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The Ubyssey Sep 12, 1978

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 1 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1978
228-2301
Bus pretest
hits 50* fare
By VERNE McDONALD
Organizers of a campaign
against bus fare increases hope the
campaign will gain momentum
this week as students begin taking
the bus to classes.
Many bus users are using
promissary notes instead of the 15-
cent fare increase which took effect
Spt. 5, raising the cost of a bus ride
to 50 cents from 35 cents. A
coalition spokesman said Monday
that 70,000 notes have been printed
and "several thousand" have been
used.
Another 45,000 will go into
circulation today as each copy of
The Ubyssey contains three notes
for the use of students.
A bus driver, who refused to be
identified, said Sunday many
drivers are sympathetic to the
protest against the hike and are
allowing customers to use the notes,
but are not handing them to their
supervisors at the end of shift for
fear of company retaliation.
The Amalgamated Transit Union
has instructed its members to
follow procedure laid out in the
driver's operating manual and to
take names and addresses of
customers not paying the full fare.
Passengers would be allowed to
board the bus, while drivers would
turn in the names to the operating
supervisor at the end of their shift.
The notes distributed by the
coalition include spaces for name,
address and telephone number in
order to comply with these
regulations, but B.C. Hydro
disagrees with the union interpretation of the manual.
The company has ordered drivers
to refuse service to customers using
the notes and if necessary to call a
supervisor for assistance.
All the supervisor can do is
persuade the protester to leave the
bus and threaten to call the police.
Although there has been one arrest
m Vancouver since the fare increase, police have told Bruce
Eriksen of the Downtown Eastside
Residents' Association, a member
of the coalition, that they will no
longer interfere unless there is a
disturbance.
What the supervisor can do is
order the bus not to move until the
protester leaves. This has caused,
several buses to stand idle for long"
periods in the past few days while
protesters meditated or caught up
on their reading.
Eriksen has charged that B.C.
Hydro is being irresponsible by
disrupting the public bus system to
fight coupon users.
' 'We will pay if they can justify it
See page 21: NEW
Students join in
UEL park battle
t   <    -  T j.r.
CHANGING
students who
— richard schreiner photo
WORLD draws angry response from unidentified student, unidentified 4, who joins legions of
are sending message to car dealer coalition and their Hydro lackeys that new four-bit fare isn't fair.
Hundreds of UBC students have
joined in the fight to stop a
provincial government proposal
which would effectively split the
Universiy Endowment Lands in
two.
The endowment lands regional
park committee signed up several
hundred students during
registration week and plans on
holding general meetings and rallies
on campus during the year.
The committee is dedicated to the
Federal gov't moves to cut student UIC
OTTAWA (CUP) - Despite
rising student unemployment, the
federal government has decided to
effectively prevent students from
claiming unemployment insurance.
Under changes to UI announced
September 1 by Employment and
Immigration Minister Bud Cullen,
students would have to work at
least 40 weeks in the previous two
years and 10 to 14 weeks in the
previous year to be eligible for UI.
Currently, the requirement is 10 to
12 weeks in the previous year.
According to National Union of
idents spokesperson Pat Gibson,
this will effectively cut students off
' because very few can work more
Jian 16 weeks during the summer.
She termed the change
"disastrous".
"This will cut many students off
UI for several years. It's conceivable that a student could work
for three summers and still not be
eligible for UI."
When asked about the effect of
the changes on students, Cullen
admitted they would have a "tough
effect". However, he said there was
a "spoonfeeding aspect" of the
current program that was "constantly making it far too easy" for
students to claim benefits.
Gibson disagrees.  "The simple
act that close to 250,000 students
3je out of work because there aren't
ne jobs to put them to work is
hardly what I would call pampering
Canada's young people."
As well, Cullen said many of the
students will be able to find work in
the expanded federal job creation
programs next year.
However, government estimates
show these will produce at most
14,000 new jobs next summer
through such programs as Youn
Canada Works and the Summer
Jobs Corps. According to Statistics
.Canada figures, there were 231,000
students out of work in July.
Other announced changes to UI
included cutting UI benefits from
66 and two-thirds per cent of wages
to 60 per cent, increasing the
number of weeks needed to receive
UI if a claimant had received it in
the previous year, and increasing
the minimum number of hours
worked in a week needed to claim
UI.
Cullen also said the government
planned to make workers and
employers pay part of the costs of
UI after the first 25 weeks.
Currently, workers, employers, and
the government all contribute for
benefits for the first 25 weeks, while
the government pays all the costs
after that.
In introducing the changes,
Cullen said he hoped they would
discourage people from using UI
"as their major Source of income
interrupted only by brief periods of
short-term employment" and
would "break the circle of reliance
on UI that some claimants have
built up".
He also said they would "exclude
those who have at best a marginal
attachment to the labour force".
The reduction in benefits, he
said, would  "decrease the work
disincentive effects of the UI
program" and "make jobs at the
lower end of the income scale look
more attractive". They would
encourage "people to look for,
accept, and remain at work".
The   government   had   made
See page 2: UI
preservation of the UEL as
parkland and is the focal point of
opposition to a proposal by
provincial environment minister
Jim Nielsen to not designate 300
acres in the UEL's central core as
parkland.
Nielsen's proposal, which was
made in a letter to the Greater
Vancouver Regional District this
summer, would leave the UEL a
"broken park", according to
committee vice-chairman Bowie
Keefer.
"If you take the central core out
you're sadly diminishing the park
and leaving it fragmented. Without
the central core you've got a broken
park."
Keefer said the move to take the
central UEL core, which lies
between 16th and Chancellor
Boulevard, out of the park is a
direct contradicition of a Social
Credit   party   campaign   promise,
See page 2: PARKLAND
'Chile police get bank funds'
By JEFF RANKIN
Canadian banks have been lending money to the
Chilean secret police, a member of the Committee for
the Defence of Human Rights in Chile charged
Saturday.
The member, who wished to remain anonymous,
said the Toronto-Dominion Bank has lent $1.2 million
to Chile's Direccion General de Investigaciones,
Chile's secret police.
He also said the Bank of Nova Scotia lent $100,000
to the Chilean ministry of foreign relations, who he
claimed were instrumental in planning the
assassination of Chile's former ambassador to the
U.S. under Allende in 1976.
The Royal Bank, the Bank of Commerce, and the
Bank of Montreal have also made loans to various
sectors of the Chilean government, he said.
"Canadian businesses are also making huge investments in direct partnership with the junta," he
said.
"Noranda has put in $350 million and Falconbridge
$500 million. These loans are approved by the
Canadian government in the form of the Export
Development Corporation, a crown corporation
created to insure Canadian investment in other
countries agjnst loss.
' "The Bank of Canada has played exactly the same
role in relation to Canadian banks," he said, "insuring their loans to Chile."
"We (the committee) are trying to form a broad
coalition of organizations in B.C. to help put a stop to
Canadian investment in the junta.
"The reason stopping of investment would hurt the
government and not the people is because the people
are not benefitting from it in the first place," he said.
" It has only been the multinationals and the people in
Chile associated with them (mostly expatriates) that
have been benefitting.
"One result of Cnile's total dependence on foreign
investment is an ever increasing concentration of
wealth in the upper classes," hg explained. "The
situation for the lower classes has never been worse.
"The purchasing power of the Chilean peso has
dropped 40 per cent since the coup, strikes are still
illegal, and human rights have not been restored.
See page 11: BANKS Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12, 1978
Parkland cut in half
From page 1
which was often repeated by the
Point Grey riding's MLAs,
education minister Pat McGeer and
attorney-general  Garde   Gardom.
"We've got a political issue of.
integrity with the voters. McGeer
was the guy riding around on a
white horse saying 'we have to save
the UEL'. And then there's Gardom, who hasn't said anything
lately but before the election was
for 100 per cent park."
In his letter to the GVRD Nielsen
proposed that the central core not
be designated parkland because the
area will be required "for
development in order to round out
the existing community". Nielsen
stated that a connecting corridor of
unspecified size which would join
the two areas declared parkland,
would be considered.
Nielsen's   proposal   also   goes
against recommendations of a team
of consultants commissioned by the
government to draw up a comprehensive plan for future
development of the UEL. The
team's report recommended that 99
per cent of the endowment lands be
declared parkland.
Henry Hersog, a charter member
of the committee, said student
response to the committee's
campaign to preserve the park has
been "just incredible".
"The students can help save the
endowment lands," he said. "The
government could have got away
with this before but not now.
"We're very, very concerned and
disturbed about the situation but
we've got a hell of a lot of friends."
Hersog said the government
move was unexpected and hit the
committee like "bombshell", after
earlier   promises   that   the   UEL
Iff clampdo wn
hurts students
From page 1
unemployment insurance "far too
generous", Cullen said, and had
swung too far to the left".
Officials from Cullens department later said they estimated
263,000 claimants would be made
ineligible by the changes.. They
expected about half would be able
to make up the extra weeks of
work, leaving 130,000 definitely
unable to claim UI.
When asked what these people
could do, an official said one
alternative was to go back to
school.
The officials said they had no
figures on the number of students
currently claiming UI benefits.
However, Gibson said it was
probably not a large percentage
since most students already cannot
qualify for UI.
If the changes are passed by
Parliament, reduced benefits would
start in January, while the increase
in the qualifying period would be
introduced .next April.
In July, the unemployment rate
for students was 15.3 per cent, up
from 15.1 percent the previous
July. The highest rate was in
Newfoundland^.7 percent), while
the lowest was in Manitoba (11.6
per cent).
would be designated almost
completely parkland.
"The government said they
would follow the wishes of the
people. The study team recommended 99 per cent park and I
thought, 'we've saved it'.
"The next thing we heard about
was this industrial park. Then we
get the bombshell about cutting the
park in half."
Iva Mann, committee member
and GVRD UEL representative,
said the committee is a non-political
group.
"Re pOf^De^o6q
0>fcJe* of
tfetT Aaifc
urfwecftnY
&oui_e*ani>
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
NO MAN'S LAND
By Harold Pinter
SEPTEMBER 22-30
(Previews Sept. 20 & 21)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by John Brockington
Setting by R. K. Wilcox
Costumes by Brigitte Sitte
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $8)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 20-30
Nov. 7-22
Jan. 10-20
Feb. 28-March 10
NO MAN'S LAND (Pinter)
THE BACCHAE (Euripides)
THREE BY BECKETT (Beckett)
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL (Shakespeare)
BOX OFFICE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 207
The
THE FRASER ARMS
in the FRASER ARMS HOTEL sends a hearty
welcome to U.B.C. students and we look
forward to seeing you in our new
Neighbourhood pub with its high booths and cosy
intimate atmosphere. SPECIAL TUESDAY NITE feature
Wet T-Shirt Contest
The Best Live Rock club in town,
featuring the best Canadian and U.S.
rock bands. Open Monday thru
Saturday evenings.
WEDNESDAY
* LADIES NITE *
* MALE DANCERS *
J. R BEANS
A swinging disco with
the latest in disco boogie.
Open Friday and Saturday
■^f^
puuranoN
Swinging Southern Bar.
Seat oj tuc6 fax tie comuty yean, and 4ee ytxt att6eA>wt& . . . Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
high at IH after firing
By HEATHER CONN
Hopes for the future are high at
International House after the UBC
administration fired controversial
executive director Colin Smith in a
"management reorganization"
during the summer.
Disputes   between   the   house's
.management and board of directors
led   to   a   board   of  governors'
decision to suspend  the  house's
constitution in May and place it
under the direction of Erich Vogt,
vice-president for faculty and
student affairs.
Charges that Smith had
discouraged student activities,
alienated many students and was
more concerned with making International House a financial
success rather than developing
social, cultural and academic
programs were key issue* in a 15-
page report criticizing management
that was submitted by the directors
at a March.house board meeting.
Smith denied the charges in a 34-
page counter-report.
Despite management problems
under Smith, International House
has "closed the doors to its past,"
Vogt said Saturday.
"We're over that (management
problem) now. Important changes
have been made and the spirit has
changed.  More things are being
done by the students. There is less
importance on outer interests such
as rentals (of IH to outside
clients)."
Vogt said Smith tried very hard
but had "somewhat more rentals
than desirable". He added that the
rental problems have been frmly
resolved.
Staff at the house said they saw
definite changes in operation after
the dismissal of Smith.
LUCKY STUDENT leaps into new UBC aquatic center pool, finally completed after five years of wrangling and building. She won't be joined,
however, by former students who have subsidized construction of under
water wombat cleaning terminals and submarine nets to the tune of $25,
that is, unless they have admission money to shell out like all the unwashed
masses.
Aging dean of women given facelift
By KATHY FORD
After more than 50 years, the
dean of women is no more.
The title and office were
abolished at the end of May,
following then-dean Margaret
Fulton's resignation. The
president's committee on student
services recommended the name be
changed because, the committee
claimed, the title was misleading.
But a member of the search
committee for a women students'
office director, the title picked to
replace that of dean, said the
change will damage the credibility
of the major reasons for his
and in the community.
Kate Andrew, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer and
an active member of the society's
women's committee, said Monday
the title of dean commands an
element of respect that is valuable
in getting things done.
"The administration's line was
that it was a false status, that it
carried no weight and that in
supporting it I was supporting a
lie," she said.
"The university is set up very
much along prestige lines. And it's
all, in a sense, very false, but it is
respected and it's important to give
women's concerns and women's
problems respectibility on this
campus because they have serious
problems.
"They're not being given the
serious attention that they should
be."
Andrew said the change was
made with the blessing of vice-
president of student affairs Erich
Vogt, despite the opposition of the
student representative assembly.
The recommendation says:
"The title dean of women poses a
problem. It is misleading, since it
implies academic jurisdiction."
But Andrew thinks it is important to retain the academic
aspect of the job because the office
is dealing with women who are
students.
"I think the administration has
See page 22: WOMEN
Bad marks force AMS pres out
The president of the student representative assembly
will resign today after receiving an ultimatum stating
he drop all extracurricular activities or be ineligible for
enrolment at UBC.
Bruce Armstrong said Monday that a senate
admissions committee member told him Aug. 31 that
the university would allow his enrolment only if he
resigned all official positions.
He declined to give the identity of the committee
member.
Armstrong also said he filed an appeal with the
committee July 6 to seek enrolment in the 1978-79
academic year.
(Students who fail a year usually must wait a year
before re-registering.)
Armstrong received an official Jetter from the
registrar Sept. 7 finalizing the committee's decision.
"They're (the admissions committee) lowering
themselves to the level of politics. They're putting no-
academic restrictions upon nx." „„„•„_
He said the committee decision was an unfair
restriction and added he should be given the personal
choice to combine academics with extra-curricular
work.
"I'd made an error in my capacity and over-
committed myself. But I should have the right to try
again. If I fail a second time, I suffer the consequences. I didn't ask for any special treatment."
Armstrong said the admissions committee had
received a recommendation from the dean of science
that Armstrong "not engage (himself) in any outside
activities whatsoever."
In the 1977-78 academic year, Armstrong was a
member of the senate and various faculty committees.
He was elected president of the Alma Mater Society in
March.
Armstrong said the admissions committee's decision
to prohibit him from being AMS president was a
dictation of AMS actions.
No SRA members have indicated that they will seek
the presidency.
"There is a big difference now,"
program co-ordinator Saf Bokhari
said Saturday.
"Last year the budget was
$110,000, which paid for salaries.
We were given only $252 for the
whole year for our programs. This
year we've been given $1,500 for
one month. We've also received
$3,000 for a new coffee place with a
bar and stereo."
Bokhari said IH was no longer
business oriented. He added that a
new advisory board committee had
been set up to organize budget and
policies.
"The university has been very,
very good. Whatever our needs are,
we present them to the board.
There is a difference in priorities
now. The people under Colin Smith
— we're doing without them."
He added that Smith had acted as
a "high-up director" who treated
International House as a "10 to
four job and a black tie affair".
When contacted Friday at his
Vancouver home, Smith refused to
make any comment on his
dismissal.
"My situation is in the hands of a
lawyer," he said.
Evelyn Riediger, student
volunteer at IH, said she judged
Smith's leadership by its negative
effect.
"It (International House) was a
dead, empty shell. Nobody was
making use of the place. We were
terribly stifled."
*
Pit manager
Tor Svanoe
quits post
Tor Svanoe, Pit manager for the
past three years, has resigned.
Interference from the student
administrative commission was
cited as one of the reasons for his
resignation, but Svanoe said
Saturday that this was not the only
reason.
"It is very possible it was a
factor," he said, "but it certainly
was not the factor."
In his fetter of resignation,
Svanoe cites SAC meddling as one
of the major reasons for his
decision to leave.
But when The Ubyssey tried to
check out these reports, copies of
the letter became very scarce.
Originally copies were circulated
to several departments in the Alma
Mater Society, including SAC
chairman Gary Waters and AMS
president Bruce Armstrong. And
for awhile there was even a copy
posted on a Pit bulletin board.
Armstrong and external affairs
offfcer Kate Andrew promised The
Ubyssey a duplicate, but later
refused. And when a staffer went
down to the Pit to glance at the
posted copy he encountered a very
uncooperative  new   management.
The letter had been taken down
and a glib member of the
managerial staff insisted, between
jokes, that we were working on a
non-story.
There have been no complaints
on the part of Svanoe concerning
SAC, he said.
Svanoe was reputed to have been
one of the Pit's best managers.
Through clever purchasing
practices he enabled UBC to
weather the summer beer drought
completely unparched, and has
been known to buy large amounts
of beer immediately before price
increases, passing the savings on to
the students. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12, 1978
Gov't forsakes buses for cars
That is why the recent increase in bus
fares is so incredible.
We have come to expect the Social
Credit government to make things difficult for the disadvantaged, so the cutbacks in bus service and the increased
prices are not surprising given their past
record of concern for the less powerful.
But from the point of view of sound
business practice, something they are
supposed to know something about,
their actions are equally unforgiveable.
Energy is going to become more expensive, not less. The economics which
start moving now, strongly, to a more
rational use of energy resources will be
the strongest and the least affected
when the energy crunch comes. And it
will.
Our Socred provincial government is
pulling the reverse Robin Hood caper
again. That the new "improved" bus
fare increase robs from the poor, the
unemployed, pensioners and students is
self evident. What is not so clear, or as
quickly felt, is how the increases strongly reinforce our automobile-based society and burden us with an antiquated
transportation system. .
• B.C. Hydro screams and stamps its
ponderous feet when the public deficit
creeps upward because of inflationary
pressures. But the same concern is not
shown by the provincial government
when; the highways department
demands a slice of the provincial
fiscal pie. A slice which dwarfs the transit deficit in comparison.
The tired Socred philosophy which,
states that the user must pay — even for
services judged by the public to be
essential and in the public interest — is
not applied to the sacred cow of
automobile transportation.
If the same philosophy was used to
justify the construction of roads, bridges
and the many government-paid services
provided for motorists, car users would
find toll gates everywhere.
We owe our legacy of the automobile
to the governments of the fifties and sixties which decided private transportation as to be subsidized to a massive extent.
Highways were pushed through
valleys, mountains blasted away and
rivers crossed to bind British Columbia
and its cities with asphalt.
So why the big stink about public
transportation? Most people are now
agreed that our previous flagrant use of
expensive petroleum resources is no
longer viable.
It is not preferable, it is essential that
British Columbians radically alter their
energy consumption patterns and public
transportation has a big role to play in
this process.
You're all
welcome
Hi, we're the Ubyssey, and we're only
as good as the people that work on the
paper. We always need writers for
news, sports, and Page Friday. Why not
come up to SUB 241K and hone your
writing skills on a nutcracking article?
It's not all work. We have fun parties
and conduct other semi-ritualistic functions.
If you can't join the paper, you can
still contribute to your paper by submitting opinion articles and letters. Letters
help us keep issues alive and we rarely
get enough of them.
And we never get enough story ideas.
So if you hear about something of interest on campus you can put us onto it
by giving us a call at 228-2301.
THE UBYSSEY"
SEPTEMBER 12, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,. 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
"That'll be the day" sang Buddy Schaefer and the Roaches at the hayride, while Big Bopper Gainor
swooned to their crooning. Little bopper, Marli Moore made eyes at the tall dashing lead coach, Tom
Hawthorn. Rookie roach Julie Wheelwright cooed "It's so easy" in the ears of Father Bill Tieleman,
who rose from his seat in.shock and upon finding out what she meant, ran out into the streets yelling,
"Stop that evil jungle music, or you'll go blind". Parisher Dave Branson heard the cry and tried to get
Verne 'Wolf McDonald, the D. J., to stop the proceedings. Bopper Greg Strong started to tussle with
Branson when suddenly, Mike "Be Bop" Bocking, the record producer, rushed in and offered the
Roaches a recording contract and an appearance on the Steve Howard show. Unable to refuse, they
picked up and left for Pango-Pango. Buddy left his girl. Heather "legs" Conn, while Tom Hawthorn
wrenched the adoring fans from his body. They went on a Pango-wide tour with the soul music group
Marcus Gee and the Souvlakis and twister Jeff "Skinny" Rankin. It was there that Buddy took up with
a lusty Latin woman named Alexandra Carrea. They were married by Pastor Richard Shreiner. Unfortunately they all died of seeing a film about them made by director Geof Wheelwright. Buddy's parents
Kathy Maurer and Ralph Ford had held a yearly trek to their resting place, Katesland.
Governments must move now to
mobilize resources and build the best
and most efficient rapid transit systems
money can buy.
The effort to improve public transportation must equal the earlier push to
create an asphalt wonderland.
The economics are sound. Money we
spend nov\T on such projects will be
returned many times over when oil
prices go through the roof.
The current bus fafe protest is
therefore not just a self-interested desire
on the part of demonstrators against
paying more, but a genuine concern that
if public transportation systems are increasingly discouraged, B.C. will sooner
or later find its way down the slippery
road  of economic decline when  the
energy czars demand their pound of
flesh.
The last oil crisis put many once
powerful western countries, such as
Great Britain, on the skids.
These countries are starting to pull
themselves up again as oil prices have
stabilized, but the same potential threat
is still present.
Used car dealers in the provincial
government will tell you differently.
Anyone who believes them is living in a
fool's paradise.
The provincial government has acted
irresponsibly so it is our responsibility to
correct them.
Fight the fare increase. Don't pay the
extra 15 cents.
Letters
Convict reaches out for help
My  name   is   Dennis   Dussell.
Unfortunately I'm labled 143562,
Flattered
Flattered as I am by your
generosity and consideration, I
regret to inform you that my attorneys have advised me to return
the four-pack of Moody Blue that
you recently left on my doorstep.
I hope the two empties are
refundable.
JackYoh-ick
mayor, Snafouver
as I'm in prison. I'm writing to you
because I feel I must reach out to
someone. I'm requesting
correspondence, as corresponding
is about as far as it goes regarding
staying in tune to you, and your
free society.
So, I simply ask you for any form
of aid possible, as any attempt will
be unquestionably appreciated! I'm
very lonely, very alone! I want to
again smile and share/grow, know
what I feel with friendship.
My profession is photography. I
love the outdoors and I play guitar.
H20 and snow skiing are fun too,
and of course, so are partyin' and
good people. I'm originally from
Miami, Florida, therefore Ohio and
its prison are strangers to me. I'm
23 years old.
Won't "someone" write and let
me know that indeed good people
and things still do and are out
there. Editor, I thank you for
anything you may do regarding this
request. I also thank you for at least
listening ... be happy and please
take care!
Dennis Dussell
143562 Box45699
LucasviUe, Ohio
45699 Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Bus fares forfeit freedom
The fare fight is on. Thousands of people
are using promissory notes intead of paying
the new 50-cent bus fare which went into
effect Sept. 5. Most bus drivers are quietly
accepting the noics, trying to obey rules to
the letter to protect their jobs, but' also
sympathetic with the citizens who refuse to
pay the 43 per cent increase.
The official position of the Amalgamated
Transit Union is that public transit should be
free. A small number of drivers are not
accepting the coupons, but that is to be
expected, as bus drivers still have varying
degrees of awareness of the effects of the fare
increases.
The Coalition Against Fare Hikes and
Service Cuts is urging all responsible citizens
that bus service would be "rationalized" or
"improved". That was Hydroese for saying
they would be cut back. Half the late night
service was cut back in spite of protests from
City Council, Rape Relief, the transit union,
DERA, churches and others.
0
By JEAN SWANSON
)
to use promissory notes as a way of
pressuring the provincial government to
increase and improve public transit in the
Lower Mainland. The coalition is made up of
groups who have a reputation for speaking
out on socially relevant issues - Downtown
First United Church, UBC Alma Mater
Society, SFU Student Society, Status of
Women and others.
They are all responsible groups. They are
not anarchists. They don't go around kicking
buses.
The crucial issue in the fare fight is the sh-
ockmg and far reaching effect that an increase will have on the transit system. Hydro
officials have stated publicly that for every
10 per cent increase in fares, there is a three
per cent decrease in ridership. That means
the present fare increase will probably
decrease ridership by 12 per cent. That's
similar to what happened when the last fare
increase went into effect in 1976.
In fact, during the last two years Vancouver bus riders have experienced the effects of the 1976 increase. Every six months
or so Hydro came to city council announcing
Hydro also increased the time between
buses on some routes, including Main-
Robson and Davie-Kingsway.
They eliminated part of the Broadway route
so that some buses go just to Renfrew. They
stopped the Beach bus after 10:00 p.m. And
there were many other cuts.
Hydro even conveniently changed their
method for keeping statistics so it is difficult
to ascertain the effect of other cuts in ser-
vice.but no doubt they, too, have resulted in
further reduction of riders.
In others words, there is good hard experience of the last two years to show that a
fare increase reduces ridership, which causes
cuts in service, which casues fewer riders,
and so on. It would be safe to say the present
fare increase will continue the deterioration
of Vancouver's transit tystem.
So, who wants bad transit service in the
city? Not the planners. They say that 25 per
BUS UNDER SEIGE ... by protesters with notes
Could it be our Social Credit government
wants to sabotage the transit system?
Social Credit actions since 1975 certainly
raise some serious questions. They seldom
perspectives
cent of the trips in the city should be by
public transit, rather than the present 12 per
cent. Not low income people who have no
alternative to public transit. And not even
commuters who would have their work day
made easier by fast, efficient, affordable
public transit.
say anything about the benefits of public
transit and often raise the question of its
cost. When it comes to private transit,
however, they consider it a "necessity rather
than a luxury," and brtag about increased
expenditures. The result is that the public
gets used to questioning the costs of public
transit, but goes along meekly with increases
in the costs of private transit.
The argument about paying for highways
out of gasoline taxes doesn't work either, as
these taxes are $100 million short of paying
provincial costs for highways, and the city
gets no provincial revenue explicitly for
streets or traffic control.
When it comes to questioning the costs of
public transit, Hydro chairman Robert
Bonner, who is also a Social Credit Party
member, is quick with figures. He says the
$61 million "deficit" (who ever heard of a
highway construction "deficit"?) for public
transit proves that the system is in "obvious
and unavoidable financial difficulty."
Of course, if Hydro can reduce the cost of
public transit, it should. Perhaps the huge
corporation should begin charging its transit
ctivisbn the same price for elect.ricky (3.7
cents per kilowatt hour) as it charges private
industry. That could save taxpayers a million
or two.
But,the most important costs the Bonner,
the Social Credit f lackman, doesn't mention,
are the hidden costs of a transit system so
bad that no one uses it. The Annacis Island
Bridge, which could be required to ac-
But the most important costs the Bonner,
the Social Credit flackman, doesn't mention,
of widening the Lion's Gate Bridge - $32
million. He neglects provincial health
department expenditures required to deal
with victims of auto accidents - $100 million.
Then there are the increased costs of urban
land, more lead pollution from gasoline
engines, more smog, increased costs of
products, as stores have to pay for and
construct parking garages. Neither Bonner
nor highways minister Alex Fraser (who just
happens to own a trucking company) have
stated publicly that the highway system or
the private transit system is in "obvious
financial difficulty."
In fact, fnance minister Evan Wolfe (who
happens to be a director of B.C. Hydro and
also past president of B.C. Auto Dealers
Association) announced in the budget speech
that an extra $27 fnillion spent on highways
this year is harnessing the budget surplus "to
create jobs".
The, allegiance of Social Credit to private
transit is even more suspicious considering
their recent move to further impair the
system by passing the responsibility for
funding 25 per cent to 40 per cent of the costs
onto municipalities and devising an Act
which allows cities to raise money for transit
by three methods.
All will raise a big stink among property
owners, car drivers, and Hydro users who are
already burdened with increasing taxes,
gasoline and Hydro prices.
The have also conspired to increase the
cities' share of the cost at a time which will
probably be after the next provincial election, so Socreds won't have to take the heat
for reduced transit usage until after that
time.
The refusal of the provincial government
to provide adequate funds for public transit
could easily result in Vancouver becoming
another freeway jungle and smog capital.
Many people in responsible positions have
tried the traditional methods of dealing the
refusal of the Social Credit government to
provide adequate funds for transit. On Aug.
29, Vancouver city council voted to
"strenuously oppose" the fare increases.
They sent a telegram to the cabinet so informing them and asked for a meeting. The
Social Credit response was typical. Nothing.
That's why it is up to responsible people
like students, pensioners, workers and others
to fight the fare increase. Right now,
thousands are doing it - just fill out the
coupon with your name and address and give
it to the bus driver along with your 33 cents.
Coupons are available at UBC, SFU, and
DERA at 333 Gore Street.
Perspectives, which will appear regularly
in The Ubyssey, is a column of opinion and
analysis open to anyone in the university
community.
Perspectives articles are also solicited from
outside persons and organizations on issues
of interest to UBC students.
A U submissions should be typed and triple-
spaced.
Jean Swanson kicks off the column this
year. She is secretary of the Downtown
Eastside Residents' Association, which has
been active in opposing the bus fare increases. Page *6
THE-   'UBY S-S E Y
Tuesday, September JJ,  1978
Clamshell Alliance fights
Seabrook nuclear plant
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) has ordered a temporary halt to construction of a 2,300 megawatt nuclear power
plant at Seabrook, New Hampshire.
The construction site has been the scene of
several peaceful demonstrations by the Clamshell Alliance, a New England citizens' group
devoted to non-violent direct action against
nuclear development.
Last year, 1,414 people were arrested for illegally occupying the site, about 100 km.
north of Boston. About 1,200 of the
demonstrators decided by consensus to
refuse bail for 13" days, costing the state of
New Hampshire about $500,000.
By MITCHELL BEER
and TED PARSONS
For Canadian University Press
This year, about 20,000 people — some
from as far away as California and British
Columbia, but the vast majority from New
England — particpated in a legal demonstration on the plant site, June 24-26. Some
demonstrators moved on to Washington,
D.C., where about 50 were arrested.
To coincide with the demonstration, between 200 and 1,000 people gathered at Manchester, N.H. for a pro-nuclear rally and
"clambake". "I'm going to eat some
clams," New Hampshire Governor Meldrim
Thomson Jr. told the crowd.
NRC voted 2-1 June 30 to stop construction of the plant, already 15 per cent complete at a cost of $400 million, as of July 21.
At the request of the New Hampshire
Audubon Society, the New England Coalition on Nuclear Pollution, the Seacoast Anti-
Pollution League, and the Commonwealth of
Massachusetts, the commission said it
wouldn't renew the Public Service Companies of New Hampshire (PSCNH) construction permit until the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) had reviewed the
plant's proposed cooling system and NRC
had looked at alternative sites.
Radioactive
PSCNH Vice-President R. J. Marrison
said each month of delay would add $15
million to construction costs, "which
ultimately must be borne by our consumers."
One of the Clamshell Alliance's arguments
against nuclear development is that it inevitably leads to needless utility rate hikes
over which consumers have no control.
Under current specifications, water that
has been heated by the radioactive reactor
core would be discharged into Massachusetts
Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. NRC suspended
construction at Seabrook for seven months
for that reason, but allowed the company to
continue in August on the possibility that
later rulings could lead to further suspensions.
On July 21, all but 300 technical advisors
among 2,000 workers will be laid off. While
most of the workers are from outside the
village of Seabrook, said Boston Clam
member Barry Bock, the entire state of New
Hampshire is currently facing high
unemployment.
Governor Thomson promised to generate
public support for the plant's completion.
"The people of New Hampshire will not take
this lying down," he declared.
But according to Energy Probe, Toronto,
nuclear power creates only 8,825 employee-
years of on-site employment and 565-trillion
units of energy over 30 years, per billion
dollars invested. Solar development creates
10,100 years and 669-trillion units of energy,
methanol (wood alcohol) 36,000 years and
450-trillion units, and energy conservation
22,250 employee-years of on-site employment and 1,594-trillion units of energy.
Chuck Matthei, a member of Clamshell's
Portsmouth, N.H. central office, said the
organization will issue a statement before the
layoffs take place, "which would at least
make clear . . . what kind of possibilities
there would be" for alternative employment
if government or industry made the commitment.
But it's unlikely that commitment will be
made. "The statistics aren't new," Matthei
said. "This is one concern, that they've
chosen to pursue a costly and hazardous
energy path which ... is the least employing
energy path open to us" per ratepayer's
dollar.
There's no indication that government or
industry will move to renewable energy
quickly, Matthei said, but they'll have to
"when the plant is irrevocably cancelled."
Asked whether Clamshell will try to reach
the .workers with its position, Matthei said
the group will "continue the leafletting and
the contact we've had with workers. Obviously, they're going to have mixed
feelings" about the situation.
"Needless to say, they're going to be concerned about the layoffs, and we're going to
be too."
Bock said a meeting to discuss future
strategy would take place the evening of July
5, with a Clam Congress — the
organization's main decision-making and
policy body — convening soon. He said no
date had been set for the Congress.
Central office member Matthei said there
"won't be a Congress in the next few weeks,
certainly." He said a consultative conference
outreach and community organizing to the
future of the anti-nuclear movement.
But behind the atmosphere of friendly unity, a split in the Clamshell Alliance was brewing. The group that went on to Washington,
calling itself -the Seabrook Natural Guard,
was one spin-off.
Disobedience
The split centred on a legal decision by
Clamshell organizers to opt for a legal, three-
day demonstration on an 18-acre site
negotiated with state authorities. The original
plan called for a civil disobedience action involving occupation of the site for an indefinite period of time, and arrest.
Thomson, who once referred to the
Alliance as "a lawless mob," told the clambake the group was "regenerated and
rehabilitated".
A unique and central aspect of the Clamshell Alliance is its commitment to consensus
decision-making on all policy. The consensus
model has been duplicated by non-nuclear
organizations   across   North   America,   in-
might be held in the near future, with a full
Congress in August or September.
The latest Seabrook demonstration took
place in what New York Times correspondent Michael Knight called a "carnival atmosphere." A Clamshell booklet entitled
"Seabrook '78 — A Handbook for the Occupation/Restoration" urged participants
"to develop a simple restoration or alternative energy project" to bring to the site.
Alternatives
"Returning the land to its former condition will be difficult and in some cases impossible, but we can make
a start. We can place trees and grain and
vegetable crops and fish in the river to
demonstrate that the land has other uses. Instead of just taking things away from the
earth and marshland, we can build a model
of a sane, energy independent society on a
restored and venerated land."
Suggested projects included solar cookers
and ovens, hot water heaters and stills, bicycle generators, small windmills, compost
toilets and methane generators. The alternatives fair held on the site featured
celebrities including Pete Seeger and Dick
Gregory, and workshops on topics ranging
from energy alternatives to media contact,
economics and property relations to juggling,
zero  population  growth  to  sufi  dancing,
eluding the Ontario Non-Nuclear Network
(ONNN).
"Under consensus," says Clam's occupation handbook, "the group takes no action
that is not consented to by all group
members. The fundamental right of consensus is for all persons to be able to express
themselves in their own words and of their
own will; the fundamental responsibility of
consensus is to assure others of their right to
speak and be heard."
Bock said the decision to cooperate with
the state "was poorly done, basically." The
Alliance "should have come back to the local
areas instead of having an emergency meeting
of local representatives."
Occupation
Most Seabrook '78 participants were more
concerned about the manner in which the
Clamshell Alliance decided to cooperate that
the decision itself. Bock said Clamshell needs
"to sit down and take a very long and hard
look at ourself, and decide whether our
whole decision-making process is a correct
form to take."
Participants in each Seabrook action have
been organized into "affinity groups",
which the occupation handbook explains are
"usually composed of 10 to 20 people who
have   organized   themselves   through   local
Clams or participated together in nonviolence preparation." The preparation is
mandatory for all participants, since nonviolence is a central principle of the Alliance.
In addition to providing emotional and
physical support to individual participants,
the handbook says, "affinity groups are the
basic decision-making structure for the occupation. They allow for decentralized tactical decision-making through the use of consensus, thus evoking personal empowerment
by giving all participants a voice in the decisions."
At Seabrook '78, affinity groups debated
at great length whether to stay beyond the
agreed time limit. "By midafternoon (June
25) a consensus had been reached to leave the
site peacefully," the New York Times
reported, "but Clamshell Alliance
spokesmen (sic) warned that some protesters
might take it upon themselves to stay
nonetheless."
"We really do want everybody to leave,"
Clamshell member Harvey Wasserman told
reporters, "but people have to realize that
the movement is now a lot bigger than just
the Clamshell Alliance. We're at the stage in
a movement's life when there are breakaway
movements — it always happens. But we're a
democracy, and we had factional fighting
two years ago, when we had just 18 people."
Democracy
"We have got to understand," the handbook says, "that the very basis of solidarity is
that we each remain true to our common purpose in our own style, remaining true to one
another in this way."
In opposing the decision to cooperate with
state authorities, a group called Clams for
Democracy invited other participants to "a
series of workshops examining the relationship of the state, private property, direction
action and democracy to the future of the
anti-nuclear movement."
A Clams for Democracy pamphlet said "a
large number of people have expressed
dissatisfaction with the shallowness of
political debate and development with Clamshell. The leadership's private dealings with
the State in recent weeks has aggravated the
situation, creating doubts about the
Alliance's ability or desire to stop nuclear
power through democratic direct action."
To fight nuclear power, the pamphlet said,
"it is necessary to oppose the state and its
allies. Clam has tied many decisions to
electoral campaigns and has viewed the state
as an 'honorable' adversary, and at times
even as a partner. How can we mobilize
ourselves in solidarity against the state?"
The June 24 weekly newsletter of the Red
Balloon Collective of Brooklyn, N.Y. comments, "Clamshell's lack of political analysis
plays into the hands of the 'liberal' elements
within the corporate structure."
Energy
The "tactics" Clam wishes to rely on —
moral pressure obtained through symbolic
action — does nothing to address itself to the
economic interests behind the construction
of nukes. Afraid of tackling the problem of
transforming itself from a symbolic,
educative movement into one that will actually bring about the end to nuclear power
and td nuclear weapons, Clam falls victim to
its own program."
Red Balloon suggested a four-point plan of
action involving mobilization of "all those
people whose consciousness has already been
raised" for "militant acts of civil disobedience;" a "nationally advertised wave of actions over a short period of time" so that
"the state's resources will be strained to the
breaking point;" organization of site
employees; and an end to "red-baiting and
cop-baiting" within the organization.
Asked how the Clamshell Alliance
"establishment" would respond to Clams for
Democracy and Red Balloon, Bock said their
existence "just tends to show that Clamshell
is a democratic decision-making body, and it
allows room for people like that who have
opposing views." fuesday, September 12, 1978
THE    VU6YSS"EY
Page T
YOU TOO CAN BE A STAR REPORTER
Join the Ubyssey and within minutes you could be
scooping the world on the finest student newspaper
west of Blanca. Friends will thrill to your stories of
excitement and intrigue. Classmates will gasp at your
tales of wild parties and weird deadline rituals.
Parents will disown you.
All this will be yours when you come to the Ubyssey
newsroom at SUB241K. Press days begin at noon
Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. We need
reporters, photographers, and reviewers.
No experience necessary.
s/ Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12, 1978
Industry threatens parkland
By BILL TIELEMAN
Uskig a combination of subtle pressure
and blunt force, education minister Pat
McGeer has come within easy grasp of a long
cherished goal - creation of an industrial
research park on the University Endowment
Lands.
"Events that have transpired during the
summer provide adequate proof that McGeer
is pulling strings to create an industrial
research park on campus, with an expansion
onto LOO acres of the UEL a good possibility
in the Very near future.
And the UBC administration, which
originally opposed the concept of a research
park and vowed to keep it off campus, is now
actively assisting McGeer by offering a
landswap deal which would give 16 acres of
campus land for the park according to a UEL
regional park committee member.
Park committee vice-chairman Bowie
Keefer charges that UBC agreed to offer the
16 acre site to the provincial government in
exchange for a triangle of about 38 acres of
endowment land bordering the Musqueam
Indian reserve and the Shaughnessy golf
course.
Keefer says that 100 acres of the endowment lands that were removed from the
Frank Buck Memorial Park during the
summer by Environment Minister Jim
Nielsen, minister responsible for the UEL,
may be used as an expansion site for the
industrial research park.
The 16-acre campus site adjoins the 100-
acre UEL parcel, is adjacent to the B.C.
Research centre and near the Truimf accelerator.
While spokesmen for McGeer, Nielsen and
UBC have all denied the landswap charges,
university sources claim that the 16 acres
were offered by UBC on the expectation that
it would get the 38-acre site in return, to be
used for a forestry project, and a say in
development of the research park.
Keefer claims that McGeer is pushing the
industrial research park through the B.C.
Development Corporation, which has officially proposed the establishment of a
research park at UBC. BCDC will use the 16-
acre UBC site as a way of getting their foot in
SUNS©
the door of the 100-acre UEL site, he said.
"The fact is that McGeer has actively
fomented the discussion of an industrial
research park at UBC. He's definitely
boosting it."
Keefer said his information is partially
based on conversations he has had with
BCDC president Don Duguid and McGeer
himself who is also one of two MLAs for the
area.
And McGeer originally proposed the
development of such a research park on the
UEL in his 1972 book Politics in Paradise,
written when he was still leader of the
provincial Liberal party.
In that book McGeer envisioned an in-
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
dustrial research park that would be called
Science City. His future objectives were
made perfectly clear when he stated:
"The University Endowment Lands
surrounding the University of British
Columbia campus in Vancouver are an ideal
location for such a centre."
The endowment lands regional park
committee wants the provincial government
to follow the recommendations of a consultant team which studied the UEL for
several months, held public forums and
accepted individual submissions on the UEL
before advisinG the environment ministry to
designate 99 per cent of the endowment lands
as parkland.
It was during a public forum of the UEL in
January, 1977, sponsored by the study team
that BCDC first proposed establishment of a
research park, requesting that 32 acres of
campus land be allocated for a research park
and that 100 acres of the UEL be set aside for
consideration of future expansion.
Although a BCDC spodesman told the
forum that the park would be used for
scientific and not industrial research,
audience members voiced strong disapproval
with the plan, expecially after it was pointed
out that of the 32 acres, there would be 10
acres of parking lots and 18 acres of
buildings.
At that time a UBC spokesman stated that
the university#had no interest in a research
park, either on the campus or the endowment
lands. Peter Larkin, who was then head of
the university's committee on the UEL, said
it was debatable if research parks were the
best way to achieve cooperation between the
university, industry and the government and
noted that other such research parks have
had very mixed success.
Then in April of this year, McGeer who
had promised earlier that the government
would begin establishing research parks, had
a cabinet order-in-council passed which gave
BCDC approval to set up a corporation
through which industrial research parks
would be established.
Only three weeks after the new corporation, Discovery Park Industries Ltd.,
was set up UBC did a political flip-flop,
stating that it was considering turning over
the 16 acres of campus land to BCDC for use
as a research park.
The move clearly signified that the
university had been "persuaded" to change
its stance in favor of McGeer's pet project.
In addition to the landswap deal, there
apparently were other considerations thrown
in to sweeten the BCDC deal.
One of them became apparent in May,
when UBC received authorization from the
provincial government to borrow $3.5
million from BCDC for the construction of a
cyclotron at the TRIUMF accelerator. The
cyclotron will be used for radio pharmaceutical research and commercial
production of isotopes. Kenny announced
when the 16 acres were offered to BCDC that
he expected the park would be of interest to
the pharmaceutical industry.
Specials
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CHARGEX
WELCOME
5754 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
224-3202 FREE DELIVERY
B.C. TEL.
B.C. HYDRO
COLLECTIONS Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
No more chemicals
with home brewing
During the three and one-half month beer shortage, homemade brew found eager throats. "A light, a dark or a cider,"
I would ask, and a gleam jumped to the guest's eyes.
After months of hardship, and then a partial reprieve in
the form of expensive foreign and watery U.S. brews, many
people lost their immediate demand for the standard
commercial product. As the shortage continued they had
littie to compare my home brew with, except the watery U.S.
beers. The cards were stacked in my favor. They were ready
for change. Revelation appeared to many.
Although a strong, stoutish dark ale makes most people
shy away, one such batch of mine drew the most approval.
Taste being so important to everyone, given the chance, it's
easy to tell that one beer is better than another, even when
the commercial beers are made to taste so much flie same.
Even so, it wasn't surprising that the demand among my
friends continued to be for a beer like the one they missed, so
\
c
By STEVE
HOWARD
I concocted a large batch of special light. Unfortunately, it
didn't turn out as well as the dark ales I was then offering.
But I like my beers thick and rich, not too sweet and with a
lively and lasting head. Beer has a social function, invoking
genetically-implanted memories of comraderie. One thinks
of the medieval British ale house, especially after a thick
home brew.
The lockout-strike was a fine time to give away beer,
because I was experimenting with many kinds of beer, and
because the more you give away, the more you can make.
For the 50 cases I laid up this summer, the ingredients
averaged $2.20 a case, and a regular light beer costs only
about 12 cents a bottle.
But cost advantages aside, a beer lover should make his
own, because beer, with bread, are staffs of life. Beer-
making is not a hobby as such, but rather an integral part of
life, providing continuity and peace of mind. You work it
into your daily schedule, giving about 10 hours, in-
termittantly, to one batch, from buying the ingredients to
capping.
Another advantage to making your own is that because
you are not a profit maximizer you can use the best
ingredients and don't need to add the crazy chemicals in
most commercial products to assure that, for instance, a
Blue looks and tastes nearly always the same.
There are about 50 chemicals used in commercial beers
and almost all of them are useless in home brews. They
perform such functions as preserving, coloring and
flavoring, as well as stabilizing foamy heads.
Commercial breweries usually add corn or rice to their
beers to lower costs, but home brewers have the choice of
using the best ingredients.
Unless you have a cold basement (7-15 degrees C), you
can't make lager. But from 15-25 degrees good ales are
made, the difference being in the kind of yeast used. Yeast is
a living organism which, at appropriate temperatures,
multiplies and converts sugars into mostly alcohol and
carbon dioxide.
You also need equipment and a method. An enamel pot to
brew in, a plastic vat for the primary fermentation, a siphon
tube, a hydrometer to test to sugar content and potential
alcohol content, and a carboy into which a fermentation lock
can be fitted are essentials. You can rent a bottle capper to
start, and less important equipment can be bought later.
The part that really feels like beermaking involves cooking
the hot wort for an hour over the stove. The main flavoring
ingredient, and one of the main providers of sugars (in this
case maltose) which the yeast converts to alcohol is barley,
usually malted and bought as a syrup, a powder or still in
kernels. In malting, barley germinates in water, the starches
in the grain becoming soluble sugar through enzymatic
action. The barley is then kiln dried to stop this action.
To bring the brew up to the strength required, cane sugar
or invert sugar is usually added after brewing.
But we were standing over the hot stove, still stirring syrup
,. —richard schreiner photo
HACK HOWARD does German burgomeister imitation while brandishing mug of his own specially brewed Tree Frog beer.
Howard concocts frothy substance in dank depths of his Kerrisdale basement in between driving cab and pursuing extended
career as one of UBC's most durable professional students.
malt extract into the sknmering water, adding hop flowers
and some malted barley kernels in a straining bag. The house
fills with the rich smell of brewing.
In Vancouver, a little citric acid should be added to the
liquid (called wort) to give the Water the right bite. Otherwise
it may taste a little insipid.
After pouring the wort into the vat, dissolving the extra
sugar used, and after adding the rest of the water needed,
because it's hard to boil all of it, you wait until the wort
cools and pitch the yeast. The vat is left tightly covered, and
in four or five days, when about half of the fermentation is
complete, you siphon the mixture into the carboy, where,
after gelatin is added to clear the beer, it stays until fermentation stops.
At this point prime this flat draught beer with sugar syrup
to make it lively upon uncapping, then bottle and age it for a
month.
That's the outline of beermaking. But the fun is in
deciding which recipe to use, because a brewer needs to learn
which different tastes the many available recipes will give.
To find that out you will'need to experiment a lot. So you
will have to bring your friends in to give other opinions.
A ritual of rare importance takes place two weeks after
bottling, when the first bottle of a batch is sampled because
the final fermentation in the bottle has just finished. The cap
pops off and the chilled beer is poured, slowly and steadily,
so as not to stir up the sediment in the bottom of the bottle,
into a chilled glass.
Check for liveliness of the bubbles, the size and duration
of the head, the color and clarity of the liquid, the aroma
and, of course, the flavor. Helpers may say something
consoling because it doesn't yet taste quite right, but after it
has matured, especially if it's a heavy beer, it will taste much
smoother.
To get started you need an easy method, which is best
acquired by getting a recent pocketbook on beermaking, and
supplies, at a vintage shop. You should start simply, trying
out a couple of standards, the regular batch being five
gallons, equalling five cases and a few bottles. As you understand more of the process you can get other books and
pick the brains of the people at the supply store, and start to
worry about the quality of the hops and of the malt extract
and other ingredients.
There are many ways to make beer and the beginner must
refine his methods until he finds the ways which work best.
After you've made a few batches, you'll get an idea of the
kinds of beer you like.
You should sample all the exotic European imports to find
out about the tastes you otherwise might miss. For instance,
Mackeson's stout from England is excellent, but sweeter
than some other stouts, probably because of the addition of
a non-fermenting sweetener such as lactose.
You'll have to decide whether you want to treat your stout
that way, and also whether you want to add licorice to stout.
Licorice fills out the taste, adding body, but takes the bitter
edge off the hop flavor. It also makes the head foam.
Another brewer's personal dilemma may be whether to
add a heading powder made of glucose and natural organic
gum, or stay with a smaller head.
You can branch off, making apple cider from concentrate,
or, by going all the way, from the apples themselves. There
are strong barley wines and oddities such as honey beer and
beer made with the addition of grapes. Before Great Britain
could get sugar cane from the colonies, honey was prized for
its fermentable sugars, so there are recipes for the honey
liquor mead and many other honey drinks made with juices,
herbs and spices.
But remember that all types of lagers and ales, from light
to heavy, are made with varying amounts Qf hops and malt,
so you can write your own recipes. The amount of alcohol
should usually increase with the relative amount of malt
used, or the beer may seem too thin. You need more of the
hops' bitterness as you use more malt to balance the drink,
giving it a full taste.
But hops themselves are complicated, yielding many resins
and not only changing the taste, but also changing the
heading quality and increasing the shelf life of the beer.
Different hops are appropriate for different beers, the less
acrid types being used for lighter beers.
The continuity of the process, because you do something
to the brew every few days, leads to a quick payoff compared
to, for instance, making wine. Wineraakers-wait for six
months before bottling, after a fermentation lasting several
months. Then the wine is aged. But most beer is meant to be
consumed young. Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12,  1978
HI
'Tween classes
TODAY   |
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International House is looking for volunteer help
to write and produce a newsletter, or help with
cultural nights. If interested, call 228-5021,
Joint   AMS/lnternational   House   dance.    La
Tropicale band,  at 8:30 p.m., at International
House.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Opening barbecue for the Lutheran student
movement, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran centre.
UBC LIBRARY
Library tours of Main and Sedgewick libraries, at
either 10:30 a.m. or noon until Friday, at the
Main library entrance.
CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF
TRUTCHKEYITE INTERATIONAL
Vyild   couple   swapping   party,   noon,   Trutch
House.
WEDNESDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Introduction to Canada speaker, Gerald Savory,
7:30 p.m., International House coffeeplace.
Immigration   authorities   will   review   visas   or
answer questions, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m..
Hot flashes
Getting hotter
all the time
No, it doesn't mean that we have
the hots.
A hot flash is merely The
Ubyssey's way of telling you what's
happening on campus in the form
of speakers, events, exhibits, etc.
They're informative, thought-
provoking, interesting, fascinating
and funny, but they always let you
know what's going on.
If you or your club think you
have something interesting to
present to one or all 23,000 of us,
come on up to our office in SUB
24 IK (in the northeast corner on the
second floor) and tell us about it.
And remember that when you're
reading these notices, noon means
12:30 p.m., not 12 hours before or
after midnight.
Grow your own
Do your plants wither and die
even though you spend hours talking to them? Do neighbors make
jokes about your thumb being any
color but green?
If so, then you have a chance to
purchase new victims at the UBC
botanical garden's giant plant sale
Wednesday from 4:30-6:00 p.m.
and Thursday and Friday from noon
to 2:30 p.m.
Giant plants and even smaller
ones will be available at the
Botanical Garden office on Northwest Marine Drive.
Price is wrong
After a three-hour stint of exhaustive investigative reporting last
week, a Ubyssey reporter uncovered a beer price increase in the
Pit.
There was a token increase (get
it?) of ten cents per beer this summer, bringing the price up to 85
cents. Jugs have gone from three-
for-$2.25, to three-for-$2.50.
But take heart boozers, you can
beat inflation by buying six tokens
for five dollars, a whopping ten
cent savings.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35a
Commercial v 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B,, UBC, Van., B.C. VST 1W5
5 — Coming Events
TAKE A
LIBRARY TOUR
OF
Main and Sedgewick Libraries
Every Day This Week
Meet at Main Library Entrance
10:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m.
NEW Music/Poetry/Jazz/Etc. Bob Turner, and Friends, Wed., Friday. Sat;
8 p.m. 4607 West 10th,  $3.00.
30 — Jobs
111 HELP   GREENPEACE   HELP I 11
SeUers urgenUy needed for the Greenpeace "Go Anywhere" lottery. Make
money! Save Life! 2108 West 4th Ave.,
Vancouver, V6K 1N6, 736-0321.
ART STUDENT to do some pen and ink
drawings and layout work. Call Susie,
736-7611. 9-5 Mon.-Fri.
U.B.C BOWLING LEAGUE organizational meeting, Wednesday, September 13
in Buchanan Room 104 at 12:30. For
further Information phone Chris ait
224-6539. ^^^
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C. 	
OVER 100 MILES to the gallon. 1978
Honda CB125 S. Less than 800 miles,
like new. Has windscreen and 2 helmets. This model sold out for 1978.
Paid over $1,000, selling for $800. 271-
5771.
11 — For Sale — Private
l»68 FIREBIRD 3S0 HT. P.S., P.B., new
paint, low mileage, city tested. 266-
7000 or 261-3711 or 682-0321.
25 — Instruction
CANOEING INSTRUCTION by cert. Inst.
15 hour course. 266-5705. Group rates.
Maximum of 6 students.
THE CITY — where the action is. ORBAN STUDIES 200, HENNINGS 100.
Every Tues., Wed. 11:30.
CREATIVE MOVEMENT
and
MODERN DANCE
CLASSES
Call Naava — 266-8373
HOUSEKEEPING, 10th and Balaclava, 4
hours per week/$3.50 per hour. Phone
732-6858.
35 - Lost
ONE BEARD AND MOUSTACHE. Last
seen Sun. night at Trutch House. If
found contact comrade John PenhaU,
734-1606.
MAN'S RING, near S.U.B. in late Aug.
Silver with dark stone. 681-5884 or
731-4384.
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3690 after
6:00 p.m.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
=ii=ii=Jr=ir=Jf=ir=ir=ir=ur=Jr=ii
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
="="==JF=ir=ir=Jt=Jr=i[=ir=Jr=3r;
7:30  p.m..   Gym  E,  Winter
Wednesday and Thursday, International House,
room 400.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 211.
UBC BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational meeting, noon, Buch. 104.
THURSDAY
SIMS
Group meditation, noon, Angus 210.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Demonstration jump, 1:00 p.m., south playing
field by Winter Sports Centre.
FRIDAY
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
SQUASH TEAM
Tryouts for C-D squash team 2:30 to 5:00 p.m..
Winter Sports Centre squash courts.
MONDAY
FENCING
General meeting.
Sports Centre.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
Welcome to 'Tween classes. The Ubyssey's
very own free and exclusive bulletin board.
'Tween classes are open to all members of the
university community, but differ from hot
flashes (above) in one important way. We decide
which hot flashes to run, but every Tween
classes submitted is published.
If you or your club would like to tell the
university about an event, speaker, exhibit, or
whatever, visit the friendly Ubyssey office in
SUB 241K (in the northeast corner on the second
floor). After filling out one of our very
bureaucratic forms, your event will be magically
advertised.
The Ubyssey publishes Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday and the deadline for 'Tween classes is
noon the day before the paper comes out.
Remember, noon is really 12:30 p.m., and a
new form has to be made for every day you
want your event publicized.
Join the
UBC Bowling League A
Monday or Tuesday
6:30-8:30 p.m.
SUB Lanes
sB
Phone: Christine 224-6539
Karen 224-6582
UBC FALL COURSES IN
READING,   WRITING,   AND   STUDY
SKILLS
The University of British Columbia Reading, Writing, and
Study Skills Centre is offering a number of non-credit courses
in reading, writing, technical writing, vocabulary development, grammar and composition review, study skills development and spelling improvement commencing the week of
September 30, 1978. Classes last for 7 to 10 weeks and meet
on the UBC Campus.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION
CALL 228-2181, loc. 245
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED
FOR ALL CLASSES
FIGHT THE
FARE INCREASE
Use these I.O.U.'s
The Bus Drivers' Union has agreed to accept them.
■ K41 I object to the increases of from 43% to 67% in transit fares, as well as to the service ■ m —
I ^PC and route cutbacks. I vii
It is my opinion that these fare increases, services and route cutbacks are not justified.
For this reason, I am paying only the regular 35c fare in cash at this time.
The 15c increase you are demanding, I propose to pay in the form of this conditional
promissory note, which I am offering along with the regular 35c fare.
I PROMISE TO PAY TO B.C. HYDRO THE FULL SUM OF 15c, SUBJECT TO THE
FOLLOWING CONDITIONS:
1. THAT B.C. HYDRO OPENS ITS BOOKS TO FULL PUBLIC SCRUTINY;
2. THAT B.C. HYDRO FULLY JUSTIFIES THE 43% TO 67% FARE INCREASES
AND THE SERVICE AND ROUTE CUTBACKS TO THE FULL SATISFACTION OF
THE TRANSIT RIDERS AND THE PEOPLE OF       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Name	
I 5C Address    1 5C
■ JR^l I object to the increases of from 43% to 67% in transit fares, as well as to the service ■ ■■
I 9C and route cutbacks. | 9C
It is my opinion that these fare increases, services and route cutbacks are not justified.
For this reason, I am paying only the regular 35c fare in cash at this time.
The 15c increase you are demanding, I propose to pay in the form of this conditional
promissory note, which I am offering along with the regular 35c fare.
I PROMISE TO PAY TO B.C. HYDRO THE FULL SUM OF 15c, SUBJECT TO THE
FOLLOWING CONDITIONS:
1. THAT B.C. HYDRO OPENS ITS BOOKS TO FULL PUBLIC SCRUTINY;
2. THAT B.C. HYDRO FULLY JUSTIFIES THE 43% TO 67% FARE INCREASES
AND THE SERVICE AND ROUTE CUTBACKS TO THE FULL SATISFACTION OF
THE TRANSIT RIDERS AND THE PEOPLE OF       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Name	
1 5C Address ..,    1 5C
15c
15c
I object to the increases of from 43% to 67% in transit fares, as well as to the service
and route cutbacks.
It is my opinion that these fare increases, services and route cutbacks are not justified.
For this reason, I am paying only the regular 35c fare in cash at this time.
The 15c increase you are demanding, I propose to pay in the form of this conditional
promissory note, which I am offering along with the regular 35c fare.
I PROMISE TO PAY TO B.C. HYDRO THE FULL SUM OF 15c, SUBJECT TO THE
FOLLOWING CONDITIONS:
1. THAT B.C. HYDRO OPENS ITS BOOKS TO FULL PUBLIC SCRUTINY;
2. THAT B.C. HYDRO FULLY JUSTIFIES THE 43% TO 67% FARE INCREASES
AND THE SERVICE AND ROUTE CUTBACKS TO THE FULL SATISFACTION OF
THE TRANSIT RIDERS AND THE PEOPLE OF       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Name	
15c
Address.
15c Tuesday/ September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
'Banks support Chilean secret police
From page 1
More than 800,000 Chilean
children suffer from malnutrition,
even though food and milk are
being exported he said.
"Many programs and social
services initiated by the Allende
government have been scrapped,
including   medical   services    and
many others that we would consider
normal in Canada."
The current troubles in Chile
stem from a bloddy coup which
overthrew the socialist government
of Salvadore Allende five years ago
this week.
Allende was elected on the
platform of a peaceful transition to
socialism, and one of his government's actions was the
nationalization of several major
industries, including copper
mining.
Major corporations responded
with an international boycott of
Chilean products which induce a
scarcity  of  goods   and   runaway
inflation. Coupled with internal
dissention, the government was
weakened considerably.
It was then that the military, with
considerable help from the CIA,
overthrew the Allende regime,
leaving 40,000 dead, 100,000
imprisoned, and one million exiled.
The    Pinochet    government
UBC settles with largest unions
By CHRIS GAINOR
UBC is in for a year of relative
labor peace after the UBC faculty
association, UBC's two largest
unions and another union which
had been on strike for 12 weeks
settled over the summer with the
UBC administration.
Clerical and library workers
belonging to local one of the
Association of University and
College Employees voted narrowly
Aug. 30 to accept a university wage
offer, averting a possible strike
during registration week.
Local 116 of the Canadian Union
of Public Employees, at 1,450
members UBC's largest union,
settled with the administration
earlier in the summer, as did the
faculty association and the tiny (26
members) UBC local of the International Union of Operating
Engineers which struck UBC for 12
weeks on a bitter dispute which
included violent confrontations on
picket lines.
The administration is still in
mediation talks with the UBC local
of the Office and Technical Employees Union, which represents 39;
employees on campus.
The 1,300 members of AUCE
had voted Aug. 23 in favor of strike
action, but talks under mediator Ed
Sims had brought the two sides
within $10 per month of each other
on pay increases.
The UBC offer of a $45 per
month increase for all AUCE
members was accepted at a meeting
Aug. 30 in a 292-214 vote. The
increase takes effect Oct. 1.
Both sides had already agreed
that AUCE members would receive
a $13 a month increase effective last
April 1, the effective date of the
one-year contract. UBC's offer was
accepted despite a recommendation
from the union's contract committee that it be rejected.
Administration spokesman Al
Hunter said increases in all union
contracts must remain within Anti-
Inflation Guidelines until Sept. 31.
AUCE negotiators had
demanded that all official employee
evaluation reports be subject to
removal from university files after a
certain time, but the demand was.
dropped when the wage offer was
accepted.
Since signing its first contract
withUBC in 1974, AUCE has had a
difficult relationship with the
administration. Virtually every
agreement has been proceeded by at
least   a   strike   threat,   and   in
December, 1975, AUCE struck the
university for a week.
Hunter said CUPE agreed to a
four per cent increase in a one-year
contract, with a minimum wage
increase of $42 for monthly-paid
workers.
CUPE tradesmen's wages will
continue to be set at 90 per cent of
the rates paid to tradesmen under
contract to member firms of the
Construction Labor Relations
Association. Hunter said the figure
for UBC tradesmen is lower than
for those in the conduction industry because of more reliable
working conditions.
Faculty association members
settled for a four per cent increase
over one year, plus a 1.75 per cent
"career experience increment,"
which is paid on a sliding scale
according to a professor's experience, Hunter said.
The pact also provides for a
slight increase in the fund for merit
pay, which is paid to faculty
members deemed deserving of it by
deans and department heads.
The strike by the operating
engineers, who operate UBC's
heating plant, ended May 18 when
members ratified a 15-month pact
giving them a total wage increase of
about  six  per  cent  over  several
stages.
The union's contract will expire
next March 31, along with the
AUCE and CUPE contracts. The
engineers had gone on strike
partially because they wanted their
contract to end on a different date
than the other unions.
Virtually all of UBC's unions
now have contracts ending March
31, which is the end of UBC's fiscal
year. Interesting enough, the pact
with the faculty association ends
June 30, the end of the academic
year.
The operating engineers shifted
picket locations several times
during the tense strike, and three
union members were charged with
assault after strikers clashed with
supervisors and scabs who the
union said were operating the steam
plant, which provides heat for all
UBC buildings.
The RCMP was involved at one
point in the strike, and union
members accused administration
vice-president Charles Connaghan,
a former CLRA boss, of trying to
break the strike with the use of
"hatchet men". The union wanted
its contract to end Dec. 31 as before
to ensure that its negotiations
would not be unduly affected by
negotiations with other unions.
recently released all political
prisoners, but unfortunately most
of the political prisoners jailed since
the coup were jailed as common
criminals and will not be affected.
The Pinochet government has
disbanded DINA, the secret police,
but in fact they have only changed
their name.
The Pinochet government has
invited all exiles back to Chile, but
they must sign documents forfeiting
all rights to political freedom of
expression.
But this year has seen an increase
in opposition to the Pinochet
government from within Chile,
including strikes and demonstrations.
British and Swedish
longshoremen will not load
Chilean goods, and a recent arms
shipment from the U.S. to Chile
was stopped when California
longshoremen refused to load.
"We encourage people not to
buy Chilean goods, not to have
their money in banks that send to
Chile," said another member of
the Committee.
"But it's going to be a long
fight."
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs throughout this
tiny island kindgom erupted in
warts and spontaneous demonstrations today following the
jubilant announcement by assistant
Reichsbureaucrat Bill Bummerdull
that the war has finally aided.
He went on to state, however,
that the announcement was
necessary in order to take the
blorgs' small but excitable minds
off the fact that there had been no
let up in the unseasonable torrential
rains that have plagued the
kingdom for the past forty days and
nights.
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLOMBIA
The two "Campus Branches" of the Bank of Montreal take great pleasure
in welcoming new and returning students to U.B.C.
We figure it this way: if we can be of help to you while you're a student, you'll stick with us after
graduation—when we can be of even greater assistance.
So, come see us for advice on handling money. We can show you a few things that Economics 201 doesn't cover:
how to save with a True Savings Account, how to cheque with a True Chequing Account, how to budget to make the most
of your money, how to avoid running short. And we can discuss loans too.
There's a Bank of Montreal nearby. Drop in, anytime. We want you to get your money's worth.
Start with
the bank
you'll stay with.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH - STUART CLARK, MANAGER
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING BRANCH - GEORGE PEIRS0N, MANAGER £
ta
1
I
class and won't be needed for the exam.
BUDGET — A very tight item which the administration is
in charge of. Unfortunately the provincial government
decides how big it's going to be, which boils down to "How
much can we cut? How much can we raise the fees?" and
other questions of policy on higher education. Faculty wages
take the biggest chunk, the administration gets a nice piece,
and you get the unsanitary end of the stick.
BUREAUCRACY — There's lots of it around. It
translates as line-ups, truculent secretaries who don't want
you to see the dean, endless forms that are often mysteriously
unavailable (at this time) and are never read (but are absolutely necessary ... no, we don't know why), and a thousand other things that are designed to totally waste your time
while you try to get your degree. Bureaucracy, however, is
absolutely necessary . . . no, we don't know why.
CATS — Small, furry, four-legged animals. (Also spelled
KATS.)
CLASSES — Regardless of what you might have heard,
attendance is not mandatory. ,If your prof is boring and
mainly reads from the text (or his thirty-year-old notes) attendance is stupid.
COURSES — Boy, are there ever a lot of them, eh?
There's even some that aren't necessarily related to your own
particular program. Try to branch out and get into things
that will make you a better, more well-rounded person. You
might even learn something.
CYCLISTS — A flourishing new counter culture that
UBC wants to make an endangered species. Every student
should become one, if only as an answer to inflated bus
fares. Then perhaps it won't be illegal for cyclists to use the
public roads in this area. If you drive a car, please don't
squash or annoy them.
DEMONSTRATIONS — Something you probably won't
see at UBC. After all, every single one of the world's problems have been solved, haven't they?
DRUGS — Terrible, immoral, disgusting, awful, illegal,
and just plain icky. Columbian's going about $70-$80, the
Mexican isn't in yet (it's said to be a good crop this year),
homegrown varies all over the place, hash (at least decent
hash) hasn't been heard of for a while, and if you hear of any,
good acid from the chem lab that wasn't made with paint
remover, call the Ubyssey at 228-2301. Stay away from all
others if you want to keep your teeth and hair.
ESSAYS — A form of prostitution. Do it properly and on
time and you get rewarded. Be sure not to rock the boat by
disagreeing with the prof's pet theories or by doing anything
that he doesn't expect. On the other hand, your essay should
be a little better than the average if you want a high B. For
A's you have to work harder, and do some real research. Get
the books out of the library early, or they won't be there
when you're ready to do;it at the last moment. Don't take
essay due dates too seriously. No one really expects you to
have essays in all at once for all your different courses. Just
before it's due, you can go to the prof with a good excuse
and usually he will give you an extension. After a while, lying
is easy. Don't plagiarize or you can be thrown out of school.
Get a good style guide so you can figure out how to deal properly with footnotes and bibliographies.
EXAMS — Methods of measuring exactly what informa-
or two to campus. You'll see them here and there (trees, not
grad classes). It's a good thing, because they keep cutting
them down at the centre of campus.
GRADUATION — So you've gone through your tour or
five years, you've worked like a dog, grovelled before profs,
spent countless sleepless nights working on that overdue
essay, and lost your physical and mental health. So how does
it end? They send you a piece of paper and Doug Kenny
whacks you on the head at a long, boring ceremony.
Honestly, that's it. The piece of paper will start a kitchen
fire — if you still have a wood-stove. As they say, that and a
quarter will get a cup of coffee.
1
HEALTH SERVICE — Located in the Wesbrook
building at the southwest corner of University Boulevard
and West Mall. Students can go there to get things checked
out, like twitchy eys&from reading too much. You should be
on the provincial medical plan, which full-time students can
belong to for only $3.50 a month, less than half-price.
HITCHHIKING -—to UBC is easy, if you are on a main
route. But women should be careful, especially after dark,
because it is a big city. Hitching helps fill some of the 10,000
cars which are registered at UBC, many of which arrive out
here with just a driver.
HOUSING — at UBC was available, but opportunities to
live like sardines in Totem at the same rates one would pay
off campus have been snapped up. To avoid going stir cra2y
you can always go for a walk in the woods, where there are
many trails, squirrels and such.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE — A gathering place and
clearing house for international students and other interested
parties located west of West Mall between the Grad Centre
and the Museum of Anthropology. Often serves noon-hour -
meals for those with cosmopolitan tastes and anyone else
who has had enough of Food Services' ptomaine cocktails. A
good place to sharpen up your Estonian.
IBEX — An African grazing animal which looks like a
gnu, but isn't.
JAIL — is for staying out of. Do not pass GO, and do not
collect $200.
KARMA — means finding your own space. Anyone who
knows what this means left for the ashram five years ago.
I
LIBRARY — is where books on the burning issues are
kept. There's no match for it. I always get fired up at the
thought of a warm glow in the stacks. Last year there was a
bomb scare in the Main, but don't mention it to the
librarians. They always seem to get kinda nervous about it.
Try to return your books on time so the rest of us can use
them, but hold off on paying overdue fines for as long as
possible.
OFFICIALDOM — (see BUREAUCRACY).
f
PANGO PANGO — Throughout the year you will see
numerous small stories in the Ubyssey datelined from this exotic South Pacific island kingdom, inhabited by hairy blorgs
of many different colors (kind of like New York, really). The
name is said to be Ognap Ognap spelled backwards.
POOL — also known as the Aldridge Memorial Submarine Net and Wombat Cleaning Terminal, after the student politician who ^leverly inveigled the administration into
paying upwards of 30 per cent of the cost of a building they
had to build anyway.
Students were to pay another third, while the taxpayers
were to pay the rest. Double-digit inflation changed all that
and students will Ciid up having paid less than one third when
the pool fee levy finally expires in 2525.
Graduating students have paid $25 into the pool. Now that
they are no longer students, they pay to use the pool, like
everybody else out there in the real world.
PROFESSORS — Let's face it. UBC is strictly little-
league: If the profs were any good, they'd be at Harvard, Oxford, Cambridge, McGill or what-have-you. But they're not.
They're here.
P also stands for prostitution, pollution, prisons, poverty,
pain when you pee and the president's office. You will learn
next to nothing about any of these unless you read the
Ubyssey.
QUASI-COPS — Pseudo-police force that tickets yotir car
if it is riot parked where they want it. If you refuse to pay
your tickets the university threatens to withhold your
marks. There is probably no legal basis for this sort of extortion but the administration figures, shrewdly and correctly,
that no more than about 22 per cent of students possess the
wherewithal to challenge this policy in court.
RACISM — Thank goodness there's none of that nonsense
here, eh?
R also stands for rape (if it happens to you, the Women's
Office or Rape Relief will help), RCMP (the real cops; they,
too; sneer at the quasis), and rip-offs (thank goodness there's
none of that nonsense here, eh?).
REGISTRATION — By the time you've gone through the
process five times, you'll have it down pat. Some advice:
Unless you are too dumb to figure out what you are and arc
not allowed to take, don't bother coming out in August for
preregistration, or preapproval. It saves no time. If you are
scheduled to register, say, on Thursday or Friday, when the
courses you want will be filled, find somebody who registers
early in the week and offer to do it for them. Use their authorization to get in. It only takes a while longer and you get in
days earlier. If your friend doesn't get into the courses
he/she wanted, well, that would have happened anyway, so
there's no loss. Finally, avoid lineups whenever possible. If
there's a lineup when you go to hand in your course cards,
have lunch and come back later. Wait two weeks before you
buy textbooks. Don't be panicked into buying them all the
first day.
UNEMPLOYMENT — Thank goodness we don't have
any of that nonsense here, eh?
U.S. of A. — Mention to your prof how much you enjoyed your vacation there. They get homesick.
UBYSSEY — Often mistaken for the Christian Science
Monitor, the Ubyssey is generally livelier, more widely
available at UBC, offers better coverage of on-campus news,
and is a whole tot more fun to work on.
Nothing gives greater satisfaction than compiling facts,
organizing information in a solid news story, discussing a
story's relative merit, setting coverage priorities, producing a
crisp, readable newspaper, and the feeling you get when you
SCalk by somebody in the cafeteria reading something you
sweated over the day before. Except maybe a paycheck. The
Ubyssey can provide all but the latter. Also booze and sex.
We're in SUB 241K, in the northeast corner on the second
floor.
VENEREAL DISEASE —Thank goodness we don't have
any ol" that nonsense here, eh? But if you do, go to the
Health Services in Wesbrook. Don't worry. VD is nothing to
be asJUMted of, any more than sex itself is. In fact, many
pfcysidlpl now.believe VD is as prevalent as influenza or the
common Md. If you think you have it, you probably do, so
have a doctor look at it.
VALIUM — Take two, and call us in the morning.
WOMEN'S OFFICE — Where to go for advice, help, support, information, or simply where to go. It's run by the
AM$'s Women's committee and is in SUB 130, to your right
a$;$fci enter the north doors of SUB.
.;,W|HBCK BEACH — A name usually considered to en-
,'pt^^^ss West, West, West Spanish Banks and Towers Beach
ja$.wtfi as Wreck Beach. You have to scramble down steep
paths to get there but it's worth it. And when the weather is
good, you can take your clothes off there without being arrested.
But be careful about swimming there. The currents are
pretty tricky and the Vancouver Parks Board is too
squeamish to place lifeguards there.
XEBEC — A small three-masted Mediterranean vessel
with some square and some lateen sails.
Why
indeed?
ZEAL, ZEST, ZIP — Commodities which, come March,
will be in short supply. In fact, you will feel like a ZOMBIE.
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ACCESSIBILITY — to UBC is easy, if you're white,
middle-class and not a foreign student, it's also easy to afford if you've won the Loto Canada. If you're poor it's not
likely that you'll be reading this.
ADMINISTRATION — is the system at UBC which controls the bureaucracy, (see BUREAUCRACY). Much of it is
located in the ugliest building on campus, at the northeast
corner of University Boulevard and Wesbrook. They are
secretive, distant, unwieldy and responsible for any long
lineups during registration week.
AGGIES — is the name for students enrolled in
agriculture. It is not true that they have to collect eggs each
morning for marks.
AMS — is us, the Alma Mater Society. We have an executive, the Student Administrative Commission (SAC), and
the 50-odd reps from the faculties and departments, which
meet in a body called the Student Representative Assembly
(SRA).
Reps are elected yearly and you can catch their act on
Wednesday evenings. They play in the student council
chambers on the second floor of the Student Union Building.
Whenever enough of the SRA (also known as the Silly
Reprehensible Assembly) manage to show up for a meeting,
they drone and decide about your money, which is about the
only interesting thing they do.
From this decomposing body SAC is appointed to carry on
the day-to-day affairs of student government. The SAC motto is "What isn't elected can't be impeached". They have
been given powers accordingly, with most of their decisions
being referred back to the SRA. Thus do day-to-day affairs
become decade-to-decade non-decisions.
BEER — The barley sandwich is the staff of life and the
traditional opiate of the student (going back to the 1100's).
Available in the Pit.
BOOKSTORE — A supposedly non-profit enterprise
dedicated to giving the student a better deal. Then why is
there a lower price under the bookstore sticker when you peel
it off? Why does the bookstore make a five or six-digit profit
every year?
Because they are ripping you off, that's why., Make use of
UBC's excellent library system or buy your books downtovvn
from the second-hand people. Better yet, help out the impoverished students who put notices offering their last year's
books at cut-rates.    <
As well  take with a pra:n of salt vnur nrof's statement that
tion you are about to immediately forget. They are more frequent than they used to be, the current philosophy in the provincial education department being that every subject ought
to be examinable. If you are just sloughing through classes,
and not really attending too often, you still should'look and
find the exam timetables sometime in November and March,
These are posted around campus. You should study on the
basis of what is likely to be asked. At the counselling office
west of the anthropology annex, and west of the West Mall,
there are files of past exams which can be consulted to get an
idea of what to expect. Some lazy profs give the exact same
exam each year.
FRATERNITIES — About as Greek as most people on
campus and not quite as big as they used to be. Frats provide
a tight social life for those who need the structure. Each
organization is part of" an international (American) parent
organization.
FOOD SERVICES — The organization which may have
already fed you today. The food is usually overpriced
because the administration is trying to inake money to pay
off the mortgage on the cafeteria's share of the Student
Union Building's construction costs. You should look
around at what's offered, then bring yoiir ofVyn lunch. Try
not to eat there more than once a day if you have respectfldr
good food. The salad bar in SUB, a relatively new offering, *
is overpriced but-almost worth it. Also in SUB is the custom
sandwich woman. Other attractions include the cinnamon
buns and Chinese food in the Old Auditorium, if you get
there early. But the Chinese food makes the stomach queasy
sometimes, especially when you get there after it's been simmering for a while. Avoid rubbery sandwiches and anything
out of a machine. Residence food is very sad. Many minor
uprisings have occurred over the lack of variation in menu
and the phenomenon of students losing the color from their
faces after eating regularly in Totem Park. Try the Deli in. the
SUB basement for variation and ice cream cones. You can
get beer with your lunch in Ponderosa, the Old Auditorium
and the Grad Student Centre.
FRENCH 400 — French literature in translation, is
notorious as one of the easiest hand-jobs for three units.
Always make sure you are taking at least two easy courses
and if your prof looks like he wants you to read the collected
works of Winston Churchill in the first !erm, change courses.
Other easy courses are Theatre 230 and 330, history oStfibm.
My favorite was always Music Appreciation.
LIQUOR — makes me crazy but I never drink before
noon. The Pit and the Lethe in SUB serve booze, as do the
Ponderosa Cafeteria and the Old Auditorium at noon. You
should get off campus often to clear your head. Try Rohan's,
the King's Head Inn and Jerry's Coverall in Kitsilano. Never
drink heavily within four hours of an important exam.
MEDICAL SCHOOL — only has openings for real
keeners. If you really want to prepare yourself for the competition for this or other advanced studies, get good grades,
but otherwise don't take courses you won't need. On the
other hand, you should talk to counsellors and find out
which are the right courses, to take, so you aren't taking
courses needlessly. Keep open lots of options because-the
unemployment situation isn't getting any better. Find out
what people do when they get out of here. Try to g* practical experience in your field to find out if you really like it.
MOrllY — Yoii'H needlt to get through. Don't be shy. If
you've got a full course load there's no point in working during the winter session. Get a grant arid loan. Forms are
available in Jthe basement of the main administration
building. Lie like hell to make sure you qualify for the grant
and loan. Figure out how much you need and work
backwards. Squeeze out as much money as you can from
each of the expense categories allowed. Make sure you say
you've saved the minimum that they ask you to save from
your summer earnings. Remember, it's Hot too late yet to apply for money for this term.
NUS — The National Union of Students, a struggling
organization which represents us even though we don't
belong.
NECESSARY PRECAUTIONS — Important for sexual
contact. You can find out about birth control methods at the
student health services in the Wesbrook Building. (See
Health Services).
NUCLEAR POWER — It scares the hell out of me. It's
one of those things which are too terrible to think about most
of the time, but get you really burned up when the chairman
of B.C. Hydro announces that fission is in our future,
especially when some nuclear power plants in the U.S. have
been closed down and just last week those scientists in
England were found to be contaminated. And if that's not
enough, the largest nuclear submarine base in the world is being built at Bansor   ' Vhington, just 100 miles south of
SEX — Go ahead. Your parents aren't in the next room
anymore, and besides, everybody else is doing it. But take
illie Necessary Precautions.
SEXISKl — Thank goodness there's none of that nonsense
here, eh?
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY — As in "I should have
gone to SFU, I would have, except it's so far, and I couldn't
count onthecar."
, SOCIAL CREDIT — They're distinctly anti-social, and
everybody thinks B.C.'s the laughing stock of the country, so
they are»s*t Mich of a credit to us. How did they get that
But ho matter. Soon WAC will die and Bill will call an
election, pleading that the timing of Trudeau's election gives
him no alternative. Everybody will "remember" what a great
preptef I^AC was and vote for Miniwac for sentimental
reasons. It almost worked for Bobby Kennedy.
• SNOOKER — There are eighteen five-by-tens in the basement of SUB, which also begins with an S. The price is $L80
an hour, you often have a bit of a wait for a table, but there
are m^ny, many people who will swear that the only thing
they learned from UBC was how to work the top end of the
table.
S also stands for scholarships (too late to worry about
those for this year), senate, strikes, (thank goodness we don't
have any of that nonsense here, eh?), and student records,
which the registrar's Office will cheerily tell you are probably
none of your beeswax.
TENURE — A sensible idea (although imperfectly carried
off) giving professors job security after they have
demonstrated reasonable competence for a number of years.
FU'hny_«~ wheilkstcel workers or dock workers or post office
employees want that kind of security, they are accused of
greed and "featherbedding."
TEACHING ASSISTANTS — Used by professors as buffers between themselves and students. They are generally as
intelligent as profs, work equally long hours and are more
enthusiastic about the subject they are teaching. Also, they
could double their incomes if they got a paper route.
, ;T^nds for television (which you can profitably forget
aW^ittp^ljftprtft. tte Third World (as in "You know, funny
thing* fctrf'Pve never been able to figure out what the first
two worlds are"), transportation ("Mom, do you need the
ca$*on Tuesday*") and tuition (pay in instalments; don't
pay the whole shot now). Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12, 1978
B.C
AQUATIC CENTRE
The U.B.C. Aquatic Centre announces its grand
and long-awaited opening. The new facility is one
of the most modern and best equipped in Canada.
The unique shape of the indoor pool was designed
so as to facilitate both recreational and competitive swimming. The various programmes being offered reflect the pool's versatility. - The
Aquatic centre combines the outdoor 55 yard Empire Pool with the indoor 50 metre pool and the
John M. Buchanan Fitness Area.
The indoor pool is a combined project of the students and administration of
U.B.C, funded by grants from the students Alma Mater Society, U.B.C, the
Federal & Provincial governments, U.B.C. Alumni Association, Foundations as
wellas donations from faculty and staff on campus and the citizens of B.C.
SOME OF THE FEATURES ARE:
• 55 yard outdoor pool (Empire) a
• 50 metre indoor pool
— 8 lanes 50m (lengthwise)
— 8 lanes 25m (widths)
— 6 lanes 25yards (widths)
• A shallow warm water area
• Deckside whirlpool
Men's and Women's saunas
and steambaths
2 - one metre diving boards
2 - three metre diving boards
1 - five metre diving platform
Pool slide
Fitness and exercise area downstairs
SCHEDULE
Public Swim
2:30- 4:30 p.m. (M.W.F.)
7:30-10:30 p.m. (M.F.)
8:30-10:30 p.m. (W.)
2:00- 5:00 p.m. (S.)
12:00- 5:00 p.m. (Sun.)
'6:00-10:30 p.m. (Sat.Sun.)
Faculty, Staff, Student Hours
(A.M.S. cardholders admitted
free during these hours ONLY)
7:30- 9:00 a.m. (M-F)
Early Riser Swim
12:30- 2:30 p.m. (M-F Fall)
11:30- 1:30 p.m. (M-F Spring)
4:30- 5:30 p.m. (M-F)
Family Swim
7:30- 8:30 p.m. (W)
10:00-12:00 noon (Sun)
Adult Swim
8:30-10:30 p.m. (T.Th)
Seniors/Handicapped
9:30-10:30 a.m. (T.W.F.)
Ladies Keep Fit
10:30-12:00 noon (M.Th)
Midnight Swim
(Adults 8- UBC students only)
11:00- 1:00 a.m. (T.Th.Sat)
Swim Session Information
Public Swim: open to all ages - Everyone welcome!!
Faculty, Staff, Student Swim: patrons should have identification
Family Swim: Children must be accompanied by one or both of their parents in the pool. Children
are admitted free.
Adult Swim: Patrons must be 18 years of age or older or be an A.M.S. cardholder. Proof of age
may be requested.
Midnight Swim: (adults & UBC students only). For those 18 and over who enjoy late night swims.
'Note: Children age 8 and under and children under 4' tall must be accompanied by an adult.
ALL SWIM SESSIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CANCELLATION WITHOUT NOTICE - THESE HOURS
ARE IN EFFECT FROM SEPTEMBER 5th TO DECEMBER 23rd, 1978.
MANAGEMENT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CLEAR THE POOL 10 MINUTES PRIOR TO THE END
OF EACH-SESSION.
Program Information
The U.B.C. Aquatic Centre will be offering a wide selection of aquatic programs to suit varied interests and ages. We hope that you will enjoy participating in our programs.
Ladies Keep Fit:
Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:00 to 12:00 noon
Date: Sept. 18th
Cost: Regular admission rates
An opportunity to get in shape and learn new skills in a fun social atmosphere. Come whenever you
want during the two hour session.
10:00-10:30 - lap or recreational swimming
10:30-11:00 - Aquasize session (special exercises done in the water)
11:00-12:00 - lap or recreational swimming
Special help with strokes and skills will be available. The fitness centre, sauna and whirlpool are open
for use during the keep fit sessions.
Handicapped Swim: Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Date: Sept. 18th
Cost: Regular admission rates
A time to swim, use the whirlpool in a building with full access for handicapped persons.
Parents & Tots: Monday & Wednesday 3:30-4:30
Set I - Sept. 18 to Oct. 16
Set II - Oct. 18 to Nov. 13
Cost: $15.00 for 8 half-hour lessons
Note: No class Sept. 27
A half hour lesson for children up to 3 years old. Time for parents & children to enjoy and explore the
water together. Informal instruction on how to orient your child.
U.B.C. Student Lessons: Tuesday & Thursday 2:30-3:30
Date: Sept. 19 to Nov. 23rd
Cost: $20.00
Special classes for students from 'scared stiff' levels to more advanced; 45 minute classes to break up
your day.
Levels to register in:
1) Scared stiff (Beginners)
2) Stroke learning and improvement (Intermediate)
3) Advanced
Bronze Medallion may be offered, if there is enough demand.
Red Cross Lessons: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 5:30-7:30 p.m.)
(half-hour lessons)
For children age 6 and over.
Cost: 12 half-hour lessons for $12.00 up to Intermediate
Intermediate and Senior: 12 one hour lessons for 14.00
Set I - Sept. 15 tq Oct. 13
Set II - Oct. 16 to Nov. 10
Set III - Nov. 13 to Dec. 8
Note: There will be no class on Sept. 27. There will be a class on Thanksgiving Monday, Oct. 9th and
.Remembrance Day Stat holiday November 13th.
The levels offered every half hour are:
1) Adjustment to water (for children with no aquatic experience)
2) Prebeginner        5) Junior
3) Beginner 6) Intermediate 5:30-6:30 only
4) Survival 7) Senior 6:30-7:30 only
Beginning Swim Lessons: Tuesday Er Thursday 5:30-7:30 p.m.
(half-hour classes) Levels offered each half-hour are:
Cost: 12 half-hour lessons for $12.00 1) Adjustment to water
Set 1 - Sept. 19 to Oct. 26 2) Pre-beginners
Set II - Oct. 31 to Dec. 7 3) Beginners
Synchronized Swimming: Tuesday & Thursday 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Set I - Sept. 19 to Oct. 12
Set II - Oct. 17 to Nov. 9th
Set III - Nov. 14 to Dec. 7
Cost: 8 half-hour lessons for $10.00
Program based on Canadian Amateur Synchronized Swimming Association Star award program. Will
include conditioning, basic and advanced synchronized swimming skills and routines.
Requirements: any age, any level.
Must have Red Cross Junior level swimming ability (able to swim 50 metres back/front crawl)
5:30 - For Beginners (Star I - aged up to 16)
6:00 - Advanced (have Star I - any age)
6:30 - U.B.C. student and adult beginner
7:00 - U.B.C. student and adult advanced
Diving Lessons: Tuesday & Thursday 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Cost: 8 half-hour lessons for $10.00
Set I - Sept. 19 to Oct. 12
Set II - Oct. 17 to Nov. 9th
Set III - Nov. 14 to Dec. 7 *
5:30 - Beginners'
6:30-7:30 - for those with some experience
(eg. can do a forward and back dive off a 1 metre board)
Adult Lessons: Tuesdays & Thursdays 7:30-8:30 p.m.
Set I - Sept. 19 to Oct. 12
Set II - Oct. 17 to Nov. 9
Set III - Nov. 14 to Dec. 7
Cost 8 lessons for $15.00
Lessons for the public as well as U.B.C. students, staff Et faculty. Levels offered every half hour are:
Beginning swimming
Intermediate Swimming
Advanced stage.
Royal Lifesaving Society Lessons
1. Bronze Medallion: Saturday 9:00-11:00 a.m.
Cost: $30.00 for 12 two-hour sessions (includes exam fee)
Starts: September 23 to December 9th
2. Bronze Cross: Saturday 9:00-11:00 a.m.
Cost $30.00 for 12 two-hour sessions (includes exam fee)
Starts: September 23 to December 9th
3. Award of Merit: Saturday 10:00-12:00 noon
Cost $30.00 for 12 two-hour session (includes exam fee)
Starts: September 23 to December 9th
4. National Lifesaving: Saturday 10:00-2:00 p.m.
Cost: $55.00 (includes exam fee
Starts: September 23 to December 9th
5. Leaders: Saturday 12:00 noon-2:00 p.m.
Cost: $35.00 (includes exam fee)
Starts: September 23 to December 9th
Please note: There may be additional charges in the above courses for books and literature.
REGISTRATION INFORMATION
1. If you have any questions concerning the above information please don't hesitate to call the
Aquatic Centre at 228-4521.
2. Registration for the first set of all swim lessons will be taken in person ONLY at the UBC Aquatic
Centre. Registration hours are 9:30 - 3:30l weekdays starting SEPTEMBER 7th, 1978 and 9:00
to 12:00 noon Saturdays.
3. Full payment (cash or cheque) must be made upon registration. Please note that prices vary
depending upon the type of class.
4. Absolutely no refunds will be made. Please note however that any class may be cancelled due
to lack of enrolment. Refunds will be made in these cases only.
5. All participants are responsible for their own accident and medical coverage.
6. All registrations are on a "first come, first serve basis". You may not register your child in the same
class at more than one time.
7. Participants may register for only one set at one time. The previous set must be completed before
you may register for the next set.
e ma
8. Registration for lessons other than Set 1 can be made starting September 18th.
Monday to Friday 9:30 - 4:30
Saturday 9:00 to 12:00 noon.
Please note that you must be registered at least 3 days prior to the start of any set of
lessons.
PRICE SCHEDULE
1. Passes will be available on a 4-month basis beginning September 5th, 1978.
Child $20.00
Student $25.00
Adult $30.00
2. General Admission
Adults - $1.00 or 10 tickets for $8.50.
Students (13-18 yrs. & AMS cardholders) $.75 or 10 tiGkets for $6.00.
Child - $.50 or 10 tickets for $4.00.
Seniors 8- Handicapped $.50 or 10 tickets for $4.00.
3. Swim, Sauna, Steam and Exercise Room $2.00 or 10 tickets for $16.00.
Sauna, Steam Exercise Room ONLY - $1.00.
4. Please note: Family Swim: Children must be accompanied by a parent and are then admitted free.
Baskets
Baskets with locks are available for rental at $5.00 for four months beginning September 5th and ending December 23rd, 1978.
THE ABOVE SCHEDULE OF HOURS AND LESSONS IS GOOD FROM
SEPTEMBER 5th TO DECEMBER 23rd. 1978.
We hope that you will take advantage of all that the new Aquatic
Centre has to offer in the way of swim hours, lessons and recreational time. We want to show you that swimming can be an enjoyable experience. THE MANAGEMENT Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
No news like old campus news
The Universities Council of B.C.
has charged that UBC is spending
too much money on academic
salaries and not enough on library
resources, university maintenance,
equipment and other non-salary
items.
In a report on the distribution of
provincial funds to B.C. universities, the council said UBC's
operating fund allocations appear
to be leaning too heavily on
academic salaries and added that
the university seems to be spending
a disproportionate amount of
money on salaries compared to
other Canadian universities.
TTie report states the council will
be closely examining the extent to
which the situation has been altered
in UBC's 1978-79 internal funding
allocation when considering the
university's 1979-80 funding needs.
The UBC administration shocked
the giant computer firm IBM this
summer   by    awarding   a   $2.74
million computer contract to
Amdahl Ltd. The contract was for
installation of a central processing
unit (CPU) to replace UBC's
biggest computer, an IBM 370/168.
Amdahl's $2.74 million system
compared to a $3.3 million system
from IBM. Amdahl sweetened their
offer by arranging a trade-in on the
old computer, lowering UBC's net
bill from   $555,000 to $600,000.
And the upstart computer
company, which is making large
inroads into formerly IBM
dominated fields, was also able to
deliver the system a full nine
months before IBM could have.
UBC felt the change in computers
was necessary because the value of
the IBM 360/168 was expected to
drop quickly.
Full-time faculty members
should be "disciplined" if they
moonlight at outside jobs for more
than a half day a week or 26 days a
year, a Universities Council of B.C.
report   released   this   summer
recommends.
But UBC has stated that its own
policies are strong enough to
discourage extensive moonlighting
already. The UBC report, submitted to education mininster Pat
McGeer, says paid consulting jobs
may be undertaken only after the
faculty member's full-time commitment to the university has been
fulfilled.
a REC U.B.C. Presents: 1
WOMEN'S
SELF DEFENSE
Instruction provided by Canada Shotokan in conjunction with
the university detachment of the R.C.M.P. Sign up in Room
203 War Memorial Gym.
U.B.C. KARATE CLUB
Practise Times:
Thurs. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Gym E
Sun. 10:30-12:30 p.m. Gym E
Demonstration: Thurs. Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m. Gym E
COMING THURSDAY &  FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 14 & 15
CLUBS' DAY
Clubs Day gives you a chance to talk to the many different
clubs you may wish Jo join. Club representatives will be on
hand at their booths and displays in SUB to explain their
activities and functions.
master charge
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1522
224-9116   »
VfSA
closely with Rick McGeer, the
minister's son.
Burnes will be editor of the B.C.
Government News, a public
relations information sheet put out
by the Socred government.
She will replace Dave Roach,
effective Sept. 18, and will start at a
salary of $16,500. Burnes has also
worked as a speechwrker for
Ontario premier Bill Davis.
A close friend of education
minister Pat McGeer's family has
been appointed premier Bill
Bennett's information officer.
Jane Burnes, also a Vancouver
Sun summer reporter, has worked
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UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
2075 WESTBROOK PLACE, B.C.  V6T 1W5
TEL: 228-4741 Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12,  1978
SPORTS
Gridiron warriors primed for 1978
-geof wheelwright photo
FOOTBALL 'BIRDS . . . practice for tangle with Manitoba Saturday.
This is a rebuilding year for the
UBC Thunderbird football team,
according to head coach Frank
Smith.
The 'Birds lost 20 players from
last year's squad, including 11
starters ' and five Western Intercollegiate all-stars.
But the opening two games have
indicated that the team may do well
despite the large losses from last
year's WIFL second-place
finishers.
Opening games saw the T-Birds
handily defeat the Saskatchewan
Huskies 48-7 in Saskatchewan on
August 30, then losing 29-14 to the
Dinosaurs in Calgary Friday.
Coach Smith finds the team's 1-1
record encouraging as he says it is
difficult to win on the road in the
WIFL.
"This is definitely a rebuilding
year as all 20 players we lost from
last year's team played regularly,"
said Smith Saturday.
Smith was quick to mention that
although they are rebuilding, this
does not mean they will not have a
good year.
Quarterback Dan Smith and
fullback Gord Penn are returning
as strong threats while third-year
middle-linebacker Kevin Konar
promises to continue his solid
leadership on defence.
Other returnees include linemen
Doug Biggerstaff, Rick Faoro,
Mike Moore, Kevin Chin and Mgrk
Wald, defensive backs Al Chorney,
Marsh MacLeod and Craig Miller,
tight end Chris Davies, and flander
and kicker Gary Metz.
Smith says none of the WIFL
teams can be taken lightly but he
has great respect for Calgary, which
has 35 players returning from last
year's squad.
Other teams are not faced with
the situation in Vancouver. UBC
must compete with Simon Fraser
University for football prospects
and SFU, because it doesn't play in
the WIFL, can offer scholarships to
their prospects. WIFL teams can't
do this.
Middle linebacker Konar said
Saturday he believes the team still
has a good chance to win the WIFL
title.
He said UBC has a lot of good
players in key positions and a lot of
good young players are moving up
to help balance the team.
He admits that, expecially in the
Calgary game, they are making
mistakes but he thinks these can be
corrected.
Fullback Penn is off to another
fine year. In the Saskatchewan
game he gained 114 yards on 16
carries while scoring three touchdowns on runs of 43, 10 and 10
yards.
Tailback John ManKay, a
transfer from Wenatchee Junior
College, could be exciting to watch.
He rushed for 120 yards on 10
carries against the Huskies and ran
for one touchdown against
Calgary.
In the season's first home game,
UBC hosts the University of
Manitoba Bisons (0-1) this
Saturday at 2 p.m. in Thunderbird
Stadium.
**$N*
Take a freshman to lunch
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Football 'Birds fall to Dinosaurs
CALGARY (CUP) -- The UBC
Thunderbirds are still jinxed in
McMahon Stadium, which has
become one of their unluckiest
stops in the Western Intercollegiate
Football League.
Quarterback Caryll Moir passed
for two touchdowns and scored two
others himself as the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs defeated the T-
Birds 29-14 Friday.
The rematch of the 1977 WIFL
championship failed miserably as a
sequal to the classic confrontation
of a year ago, with Calgary building
an irretrievable early lead with 16
unanswered   first  quarter  points.
The 'Birds lost both their games
at McMahon last year.
Dinos rookie place kicker Tony
Kuchera opened the scoring
midway through the opening
session by booting a 32-yard field
goal, his fifth successful try in as
many attempts this season.
Less than five minutes later
Calgary capped a march of 57 yards
with a 25-yard touchdown strike
from Moir to slotback Grant
Newell, converted by Kuchera.
The T-Birds were unable to
mount a drive following the
kickoff, and on a third-down punt,
the Dinos were on their way in
again. On the first play from
scrimmage, flanker John Tietzen
made a spectacular catch to move
the reptiles 40 yards to the UBC
four-yard Une, only to have QB
Moir fumble on the next play.
Two plays later, UBC running
back John MacKay coughed up the
SPORTS
ball to return the favor, with the
Dinos taking over on the thirteen.
On the last play of the quarter,
Moir found Newell with a short
look-in for another major.
Kuchera's convert attempt was
blocked.
The Thunderbirds chalked up
their first points early in the second
quarter, taking advantage of a
Calgary turnover and a penalty.
Punter Gord Efer, facing a strong
UBC rush, opted to run, but was
caught on his own 24-yard line.
On second down and goal to go
from the 18, Calgary was called for
pass interference in the end zone,
giving UBC first and goal from the
one. John MacKay punched the
ball over on the next play, and Gary
Metz converted.
Neither club was able to maintain
a drive for the rest of the half,
which ended with the Dinosaurs
leading 16-7
The Thunderbird's first half
woes were well reflected in the
statistics. Known primarily as a
passing quarterback, Dan Smith
completed only three of 11 attempts
for 25 yards, while his counterpart
completed eight of 12 for 120 yards
and two touchdowns. Calgary also
had 83 yards rushing and a net of
185, while UBC collected 57 rushing
and a net of 75.
Smith's statistics proved very
little in the final 30 minutes, but
this was due more to the inability of
his receivers to make even easy
receptions rather than his inability
to deliver the mail.
The Dinos went ahead 22-7 early
in the third quarter, taking the
opening kick-off and moving 75
yards in 11 plays for the touchdown.
Calgary kept mostly to the
ground with an attack spiced with
passes of 12 and 22 yards to tight
end Richard Buckley. Moir finally
carried the ball himself from one
yard out. An attempt af a two-point
conversion on a pass from Moir to
fullback Gord Goodwin failed.
Later in the quarter Calgary
started a march for their fourth
major of the night, initiated by a 33-
yard punt return by Jim Henkyns.
With a facemasking penalty tacked
onto  the   return,   the   Dinosaurs
Test your sports knowledge
Test your sports trivia
knowledge.   Answers   at   bottom.
1. Name the Heisman trophy
winners who have been inducted to
the pro football hall of fame.
2. Name three pitchers currently
paying in the National League who
have won the American League Cy
Young award.
3. Who won the Calder trophy
for rookie of the year when Bobby
Hull broke into the National
Hockey League?
4. Who scored the first NHL goal
Join the sports staff
Sportswriters are needed to cover
all sorts of events. No experience is
necessary, and this is a fine opportunity to learn the cliche-ridden
style of sportswriting. People are
expecially encouraged to write up
women's sports. In the interest of
objective journalism, students are
not allowed to cover a team to
which they belong.
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A
tit
scrimmaged from the Thunderbird
18. Five running plays got the
Dinos pay dirt, with Moir again
carrying the ball in himself from the
one. Kuchera kicked the convert to
put Calgary ahead 29-7.
UBC closed the gap to 29-14
midway through the final quarter,
recovering a fumble on the Calgary
31-yard line and covering the
distance in four plays. Chris Davies
scored on an eight-yard pass from
Smith, with Metz covering.
Statiscally, the Dinos managed
18 first downs, the 'Birds 11. Moir
was good on 11 of 18 pass attempts
for 153 yards, while Smith connected on 11 of 30 for 81 yards.
Calgary had 212 yards rushing to
UBC's 108, and had a net offence
of 339 compared to 182.
Pat McCune rushed for 97 yards
on 20 carries, and Gord Goodwin
for 60 on 12 carries. Gord Penn of
UBC collected 92 yards on 16
carries.
Calgary's John Tietzen and
Grant Newell gained 63 and 54
yards respectively on 3 catches
each, while the Thunderbirds' Chris
Davies picked up 39 yards on 4
receptions.
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against Tony Esposito? Who was
he playing for?
5. Name the active major league
pitcher with the highest number of
career wins.
6. Name the only world driving
champion to win the title
posthumously.
7. What do the following B.C.
Lions players have in common:
Paul Seale, Pat daridge, Greg
Findlay, Dave Golinsky, Paul
Giroday?
8. What player did the
Philadelphia Flyers trade away to
acquire Rick MacLeish?
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THE      UBYSS1Y
Tuesday, September 12,  1978
Old folks
are popular
Are you afraid of growing old?
It so, you're in the minority,
according to a recent UBC poll.
A study conducted by the
psychology department during the
summer showed that most people
hold a positive attitude towards
aging and the elderly.
The department is gathering
information on attitudes of different age groups toward old age,
under the leadership of Dr. E.I.
Signori.
Signori said Monday he
discovered that attitudes towards
aging are not based on gender and
vary with age groups.
His results came from 1,000
people between the ages of 14 and
90 in the Lower Mainland and
throughout Canada who filled out a
questionnaire during the summer.
In an earlier study held last year,
elderly people outlined their needs
and wants, citing finances as their
first priority.
Other areas of concern for the
elderly were accommodation,
loneliness and contact with the
world. The politics of aging rated
twelfth in priority, before mental
competence and sexual activity.
Besides Signori's survey, the
psychology   department   held   18
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different studies on prejudice
against the elderly in employment
areas, he said.
Signori added that his survey had
inspired additional research at the
U. of Windsor on chQdrens' attitudes towards aging, to determine
the origin of prejudices.
Signori said that he was heartened by the results of attitudes
from the elderly and the general
population.
The study on attitudes is
scheduled for presentation in mid-
October at the Canadian
Association on Gerontology in
Edmonton, Alberta.
Signori said the UBC findings
will eventually be passed on to the
federal government to "give the
policy makers a better picture of
how we all feel about aging and the
elderly."
Signori said in the year 2000 there
will be a projected three million
Canadians 65 years old or over and
our positive attitudes at this point
could certainly help in the future.
PUBLIC
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AT THE AMS
and dance
Sept. 14th   4:30 p.m.
Between S.U.B. and Aquatic  Centre
Reasonable Prices for Food and Drink
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600 West Broadway
873-4571 Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
Wheelchair
speedster
sets record
Wheelchair athlete Peter Colistro
endured a 20-mile marathon
around the UBC campus June 27 at
a record pace of 1:59:56.
He beat his 1977 effort by more
than 15 minutes.
Colistro raised about $2,000 in
pledges to aid other disabled
athletes.
Before the gruelling one-man
race against the clock began,
Colistro was confident of beating
his previous mark.
"Sure, I'll do it. The only think
that bothers me is all the people
pointing out things like how hot it
is," he said.
"That doesn't help at all."
To break the old mark, Colistro
had to maintain a pace better than
10 m.p.h. in uncomfortable 22
degree heat.
Colistro is a world record holder
in the 800 metre wheelchair race,
and broke two B.C. records in
B.C.'s Physically Disabled Games
in June.
PETER COLISTRO speeds to new
wheelchair marathon record as
trainer runs alongside, trying hard
to keep up.
Chlorine ODs, illicit plunge mar pool opening
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC finally has a new indoor
pool, and it's open if you want to
take a chance on going there.
Former students who have
shelled out $5 a year for the past
few years won't get any special
considerations.
And during the past month some
students have experienced acute eye
irritation from swimming in the
pool, and three students were
forcibly ejected.
The pool opened on Sept. 5, and
during its first: week of operation
was the cause of eye irritation for
more than half a dozen UBC
students, according to a student
health services doctor.
Dr. C.A. Brumwell, assistant
director and physician at student
health services, said Monday that
the pH level in the pool had crept
up quite a bit. "Some of them (the
students) were quite uncomfortable," he said.
According to Brumwell, this is
not the first time something like this
has happened. From time to time
Empire pool has also experienced
this severe pH imbalance, but it is
uncommon, he added.
The reason for the imbalance was
a pump that was too small, according to pool manager Jim
Bremner.
Eye irritation was not the only
disturbance at the pool this month.
A group of three students and
alumni decided they were going to
take an unscheduled dip before the
pool was due to open to the public.
The pool was being rented by the
Association of Commonwealth
Universities, which was holding a
convention on campus. Dave
Williams, a student who participated in the unauthorized dip,
said he went into the pool because
he wanted to lend support to a
friend who had contributed his $5
yearly for the pool fund and wanted
to take a swim.
Williams said his friend, Allan
Cox, could not wait for the pool to
open because he was leaving for
France before the scheduled
opening.
So   Williams,   Cox   and   Don
Andrews decided to take the
plunge, said Williams. On Aug. 25,
at about 5:30 p.m., they walked
past the pool entrance, went into
the changing rooms and then dove
into the pool. This was only after
asking for permission to swim in
the pool and being refused.
Williams said he was soon met by
what he described as a reasonable
lifeguard who suggested that the
swimmers remove themselves
because the campus police had been
contacted.
Andrews and Williams left the
-pool, but Cox decided to take his
chances and stay, said Williams.
As he and Andrews left for the
showers. Williams said two large
lifeguards dove in after Cox had
again refused to leave the pool.
Williams said when he returned
from the changing rooms, he saw
Cox being physically restrained by a
lifeguard.
After Cox was released he had to
be stopped from hitting the
lifeguard, Williams said.
Williams, Cox and Andrews then
left the pool, he said.
Pool manager Jim Bremner said
the people involved in this incident
were quite belligerent and had no
right to be in the pool.
Bremner also said that there will
be no special deals for students
who have contributed to the pool
fund and have now graduated.
He said the rationale for this
move is that other contributers,
including the federal and provincial
governments, would also have to be
offered reduced rates.
Student contributions to the pool
fund amount to $925,000 out of
the $5.4 million total cost. This
contribution is being funded by a
yearly student fee levy of $5, which
will probably continue into the mid-
1980's.
The fee was instituted in October, 1972, and was originally
designed to cover an original
projected cost of $2.8 million.
The aquatic centre contains the
new covered pool, Empire Pool, a
fitness testing centre, a sauna, a
whirlpool and several diving
platforms and diving boards.
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10% Discount on all
cash pick-up orders Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12, 1978
w^ve hatched
a better idea*
A better idea that you can be part of!
The B.C, Teachers Credit Union is now
conveniently located on the U.B.C. campus
offering complete banking facilities
for all your financial needs.
In addition to the usual chequing
services, there are personal loans and
mortgages with no prepayment penalties,
and our "Plan 24" savings account where
interest is paid on the minimum daily balance.
Hours will fit just about everybody's schedule as
the University Branch is open Tuesdays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on
Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Of course anyone can be a member whether
they're a student, a campus employee or a
member of the faculty.
For more information, drop into the
University Branch at 2150 Western Parkway in the
University Village — Where they're making a
good idea even better!
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
BMlSHCOLUtl&A
B.C. Teachers ^-t-tjw
Credit Union   L *1?L 'J Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
New fare costly
From page 1
(the fare increase) and we believe
they can't," he said.
"As citizens of this province, as
taxpayers, and as users of the
transit system, we have the right to
demand that B.C. Hydro open its
books to the public and justify both
the fare increases and service
cutbacks," he said.
Eriksen added that the increased
fare will reduce the number of bus
users and this reduction will be used
as justification for further cutbacks
in service.
He accused B.C. Hydro of trying
to phase out public transit.
The coalition also argues that
decreased use of the transit system
resulting from the fare hike will
lead to an increase in the use of
private cars and will end up costing
the public more in the form of
road building and maintenance,
traffic policing, and higher costs
for alternative transportation.
The coalition's problems so far
include keeping up to the demand
for promissary notes, as well as
hesitance on the part of commuters
to use the notes or to fil them out
wiht their real names and addresses.
Another problem is the public
confuses   the   coalition   with   the
Coalition Against Fare Increases,
an anarchist group which has been
using disruptive tactics to fight the
increase.
Art Griffin on the United Church
of Canada blasted the media for
connecting the two organizations.
"This (CAFHSC) is a responsible
response to an irresponsibe increase
- we are not anarchists," he said.
Another member of the
coalition, the UBC Alma Mater
Society, is carrying on the protest in
another way. On Aug. 16 the
Student Representative Assembly
voted to sell its $25,000 B.C. Hydro
bond and inform the corporation
that the action is a protest against
the fare hike.
But the main hopes of the
coalition .are pinned on the
promissary note campaign, and
they have no intention of giving up
for some time to come.
John Doherty of the B.C.
Students' Federation has declared:
"We will continue this campaign
next week, the week after, and will
continue until we get a response
from B.C. Hydro."
Kate Andrew, AMS external
affairs officer, added "protesters
must remember to be cool and
polite."
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The UJB.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE
U.B.C. Skydiving Club
Demonstration Jump
Thursday, Sept. 14-1:00 p.m.
South Playing Field by
the Winter Sports Centre
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
ASSEMBLY AGENDA
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1978
SUB 206 — 6:00 p.m.
1. PRESIDENTS RESIGNATION
2. MINUTES — S.R.A.
— S.R.A. Committees
— S.A.C.
— S.A.C. Committees
3. REPORTS AND CORRESPONDENCE — Committees
— Board and Senate
— Officers
— Constituencies
4. DISCUSSION OF VOC DISPUTE
(Unfabled automatically from April 26/78 meeting)
5. DISCUSSION ON FEE REFERENDUM
6. MOVED PAM ROSENGREN, SECONDED
That John Olesen be appointed'to the Men's Athletic Committee
7. MOVED JOHN DEMARCO, SECONDED
That a person be hired by the executive as soon as possible to organize and, if
possible, implement by September 18 a limited bus service to and from UBC at a fare of 35c,
under the direction of SHAC. The person shall be paid at the rate of an AUCE Clerk I under
terms decided by SHAC. A budget of $1,000 shall be allocated for this project from the
Special Projects Fund, including the salary of the organizer. In the event that SHAC Is unable
to meet, its functions for the purpose of this motion shall be carried out by the executive.
8. OTHER BUSINESS
9. ADJOURNMENT
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INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
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you are studying in Canada.
The UNIVERSITY HEALTH AND ACCIDENT PLAN provides a comprehensive health
insurance coverage at the lowest possible rates.
CHECK THE BENEFITS BELOW
HOSPITAL BENEFITS-
MEDICAL, SURGICAL &
DIAGNOSTIC BENEFITS
— pays the full daily ward rate for
hospitalization plus out-patient and
emergency benefits
— pays the full Provincial Medical
Association schedule of fees
EXTENDED HEALTH CARE —up to $5,000 for expenses for the following services:
— prescription drugs (in case of sickness $1.50 deterrent fee deducted)
— private duty nursing
— semi or private hospital room
— chiropractor
— physiotherapist
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TO 12 MONTHS FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1978 TO AUGUST 31, 1979.
PREMIUM RATES
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12,  1978
Women lose dean
From page 3
been  less than  honest  with  the
students and does not have women
students'   interests   close   to   its
heart," she said.
Andrew is also angry about the
change because there are few
enough women with prestigious
titles on campus as it is, which
means there are few role models for
women students.
"Although in real terms the
office will be carrying out the same
functions, it is important that there
is that kind of high-level published
position that people can look to,
that they can depend on that they
can turn to for advice and advocacy," she said.
"It (the change) is going to
weaken their ability to function by
taking away the glossy
title." Once the change was
made, education lecturer Lorette
Wools ey was appointed acting
director and the job was advertised
in the Vancouver Sun, the Vancouver Province and the Toronto
Globe and Mail.
Andrew said the position should
also have been advertised in
University Affairs, a publication
read by many professors and
university staff members across
Canada. She said that it is important that qualified academics be
reached and is not convinced all
possible candidates were alerted
because of the limited advertising.
The committee has narrowed the
search down to four candidates.
There were five, but one, described
by Andrew as "a very fine can-
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Scientists from all nations are
flocking to this tiny island kingdom
to observe the annual mass
migration of hairy puce blorgs
down to the sea. A prominent
biologist has optimistically
predicted a record number of
suicides this year at the Point Grape
cliffs.
No one knows why blorgs rush to
the cliffs at the end of the summer
months. No one really cares. But
rush they do, in spite of all obstacles placed in their way by the
government of Pango Pango, the
administrators of the cliffs, and the
strident warnings of the Daily Blat,
a local newspaper.
didate" accepted another position.
The four candidates, including
Woolsey, will be interviewed
Thursday.
According to one source, Vogt
has more or less promised Woolsey
the job and this alarms Andrew.
"She's a very nice, very competent person as far as I'm concerned and I have a great deal of
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respect for her personally," Andrew said.
"I think Lorette Woolsey is a
very fine candidate but I want this
to be a thoroughly democratic and
open competition. I think she
(Woolsey) does too."
Andrew said Woolsey's term as
acting director will end as soon as
the appointment is made.
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Sir Denys Wilkinson
A physicist of international repute, Sir Denys Wilkinson is also Chancellor of the
University of Sussex in England. His research in physics, especially nuclear and
elementary particle research, has gained him many awards and honors. His most
recent work has been concerned with determining the structure of a nucleus and
the radioactive decay of a nucleus. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society and was
knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1974.
WHAT IS THE ATOMIC NUCLEUS MADE OF?
Thursday, September 14     In Hebb Theatre, at 1,2:30 p m.
F. Denys Richardson
Dr. Denys Richardson founded the Nuffield Research Croup in Extraction Metallurgy
at the Royal School of Mines, Imperial College of Science and Technology in 1950 and
is now professor emeritus and senior research fellow at that institute. He is among the
foremost metallurgists in the world, centering his research on the thermodynamics and
kinetics of metallurgical processes. His ability to relate metallurgy to other branches
of science and society makes him an excellent speaker.
METALS IN SOCIETY - NEEDS, PRESSURES, PROBLEMS
Thursday, September 21     In Room 250, Chemistry Building, at 12:30 p.m.
Owen
Owen Barfield has had a far-reaching impact on the humanities in our time, as both a
writer and a literary critic. His Saving the Appearances, Worlds Apart and other books
have explored the relationships between science, religion, philosophy, history —
almost the breadth of human thought. Owen Barfield, now 80, continues to explore
new patterns of thought after his careers as lawyer/writer and literary critic from his
home in Kent, England.
MODERN IDOLATRY: THE SIN OF LITERALNESS
Thursday, October 12 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE FORCE OF HABIT
Tuesday, October 17 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
HISTORY OF IDEAS: EVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUSNESS
Saturday, October 14 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
Richard Meier
A professor of environmental design at the University of California at Berkeley,
Richard Meier was educated as a chemist. He was exposed to policy planning as a
member of a group concerned with advanced weapons policies following World War
II. From there he has evolved into one of the foremost urban planners in North
America.His concern with resource-conserving urbanism and the relationship between
technology and development have taken him all over the globe.
THE CONSERVER CITY - SOCIAL EFFECTS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY
Saturday, November 18      In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
THE FUTURE OF ASIAN CITIES
Tuesday, November 21        In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
COMMUNITY ECOLOGY AND THE URBANIZATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thursday, November 23     In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCED
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund Tuesday, September 12, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
%n the ueusszy n-7$,0N6N the barbarian travelled from the
KINGloM  of CHOCK  THROUGH  THE MouHTAlfi/S  To   THE FABLED ToWER OF THE
FOUR EyES, (J HERE THE DWINDLING TRIBES OF  TECH-RATS   HELD  OUT AGAINST
THE    MASSACRES   AMD   KNOWLEDGE-BURNINGS OF THE DEGENERATE  KINGS —
BUT   WHAT   WAS ON Aft DoiNG IN CHUCK, SO FAR FRdhj HIS NfYriVE SlMMltARlA^
AND THAT NATI6N*S ETERNAL  WAR   WITH GoNZX>R?THlS NEVE&JO-BE-ANSWERED
QUESTION  BEG/NS  THE
:he journey qf
»T GROWS DMttC WITH A SILENCER
So DEEP IT COM PELLS   LISTENING
THE Surf P»ESaO|£T WHILE THE
RED OF BUX*>y AMD ^AWESOME,
BATTLE-   RAGES   XfcCRo&S
THE Storms AS,
THOUGH THE KOLd^^y s^T U>0K TOO LONG AND HORJ
(LAOST   «^n^R^W?5l^l\ r&°* E3E55LVSTEKTOO LONG
" A^^Jou'LU
EAR UES
ue.(CNAN
IT lSGOME.*M»GH
WATCH SELDOM   4
3RlNGSGooI> ^WST
F£ARTHE T>ARK.
X LOOK EVERY-
ERE FbRT^AHGEe
SEE NOTHIN
AUE. THERE ARE PUTTS, STEAV-THJ
SWORDS  THAT ARE WlBDEM
8EHIND "TOE DARKLESS.
N\OHT AWAITS THE END OF
tND DEATH A\
ONUJ THE PARANOID CAN DISCOVER
DANGER WHERE NONE IS SEEN.
feVO\-V&- SMOKE OF KENNING, FbR
 *      HAVE NEED OF n5 BaWER/
.JHEH ASKED WHAT |F AUL~
.    WERE -DESTROYED SAVE ONE,
\a»SE MEN SAIT) *HE WOULfc THE?
MjOnE-AWD 1NSAME.'
SPEAK, FOOL, ABPUSE ifctfR WORDS  TOj
^        PLANT SEEPS OF SECRET
oUBT itf  MS MU
AT WILL BE CAS9, FOR. T
SEE   Fl/RRoWS DEEP
A»JI> WELL-MARKED.
iEN  WHAT iF ALL N ATI or
fyERE DESTROYED SAve ONE?.
TRUE.
r JEN THE- MADIA AN WOULD  WEM.
\}E CROWN. *1D THE KiMG THE FboL'SJ
/NAVl, fad THEN T^— r CoDPi £CE
NWOULD BE ^00, AMD 9e*> ME, AND AU-
woutpbeoppositc wh/tt it seeks.
£UCH REASON  IS TRULi
MADNESS.
t*
73 B£ C0NTIHV£D..* Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 12, 1978
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