UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128595.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128595.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128595-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128595-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128595-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128595-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128595-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128595-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128595-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128595.ris

Full Text

Array «e>- *.»*ic;»«
Council passes belated judgment on election
By BERTON WOODWARD
Student council decided
Wednesday night that the Aim a
Mater Society executive election
held earlier in the day was a valid
exercise in democracy.
The question arose in the
council meeting after a motion
was approved declaring
"undemocratic" the- AMS
constitution clause that
disallowed the Young Socialist
club from running a slate in the
election.
A resolution was moved on
behalf of the Young Socialists
asking council to declare the
election invalid.
Ineligible YS presidential
candidate and AMS
ombudswoman Joan Campana
stated that if council was to have
any consistency it should follow
the theoretical stand with action.
AMS president Grant Burnyeat
maintained that it is not council
but    student    court    that   must
X
^S
decide on election irregularities.
Council   sided  with Burnyeat
15-7.
Then, in an apparent effort to
remain consistent with that
decision, most of the same
members voted to rescind an
eligibility committee ruling
allowing YS to run candidates in
—
the second-slate elections Feb. 9.
Campana stalked out of the
meeting calling council "an
absurd, gutless body."
In other business, council
approved implementation of a
plan to set up a guaranteed
income formula to finance
undergraduate societies, based on
a $200 grant plus 40 cents for
.\v
Vol. Llll, No. 45      VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1972
each student enrolled in the
previous year. However, an
amendment also passed making
implementation dependent on
student approval of the $5 fee
increase Feb. 9.
External affairs officer Adrian
Belshaw told* council an
application has been made to the
federal Local Initiatives Program
for a grant of $22,795 to employ
11 people to repair and build
trails in the University
Endowment Lands and add steps
to three trails leading to Spanish
Banks beach.
He said council will know in
another week whether the
application is accepted.
Ticker tape campaign wins
—garry gruenke photo
WHO THE HELL wants ticker tape? This is loads of fun, say ballot-counters Pat Friesen, ed. 5, and Dave Elviss, arts 3. Selfless volunteers
unstuffed more than 20,000 ballots tabulating Students' Coalition victory, attained with support of less than 10 per cent of student population.
By SANDY KASS
Ticker tapes around the world
won an overwhelming victory
Wednesday with the election of
the Students' Coalition slate to
four Alma Mater Society
executive positions.
A total of 1,872 spoiled ballots
was recorded in the election, but
returning officer Andrea Smith
said she could not determine if
this was a result of the Young
Socialist ballot write-in campaign.
Members of the YS slate
decided to hold the write-in
campaign when they were
declared ineligible to run as
members of a club constituted
under the university clubs
committee.
Elected were: Doug Aldridge,
engineering 4, president; Sally
Clark, arts 1, secretary; Lynne
Phillips, arts 2, internal affairs;
and Teri Ball, agriculture 2,
external affairs.
They defeated Human
Government candidates Svend
Robinson 1,889 votes to 1,244
for president, Garth Sundeen
1,974 votes to 1,455 for
secretary, Keith Richardson 1,824
votes to 1,548 for internal affairs,
and Penny Newman 1,866 votes
to 1,540 for external affairs.
Independent presidential
candidate Fred Ferdman, grad
studies 9, received 532 votes in
the election in which 3,974
people voted.
Aldridge said the ticker tape
idea for the running of elections
suggested by Clark is a vast
improvement in present AMS
election policy and added it is one
of the Students' Coalition
priorities.
"But I believe the Coalition
won because students still believe
the administration isn't out to
screw them," he said.
When asked why the Students'
Coalition won, AMS president
Grant Burnyeat replied: "Because
they got the most votes."
Robinson said: "Students'
priorities seem to lie in ticker tape
machines, writing cute little
ditties about the Nazi Party and
entertainment columns in The
Ubyssey.
"If students want these
priorities, they got what they
asked for," he said.
Both referendums passed
overwhelmingly; 73.2 per cent of
the voters approved in principle of
the purchase of the Sub food
service and 73.7 per cent
approved the expansion of SUB. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1972
The meek, narrow minds
of our future teachers
Analysis and comment on proposed reforms in
the education faculty by Ubyssey staffer and
education student council representative Sandy
Kass.
Meek little students.
One, two, five, 20, 6,440 of them.
That's the number wandering through the halls
of the education building.
Just count 'em.
They're the ones who wander from class to
class murmuring: "Yeah, I know the B.C.
government isn't giving much money to schools, but
it will all work out in the end. If I try really hard
and meet some influential people I'm sure I'll get a
job. Besides, with all these heavy courses, I've got to
worry about passing."
They're the ones who won't protest against.
B.C. education policies because it might ruin what
chance they do have of getting a job.
They're the ones who wouldn't dream of calling
an education students' strike to support the B.C.
Teachers' Federation proposals to strike if the
Social Credit government does not rescind its
proposed law on teacher salary increases, because
the faculty just wouldn't support it.
The proposed law states that any salary
increases above a government limit have to go to a
taxpayers' referendum.
Reaction to that law from professionals in the
field has been consistently and solidly negative.
But if those professionals are counting on UBC
education students for support, they had better
look elsewhere.
Education students are busy as little beavers in
the building that doesn't sell newspapers, but
substitutes them for greeting cards at the news stand
in the basement.
Very busy, especially those on the education
students' association council.
Take the recent bubblcgum contest, for
instance, that was sponsored by the Incubus, the
education students newspaper. It really took a lot of
hard work. Oh, all those bubbles . . .
And take the hassle earlier this year over the
selling of paper to students. How much do we
charge? Where should it be sold? And when? How
many pieces to a package? Oh, such problems.
And whether students should have one box of
oranges or two to distribute at the Christmas faculty
meeting.
The list is infinite.
But the actions of EdSA president Kerry
Bysouth this week in calling an emergency council
meeting have got to be the limit.
The reason for the council meeting? Simple.
The Bentley Report, calling for curriculum
changes in the faculty, had to be discussed to know
what to say about it at today's faculty meeting. ■
Council approved it once in principle. The
report was approved again at the emergency meeting
with people making suggestions for its
improvement.
There's no question of the importance of that
report. Curriculum changes are long past due in the
faculty and it's good that students are finally taking
part in bringing those changes about.
But the isolation of education students from
the rest of the world is something which is not being
considered and won't be until students open their
eyes and discover the world doesn't end with D lot.
Until students realize this isn't a land of milk
and honey and it isn't going to change by
miraculous conception they will continue to exist
under their self-imposed oppression.
Support the B.C.T.F.? "Well, yeah, unions are
okay and all that, but if I don't join, I'll be able to
get a job for less pay from those poor broke school
boards across the province.
"And if I say I don't like the B.C. government,
well, they might not let me teach here at all.
"And I can't waste my time protesting when
I've got all these assignments due next month."
Meek little students.
All 6,440 of them enclosed in one little faculty.
Count 'em.
But don't worry if you miss a few — there's lots
more wandering around.
Whafs up, doc?
Some answers to queries received:
Are there any controlled
studies proving that Vitamin C has
side effects in large doses? Yes.
Are there any useful herbal
remedies? Yes, probably there are
many whose beneficial properties
are not realized by organized
medicine. William Withering, the
country doctor who learned from
the local wise women that
foxglove leaves would help a
failing heart, was one of the
pioneers in learning from the
people. In China today, all
medical students must study
traditional herbal medicine. We all
read how the Indians cured early
white visitors of scurvy with
spruce bark. However, most of the
remedies now available in health
food shops have been hopefully
investigated by scientists and
found wanting.
Needless to say, many
expensive prescription drugs have
also been found wanting, and the
majority of over-the-counter
remedies don't really perform the
miracles we are promised in the
TV commercials.
Should a woman stop taking
the pill after a year or two? No,
not jf it would disrupt her lite
unduly to do so. Many women in
North America have been on the
pill for five or more years without
trouble. Some Puerto Rican
women have now been taking it
for 15 years.
However, there is growing
evidence that people who stop
taking the pill may not have
normal periods for several
months, or even more than a year.
Some doctors fear prolonged use
of the pill may cause infertility.
This is something to consider if
having a baby some day is very
important to you. But remember,
many healthy babies have been
born to women who took the pill
for several years.
Contraceptive pills prevent
ovulation by tampering with the
hormone balance of the female
body. In general, doctors prefer to
use simpler methods of achieving
some therapeutic end, rather than
drugs which have many effects on
the   body.   If  a   woman  is  well
motivated and does not require
the near-perfect conception
control of hormone contraceptive
pills, she should use some other
method of contraception and
avoid all the problems of the pill
both present and future. The
diaphragm plus contraceptive jelly
is nearly as effective, although not
as convenient.
Feeling rotten? Got problems
with your body? This column,
written by someone who knows,
attempts to provide information
about aches and pains common
among students and dispel some
common   myths.
Send questions and letters to
What's Up Doc?, Room 241-K,
SUB, UBC.
MUSSOC PRESENTS...
LIVE ON STAGE!
u
fiddler
ontheRpof
Feb. 3rd - 12th
8:30 P.M.
Old Auditorium
Tickets $2.50, $3.00 at
Vancouver Ticket Centre and Outlets
Special Student Rates: $1.50
February 7 & S and Matinee
Thursday, February 10 — 12:30
Tickets available Main Floor of S.U.B.
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
777e following referendums will be voted on in conjunction with
the SECOND SLATE of AMS elections, on WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 9, 1972.
7.    Fee Referendum
Whereas the AMS fee is currently divided into a
non-discretionary $15.00 Building Fee and $9.00 Student
Activity Operating Fund levy;
and whereas the Student Council of the AMS recommends
an increase of the Student Activity Operating Fund levy;
ARE you in favour of increasing the Operating Fund levy
from $9.00 to $14.00?
2.    Constitutional Amendment
Referendum
Whereas the Student Council has recommended that certain
procedural sections of the Alma Mater Society By-Laws be
removed and placed into the Alma Mater Society Code:
ARE you in favour of the following sections being removed
from the By-Laws and placed into the Code?
By-Law 4 (2), a section dealing with the appointment of
honorary members of Student Council;
By-Law 4 (4), a section dealing with the appointment of
an Honorary President and his/her duties;
By-Law 10 (2) to 10 (7) and that is sections dealing
with the procedure for the levying of a fee upon each
member of an undergraduate society;
By-Law 11 (9) and 11 (10), that is sections dealing with
the procedure by which the Alma Mater Society Budget
shall be accepted and by which the A.M.S. Treasurer
shall deal with fees levied by Undergraduate Societies
upon their members;
By-Law 12 (1) to 12 (3), that is sections dealing with
prohibition of gambling, the irinking of intoxicating
liquors and the approval of wivertising and distribution
of materials on campus.
By-Law 14, that is a By-Law setting out the procedure
for dealing with subsidiary clubs and organizations;
And all other changes necessarily incidental to the
foregoing amendments.
Read and consider
the above referendums! Thursday, February 3,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Weak abortion reforms blasted
By MIKE SASGES
Two recent interpretations of liberalized abortion laws by North
American judges show the weakness of these reforms, a member of a
provincial pro-abortion coalition said Thursday.
"We can't be complacent in Vancouver. We can only be sure of
our position when all laws are repealed," Sharon Hager, executive
secretary of the B.C. Women's Abortion Law Repeal Coalition, said at
a discussion in the SUB clubs lounge at noon.
Hager was referring to the recent decision by an Ontario
supreme court judge to grant an injunction restraining a mother of
four children from having an abortion and another by a New York
supreme court justice granting the guardianship of all four to
24-week-old foetuses to a Roman Catholic law professor.
"These injunctions are something similar to chattel slavery,"
said Hager.
"These are attacks on a woman's right to choose her future and
it was consciously done," Hager told The Ubyssey.
The Ontario decision was branded as "barbarian" and
"stone-age" and as a step backwards in the fight for women's rights at
the discussion because the injunction was granted to the woman's
husband.
"The New York decision was an attack on working women and
the poor," said Hager. "Only municipal hospitals were banned from
giving abortions, not the private hospitals for the rich."
She said the abortion repeal movement does not try to force
itself on all women but the anti-abortion movement does.
"People such as the Catholic Women's League are trying to
force their moral views on everyone else," Hager said.
"The abortion repeal allows every woman to make up her own
mind," she said.
She said Canadian coalitions are attempting to start a petition
across the country to counter a CWL petition which is aiming for
100,000 signatures.
She also suggested that UBC women should petition for a
campus referendum on the abortion question.
On March 18, a cross country conference of repeal coalitions
will be held in Winnipeg, said Hager.
Quebec labor scored
by national CIC head
—kini mcdonald photo
LOOK MA, NO SCRUPLES, screams erstwhile student Dirk Visser as he clowns shamelessly before Ubyssey
camera. Act is thought to be manifestation of sexual identity crisis occasioned when Visser got a girls'
bicycle for his 21st birthday.
TORONTO (CUP) - The
Canadian Labor Congress appears
to be launching a holy war against
increasing solidarity and militance
of the labor movement in Quebec.
In a private speech Monday to
top congress personnel, Donald
Macdonald, president of the
national labor organization
warned of the danger of what he
described as the "clearly Marxist"
policies advocated by the Quebec
Federation of Labor and other
large trade union centrals in
Quebec.
Macdonald told CLC Quebec
organizers they would be fired if
they were to pursue such policies.
He  also  told those present that
Grape publishes from new office
Grape staffers peacefully abandoned
their two-week occupation of the Georgia
Straight office Wednesday at noon,
according to Straight owner Dan McLeod.
The move followed a B.C. supreme
court ruling Tuesday, requested last week by
McLeod, that the staffers would have to
return the Straight office and equipment to
McLeod.
The hearing, originally scheduled for
Friday and postponed to Monday and then
to Tuesday to allow Grape staff lawyer Leo
McGrady time to prepare his case, lasted all
day.
Judge John Gould, who presided at the
hearing, said although Grape staffers had
legitimate complaints they did not have the
legal right to occupy the Straight office.
He said they should have tried to settle
their grievance through legal channels.
After the ruling McGrady and McLeod's
lawyer, John Laxton, decided the injunction
would be enforced Wednesday at noon.
McLeod said Wednesday the return of
the office was uneventful.
"One of our (Georgia Straight) staffers
returned at noon and most of the Grape
staffers had already left."
The majority of McLeod's staff,
including McLeod, had not returned to the
office by 6 p.m. Wednesday.
"But we will be going there tonight to
use some equipment for producing this
week's issue of the Straight," he said.
Grape staffer Claude Jordain said
Wednesday the office was relinquished
peacefully because "we had no other choice
with an injunction demanding we leave."
Gould said the Grape staffers could
publish their own paper as long as they did
not use the name Georgia Straight or
Georgia Grape.
The evicted staffers will • continue to
publish their paper as the Grape.
Jordain said the Grape staffers have a
new office at 60 Alexander Street.
He said the only equipment they own is
a typewriter and "there are no definite
decisions as to whether more will be
purchased or rented."
McLeod also requested and was granted
remuneration for all orofits made by the
Grape staffers from sales of books and
papers, ordinarily distributed by the
Straight, made during the occupation.
But his request for an injunction against
Horizon Publications for publishing a paper
resembling the Straight was denied.
"Because Horizon published the Georgia
Grape before the court ruled that name
illegal they did not break any law so we have
no legal case against them," McLeod staffer
Brian Nation said Wednesday.
The two-week occupation by
discontented staffers protesting McLeod's
private ownership of the Georgia Straight
has resulted in much bitterness between the
two camps.
Nation reflected this bitterness, saying
he personally no longer wants to "help the
collective (Grape staffers) get started on
their own paper."
The offer to help the collective start an
alternate paper to the Straight was McLeod's
original compromise to the disagreement
over his ownership of the Straight.
anyone responsible for leaking the
proceedings of the meeting to the
public would also lose his job.
The precise wording of
Macdonald's salvo against the
235,000-member QFL - which is
officially chartered by the CLC —
has not yet filtered through.
However, in general terms what
the congress president told the
meeting was that national policies
set up by the CLC must be upheld
in preference to decisions made
on a regional level. Provincial
labor groups must either follow
the national organization's line or
get out of the CLC.
He said that while the CLC,
which is the Canadian affiliate of
the giant AFL-CIO in the U.S.,
opposed totalitarianism in all
forms, it would never support any
form of Marxism, Trotskyism or
Maoism.
There are rumors that a
number of CLC organizers in
Quebec have already been
threatened with dismissal by the
CLC hierarchy for their support
of the recent actions and
declarations of the QFL.
Early in December several of
the large labor centrals, including
the QFL and the 225,000-member
Confederation of National Trade
Unions, launched a "common
front" and advocated a general
strike in support of locked-out
workers at Montreal's La Presse.
Louis Laberge, president of the
Quebec Federation of Labor, has
emphasized in recent statements-
the need for worker and
organizational solidarity in the
struggle to build "a socialist and
democratic Quebec." That kind of
talk does not sit well with the
generally conservative CLC and
Macdonald's statements may
prove to be the first step in a
purge of the QFL from the main
body of the congress. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1972
The numbers game
If you work at it, you might recall the
Students' Coalition — though it probably remains
as unclear to you as it does to us just which
students this group claims to coalesce.
At any rate, this is the slate that took over
the AMS executive after the resignation of
Human Government, and whose term in office
has been strangely reminiscent of that of Tom
Campbell, who has sailed along on the coattails of
the Bill Rathie administration and done it badly
at that.
And this is the group that now controls half
of the AMS executive following Wednesday's
elections.
Its campaign platform consisted of improving
student services (motherhood) and installing
ticker tape voting machines (apple pie?), among
other choice items. Furthermore, the slate claims
to abhor things political, resulting in
president-elect Doug Aldridge's pathetic campaign
promise that the first priority in money
allocations will be the number of people involved
in any proposed program.
Apparently the new slate, in a doomed
attempt to prove it can be apolitical, plans to
make decisions on the basis of quantity, though it
may just as well, since we question whether
people with such a ridiculous campaign platform
are capable of grasping anything more subtle than
plain, simple numbers.
But why should we worry? If the new
executive wants to play the numbers game. The
Ubyssey's publication grant for next year will
naturally double. We do have, after all, a basic
circulation of 16,000.
We'll remember Aldridge's oromise, though,
because past executives have had an uncanny
tendency to forget the numbers game when the
subject of The Ubyssey was introduced.
Could politics have had anything to do with
it? Surely not.
And as for secretary-elect Sally Clark
(mother of the ticker tape machine) we're at a
total loss.
Her campaign statement revealed that she
wants to write a "weekly column" (in The
Ubyssey, we presume) about "the entertaining
aspects" (of student council or student
government, we presume).
We presume these things because Clark's
campaign statement was so unintelligible that a
dozen different people we questioned couldn't
make any sense at all of it.
So we doubt whether she'd be capable of
writing a 'tween classes notice, let alone a weekly
column.
But the Students' Coalition (sic) people were
only one dismal part of a dismal election. Almost
without exception, the candidates were
nonentities and their ideas (if any) were neither
good nor new.
About all we can do is place any vestiges of
hope in the second-slate elections coming up six
days from now.
LIT  A
toUNDteo
SCHftots
OF THOUGHT
COMTSMO/
You gotta be kidding
Unemployment is rampant, people are lined
up at the welfare offices, the country is going to
hell in a handbasket.
But never fear, it's UBC to the rescue.
What are we doing? Getting a Local
Initiatives Program grant, of course. How many
people will we be hiring? Fifteen, of course. What
will they be doing? Expanding UBC's
rhododendron collection, of course.
Rhododendron collection? Canada's
unemployment level is 6.2 per cent and we're
expanding our rhododendron collection?
And when the jobs of these 15 people are
done, what then? Rhododendrons don't change
the socio-economic system that gave rise to the
unemployment crisis. That's why we got the
grant.
But rhododendrons? You're kidding.
Letters
Glue
As a student interested in the
appearance and beauty of the
environment created by this
higher institute of learning, I wish
to lodge a complaint concerning
the placement of election posters.
Lunchtime is the time that I
relax and renew myself in the
Buchanan lounge — but this day
revealed such bad judgment on
the part of Students' Coalition
that this was foregone and
subsequently I am writing this
note.
What bad judgment you say?
The fact that many of this slate's
posters were glued and tacked to
places where removal will be
difficult and expensive: glass
doors, wooden doors with walnut
varnish, windows and plastered
walls. Such behavior is strange
from a group whose chief
platform was care of the
environment.
I realize that the responsibility
may not lie with individual
candidates but I had certainly
thought students at this stage
were intelligent enough to see the
consequences.
Francine Cosmos,
Arts 3.
Thumb
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 3, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Grumble, greech and squelch sickled Sandi Shreve to Paul Knox who
jumbled jargon jamblingly at Jan O'Brien. Mike Finlay snorted Laurence
Leader tunes at Berton Woodward's department store which sells Sandy
Kasses by the dozen. Ah, not so cheap, mocked Mike Sasges to Leslie
Plommer who Gruenked Garyly. Lesley Kruegered compulsively to Pat
Fitsgerald who Kini .Mcdonald's burgers barked at. Gord Gibson grumbled
all the while, quite unnoticed by Mike Gidora and Kent Spencer who
whistled while they worked.
I would like to add this letter
to the others which have been
addressed, through the Letters
section of The Ubyssey, to those
more paranoid members of our
paranoid society who don't pick
up hitchhikers.
Please, even if, as a matter of
policy, you do not pick up
hitchhikers, at least look at them.
That menacing thumb may just be
hiding a friend of yours (who may
just be getting very wet or cold or
both).
John Morris (and others, where
appropriate), please note.
Douglas E. Dent,
Arts 4.
Right on
Concerning the spectacle of
organization and group solidarity
called "engineers": Everyone as a
human being is degraded by such
blatantly sexist events as parading
a bare-breasted woman on a white
horse (what a horrible Lawrencian_
cliche) through the campus
Tuesday, encircled by hundreds of
titillated voyeurs.
I was surprised at how
old-fashioned, how anachronistic
the occasion turned out to be: I
no longer feel the impotence of
the past. Just a warning: Come
the rev, all you male chauvinist
pigs will simply be rubbed out. We
have your number.
A militant.
(Note to readers: our sources
state that the gears got the horse
for SI00 and the woman for $50.)
Chile
Re: Canada urged to follow
Chile's lead.
On Jan. 18, an article appeared
in The Ubyssey about John
Bizzell's point of view about
Chile's situation. He had visited
that country in September, 1971,
as the head delegate of the
Canadian delegation.
I was born in Chile. I came to
Canada as a landed immigrant in
the first days of January, 1969. I
still have part of my family living
there and many friends. My
knowledge of Chile causes me to
refute Bizzell's statements.
Mr. Bizzell cites a lot of figures
about the economic situation of
Chile. It appears that he came to
the conclusion that Canada and
Chile have much in common. I
feel that he is completely wrong.
It is impossible to understand the
economic situation of any
country after being there as a
visitor for only a few days. One
should not place confidence in the
official figures given to tourists by
the Chilean government and the
political parties supporting the
present government.
In 1966, the president, Mr. E.
Frei, signed a contract with the
copper mines (i.e., Andes Copper
Mining, Kennecott Copper, etc.)
obtaining 51 per cent of the
shares for the Chilean
government. The outstanding 49
per cent was left to the mining
companies. The mining companies
retained their technical
administrations. That point was
guaranteed by a contract between
the two parties. The mining
industries before 1966 had to pay
a heavy tax to exploit the copper.
The miners had adequate housing,
hospitals, schools, and other
fringe benefits. No other group of
workers had ever had such good
facilities.
Also the mining companies
were constantly contributing and
improving these facilities, with
X-ray installation, hospital beds,
etc., all over the country.
Whenever    there   was"   a   public
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from ail readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed. Thursday, February 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
calamity (like flood, earthquake,
etc.) they were ready to help the
victims.
Therefore, it is ridiculous to
charge the companies with taking
out money and impoverishing the
country. Similarly it is untrue that
Chile is the most impoverished
country in South America. Before
Allende took over the
government, and starting in 1925,
the late president Arturo
Alessandri gave the country the
first social security laws. In 1952,
president Gonzales gave the
workmen better protection still.
Under president Ibanez, the
workmen obtained family
assistance, minimum wages and
other benefits. In all these years
wages and salaries were adjusted
to make them higher than the
inflation rate.
Under president Jorge
Alessandri, it became law to
expropriate any parcel of land of
more than 80 hectares (197.6
acres)    which    was    not    well
exploited. The present
government started to take over
any such large portions of land,
whether it was well worked or
not, therefore, now there is no
legal protection with regard to the
tenure of land in Chile.
Something similar occurred
lately in Chilean industry. The
textiles industry was taken away
from its legitimate owner who
worked very hard and for long
years and greatly improved the
standard of production.
Production is lower now than ever
before. Politics and politicians are
at the present time apparently
more important than production
and technology.
Many people did leave Chile:
not because they are bad Chileans,
but because they cannot accept
an economic dictatorship which
ignores the basic rights of the
people and only burdens them
with duties with which they
cannot comply.
For example, the government
wanted increased production,
because a 40 per cent increase in
wages and salaries pushed up the
demand for merchandise. On the
other hand, taxes went up.
Therefore, it was impossible to
maintain low prices, a situation
which would destroy the
economic basis of any enterprise.
Any economist understands that
the economies of different
countries must be considered
individually.
But the relationship between
tax-payers and tax receivers must
be friendly, otherwise confidence
in the actions of the government
is destroyed, with the obvious
consequences.
I believe that if Canada applied
present Chilean economic laws to
Canada, the country would be
bankrupt in a short time. Our
present high standard of living
would be converted into extreme
poverty.
Jacqueline Bick,
Home Ec1.
'What election?9
Here's English grad student
David Schendlinger doing it to us
again.
"Take it to food services," we
cracked when he walked in with
his latest piece of garbage.
He wouldn 't. So here it is.
The student election yesterday
at Peon U., the poor people's
school, ended in a shutout, with
incumbent Government
Non-action Union (GNU), which
decided to stand or fall on its
sense of humor.
"It should be perfectly obvious
that the bigger a donut's hole is,
the more donut you need to get
all the way around it. Therefore,
we want food service to stand pat
on donut holes, or maybe even
make them bigger."
\\ VOTE TOR ME
;' MEAMS ft Bf ER
a&i
■ Oja
IF   I VMS OUUMK RT TIC time,   I    5JPME   I P   VOTE   Foi?   NoU  , Too !
all major slates and all
independents polling no votes. It
was the closest election in recent
years. Recounts are now
underway.
The campaign was bitterly
contested. So much mud slinging,
arm twisting, fibbing, name
calling, using naughty words,
sticking out tongues, and giving
pinkbellies hadn't been seen since
the last rugby game between the
faculties of law and home
economics.
Food service caused some of
the most heated debates,
particularly on the question of the
size of the holes in the donuts. In
the final pre-election debate,
Ralph Nieblitz, presidential
candidate on the Armadillo
Student Slate (ASS), said the
donut holes were too big.
"You pay for a donut, and you
get all this air," he declared.
"The Armadillo Slate will see
to it that they put the nut back in
the donut."
"Elect him and you'll put the
nut back in government," quipped
Rodney   Switnik,   head   of   the
"What does Pat have to do
with this anyway?" queried
Alistair Wisnowski, ASS
vice-presidential candidate. "And
how can standing her on a donut
hole solve the pressing problems
of government which our
opponents have been ignoring or
smoke-screening for lo, these
many  months?  It  is  clear that
Government Non-action has tried
to substitute minstrel shows and
cow-chip diplomacy for debate of
the issues."
"Oh yeah?" retorted GNU
secretary candidate Jean-Claude
MacKenzie.
Meanwhile, we asked Hugo
Ferrara, independent candidate
running for president on a
know-nothing platform, what he
thought on the donut hole
question: "I don't know," he
answered. On the question of
whether to go ahead with the
proposed $28.6 million shopping
centre complex in the basement
of the Student Union Building, or
to raze the building to provide
more pasturage for the agriculture
faculty's dairy herd, he said,
"Student Union Building?" On his
chances in the election, he said,
"Election?"
Asked for a summation of their
platforms, the presidential
candidates gave these statements:
Ralph Nieblitz (ASS): "More
participation, more democracy,
more government, quieter toilets
in the library, no more water
spots on the cafeteria teaspoons,
end of the war in Fiji, bigger
donuts and smaller holes!"
Rodney Switnik (GNU):
"More elections, less campaigning,
less nose-picking in class, no more
empty towel containers in
washrooms, less crabgrass in the
lawns, end pollution and the arms
race, bigger donuts with bigger
holes!"
Hugo Ferrara (independent):
"Could you repeat the question?"
AKIRA KUROSAWA'S MASTERPIECE
RASHOMON p   m
HEBB THEATRE UBC
7:30 & 9:30pm
Fri Feb 3 Sat Feb 4
admisson 75 cents
Avocado
Well, The Ubyssey has finally
succeeded in writing a totally
uninformed, deliberately biased,
inflammatory article which
threatens the very basis of
Western society.
As president of the Friends of
Avocado League, I have been
nominated to publicly repudiate
the blasphemous statements
contained in a recent editorial,
entitled Arrghhh. The view
presented is all too common
among a narrow-minded populace
which fails to consider avocadoes
in their own right.
Such adherence to outdated,
middle-class attitudes can hardly
be expected of The Ubyssey, a
supposedly progressive newspaper.
As a life-long student of the
avocado, I can firmly state that
the avocado has many delightful,
enticing qualities — backed by a
firm, moral stand on issues of the
day. This insouciance, combined
with a core of purity, has caused
we of the League to press for
greater understanding and
acceptance of the avocado by all
members of society, at all levels of
government. (Anyone wishing to
join the society, send three
avocado pits, plus 35 cents, to
Friends of Avocado League, c/o
Lost and Found, SUB). Avocadian
friends, unite!
Power to the Avocado!
Lyn Harper, Arts 1,
Pres.,F.A.L.
MOTOR
PROBLEMS?
kC>
Get it fixed by
the experts . . .
* Factory Trained
Mechanics
* Fully Guaranteed
Work
* Reasonable Rates
VW, Volvo, Mercedes,
BMW and Porsche
gMvh
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720- 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
i FRI. &SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. -SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m..
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
(Formerly McArthur College of Education)
QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY
AT KINGSTON, ONTARIO
Applications to the Faculty of Education, Queen's
University, are being invited from university graduates
throughout Canada. The eight month program leads to a
Bachelor of Education degree and basic teacher
certification at the secondary level; additionally, an
elementary option is available.
Now in its fourth year of operations, the Faculty of
Education features the following conditions:
(1) An emphasis on the human dimension in education;
(2) A forward-looking program, in line with current and
emergent educational needs;
(3) Considerable flexibility in candidates' program design;
(4) Continuous assessment (de-emphasizing term
examinations) consistent with the stress on personal
and professional development;
(5) Participation of candidates in administration and
planning of the Faculty of Education;
(6) Unexcelled facilities in the new academic-residential
complex, Duncan McArthur Hall.
Applicants must already hold an undergraduate degree
or be eligible for graduation by September 1972. Elements
emphasized in the selection of teacher candidates include
professional motivation, academic competence, and
communication skills. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3,  1972
Hot flashes
Anf i-war act ion
this weekend
The Vietnam Action
Committee has scheduled an
anti-war action conference in
Vancouver this weekend.
Among the guest speakers will
be Robert Scheer, editor of
Ramparts Magazine, Barry
Weisberg, author of Ecocide in
Indochina and Roger Yockey,
member of the U.S. National
Peace Action Coalition.
Sheer, who will address the
conference, recently returned
from an Asian tour. He is the
author of How the U.S. got
involved in Vietnam, a
documentary of the U.S. role in
Asia.
Barry Weisberg will speak on
Ecocide and Nixon's Permanent
War while Yockey will tackle
Inflation, The War and The Wage
Price Freeze.
Dennis Cocke, New
Democratic Party MLA for Surrey
will speak at the conference panel
discussion. His contribution will
deal with the nature and extent of
Canada's supporting  role  in the
U.S. war machine.
The conference will evolve into
workshops to discuss and plan
spring action and will be held at
Chown Memorial Church, 3519
Cambie Street from 1 to 5 p.m.,
Saturday and Sunday.
Sino dictionary
The Ubyssey has come into
possession of a rather
complete-looking Chinese-English
dictionary. The book was left in a
staffer's car by a pleasant young
hitch-hiker who firmly gripped
about half of Friday's paper on
the ride from Tenth near the
Gates to College Printers.
The owner may claim the book
at his convenience in SUB 241-K.
Blood drive
Students with blood to spare
are needed at the UBC donor
clinic happening today and Friday
in the Brock Hall lounge.
The clinic is open from 9:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and sponsored
by the Canadian Red Cross
Society
Third crossing
The proposed third crossing is
the topic of a meeting today at
noon in Angus 110.
Frank Leighton of Swan
Wooster Engineering will present
slides and Norman Pearson,
planning consultant, will discuss
the problems associated with the
crossing.
VCC meeting
Students at Vancouver City
College are holding a general
student meeting today at noon at
the Langara art school for support
of their attempts to get student
and staff parity on the
administration of the college.
-raucKW on down
THE ijNe-
'Tween classes
TODAY
BAHA'I CLUB
Meeting at  noon  in  Buch.  230. All
welcome.
KING FU CLUB
Meet   outside  of  SUB  ballroom  at
4:30 p.m.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
COMMITTEE
Commerce prof J. W. Tomlinson on
the    multi-national   corporation   at
noon   in  SUB   111  (N.E. corner of
SUB cafeteria.)
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Free   films   including   YUL   871   at
noon in IH upper lounge.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Coffee  in the orange room  of  new
arts 1 bldg., 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting at Kingston Hotel at 8 p.m.
CCF
Or.   Rennie speaks on   Meaning of
Life   in   the   University  at   noon   in
SUB ballroom.
NDPCLUB
Project   meeting   at   noon   in   SUB
130.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting in St. Mark's music
room at noon.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Gene Thomas on   Listening  to the
Voice of Jesus at noon in SUB clubs
lounge.
ECO AND SPECIAL EVENTS
Slides    and    discussion    on    third
crossing at noon in Angus 110.
ANGLICAN-UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Discussion on student movements in
Japan    at    noon    in    SUB    council
chambers.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Tour of St. Mark's Hospital leaving
Wesbrook lobby at noon.
FRIDAY
UBC VIETNAM ACTION
COMMITTEE
Barry Weisberg on Nixon's
Permanent War at noon in SUB
auditorium.
WEST COAST TRAIL
Everyone who has indicated an
interest in going on the West Coast
Trail hike in late April please meet
at noon in The Ubyssey office, SUB
241-K. If you can't attend but are
still interested leave a message for
John Twigg.
COFFEE HOUSE
Happening at Lutheran Campus
Centre from 9 p.m. on with new
discoveries Rod, Brad and Karl.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Dr. Kubicek and Karl Burau on
How to Teach History at noon in
SUB 111.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
important   speaker  from   YWCA at
noon in SUB 105B. All welcome.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Musicians invited to jam at IH upper
lounge 4 to 8 p.m.
MONARCHIST LEAGUE
Dominion   chairman   John   Aimers
speaking in SUB 119 at noon.
SATURDAY
HILLEL
Film,   The Camera Man with Buster
Keaton athouse, 8:30 p.m.
VOC
Swimming    party    at   St.   George's
School, 7:30 p.m.
cvc
Dance  featuring  Ram, full facilities
in SUB ballroom, 8:30 to 1 a.m.
SUNDAY
FENCING CLUB
Lessons start in phys ed gym B at 2
p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Bishop Don Sjoberg will answer
questions at the centre Bear Pit at
7:30 p.m.
UBC TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Practice and new members class
begins at Winter Sports Centre gym
B, 6 to 8 p.m.
VST AND SCM
Gordon Imai and Marnie Turnbridge
on Japan Now and Then, fireside
room of Trinity House, 6050 Iona
Drive, 8 to 9:30 p.m.
MONDAY elcirculo
EL   CIRCULO
Film, Corrida de Toros in IH 402,
noon.
TUESDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Sally Davis in SUB auditorium at
noon.
GRADS!
FREE
4X5 Color Portrait
Make your appointment now
and avoid the big rush
CANDID STUDIOS
3343 West Broadway — 732-7446
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
LECTURE
Transcendental
Meditation
FRIDAY 12:30  Feb. 4
BUCHANAN    204
Speaker:     — _,..—  -~w
      DAVID COX
Paris Boutique
HANDICRAFTS CROCHETS
Leather Goods
Sale of Dorothy Perkins
English Sweaters
2105 W. 16th Toes. - Sat.
If your beetle needs debugging
JOHN'
PAIRS
2465 W. 41st Ave. ** 266-9410
10% Discount for UBC Students
LONGHAIRS!
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
224-4636-9 a.m. - 5:30 Mon. - Fri.    SUB Lower Floor-
CLASSIFIED
Rat«»: Campus — 3 linos,  1  day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial - 3 tines,  1   day $1.25; additional
lines 30*? 4 days arte* of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and ere payabie
in advance. Deadline is 11:39 am., the day before publication.
Publications OSice, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO CARIB 71, SAT.. FEB.
5, 9-1, Grad Student Centre.
Tickets $1.00 each at the centre
office, everyone welcome!	
HAVE FUN WITH THE OPPOSITE
sex! DANCE with SPIRIT! RAM
—IN SUB ballroom, Feb.  5th,
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
PERSON WHO RIPPED OFF
brown bag, B-lot, Jan. 24th, please
return even just notes, reward,
277-4284.	
LOST SUEDE COAT MAIN LIB-
rary Mondav. January 12. Call
Denny,   224-9706.
FOUND GOLD WATCH BEHIND
Admin. Building. Phone Joyce 228-
3287.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent   furnished   condominium   opposite   Gondola,   224-0657   eves.
Travel Opportunities
IS
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170.00
round trip, student vacations and
tours, employment services etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required. A.A.S.A.
Limited, 15 High St. Ventor
I.W.,   England.
Wanted—Information
17
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'60 RAMBLER AMER. STAND. 6,
4 dr. Good cond. 1 owner, reg.
gas gives good mil. Good rubber,
snows, city tested. '73. Conv. to
bed, extras $400.  266-2446.
~67 SUNBEAM IMP. $650. PHONE
683-1583 or 682-2573  eves.
'64 VW GAS HEATER. REBUILT
engine (Aug.), trans. '70 seats,
belts.   $475  or best offer.   738-2087.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Auto Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Duplicating &  Copying
33
Photography
35
Scandals
37
RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
latest releases in rock, folk &
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctum 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.	
START YOUR OWN SCANDAL,
have a ball. Ram in ballroom, Feb.
5.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My Home. Essays. Theses, etc.
Neat. Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates.  Phone 263-5317.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick service  on   short  essays.
HOME TYPING. EXPERT WORK.
All theses, reports, essays. Quick
service,    call   Dari.    738-6498.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — —
Agricultural Field — Niagara
Chemicals — For interviews call
Peter Waterman collect 763-2904
before Feb. 14.
PART TIME TYPIST FOR W.
Bdwy. Law Office. Must be accurate. Evenings & weekends,
Call Kathy 9-10 a.m. at 738-6345.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
Special  Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT A COURSE?
The U.B.C. Tutoring Centre reopens Monday, Jan. 31. SUB 228,
12:30-2:30 Tutoring available in
almost  every  subject.
Tutors—Wanted
64
EXP ERIE N CD , CHINESE-
speaking lady to teach couple beginner's English, Mon.-Fri. 8:00-
10:00   p.m.   Good   hourly  pay.   Tel.
688-3312.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ROBERTS STEREO CASSETTE
recorder system, one year old,
good condition with speakers,
mikes, $135. Phone 224-9065 ask
for G.  Ratzlaff.
TYPEWRITER, WEBSTER XL 500,
unused, portable, new $100. and
ask   $50.   Phone   321-3119.
GRANDMA'S LEGACY—PERFECT
"hippie style" muskrat fur coat
size 14 — $75 or offer. 980-3075.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM, QUIET,
comfortable. Private entr., neear
gates—ready now—no cooking.
224-7623. 	
BED-SITTING ROOM ON CAMPUS
furnihed, frig., hot plate, sep. entrance.   Share  bath,   $60  mo.   Call
224-3440. 	
ON CAMPUS: SPACIOUS, FURN-
ished, fireplace, limited cooking
facilities, carpeted, washer/dryer:
2 people. $45 each.  224-1981.	
ROOM FOR RENT. PRIVATE
bathroom and entrance. Immediate occupancy 4515 W. 1st Ave.,
224-5770.
Room & Board
82
IT'S NEW—STAY AT THE D.K.E.
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.,
224-9691.
FEMALE STUDENT WANTED TO
share house with five others. 20th
and Arbutus.  738-3815,  $75  month.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
FOR    YOUR    CATERING    NEEDS
phone  THE  NORMANDY
738-7231 or 738-1110 Thursday, February 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
.-■ *
"  	
$&*■'
-
*
■
:'.^s*
*£i f *>«■
.               r
.
fi*'*
*
.
■._■*■. •»_*...   .-
Highlights
Judo
Two members of the UBC judo
team have been promoted to
black belts, the highest level of
judo proficiency.
Joe Laing and Roger Timmis
were each promoted by a five-man
board made up of other black belt
holders.
The UBC team now has five
members with their black belts,
more than any other Canadian
university and comparable only to
San Jose State in North America.
The other team members
holding black belt status are Doug
Rogers, Roy Rajsic, and Charles
Maingon.
Gymnastics
The UBC men's gymnastics
team lost a meet last weekend,
but you won't hear them
complaining about it.
The Thunderbirds were beaten
by the University of Oregon
142-121  in  a meet that  should
leave coach Arnold Lascari very
pleased with his young team.
The University of Oregon has
been ranked as one of the top
teams on the Pacific Coast for
many years and the closeness of
the score shows the improvement
among UBC gymnasts.
This Sunday UBC will take on
another Western power,
Washington State University, in
Seattle.
Wrestling
Wrestlers    from    SFU,    the
University  of Alberta, and UBC ,
will compete Friday at UBC, gym
A in a three way meet.
The meet will feature UBC
against Alberta at 6:00 p.m.
followed by SFU versus Alberta at
7:30 p.m., and UBC against SFU
at 8:30 p.m.
Both Alberta and SFU have
several Canadian champions on
their teams. Tyras Hryb, from
SFU, took a bronze medal at the
Pan Am games.
Alberta is the defending
Western Conference champion.
The art of frisbee
FROM THE MARTLET
Part I
Frisbee seems to be the ideal sport. It is much more fun to do
than to watch; it gets you outdoors; it is basically non-violent and
non-competitive; it requires no special equipment — you can get a
brand-new frisbee for a couple of bucks, a used one for as little as a
quarter — and it develops timing, grace, co-ordination and body
control. And, as in the best of the zen arts, finesse is more important
than strength.
Though frisbees have become popular only recently, they've
been around for quite awhile. Wham-O, the major producer of the
plastic discs, began to manufacture them commercially back in 1955.
Legend has it that the name and the game started in a cafeteria at
Yale, when students began flipping around pieplates made by the
Frisbee Pie Company.
To many people frisbee is more than just a game, it's a way of
life. During the summer, frisbee freaks spend hundreds of hours
flipping; to them it's not a sport, but an art-form which demands
perfection and nothing less.
At any rate, whether you're wired to frisbees, or are just a
casual user, this article (adapted from Good Times) can help you
polish your style.
THE FRISBEE
The frisbee factors are size, weight, and feel — you don't want
one that is too spongy or too stiff. Watch out for a bubble top - this
is a no-no, because it messes up a good clean flight. The smaller frisbee
— the professional models, 9 and one quarter inch diameter — are
better because they are more wind resistant and easier to throw and
catch.
Weight is a major consideration, since wind is the major factor
on a frisbee flight. Most frisbees around now weigh 108 grams and
under, a little light for optimum tossing. Better weight is 115 to 130
grams - they get more distance and cut through the breeze better.
A way to add weight to a light frisbee is to put an automobile
fan belt under the lip, making sure it fits snugly, or snip the rim from
an old frisbee and tuck it inside. A frisbee with that refinement should
have no trouble fending off the stiff bay breezes.
Virtually all frisbees are made by Wham-O. A good but rare
non-Wham-0 is the Twirl-A-Boom. There are several different
Wham-O's, made in both the U.S. and Canada. The American line is
considered superior even though both are made from the same mold,
because the Canadian's are cast from inferior plastic mixtures and
tend to warp or bubble and wear out faster.
Many judge the American Olympic Ring One models to be the
best. Wham-O issued them five years ago and some may still be found
in small outlets which don't do much business. Another superior
model is the Moonlighter 14. The number refers to the mold number
stamped on the centre of the bottom side of the disc. The American
14 is also supposed to be very good.
Of the models generally available, the Moonlighter 15 is the
best, although some dislike it. The Moonlighter 14s, no longer made,
were better because of their heavier weight and deeper rim, which
aided stability.
To Be Continued
Letter
Dear Ed. In recent issues, the
quality of The Ubyssey sports
page has been suffering from
severe degeneracy.
Maybe we (the students of this
institution) can excuse some of
that on the basis that your staff is
made up of illiterate
incompetents. But some things are
beyond excuse.
In a society where it is
becoming increasingly evident
that the moral fibre of our youth
is in a state of decay it is
despairing to see that the Jast
bastion pillar of a wholesome and
God fearing society, the sports
page, has succumbed to pressures
around it. (In your case the
policies of the editorial staff.)
In particular I point accusingly
to the papers of Nov. 19, 1971
where you used the word
"asshole" twice and other
obscenities liberally. I might have
been able to excuse once, had you
immediately retracted Ihe article
in question and written a public
apology, but you didn't. And
worse, you continued to use these
foul words.
I have listed some possible
reasons for this laxness on your
part:
1. You have lost your
dictionary. (I thought this a rather
clever excuse,)
2. You never had a dictionary.
3. You have* no writers
competent enough to use good
English.
Morally yours
Arnold Brundage
Var^ity^ports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
JOHN WURFLINGER
OPEN TILL 9 P.M. THURS. & FRIDAY
SPRING FEVER SALE!!
— STARTS THURSDAY FEB. 3rd —
Reg.   x
NOW
DYNAMIC 70	
26000
20000
DYNAMIC V.R. 17	
20500
16500
ROSSIGNOL R.S	
22500
17000
ROSSIGNOL R.L	
22500
17000
ROSSIGNOL ROC 550	
18000
14000
ROSSIGNOL STRATO 102	
17000
14000
ROSSIGNOL STRATO A.R	
17000
14000
ROSSIGNOL "NANCY GREENE" ...
12000
9Q00
ATOMIC METAL EXCELLENT	
15000
10500
ATOMIC ALU-GLAS	
12000
9Q00
DAIWA METAL GLASS	
9995
7500
DAIWA FIBER GLASS	
8995
6995
6500
DAIWA FIBER GLASS	
5000
PLUS SALE SPECIAL - FRI. & SAT. ONLY
ATOMIC TARGET - with Salomon S404
95
00
RAAAY SKI POLES        25% OFF
MARKER STEP-IN BINDINGS — 25% OFF
TYROLA CLIX 55 - ROCKET 100 STEP-IN     Reg. 2700     now   2000
BOOTS
Reg          NOW
LADIES' TYROL
5500    4250
MEN'S TECHNICA BLUE
8Q00       5500
MEN'S KOFLACH BLUE STAR
9Q00         5500
LE TRAPPEUR FOAM
9500    gO00
LE TRAPPEUR PRO
16900    15000
ALSO HENKE - LA DOLOMITE - GARMISCH
SKI WEAR REDUCED UP TO 50%
Example NANCY GREENE DOWN JACKETS      Reg.    £0°°        NOW    45°°
Reg. Cut SKI PANTS 10°° - 20°° - 30°°
SKI TOQUES - 20% OFF  -   SKI GLOVES 20% OFF
PLUS MANY MORE SAVINGS - WHILE THEY LAST!
i^hh^mhmALL SALES FINALhmhmhi Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3,  1972
MATHILDA SPENCER .. . campaigns for women in 1916
— robin hanvelt photo
Suffragist reborn in SUB speech
By JAN O'BRIEN
One of B.C.'s most famous and
articulate suffragists, Mathilda
Spencer, was reincarnated at the'
women's studies meeting Tuesday
night.
Spencer, a member of the
Women's Suffrage Referendum
League, took the meeting back in
history to Sept. 16, 1916, the eve
of the referendum on women's
suffrage in British Columbia.
"We have fought a long battle,
but we can win if the men will use
their voting power to support
what they must know to be a just
cause, and give the women the
right to vote," said Spencer.
"It is a matter of simple
justice.
"Since we women must obey
the laws, we should certainly have
the right to help formulate those
laws.
"Most of the arguments used
by anti-suffragists have already
been soundly refuted," she said.
For example, the activities of
B.C. women directly involved in
the war effort have certainly
dispelled the argument that
women are too organically weak
to withstand the excitement of
elections, and that since women
took no share in the defence of
the nation, they had no right to
vote, said Spencer.
"The next foolish argument is
that women are too emotional to
participate in the broils of
campaigns and elections.
"The Reverend Anna Shaw
remarked three years ago at the
convention of the North
American Suffrage Association:
'. .. I have heard so much about
our emotionalism that I went to
the last Democratic National
Convention held in Baltimore, to
observe the calm repose of the
male contingent. I saw men jump
upon the seats and throw their
hats in the air and shout. No
hysteria about it - just patriotic
loyality, splendid manly devotion
to principle.'
She said the issue of the vote
was only a small part of the
program of the earliest feminists
in England and the United States.
"But, as the years passed, I
remember that these women
found that they could gain the
support of great numbers of
women only by focussing on the
issue of the vote, and the radical
movement thus became quite
middle of the road by the last
decades of the last century," she
said.
"So now I would ask the men
in this meeting to put yourselves
in our places, and try to imagine
the helpless situation of being
disenfranchised.
"Women, this is hopefully the
last time you'll have to use loving
persuasion to influence your
husbands to vote, for if we are
successful, you will have equal
rights of citizenship from now
on," said Spencer amid wild
applause.
Vera Rosenbluth, who delivered
the suffrage speech and claims to
be a direct descendant of Spencer,
discussed the results of women
being permitted to vote.
"There wasn't exactly a
stampede of women to take a
more active part in political
affairs, nor was there much
noticeable difference in the
economic and social position of
women."
Rosenbluth cited two reasons
for this: the majority of
suffragists at the end were middle
class women, pretty well satisfied
with society as it was and this was
the beginning of the intense
campaign of the media to create
the image of the ideal woman, as
being passive, not too bright and
beautiful.
"It seems to me that direct
action, demonstrations,
confrontations with the
government and lots of organizing
on the local level are all more
necessary than putting a few more
women in the House of
Commons.
"Then maybe we can reach the
social, economic, personal and
political equality that my
grandmother Mathilda dreamed
of," said Rosenbluth.
She then introduced suffragist
Mary Norton, secretary of the
Political Equality League in 1916.
She accompanied delegations
to Victoria to speak with the
government and on the day of the
referendum she stood on the road
to Campbell River, holding up all
the logging trucks that drove into
town, urging them to vote for
women's suffrage.
The audience responded to the
introduction with a standing
ovation.
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights    $225,   UP
f\\ ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
RECORD
SALE
We have the latest releases in
rock, folk, and blues records.
New and used records;
trade-ins accepted.
Examples: the Who (Who's
next), Carole King (Music),
Santana (3d), Savoy Brown
(Street Corner) and Cat
Stevens (Teaser) at .3.48;
Hendrix (Rainbow) and Yes
(album) at 2.98.
JOY MUSIC
SANCTUM
6610 Main St.
(at 50th)
11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128595/manifest

Comment

Related Items