubyssey's opinions section).
Student groups on all sides of
the debate have run campaigns
trying to convince uninformed or
undecided students how to vote
in the referendum that occurred
over the course of the past week.
Regardless of your stance on
the issue of BDS itself, we think
that most would agree that the
process by which the referendum
was held is subject to considerable critique.
Even accounting for the campaigns run by student groups,
the referendum was poorly
publicized — as reflected by the
large numbers of students who
(still) have no idea what BDS is.
We aren't saying that the AMS
should be devoting massive
amounts of resources into promoting referendums, but including a little more information and
context in the first email they
sent out would have been helpful.
We are critical ofthe AMS,
however, in the stance that they
took on the issue — or rather, the
lack of a stance. Though the notion of our student society taking
a stance in general is an altogether
different issue, we strongly believe
that if you're going to take a stance
you should actually take a stance.
"Anything but yes" basically
equates to the AMS taking the
position of 'we want to say no but
don't actually want to say no because it might make us look bad.'
We understand, of course, that
BDS (and the Israel-Palestine
debate in general) is a highly controversial and convoluted subject
and that, for many people, taking
a stance is a difficult decision to
make. Some of our editors believe
that in taking the stance that
it did, the AMS may have been
attempting to avoid creating a
hostile campus environment to
those who were in favour of BDS
— which is also understandable.
The majority of us, however, view
the "anything but yes" position
as an attempt at sugarcoating a
"vote no" stance and avoiding
taking a public stance on a major
geopolitical issue.
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DON'T BLAME US—ITS
ALL THE NEW SUBS
FAULT!
The AMS is months behind on
posting minutes from Council
meetings online and blamed
the delay on — are you ready
for this? - the new SUB. While
the AMS minutes are something that, quite possibly, only
we, Sheldon Goldfarb and the
Councillors themselves care
very much about, it's still a good
idea to post them for ease of reference. There's this little thing
called Code, after all.
But putting all that aside,
can we talk about the new SUB
excuse for a second?
There are only so many times
you can use the 'the-new-SUB-
made-me-do-it' line successfully
without sounding like you're
grasping at straws to hide your
own incompetence.
Things are naturally busier
with the new SUB, but considering the number of people that
the AMS employs, you would
think that one of them would be
able to set aside 10 minutes every
two weeks to repost something
on the internet.
SEXUAL ASSAULT
REPORTING
DISCREPANCIES
Campus security has included
RCMP sexual assault reporting
in their annual Campus Security
Report and the statistics show
a massive discrepancy between
the number of sexual assaults
reported to the RCMP versus
those reported to Campus Security.
The statistics were included in
the report at the recommendation ofthe Campus Safety
Working Group, which was established after a series of sexual
assaults on campus in late 2013.
There is no doubt that this is a
positive change. But the timing
ofthe development is suspect.
A CBC investigation in
January pointed out the discrepancy to the administration. VP
Students Louise Cowin told the
CBC that it raised the question
as to why the RCMP data hadn't
been included previously.
We can't help but agree. The
report shows RCMP sexual assault reporting data as far back
as 2009.
When it comes to campus
safety and security, why did it
take a public outcry regarding
sexual assault for the administration to reach out to the RCMP
detachment located right here
on campus? tJ
LETTER»
I was assaulted on campus
and nobody saw
ANONYMOUS
Letter
The bass was bumping. Seas of
people were swaying back and forth
in unison with arms raised and
smiles plastered across their faces.
As the clock struck two in the morning, the crowd began to dissipate
with a unanimous sense of satisfaction at their mid-week outing.
I decided to leave with the main
crowd of people. It was pitch black
outside and there were scattered
crowds dispersed on the street.
On my way to my friend's house,
I passed a group of six guys who
made some snide remarks about my
ethnicity — specifically the fact that
I was wearing a turban in public.
Feeling uncomfortable, I started to
walk faster towards my friends' residence hall while frantically trying
to get ahold of him. I could feel the
presence of a group behind me. I
started to walk a little bit faster. The
street was quiet. There was nothing
other than the sound of my steps as
I quickened my pace.
One ofthe attackers
ripped my turban from
my head and kicked
it to the curbside.
My ribs were on fire
and my chest was
exploding. I knew I had
to make one last run
for it."
Out of nowhere, one ofthe guys
from the group pushed me from
behind. Within seconds I was surrounded by the six people I loosely
recognized from earlier. "What do
you think you are doing you sand
n***er?" they yelled as they started
to punch my stomach and chest.
I tried to run away from the
crowd, but they had me completely trapped in the same position.
The street was deserted other
than the seven of us. I could only
cover my head and hope that they
didn't hurt me too badly. About
10 minutes passed; I gathered my
strength and tried to run through
them but the guys formed a circle
around me and they threw me
back to the ground.
Twenty unrelenting minutes
of verbal and physical brutality
ensued. One ofthe attackers ripped
my turban from my head and kicked
it to the curbside. My ribs were on
fire and my chest was exploding.
I knew I had to make one last run
for it. I threw a punch and hit one
of them in the face, buying myself
10 seconds. I sprinted down the
street, turned a corner and managed to jump into a bush next to one
ofthe residences. For 30 minutes,
I hid away from the attackers in
complete silence.
I am a student at UBC and I faced
this terrible situation following a
Wednesday evening Pit Night. Combined with the sexual assaults that
have taken place over the past year,
it is yet another incident on UBC
campus in which the perpetrator
has yet to be apprehended.
In my eyes, the solution is staring
everyone in the face. Security cameras. It is ridiculous that students
have been assaulted over the past
year and UBC has not thought to put
up closed circuit cameras at highly
trafficked areas like the bus loop,
and streets leadingto the residence
halls. I can only hope that raising my
voice — as a victim of a UBC campus
assault — may finally start to get this
idea across to campus leadership.
By speaking out about the terrible
crime that took place at UBC, I hope
that other students will start to
listen to how real the threat might
be. The objective is not to scare
people; it is simply to raise awareness about the variety of people
that may actually be targeted. Just
because you are a 20-year-old
healthy male doesn't mean that you
don't have to be careful. I just want
no other student to go through what
I did. If you are studying late and
have to walk across campus alone,
be extremely aware ofthe situation
you are in and don't be afraid to call
SafeWalk or even the police if you
feel threatened.
Ultimately, my main message is
that something has to change. The
worst part about the whole situation
is that tomorrow, I could walk into
a lecture and sit down next to the
same person that stripped me of
my dignity, physically brutalized
me and disrespected my religion —
while being completely oblivious to
that fact, a
The AMS had no business in BDS
ALEX HUMPHREY
Letter
After reading the university-wide
email sent on March 26 by the AMS
urging an "anything but yes" vote on
the BDS referendum, lots of words
came to mind. Pathetic, spineless,
disgraceful, lazy and undemocratic
were just a few. I'm disappointed
in the AMS' decision to intervene
at the height ofthe voting period,
effectively discouraging UBC
students from participating in our
campus' democratic process.
It seems likely that the AMS did
so not out of altruistic principle, but
because it is afraid to be associated
with anything remotely controversial. (In this case, I would argue that
'principled', 'ethical' and 'refreshing' are in fact more appropriate
words than 'controversial', but that's
another discussion). This referendum gathered the required number
of signatures to be on a ballot. This
is an issue that UBC students have
demonstrated they care about a
great deal. The AMS has no place
intentionally manipulating the referendum process because it is afraid
that a 'yes' result might make its job
a little bit harder.
The AMS says that its intervention was in accordance with its mandate to uphold clause (e) ofthe AMS
constitution: "To promote unity and
goodwill amongst its members."
Fulfilling this objective is important
indeed, but should be pursued in
accordance with, and never at the
expense of, the democratic process.
After all, who is the AMS Council
to say which groups on campus
should be favoured in accordance
with clause (e) and which should be
ignored? To make such an inherently exclusionary calculation is a huge
overstep of authority.
Indeed, what isn't mentioned in
the email is that clause (c) ofthe
constitution states that the AMS
must "promote the principle and
practice of student representation
at all levels of decision making...."
The AMS blatantly ignored this
obligation in wading into this debate
in hopes of keeping their student
government jobs tame and easy.
The AMS Council members clearly
need to review their job descriptions
as well as the basic tenants ofthe
democratic process, pronto. Xi // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDA1
RECREATION »
Storm the Wall 37 was the
biggest — and best — ever
A Super Ironman competitor attempts to scale the wall under his own power.
Koby Michaels
Senior StaffWriter
UBC's 37th Storm the Wall was the
largest ever, with over 830 teams
and an estimated 3,800 participants, accordingto Aaron Mui, the
manager of marketing and communications for UBC Athletics and
Recreation. Much of this growth
came from the Just For Fun
category, accordingto manager
of Intramural Programs at UBC
REC, Jason McManus. This year's
Storm saw 275 Just For Fun teams.
McManus credits this to students' desires to be part of a UBC
tradition that has remained largely
unchanged for 37 years and a "Get
Over It," marketing campaign.
But McManus and his team
of over 230 student volunteers
revamped the event this year with
a new community festival that
featured music, kids' activities and
of course, plenty of storming. The
event drew 150 local children and
community members on March 22.
Thursday's Party on the Plaza
saw top teams and individual
competitors, who had qualified
through the previous two rounds,
completing the race and storming
the wall in front of packed bleachers outside the SUB. Students and
staff circled the wall and cheered
on the competitors, spilling out
from the SUB's balcony. A beer
garden, food truck festival, sponsor tents and a health and wellness
fair also joined the festivities. The
atmosphere was electric and the
excitement palpable in the warm
spring air. Spectators basked in
the glorious sunshine, cheered on
the Super Ironpeople and other
competitors while listening and
laughing along with the music and
hilarious antics ofthe announcers.
"It's the type of experience that
animates campus and gives it life,"
said McManus. "It makes UBC
students proud."
This mentality was echoed by
Tara Stamnes, a senior student
program developer for UBC REC.
"It's the last hurrah. It's a celebration ofthe people actually competing," said Stamnes. Stamnes'
favourite aspect ofthe event
were the teams who competed in
costumes, including a team that
stormed the wall in miniskirts in
the pouring rain and team Storm
the Onesie.
After Winnie the Pooh, of Storm
the Onesie, boosted teammate
Cookie Monster over the wall and
a Minion pulled up a penguin (or
panda?), the team discussed their
rigorous training regimen. "We've
been training for months," said
Winnie. "My parents told me it
was why I was conceived."
Slightly more believably, Super
Ironwoman winner Madeleine de
Lotbiniere-Bassett, one of only two
women to clear the wall with the
help of only one person, claimed
the hardest part was clicking enter
when she was signing up.
"Amazing," was all she had to
say after finishing, between smiles
and catching her breath. Lotbi-
=HOTO KOBYMICHAELSfTHE UBYSSEY
niere-Bassett managed to scale the
12 foot wall with a mixture of pure
determination, teamwork and athletic ability. The crowd exploded
with cheers when Lotbiniere-Bassett and fellow Super Ironwoman
Allie, under the team name Wall
Me Maybe 3.0, reached their helpers' hands and pulled themselves
over the wall. The excitement of
the crowd rivalled that of other
notable UBC sporting events
this year like the Winter Classic.
Storm brought students, faculty
and members ofthe community
together for a week of athletics,
silliness and friendly competition.
While none ofthe Super Iron-
men finished the race by successfully climbing the wall unassisted,
they kept the crowd (and the
photographers balanced comed-
ically on top) on their toes. Throwing themselves at the wall over and
over again, their fingers brushed
the glory that was the ledge, just
missing their mark every time.
While they were desperately
attempting to get over it, others
were enjoying the Party on the
Plaza nearby. "Storm the Wall becomes more of a community and
less of an event," said McManus.
McManus and UBC REC are
looking to continue to expand the
Storm experience and involved
even more students, staff and
community members. "I'm not
going to let the cat out of the bag
yet," he said, "but early next year
students are going to be very
excited." 31
I
We don t bite much.
Write about sports, fitness, hiking, skiing
whatever else your little heart desires.
Say hi: sports@ubyssey.ca
the outdoors and
WIZARDRY »
Quidditch team needs your
help to get to World Cup
PHOTO COURTESF UBC QUIDDITCH
The UBC Quidditch team has found competitive success in recentyears.
Olivia Boon
StaffWriter
Five years ago, a couple of enthusiastic Harry Potter fans founded
the UBC Quidditch team. Since its
inception in 2010, the group had
one clear goal in mind: to qualify
for and compete in the prestigious
Quidditch World Cup, an international tournament held in South
Carolina, where 80 ofthe US and
Canada's top Quidditch teams
compete not only to win, but also
to uphold their reputations and to
improve their rankings amongst
other schools.
This year, for the first time in
UBC Quidditch history, the team
has managed to snag a spot in
the World Cup. Today, they are
hoping that with the help of fans'
donations through their indiegogo
campaign and a $3,000 Competitive Athletic Fund from the AMS,
they will be able to make their
five-year long dream a reality.
The Ubyssey had the opportunity to sit down with four players
to speak to them about what it
would mean for them to be able
to compete in the World Cup, and
the successes that have led them to
where they are today.
Alexa Rowe (AR): President
Mormei Zanke (MZ): Team member for two years
Janik Andreas (JA): Vice President
Patrick Fuller (PF): Coach
What would you say is the
most memorable success you
have had this year as a team?
How did that contribute to your
journey in the pursuit ofthe
World Cup tournament?
MZ: I definitely have to say
coming third place in the regional
Quidditch competition — it was
the final tournament that we had
to play to qualify for the World
Cup. We played against a strong
Boise team, and there was just an
insane amount of spirit and pride
that our team displayed on the
pitch. Just being in that moment
when we were fighting hard in
that last game was overwhelming
and indescribable, and I can't wait
to relive the feeling when we get to
the World Cup.
JA: About a year back, our team
competed in a competitive Quidditch tournament in Los Angeles. At
that time, we were still considered
the underdogs in the Quidd-
itch-sphere, and not considered as
much of a threat. But we actually
did pretty well there, and that was
the day other competitive Quidditch teams started to see us as level
competitors. Being able to play
against some of these same teams
in the World Cup this year would
really give us a chance to represent
the UBC community and hopefully emerge victorious amongst
other schools.
What would going to the
World Cup mean to you,
personally, and to the future
growth ofthe team?
PF: Having been one of the
pioneer members ofthe team and
its current coach, I have seen the
team strive toward this goal of going to the World Cup for so long,
that finally getting the opportunity to go feels like a dream. Every
year before this, we fell short on
the chance — but that only made
us a stronger team. To be so close
to competing in the World Cup
this year means so much for the
club's current members, and for
its future. It feels unreal.
JA: The World Cup would be a
great place to learn from so many
experienced teams and to get
UBC recognized in the Quidditch
world of sport. Personally, I am
excited for the team, because it
is our first time even qualifying
and it is a great accomplishment
for our Quidditch family. It is an
incredible way for UBC Quidditch
to open another chapter, and I
am hoping that this legacy will
contribute to the future growth of
the team for years to come.
MZ: There is such a great competitive dynamic on our team, and
everyone is still so enthusiastic
even after practicing for hours.
I think it would mean so much
to the team to finally be able to
achieve the one thing everyone
has wanted since the beginning —
playing in the World Cup!
If you had the chance to
speak to a member ofthe UBC
community to persuade them
to donate to your World Cup
campaign, what would you
tell them?
AR: UBC Quidditch is an incredible and driven team of Harry
Potter fans and competitive,
athletic players with one dream:
to travel to and play in this year's
World Cup! One ofthe greatest
things about the sport is that it
is entirely inclusive — regardless
of anyone's culture or orientation, we accept all recruits and
will train anybody who wants to
become an athlete in our sport.
We also promote community
involvement both within campus
and internationally, active living
and anything and everything
Harry Potter. By supporting us,
you are supporting our values and
what we stand for, and you will be
helping us represent you, the UBC
community, in the World Cup.
Currently, we are ranked 15th out
of hundreds of Quidditch teams
around the world — help us get to
number one!
Donate to the team's fundraising for their World Cup trip at
tiny.cc/ubcq. Xi 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, MARCH 30,2015
Weekend roundup: 'Birds have a hoot, paddle Rowing Club
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47
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MAR 26 ANSWERS
3
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1
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1
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6
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9
ACROSS
1-Flat sound
5-Young bird
10-Some DVD players
14- (Vlandlikova of tennis
15- Goddesses ofthe seasons
16- Author Stanley Gardner
17- I've Got in Kalamazoo
18-Separated
19-Dirty
20-Cosmetics
22-Pertaining to tactics
24-Software buyers
25-Technique
26-Neck part
28-Food and water
SOURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
32-Potpourri
35- Metal-bearing minera
37- Untidy states
38-Crosses (out)
39- Free of frost
41- Metal container used for frying
42-Goes in
45-Classical beginning
46- Diet, entries
47-Gallows loop
48-Victor's cry
50-Pendent ornament
54-Gives up
58- Not producing fruit
61-Comfortable
62-In land
63- Unexpected victory
65- Baptism, e.g.
MAR 26 ANSWERS
66-Grating
67-Give
68-K-6
69- The most heavily populated
continent on Earth
70- "Surprise Symphony" composer
71-Stains
DOWN
1-SeaWorld attraction
2- Long stories
3- Reptile
4-Italian seaport
5-Bloke
6- Bounce on one foot
7-Steamed
8- Unit of weight in gemstones
9- Sailing vessel
10-Dwells
11-Gator's cousin
12-Inter	
13- Exchange for money
21-Mex. neighbor
23-Muscle quality
25- Nothing morethan
27-Seed containers
29-Catch a view of
30-Faculty head
31-IRS IDs
32-Farm team
33- Letterman riva
34- Ratio words
36-German article
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
37-Cat sound
40- Slather plaster on the upper
surface of a room
43-"CHiPs"star
44-Gather, harvest
46-Scoffed
49-Fall mo.
51-Murmuring sound
52- Above
53-Sontag composition
55- Every 24 hours
56- First name in cosmetics
57-Appears
58- Pond organism
59- Bugs, clunkers, and rides, e.g.
60- Et  (and other men)
61-Env. notation
64-Break off

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