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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 2014

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Array HOMECOMING
HEARTBREAK
INSTALLING GUPTA  P8
Ceremony recap, future promises and photo gallery // Page 2
EVENTS        V THIS WEEK, CHECK '
MONDAY
DAY OFTHE LONGBOAT
REGISTRATION
UNTIL 5:00 P.M. ©STUDENT REC CENTRE
Monday is your last chance to register
to participate in this UBC tradition.
The Day of the Long boattakes place
on Sept. 27 and 28.1ndividuals and
teams can register. Costs vary.
TUESDAY   ' 16
MUST NATIONS
BECOME STATES?
5:00 - 6:30 P.M. @ GREEN COLLEGE
Sparked by the upcoming Scottish independence referendum,
this lecture seeks to explore what
drives the desire for nation states,
with reference to Quebec, Catalonia and Scotland.
Free
OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE1
OPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
JOURNALISM SEMINAR
7:15 P.M. @ UBYSSEY OFFICE
Canadian Press journalist Tamsyn
Burgmann will be holding a
"Journalism 101" seminar in
the Ubyssey office. Learn the
basics of journalistic writing and
reporting, and askyour burning
questions about the industry.
Free
ON
THE
COVER
The Dinos may have run away
with the game, but UBC's 12th
man was out in full force. That's a
victory in and of itself.
- Kosta Prodanovic
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                    SEPTEMBER15.2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUE VII
EDITORIAL
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=HOTOCHERIHANHASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Brydon Cotter, starting left guard for T-Birds men's football, has to carefully balance sport and school.
Brydon Cotter is tackling classes and his
opponents head-on
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Contributor
The pre-game locker room quiet.
The building energy. Then the
surging rush of adrenaline as the
lights go up and you run through
Thunderbird Stadium. It's something that not many experience in
a year, or even a lifetime. For UBC
football player Brydon Cotter, it's a
regular occurrence.
"It's like the quiet before the
storm," said Cotter. "Everyone
is just very relaxed but also very
tense. I don't know how to describe
it. Everyone is just in a weird state."
Cotter first felt that rush of
adrenaline in eighth grade, when
he tried out for football at Vancouver College. Despite being new to
the sport then, Cotter relished the
opportunity to play. And although
the move was largely at the
prompting of his parents, football
has been a driving force for him
ever since.
"I got to try [football] out and
loved it. Ended up being pretty
good at it," said Cotter. "Next thing
you know I'm playing at UBC."
It may sound straightforward,
but that belies the countless hours
of training and single-minded
focus involved in gettingthere.
Cotter was first drawn to the
sheer physicality of football and
played mostly the tackle position
throughout high school. Once he
got to university, however, Cotter
— at 6-foot-3 and about 260 pounds
— became starting left guard
because he wasn't tall or heavy
enough for his original position.
But he hasn't been shortchanged
on what he loves about the sport.
"[My position is] very physical
... playing the line can take a big
toll on your body because you're
always clashing heads with the
defensive line and linebackers;
but I would say there's not a more
physical position every play."
Now a third-year economics major, Cotter has his daily schedule
down pat. And with the 35 to 4 0 or
so hours of training a week, that's
certainly necessary.
"[My position is] very
physical... playing
the line can take a
big toll on your body
because you re always
clashing heads with
the defensive line and
linebackers; but I would
say there's not a more
physical position every
play"
Brydon Cotter
Third-year economics major and
UBC men's football athlete
After waking up at around eight,
Cotter squeezes in a morning
workout before attending regular
classes. Nearly five hours of practice follow, which involve watching
film of other teams, training, then
watching film of that training — a
continual feedback loop of training
and technique.
"It's long... but we get Mondays
off," he assured.
Although football dominates
much of his life, Cotter doesn't see
it as much of a hindrance. Apart
from having to defer some travel
plans after high school and time
manage more in general, he hasn't
had to give up much and still finds
some time for a social life and
academics.
During the spare time that he
does have, Cotter enjoys fishing in
the Fraser River or Lake Okanagan
and often goes golfing. Mostly,
however, he looks towards building
a future career.
Cotter entered the Faculty of
Arts in his first year, during which
he found a burgeoning interest in
business and finance. After considering transferring into Commerce,
he was set back by an untimely
ankle surgery, at which point he
decided to finish his economics
degree. Still, Cotter remains committed to finance, albeit through
a different route, and supplements
his studies with books on business
and finance while also networking
with business contacts.
That same type of commitment
has certainly served Cotter well
when it comes to football, which
this year, comes with a set of
team goals: two cups — the Hardy
and Vanier — and a 70 per cent
team GPA.
"Everyone on a football team is
different, but we're all working towards a similar goal... so everyone
is striving to work hard in school,
stay in school, and get strong," said
Cotter of why he loves being on the
team. "I'm excited because I honestly think we can go all the way
[this year]. We have everything we
need."
Cotter recalled a match against
Manitoba last year. There's a
noticeable excitement in his
voice as he describes it. A pass. A
split-second fumble. Thunderbird
victory. "That was probably the
biggest adrenaline rush I've had at
UBC," he said.
With what lies ahead for Cotter,
it certainly won't be the last." tJ EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC + VERONIKABONDARENKO
MONDAY, SEP1
// News
BCTF STRIKE »
UBC teacher candidates to start practica if BCTF strike concludes
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
It's been two weeks since the
regular school year should have
started, but UBC's teacher candidates remain hopeful.
According to Wendy Carr,
director of UBC's Teacher Education Office, last semester's teacher candidates finished their final
practica just before Job Action
started in June, and so weren't
directly affected.
"They were affected in the
sense that the environment, the
climate, in the school was tense,"
said Carr. "Starting in September, our new group of teacher
candidates is worried about its
first practicum."
UBC's Bachelor of Education is
a condensed, 60-credit, 12-month
program. Each teacher candidate must complete 12 weeks of a
supervised practica — two weeks
done in October, and 10 in the
spring, at least eight of which
must be continuous.
"What we're asking our teacher candidates to do now is to just
focus on the new program, on the
coursework, their community,
their cohort and the group of students that they're working with,"
said Carr.
Though their practica may not
be affected, teacher candidates
like Jen Tan are worried about
the strike's impact not only on
their education, but their futures
and the fate ofthe BC Teachers'
Federation (BCTF).
"I'm thinking about how it's
affecting the kids first and foremost," said Tan. "I think that our
cohort, while important, is just
a small piece ofthe puzzle. I'm
thinking about the teachers, about
the parents, and about the teachers
who have gone without a salary."
The BCTF strike is expected to end before October 9.
The BCTF strike is forecasted
to end by October, so Carr and
Tan expressed no worries about
practicums this year.
Carr, who has remained in
touch with the B.C. Ministry of
Education's Teacher Regulation
Branch (TRB), said the teacher
candidate program may have
to be adjusted if the strike is
not resolved.
"If it jeopardized our two-
week practica, then we would
have to postpone it," said Carr.
"The TRB is aware of this ... [they
have] assured us that they will be
in touch with all [teacher education] institutions with a plan B."
Premier Christy Clark has
alluded to negotiating an end to
the strike before she leaves on a
trade mission to India on October
9, in which case teacher candidate
practica should not be affected.
"It's more about the long term
affects," said Tan. Although the
strike may soon be over, she fears
that the predominantly tense
atmosphere amongst teachers
may bleed into the school year.
"We don't know what the
outcome ofthe strike will be. If
it's not very favourable towards
teachers and the schools, I'm a
little bit concerned about working with staff that are exhausted,
or just a little burnt out from the
strike," said Tan.
Before entering UBC's Bachelor of Education program,
Tan worked in Manitoba as a
school clinician.
"Before I moved to B.C., I
did my research about what the
working conditions were like
for teachers here. " said Tan.
"There's a huge difference [between B.C. and Manitoba.] The
pay in Manitoba is higher."
Despite the issue of low wages,
Tan believes the BCTF's biggest
concern is changing classroom
size and composition.
"If there are one or two students in a classroom that have
any behavioural problems or special needs, it's really disruptive to
the class. It demands a lot of time
from the education assistants and
the teachers," said Tan.
Still, Tan and Carr remain
hopeful that negotiations between the government and BCTF
PHOTO IAN MCKENZIE/FLICKR
will end in favour of schools
and students.
"I cannot see how schools
can stay closed for much longer.
Societally, it's just not right," said
Carr. "We're hearing that the
Premier's popularity ratings are
going down, that students are
protesting on site ... These are all
signs that society will not support this much longer, so we're
staying optimistic."
But as the strike continues,
Carr encourages students to
remain hopeful for the future
of education.
"We have 600 candidates in
the program who are keen and
excited about becoming teachers," said Carr. "We focus on
that." Xi
UBC a haven for bike thieves
=HOTO CHERIHAN HUSSAN/THE UBYSSEY
Every year students' bikes are stolen right from under campus security's nose.
David Nixon
Contributor
UBC is a haven for bike thieves,
according to UBC Security.
Every year UBC Security
receives reports of 300-350
stolen bikes, and recovery rates
are negligible.
"There are organized crime
groups who make a living out of
this," said Barry Eccleton, director
of UBC Security. "Our campus is
a target because ofthe volume of
bikes."
Security is working to educate
students on how to prevent bike
theft. The second week of school
was Crime Prevention Week, and
Eccleton estimates they reached
10,000 to 15,000 students. Their
message to bike owners: spend
over $50 for a hardened steel
u-lock, photograph your bike,
register your bike's serial num
ber with national databases and
double-check that your lock is
secured when you leave.
The Ubyssey has previously
reported that ofthe approximately
1,000 bikes recovered annually
by the Vancouver Police Department, about three-quarters remain
unclaimed. Security has focused
on education because pictures
and the use ofthe national bike
registries, Bike Revolution and
bikeregistrycanada.com are valuable tools to ensure property is
returned to its owner if found.
It's only mid-September, but
already postings are up on campus
community boards and Facebook
from students who have fallen
victim to bike theft.
"If you see someone poring over
a bike," said Eccleton. "Take note
of what you're seeing. If there is a
crime in progress, call 911." ta
seeking Student Volunteer as
UBC Development Permit Board Member
We're seeking applications for the volunteer position of
Student Member on the Development Permit Board, which
has the responsibility to review and approve non-institutional
development proposals on UBC's Vancouver campus.
If selected, you will be expected to serve on the Development Permit Board for a minimum
of one calendar year, starting October 2014. Members of the Development Permit Board
are appointed by the Board of Governors.
Candidates should be knowledgeable about contemporary practices in sustainability and
land use planning as well as support the development of UTown@UBC, UBC's on-campus
residential community.
Submit a current resume and cover letter to Campus and Community
Planning highlighting your qualifications and interest in this position by
Steven Lecocq
steven.lecocq@ubc.ca
Campus and Community Planning
2210 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z4
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
For more information, see planning.ubc.ca
campus+community planning 4    I    NEWS    I    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,2014
STUDY HABITS »
Prof and students sound off: effective study habits
Elina Taillon
Contributor
Students often start the year off
with lofty study goals, but begin
to lose their study resolve halfway
through the term.
Psychology professor Dr.
Catherine Rawn sees a consistent
pattern of marks slipping after
the first few weeks of a semester
in her classes. Exam averages
go down, attendance drops, and
students don't keep up with the
readings. Even students who start
off strong in a course can end up
with falling grades.
"Workload always increases around the middle ofthe
semester," says Rawn, who
suspects this as a significant
reason for students' mid-semester
academic woes.
So how can a student tell
if this is happening to them?
Rawn explains that courses with
frequent assessments make it
easier to spot slipping marks, but
even in courses with spaced-out
grading, students should be able
to diagnose this problem if they're
honest with themselves.
As such, Rawn suggests a few
simple check-ins for students. If a
student has not done the readings,
gone through and understood the
course notes, or attended all their
classes in a given week then they
may be in danger of experiencing
slipping marks.
According to Rawn, it's also important to find the right learning
style for different courses. Previously learned study techniques
may not work in a different faculty
or year level while speaking with
the professor may yield unexpected and helpful tips on how to study
for a particular class.
"We're not all terrifying,"
said Rawn.
Rawn also encourages students
to go into a class with a plan in
mind. A study schedule, plenty
of commitment and motivation,
and active time management are
key to avoiding the grade drop-off
point. Leaving assignments to the
last moment for weeks on end can
cause a student's performance to
burn out.
But it's not all about taking
action; a student's mentality
plays a large role in their success.
Rawn urges students to reflect
on their reasons for attending
university and to consider why
they're there in the first place.
Even if a course seems uninteresting, "maybe the lesson
you're going to learn from that
course isn't the topic, but maybe
it's going to be about endurance,
and getting through something
you're really not enjoying,"
said Rawn.
She sees studying as a luxury
and suspects that students sometimes forgo their schoolwork for
reasons other than disinterest.
Student study habits usually start to taper off after the first midterm.
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER^HE UBYSSEY
Peers can also have a strong
influence on study habits.
As a result, Rawn said that students who are choosing to brush off
work may realize that this is shortsighted and admit to themselves that
they aren't being true to their original reasons for attending university.
"There's no other opportunity
in your life where you get to go and
spend all your time learning," said
Rawn. XI
"Balance is a good thing
to think about. Always
have time for yourself,
otherwise you'll get
overwhelmed and you
might crash."
Leona Noche
Third year, Faculty of Arts
"In high school I would
slack off after school
[every day] I did more
cramming before finals.
I hope that doesn't
happen this year...it
doesn't work, right?"
Samantha Wong
First year, Faculty of Science
"I have to make sure
I don't fall behind in
class. The pace here
is much quicker [than
high school] and I feel
like my grades really
count more.'
Nicole Yang
First year, Faculty of Arts
Don't be afraid to talk
to your professors...
By fourth year, you
develop a relationship
with your professors,
you go speak to them
after class and you're
not afraid of it."
David Lenuzci
Fourth year, Faculty of Applied
Science
"I'm more on top of
things. I have a planner
that I'll write in all the
time. Reminders on my
phone. I had to quit a
lot of extra curriculars
to stay on top of my
studies.'
Misa Sekikawa-Luding
First year, Faculty of Arts
nterviews Mateo Ospina | Photos JovanaVranic
"Just be vigilant, stay
on top of it. It gets
easier. First year is the
hardest... Everyone
at UBC is smart and
knows how to study-
just find what works
best for you and keep
at it.'
Deklan Kelly
Third year, Faculty of Arts
EATRE AT M PRESENTS
THEATREFILH.UIJUA
5! WILLIAM
STEPHEN
SP
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SfPiMUi - CPU 1UQ1I I FREDERIC MOOD THEATRE. UBC
7 ffflH MM II   TMfttM    M    '11.J0
SOX OFFICE: ta-IHli I -f-
|Uirc|      ■ plica of mind MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2014    |    NEWS
Softbali
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YS
Jenica Montgomery
Culture Editor
Rookie team Ubyssey crushed seasoned veterans the CiTR Rad Socks
13-3 at the second annual CiTR
Back-to-School Softball Invitational. Having made the mistake of
believing The Ubyssey to be a soft
and inexperienced team, the CiTR
Rad Socks went in confident and
came out crying.
The Ubyssey — coaxed out ofthe
basement ofthe SUB by the promise of free beer — arrived at the
diamond late, and partially hung
over. But this didn't deter their
determination or strive. Taking
a lead of 5-0 in the first inning,
Ubyssey quickly gained their stride
in preparation for CiTR's total
annihilation.
In a showdown of print media
versus radio, The Ubyssey stood
strong. CiTR represented their
radio roots proudly but The
Ubyssey showed them that print
media isn't dead quite yet.
The Ubyssey's team was comprised of both old and new editors,
friends of friends, and any writer
who had a Saturday morning
to spare. Experienced baseball
players Max Hollingworth and
Cole Dowling joined The Ubyssey
against CiTR, aiding in their
victory.
CiTR played a gallant game, but
trailed behind the Ubyssey right
up until the fourth and final inning
when Ubyssey solidified their win.
With a rivalry as old as time, the
l/fryssey-CiTR matched proved to
be a test of wills, confirming print
media's obvious domination of
media formats.
With other things to do than
to continue playing, The Ubyssey
abdicated their position in the
tournament to CiTR. However, it's
clear that on the baseball diamond,
print media can still hold its own. Xt JENICA MONTGOMERY
PTEMBER15.20
II Culture
FASHION »
First year fashion: comfortable but chic is the way to go
Victoria Lansdown
Contributor
Honestly, what is the most stressful part of coming to university?
Sure, the exams and professors can
be intimidating, but fitting in is the
ultimate first-year test. One way
for people to feel like they belong is
through what they're wearing.
More often than not, students
gravitate towards people who
share the same sense of style. For
those who are looking to revamp
their style, there are lots of options
— both cheap and expensive — out
there for you. Every year, clubs and
UBC Rec hand out free swag to get
people pumped about the new year
— it's just about knowing where to
look. Another option is shopping
around Robson street, where you'll
find all ofthe hottest looks ofthe
season. Another cheaper option is
to look around thrift stores, which
are abundant in Vancouver, for
those hand-me-down treasures.
If you're looking to fit in specifically with your peers then sticking
to the common theme amongst
new students is pertinent. This
year's theme amongst first year's
is comfort. Across campus they are
sporting a casual and comfortable
look. Many of them are excited to
get free swag to represent their
school. X\
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Christina Bell (pictured right) — first year Kinesiology
"[My style is] pretty sporty. Leggings and a hoodie. Hard to go wrong."
Rebecca Hope — first year Arts
"I'm looking forward to playing my music around campus and meeting
new people."
Connor Beleznay — first year Arts
"[My style is] baseball players' style in general. Hat is mandatory. Can't
be flat. Can't be round. Has to be 50-50. Has to always be on."
Sophia Lapres (pictured left) — first year Arts
"I'm super excited for my classes and getting to know the great people
living on my floor in residence." MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2014    |    CULTURE
CLUBS»
CLUBS»
A Club of Ice and Fire
brings the Realm to UBC
This club is for all those who unabashedly and unapologetically
love the popular T.V show and book series Game of Thrones.
Club of Ice and Fire execs lounging like kings
Gabriel Germaix
Contributor
PHOTO ^EVEN DURFEEfTHE UBYSSEY
Eight silver stags, or as we know
them, quarters, is all it takes to be
granted citizenship in the Realm.
The emissaries of Westeros and
the Game of Thrones world welcome students in their embassy,
also known as the Club of Ice and
Fire. Trying to give substance to a
passionate — but sometimes loose
community — the executives ofthe
Club of Ice and Fire founded the
club last year, in the hope that all
avid book readers and show fans
would gather around them. Not
to rule them — at least they didn't
admit that was the goal — but to
share their fandom.
"Every clubs' day, every
Imagine day up until last year, I
would always look for a Game of
Thrones club. And I never found
one," said co-founder, and King,
Mackenzie Lockhart. So together
with Philip He, who was suddenly
promoted to Hand of The King,
Lockhart founded the new club.
Along with the King and Hand
ofthe King, other executive titles
include: the Master of Coin (the
Treasurer), Master of Ships, a
Master of Whisperers and several
other positions directly — and
jokingly — borrowed from the hit
TV show and best-selling novel
series. Although several are more
honorific than anything else.
"Some don't really have a job
right now," said Lockhart. "They
are more to complete the Small
Council." Which, in the language
of Game of Thrones, could mean
that some positions might become
abruptly available if some courtesans are not careful of where
they walk.
The club may not be the most
energetic in its event creation, as
only two events saw the light of
day last year.
"The main event for Game of
Thrones is usually in April," said
Lockhart, who still wants to bring
fans together in social events
throughout the year, with a big
finale coming next spring.
"If we can get members to get
together and watch the episodes
as they are coming out, I think
that would be a big step for us,"
said Lockhart.
These projects, simple as they
are, characterize the club as a
resolutely not serious one.
"I think most student clubs on
campus [are] getting involved for
the sake of getting involved. It's
not about pure fun anymore," said
He. Past clubs either focus strongly
on promoting a project, an identity
or an academic department.
"Our club is about Game of
Thrones, but also almost trying to
restore the spirit of a club," said
He. No matter where they come
from or what they study, the members — and subjects — ofthe Club
of Ice and Fire share a simple goal:
find people who share your love
for something that's a bit nerdy —
or not — and spend some time with
them.
"I think it allows a lot of students to release their inner nerd,
their inner geek, to get excited
about something that is not related
to school, and that is a total escape
for them," said Lockhart.
The number of fans who are releasing their inner nerd increases
every year, and it seems probable
that more students will wash
up on the shores of Westeros'
little UBC embassy. The widespread success of George R.R.
Martin's universe doesn't really
surprise He.
"Game of Thrones is a lot like university life, really. A lot of drinking, a
lot of banging," said He. tJ
CULTURE VULTURE
CINEMA SALON
Koerner Library will be kicking off their monthly Cinema
Salons with Trevor Nunn's
rendition of Shakespeare's
Twelfth Night. Cinema Salon
runs on thelastThursdayof
every month and features a
full film and a small lecture
on the relevance and themes
of the film by a UBC professor or expert. Cinema Salons
are a great way to end your
week and to end your month.
Students are able to view the
upcoming films scheduled
for the Cinema Salon at the
Videomatica collection web
page under events, u
UPCOMING THEATRE
For all the theatre lovers out
there, now is the time to get
excited. UBC's Theatre and
Opera season will be opening in justashort couple
of weeks. The first play —
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night
is premiering on September
24 2014. This is the first year
that U BC's Theatre season and Opera season are
merging together for a new
term meant to highlight the
interwoven nature of the arts.
From Shakespeare to Mozart,
theatre and opera lovers
have lots to look forward
to. Students can purchase
tickets at the Frederick Wood
Theatre box office.u
BrUBC club brewing up a storm
BrUBC meets every Sunday afternoon in the SUB servery
Braedon Pauze
Contributor
Since the time of its invention
beer has brought people together like nothing else. Something
about its ability to fuel courage,
or perhaps its ability to lower
self-consciousness, has made
it an amazing social instigator.
Because of that there are some
devoted disciples, people who
have a passion not only for drinking beer, but for making it. UBC's
brewing club, BruBC, is a meeting
place for these folk.
BrUBC was founded back in
2010 by a group consisting mostly
of Ubyssey editors who decided
the only way to deal with modern
day issues was to start a home
brewing club. They were right,
and ever since its conception
BrUBC has been a thriving part
ofthe UBC community.
The main goal of BrUBC is to
teach newcomers how to make
their own homemade beer and
hopefully instill a passion for it.
"Students can expect a laid
back yet mildly chaotic atmosphere in which they learn a lot
about home brewing, fine beer,
good people and really good
friendships. I know that may
sound cheesy but we get really
close," said Jon Pinkhasik, president of BrUBC.
There's something amazing
about sitting in a circle talking
with friends as you all learn how
to make good beer. The group
meets every Sunday at 3 p.m. in
the SUB to brew. This is when
they have the opportunity to
get experimental in their craft.
Sometimes it pays off like in the
case of Coconut Dark Wheat or
Honey Basil Brews. But other
times it doesn't like the now
infamously dubbed "Fresh Prince
Of Bel-Air" brew. The club has a
$10 membership fee, and requires
members to be at least 19 years
old, but it's well worth it as the
whole executive team has a vast
understanding ofthe brewing
process and is eager to share it.
BrUBC does a lot more than
just brewing beer, though. Once
a month the members of the
group gather for a tasting session
where each member brings their
homemade beer or a couple litres
of craft beer. This session is for
members to receive feedback and
tips on their brew however this
too is a socially-driven gathering.
BrUBC executive member Kirs-
ten Corrao describes the sessions
as "civil at first, then sloppy."
New to the club this year are
their monthly speaker sessions.
The sessions are aimed to "give
people who already know how
to brew more of a reason to
join," said Pinkhasik. These
sessions will feature people who
are knowledgeable about home
brewing, including members of
advocacy groups and professors.
If you're the competitive type,
BrUBC has you covered as well.
Every October BrUBC enters a
competition with three other universities from Western Canada to
see who can make the best beer.
The club is also immersed in
the UBC community. In conjunction with the AMS brewery
committee, they helped to save
the failing UBC Brewery project. The project had its funding
pulled out from under it, however
BrUBC helped to force a referendum by gathering signatures. The
project is now back on with hopes
of completion by 2018.
Whether it's the brewing process, the people, or the opportunity to make an abundance of
homemade beer for the weekends
that brings you to BrUBC you will
not be disappointed. BrUBC not
only boasts some ofthe kindest
people but arguably the best
name for a club. Oh, and also,
beer, a
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES
OR 19 BLUE
WHALES
You can make a difference
and create a green, ^\
zero waste campus: (^x-^
USE RECYCLING STATIONS TO |
SORT YOUR FOOD SCRAPS AND ST
RECYCLABLES INTO THE PROPER BINS. V"-
RECYCLABLE
CONTAINERS
Sort it Out.
;ustaij II Scene
Installing
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
Arvind Gupta was installed
as the 13th president of UBC
this morning.
The official ceremony to
welcome Gupta into his new role
took place at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts on
September 12.
Distinguished guests including
members of provincial and federal legislation, delegates from top
Canadian institutions, leaders
from the Musqueam and Syilx
First Nations people, as well as
family, friends and students all
gathered to welcome Gupta into a
promising term as president and
vice-chancellor.
Gupta's address to the university proposed five themes in
his vision for UBC's future: the
university as a place of learning,
engagement, international partnership, innovation and research.
Gupta concluded the speech by
outlining his goals and promises
for the upcoming years of his term.
"Our UBC is committed to ensuring that every part ofthe university is functioning at its highest
capacity so we can produce the
leaders our society requires,"
said Gupta.
For the first theme, Gupta
promised to focus on resources
that help ensure student success,
including financial aid and scholarships, on-campus housing services, health facilities and venues for
sport and culture.
"I have frequently called today's
youth the 'empowered generation,'" said Gupta. "They know
that they confront unprecedented
societal challenges. They see how
quickly yesterday's innovations
become obsolete."
Gupta then called on the
importance of technology and
research, along with on-campus resources, as a means for
expanding students' learning
beyond traditional boundaries
as well as extending opportunities for individuals who don't
have the means or time to attend
on-campus classes.
An overarching theme to
Gupta's speech was the symbiotic
relationship between the research
and innovation ofthe academy
and the diversity and inclusivity
ofthe UBC community.
"As one ofthe world's top 25
public institutions, UBC is a
portal for global engagement,"
said Gupta. "We will stretch this
portal — and shrink the world —
fostering research-and-learning
links across B.C., Canada and
beyond."
As UBC continues to welcome
more international students over
the years, more global partnerships will be built, and will "tap
into all of UBC's strengths from
the historically and ethically
informed critical thinking skills
ofthe humanities, to the transformative capabilities of modern
science," said Gupta.
Gupta expressed his wishes
to nurture leaders, better the
university's reputation and propel
graduates to the ranks of world-
class scholars by both focusing on
strengthening community ties and
broadening UBC's global reach.
As part of his promise to provide opportunities to students, he
talked of plans to double UBC's
extra-curricular internship and
co-op programs and increase base
funding for research excellence by
at least $100 million. MONDAY, SEPTMEBER15,2014    |   SCENE    |    9
"Excellence in research distinguishes great institutions from the
rest," said Gupta.
Gupta also placed special emphasis on investment in research to
keep UBC as a frontrunner in the
world of academia.
"We are not done. We are not
where UBC should be, can be and
must be," he said. "We will invest in
excellence, enhancing our research
capacity and thus our ability to
train, nurture and empower an
unprecedented generation."
To wrap up his presidential
address, Gupta outlined three
strategies to ensure excellence
at UBC.
Gupta made a promise to
support entrepreneurship and embrace the risks that come with it.
He made a vow to listen to
UBC's students, faculty, staff,
alumni, and our cities, province
and country, in order to act as
a community.
Throughout his address,
Gupta brought up the way that
the values from his upbringing,
including his father's habit to
always take the time to help
others, contributed to the sense of
community that he hopes to bring
to UBC scholars, faculty, staff
and alumni.
"UBC is yours and it is ours,"
said Gupta. "It is a gift that we
hold in our hands. It's not ours
for convenience. It is not ours to
consume. We hold it in trust, for
the next generation and for every
generation after that." tJ  ■ m   MM // Opinions
LAST WORDS //
riNGSHOTSANDSN/>
HOMECOMING HORRORS
It was the largest crowd that most
had ever seen at Thunderbird Stadium, but after a dismal showing by
the UBC football team, all 4,245 of"
them left disappointed. Just a little
to the left, though, the men's and
women's soccer teams took home
5-1 and 5-0 wins in their home turf
debut. Not that anyone watched.
UBC has a strange sense of school
spirit — we're quick to mention to
friends and family exactly which
BC institution we attend, and make
snide jokes about SFU that everyone's heard a thousand times over
("What do SFU and UBC students
have in common? They both applied
to UBC! Ha!"), but when it comes
to supporting our varsity athletes,
we're there for the first football
game and then... that's about it.
#SellOutTheDoug drew hundreds of fans to hopefully save the
men's hockey team from being
relegated to club status, but where
were they before that? A one-game
show of support is not a strong argument for a team that draws about 50
people on a good night.
PLEASE MOVE TO THE
REAR OF THE BUS
The majority of our editorial board,
like most UBC students, has to ride
the bus to get to school. Riding the
bus isn't any fun, but students are
making it a lot worse than it needs
to be. Since so many of you can't
seem to figure out how the ride the
bus, we thought we'd kindly lay out
some instructions. Please follow
them to the letter:
Move to the back ofthe bus. Yes,
that means you. The reason the bus
is so crowded at the front is because
there is so much unused space at
the back. And while we have your
attention, take off your backpack
and put it on the floor (not the seat
beside you). You're taking up twice
as much space as you need to. And
no, we don't want to hear Katy Perry
through your headphones, so turn
the volume down. People like you
are the reason there are hundreds
of students passed by busses that
aren't really full every morning. So
stop being an asshole and do your
part to help make everyone's commute a little less miserable.
INSTALLATION OF GUPTA
1.0 SUCCEEDED
Arvind Gupta was officially installed as UBC's 13th president this
Friday. After words of congratulations from numerous university
officials and several invigorating
musical and dance performances,
Gupta vowed to serve the university (which, he emphasized,
above all means the students!) well
LLUSTRATIONJUUANYU /THE UBYSSEY
throughout his time as president.
In his speech, Gupta also touched
upon his commitment to research,
international engagement and
student success.
We have nothing bad to say about
Gupta's speech — it was certainly
well-spoken and inspiring! But
while it is easy to make big promises
on stage at the start of one's career,
it is much harder to take specific
steps to improve concepts as broad
as student success. Here's to hoping
that Gupta will continue to strive
for these lofty goals further into
his term.
HIT THE BOOKS
University is hard. Life is hard. But
you know what will make it easier?
Actually studying. Students everywhere complain that they have too
much to do, and that it's too difficult
to balance school work and social
life. You're not alone. You are surrounded every day by 50,000 other
students who are in the same boat as
you, so you should just hunker down
and do your work. Sometimes that
means giving up a Saturday night to
appease the gods of studying rather
than going to a party or a club.
That being said, don't only focus
on school or else you'll stress yourself out. Plan your fun, spend time
with your friends, but don't make
partying your life. Xi
UBC has school spirit, but nowhere to show it
EDITORIAL
JOVANAVRANIC
NEWS EDITOR
On my very first day at
UBC, I experienced enough
school spirit to fuel my entire
undergraduate experience.
There was only one other person in my orientation group who
actually wanted to cheer with me
when the time came. To be fair
though, I wasn't too eager to yell
out a cheer that rhymed 'class'
and 'ass', either. And actually, if
I'm going to be specific, he wasn't
really in my group either. Point is,
I had to vent my school pride with
one other person at the top of my
lungs when the spotlight fell on the
Faculty of Arts.
Fast forward about an hour,
and I left the rally with a group of
15 students who became my first
friends at UBC. In fact, here I am a
year later, and we're still as close as
ever, despite me living an hour and
a half away from campus.
How nice would it be to have
more opportunities to meet people
at big events like that?
Walk down Main Mall any day
ofthe week and you can probably
count at least 10 students wearing
sweatshirts branded with UBC
logos. In class, you're bound to see
laptops covered in stickers advertising student clubs. Every student
seems to have something at UBC to
be proud of — but how often do you
actually see everyone get together
as a school, not segmented by our
faculties or clubs?
UBC does its best to promote
a sense of school spirit with its
events, such as the first-year pep
rally, but what else is there? The
athletics department sells tons
of Thunderbird apparel and the
Blue Crew seems to be popular
among most students, but other
than Homecoming, sports events
generally don't have great turnouts.
This year's homecoming game, despite being a total burnout, actually
fostered some ofthe best school
spirit UBC has seen. Spectators did
their best to stay as positive as they
could in the face ofthe team's poor
performance.
Last year, some Ubyssey editors
had the opportunity to experience
a whole new dimension of school
pride at the University of Washington's homecoming game. Yeah, the
US has an entirely different football
culture, but couldn't UBC invest a
little bit more into its school spirit?
The answer, unfortunately, is no.
The University Neighbourhoods
Association has some bylaws that
don't allow us to get too noisy —
basically, too happy — about going
to a world-class institution.
But really, Canadian university
school spirit in general doesn't live
up to what US schools are lucky
enough to have. Most universities
around the world don't meet the
American standard of pep. But it's
hard to wait at America's doorstep
— to sit by in our libraries — while
students down south are having
the time of their lives at rallies, parades, sporting events and parties.
In the end, it's up to individual
students to find their own ways of
expressing school spirit — if they
have it. Go to parties, home games,
and anything else that tickles your
UBC pride. Even if you aren't in love
with the idea of UBC pep and wild
partying, UBC would be a much
happier place if those of us who are
had somewhere to express it. Xi
Enough with the
feminism quotas
Op-Ed
Alex Mierke-Zatwamicki
In the summer of 2013, my friend
Sarah Manshreck and I set about
creating a feminist club at UBC.
Inspired by the success of the
"UBC Needs Feminism" event
and Facebook group, we prepared a proposal to present to
the Alma Matter Society (AMS).
Once chartered, the plan was to
bring in inspirational speakers,
host a critical book club, and,
most importantly to us, have
regular meetings where students
could get together to discuss all
things feminism. As soon as we
began the AMS presentation,
however, it was clear how things
would end.
We spoke to an all-male panel
who paid little-to-no attention
to our pitch. While we spoke,
they rudely played with their
phones or stared off into space
with glazed over eyes. When we
concluded, they fired a series
of smug questions at us before
insisting that we were too similar
to the Sexual Assault Support Centre (SASC). The panel
claimed that we were welcome
to apply again with a modified
mandate but from that point on
they never replied to a single one
of Sarah's e-mails and the project
eventually faded from my mind.
It came rushing back, however, when I found out that "I
Am A Feminist Day" organizer
Cheneil Hale's attempts to create
a feminist club were also rebuked
by the AMS. The reasoning? Too
similar to the SASC. Again.
The attitude that
we have 'enough'
feminism, that we've
reached our 'feminism quota, so to
speak, is regressive
and deeply offensive.
Yes, we have the Womyn's
Centre and the Sexual Assault
Support Centre, two organizations
that do impressive and important
work on campus. However, the
idea that there is no room for a
third feminist space strikes me as
completely illogical. As far as I can
tell, there are currently at least 14
Christian clubs chartered with the
AMS. 14. Yet three feminist spaces
on campus is too many?
The attitude that we have
"enough" feminism, that we've
reached our "feminism quota", so
to speak, is regressive and deeply
offensive. It is also a troubling
reflection ofthe same sexist ideologies that posit that feminism has
gone too far. What does the AMS
have against promoting women's
empowerment and organizing at
UBC? If year after year, different students are independently
and spontaneously coming to the
conclusion that there is room for
a feminism club, clearly there are
needs that aren't being filled by
the existing spaces.
More persistent than Sarah
and I, Cheneil has decided to barrel ahead without the benefits of
being chartered by the AMS. She
has recruited a team of executives, booked rooms through
loopholes, and paid for club
expenses out of pocket because
she believes in her project. Innocuously (I thought), I tweeted
my disappointment about this at
the AMS. Though I expected no
response, they immediately and
apologetically tried to speak to
my concerns about the resistance
to women's organizing. Seemingly worried about the bad PR
that my tweets might create, they
put me in touch with the Vice
President of Communications,
who immediately gave Cheneil
a second chance to present to
the body that approves clubs.
Currently, the status ofthe UBC
Feminism Club is still in limbo.
I'm publishing this as an open
letter because as a body that
claims to represent students, the
AMS needs to be accountable
for the actions it takes in private
boardrooms. It is especially
shocking to me that the AMS
would reject a feminist club in
the light of last year's events. Can
UBC really claim to be covered
on the feminism front when, in
the past year alone, our campus
was home to both a rape chant
scandal and a series of sexual
assaults?
At the time of writing, the UBC
Feminism Club is circulating a petition centred on their efforts to get
chartered by the AMS. If you share
my concerns, I urge you to sign their
petition and demand better from
the body that collects our student
fees. As feminists, as activists, and,
most of all, as students, we deserve
representatives that will respect and
promote our efforts to organize for
women's empowerment. Xi
Alex Mierke-Zatwamicki is a
fourth-year political science major,
president ofthe UBC NDP and is
actively involved in the UBC feminist
community.
For Your Eyes Only   l$50
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i-n i-n ix • 3049 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C., V6K2G9
Dr. J.D MacKenzie    °ffice:6047320311 or6047314821
Bottom of UBC Hill at Alma EDITOR JACKHAUEN
// Sports + Rec
SOCCER»
Men's soccer
continues to
dominate
MONDA1
Soren Elsay
Contributor
The Thunderbirds continued their
flawless start to the season with a
convincing 5-1 win over the University of Northern BC Timber-
wolves in the teams' home opener
played on Saturday as part ofthe
Homecoming week festivities.
After wins against the University
of Victoria and Fraser Valley, UBC
is sitting pretty atop a 3-0 regular
season record.
The Birds' got on the board
quickly in only the second minute
when Milad Mehrabi's cross
found its way to Sean Einarsson
who dispatched the game's opening goal from ten yards out. UBC
controlled the game throughout,
but especially early on, when the
'Birds' dominating possession
created chance after chance at the
expense ofthe UNBC backline.
The pressure resulted in
another quick goal as a long
spell of possession ended up
SOCCER»
with Mehrabi blasting home a
shot from thirty yards out. Jules
Chopin added a third before the
twenty minute mark after Navid
Mashinchi's drive caromed off the
post before falling to the unmarked Chopin.
Ante Beskovic, who had got
the call in goal for the Thunderbirds, was thrown into action
for the first time in the 28th
minute as he stuck out his left
foot to deny Conrad Rowlands on
a breakaway. UNBC came close
again five minutes later as a UBC
giveaway forced Bryan Fong to
make a goal line clearance behind Beskovic.
With a comfortable 3-0 lead in
hand, UBC came out sluggish to
start the second half - Beskovic
was forced to make a handful of
saves before UNBC finally got
on the board in the 67th minute
when Brandon Wallace converted
for the Timberwolves off of a
The T-Birds are 3-0 in the regular season so far, and show no signs of slowing down.
The goal seemed to reawaken
the Thunderbirds, who responded with two quick goals
in the 75th and 77th minute
respectively as Alex Orasa and
Sean Einarsson struck to put the
game beyond any doubt.
Overall, head coach Mike
Mosher was pleased with the
result, although he knows the
team can't afford lulls like the
one they experience at the start
ofthe second half.
"We were giving some guys
some opportunities coming off
the bench, and the first twenty
minutes was quite unacceptable...
when we start playing some of
the stronger teams we need to be
able to trust some of these guys
to come into the game and make
an impact."
One ofthe players that Mosher knows he can trust is central
midfielder Einarsson. The reigning
Canada West Rookie ofthe Year
=HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
had another strong game, punctuated with a pair of goals.
"He does a lot ofthe little things
that people don't notice, so it's nice
to see when a guy like Sean gets
rewarded with a couple goals,"
said Mosher.
Einarsson and the number-one-
ranked Thunderbirds will take
their undefeated record on the road
next weekend as they travel to the
Okanagan to play Thompson Rivers
University and UBC Okanagan. Xi
Women's soccer shuts out UNBC
5-0 homecoming win makes it a perfect Saturday for UBC soccer
The women's squad dominated UNBC right from the beginning.
Olamide Olaniyan
Contributor
The Thunderbirds finished
victorious Saturday afternoon
as they took their homecoming
game five-nil against the University of Northern BC.
"We played a strong game
with full team effort," said
Andrea Neil, the women's head
coach. "We were able to play all
our players, and everyone had an
opportunity to showcase their
skills".
The kickoff immediately sent the
T-Birds after the ball, hungry for
a goal — possession was the name
ofthe game for UBC, and most of
the early minutes ofthe game were
spent in the opposition's half. For
the first 19 minutes, however, the
Timberwolves' defence remained
completely solid.
Second year forward Jasmine
Dhanda unleashed a powerful shot
from outside the box to give the
Thunderbirds a 1-0 lead, and four
minutes later Nicole Sydor struck
a goal past the keeper's reaching
hands to double their lead.
In the second half, nine
minutes in, forward Amirit
Berar shook free from the UNBC
backline and curled a goal into
the bottom corner. Defender
Aman Shergill slammed home
a thunderous free kick in the
72nd minute. Dhanda tapped
her second goal ofthe game 87th
minute to complete the T-Bird
attack thanks to a sleek pass from
rookie Reetu Johal.
Neil thinks that her team is
doing well in fulfilling its goals this
season, including laying down a
foundation for their program, but
they have a long way to go.
"It is going to be more of a longer-term goal," she said. "It depends
on the teams that you play, whether
or not you will be travelling, coming
off a road trip against good, tough
competition, to playing at home for
the first time in the season. The
team has responded well but there is
still a lot of work to be done."
=HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
Neil commended Shayla Chorney,
a third year player and team captain:
"She's tremendous, leads by example
- not a big voice, but very consistent."
It was a stellar team performance on Saturday, staying in line
with Neil's "constant attack" team
strategy - one that hadn't resulted in
success in the first two games ofthe
season, but paid off when the 'Birds
came home.
The next home match will be on
October 3 against Thompson Rivers
University at Thunderbird Stadium. Xi 14    I   SPORTS    I    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,2014
PEP RALLY »
School spirit out in spades at Pep Rally
Connor Gillis
Contributor
It was a scene of frenzied enthusiasm at North Plaza ofthe SUB on
Friday afternoon. While trumpets blared and meat sizzled, a
gigantic bird of paradise strutted
through the crowd, flailing its
wings and shaking its tail feather.
It was the UBC Homecoming Pep
Rally. And if you missed it, you
blew it.
Cries of "free hotdogs, free
hotdogs" tore across the North
Plaza. The varsity football team,
along with Thunder, the team
mascot, had assembled in order
to generate a little bit of school
spirit, and reinvigorate the sense
of continuity between the student
body and the university's athletic
teams early on in the school year.
"It's good to see a bunch of
people being engaged," said
Shawn Olson, the head football
coach. "I think the more interactive and fun things you can do
on campus brings up the whole
level ofthe UBC community and
engages people, and gets people
intertwined in each other's lives,
and I think that's... one ofthe purposes of going to university."
The varsity team's defensive
back, Shaquille Davis, echoed his
coach's sentiments, saying that,
along with the exceptional energy
that accompanies the Homecoming Pep Rally, it's great to see
"that all the players are trying to
connect with the students ofthe
university."
Hot dogs and pep were both plentiful for UBC's homecoming game.
"We expect this year's Homecoming to be our most engaging
and inspiring yet," said Ashley
Howard, Managing Director of
UBC's Athletics Program. She
maintained that events like the
Homecoming Pep Rally "help
make the start ofthe year a
memorable one for our students,
alumni, and UBC community," a
fact which she said "is a perfect
fit with our new UBC Athletics
; Recreation vision and strategy,
inspiring school spirit and personal well-being through physical
activity, involvement, and fun."
The event, which consisted of
such alluring activities as a Prize
Wheel, Nerf football-throwing
accuracy contests, and, of course,
a free hotdog stand complete
with Thunder manning the condiment station, was punctuated
by a special appearance by the
Thunderbird Marching Band,
who brought the house down
with their electrifying renditions
=HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
of Take On Me, Safe and Sound,
and Hail UBC, to name just a few.
Olson explained that the Pep
Rally will definitely have an
effect on his team in the future
"because they'll get an opportunity to see that, hey, there is some
campus support, and that the
student body is aware." Xi
PEP RALLY»
Which Rec class is right for you?
Emma Gibson & Sean Donachiue
Contributors
If you're not a fan ofthe traditional gym, UBC Recreation
offers classes that cater to every
possible taste. Our writers took a
look at a few of them during the
Open House.
Zumba
Good music, socially unacceptable dance moves and a ton of fun
people — meet Zumba, a Latin-style dance workout that takes
the work out of working out. This
is for absolutely anyone: young,
old, clumsy or Canada's Best
Dancer. There's the kid with two
left feet who doesn't have half a
clue what's going on, just trying to
follow the girl in front of her who
might as well be the instructor
herself.
Nobody cares if you aren't
perfectly in time with the music
— if you look around, most people
aren't. Not that you'll have time
to do that, since every moment
is filled with following the new
moves the instructor is throwing
at you on the spot. There are no
"treadmill minutes" here.
Cycle Boot Camp
Zumba takes the work out of
a workout, but this class put it
right back in. And then some. The
warmup will have you hunched
over and sweating. The first song
began with no less than five hills
and three sprints. A nice aspect of
this type of workout is that, while
tough, you only have to push for a
little while, and there's always a
break that you can look forward to.
You cycle to the beat of the
music, which I found extremely
motivating. After that first song,
the next few were a combination
of sprints only, hills only, and a
couple with both. The final two
songs were exclusively steep hills
and fast sprints, respectively. It's
actually easier to push yourself
for longer in this situation, because even though your legs aren't
getting a break, your mind is.
After about 25 minutes it's
time to hop off the bike, but don't
expect a rest. You jump straight
into a heart-pumping circuit-style
workout, while challenging,
don't expect to be staring at the
clock during this portion either —
50 seconds on, 10 second rest for
three exercises per station. There
are three stations — two rounds
of each and you're done.
Early Riser Boot Camp
It can be impossible to think in
the mornings — so don't. An awesome fitness instructor leading
you through a killer workout is
always better than mindlessly
stumbling around the gym. Don't
be fooled by the "warmup" portion of this class - it takes nearly
half an hour, and the running,
pushups and squats are indicative
of what is to come.
Up next is the actual circuit:
four stations, three exercises at
each, twice around, each one focused on a different body part. In
station one, your legs absolutely
want to murder you, but you don't
even touch them in station two.
Rather than work each muscle
only a little before resting it, you
truly fatigue every muscle group,
promoting strength — and that
six pack. It seems to be the case
that the morning crew tends to
be a little more intense than the
evening crew — maybe it's that
bond of insanity tying the 6 a.m.
risers together.
Fk
\l
UBC Rec offers a wide variety of classes, some more beginner-friendly than others
Meditation
"It's your body, it's your time."
Words of soothing comfort uttered
by the instructor remind the quiet
participants of a SRC meditation
session that this activity is all about
relaxation and awareness. Awareness ofthe sensations in every inch
of your body. Awareness of your
breath. Awareness of any pervasive
thoughts threatening the quiet
stillness of your mind.
The meditation sessions hosted
in the SRC are guided, with a focus
on positivity through kindness,
self-acceptance, and courage, along
with visualization techniques to
anchor these emotions to sensations in the body.
Judo
Shoes off. Socks off. Warm up and
stretch out. Watch sensei Kim
firmly grasp his opponent's gi,
the thick cloth uniform of judo,
tripping and tossing him to the
ground. The senior student slaps
the mats loudly as he falls. We
learned all of it, starting with
proper falling techniques to avoid
injury and how to recover quickly
from the ground. We learned that
the throw we saw is called an
O-soto-gari. The first timers pair
up and occupy half the dojo, and
soon the sound of hands smacking
on mats reverberates throughout.
"Timing, coordination, balance,
and strength," said one ofthe
=ILE PHOTO PETER WOJNAR/THE UBYSSEY
instructors. "These are the four
components of any move in judo."
We learn another throw, two
ground holds, three escapes from
those holds, and two submissions. A twenty second ground
hold is worth one half point,
while a submission is worth a full
point, and ends the match. Most
ofthe participants pursue the
sport recreationally, however, the
potential for competition does
exist, should one so desire.
Hopefully you've gained some
insight on which class would suit
you, but incase you haven't you
can check out recreation.ubc.ca
for more. Xi MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,2014    I    SPORTS    I   15
FOOTBALL »
Homecoming heartbreak
C J Pentland
StaffWriter
It's never a good sign when your
punter is your best player.
UBC's Quinn van Gylswyk had
himself a day during Saturday's
contest against the University of
Calgary Dinos, totaling 510 yards
punt yards on 12 attempts. That's
a pretty impressive total, but one
only made possible due to the fact
that UBC's offence was completely out of sorts all afternoon.
Van Gylswyk punted 12 times;
the T-Birds recorded only 11
first downs.
The CIS number-two-ranked
Dinos dominated the Thunderbirds in nearly every facet of
Saturday's Homecoming game,
taking just over five minutes to
build a 21-0 lead and eventually
coast to a 59-11 victory. A whopping 4,245 fans showed up for
what has become a grand tradition on campus — Province reporter Howard Tsamura called it
the biggest crowd he'd seen there
in the past 10 years — but their
cheers quickly turned to stunned
silence as Calgary took charge of
UBC right out ofthe gate.
When asked how he felt after
the game, UBC head coach Shawn
Olson reiterated one word: embarrassed. On the biggest stage that
any UBC sports team will play on
this school year, the 'Birds were
dominated by a Calgary team
that proved they are one the best
teams in the nation.
"[There was] a great show put
on for the fans — homecoming, the
president is here, all that kind of
stuff — [and] I'm embarrassed for
all the people that worked hard,"
said Olson. "We did not come out
with any energy, we didn't make
any plays. It was embarrassing....
Obviously I haven't prepared our
guys well enough to compete at the
level we need to compete at to be a
top team in the country."
The Dinos racked up 726 yards
of total offence on an average of
10.2 yards per play; the Thunderbirds totalled 177 on 3.6 per play.
313 rushing yards for Calgary, 120
for UBC. 37:20 time of possession
to 22:03. 413 passing yards to 57.
Yes, 57. You read that correctly.
Carson Williams had just 18
yards passing in the first half,
failing to orchestrate a first down
in the second quarter before Greg
Bowcott came in and picked up
one on a nine-yard pickup. Williams came back out for the third,
but failed to complete a pass in
the entire 15-minute frame. He
eventually made three completions in the fourth to make him 5
for 23 (21.7 per cent) on the afternoon — not even a good baseball
batting average.
The 'Birds simply looked out
of sorts on offence — not sure
of exactly what they wanted
to do with the ball. Their first
drive started well; Brandon
Deschamps rattled off a couple
strong runs and Williams
narrowly overthrew Alex Morrison who got beyond the defence
and had visions of a touchdown if
the throw were a bit softer. With
some small adjustments, the
'Birds looked to be in okay shape
on offence.
Yet those adjustments never
came. As Olson said after the
game, the team had no consistency, and the 'Birds often
looked confused. Long lobs down
the field fell harmlessly to the
turf after never really having a
chance to be caught, and runs up
the middle stopped after a couple
yards. Yes, the Calgary defence
is tough, but this is a team that
averaged 450.1 yards per game
last year and returned nearly all
starters and a couple blue-chip
recruits. Saturday's offence did
not strike any fear into Calgary,
so they walked all over the
'Birds.
The loss now drops UBC to
0-2 on the season and provides
an early setback in an extremely competitive Canada West.
The only other winless team is
Alberta, and they took Saskatchewan to overtime on Saturday.
Saskatchewan previously defeated Manitoba in week one, and
Manitoba just beat Regina, who
beat UBC last week. Now, UBC
heads on the road to play Manitoba and looks to avoid digging
the hole they're in even deeper.
Two years ago UBC started
the season in a similar fashion.
As they were this year, the 'Birds
were ranked number seven in the
preseason CIS poll, but dropped
their first four contests before
finishing 2-6 and missing the
postseason. It's almost as if their
seasons are better when they
aren't expected to play well; in
2011 they made a surprise run
to the Hardy Cup final, and last
year they banded together to
make the playoffs.
There's still time to avoid that
2012 fate, but changes need to
happen fast. UBC is dead last in
average yards per game at 272.5,
with the next lowest team at 426.
On defence, they've given up the
most yards per game on average
with 633. One category where they
are doing well, though? Punting. Xi
The Thunderbirds leave the field in defeat.
=HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC /THE UBYSSEY
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 14027
Public Open House
University Boulevard - Site B
You are invited to attend an Open House on Thursday, September 18J
mixed-use development proposal for University Boulevard - Site B^
new 6-storey mixed use building with retail/commercial uses ory
of residential rental accommodation for students, faculty andj
Date:
Place:
.and comment on a
displayed for a
d 5 storeys
■
nd Campus +
to provide
es about this project.
attend the Development
this project to be held on
6:30 PM, at Michael Smith
101, 2185 East Mall. Check link
rmation on this project,
www.planning.ubc.ca
rther information:
se direct questions to Karen Russell
anager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
This notice contains importa
may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| S^lfeSSfSQlS^ SUfe gas sa?h«oi SU£M^.
&£!# flsH =l 3JS a^shfe a^# #2|*W7| «HH^.
UPCOMING
GAMES
SEPTEMBER 17
THUNDERBIRDS
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL VS. THOMPSON RIVERS
UNIVERSITY 7 PM
SEPTEMBER 19
WOMEN'S RUGBY VS. UNIVERSITY OF
CALGARY 4 PM
SEPTEMBER 20
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY VS. UNIVERSITY OF
VICTORIA 1PM
MEN'S RUGBY VS. CAPILANO 2:45 PM
SEPTEMBER 21
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY VS. UNIVERSITY OF
VICTORIA 1PM
SEPTEMBER 26
WOMEN'S RUGBY VS. UNIVERSITY OF
LETHBRIDGE 4 PM
MEN'S HOCKEY VS. UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
WOMEN'S HOCKEY VS. NAIT730 PM 16    |    GAMES    |    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,2014
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swollen
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62-Rights org. 6
Contemplation
Christmas song
Complete reversal
Building wings
Airline since 1948
Female deer
Gin flavorer
Actress Woodard
Doughnut-shaped surface
■As resort
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■"You've got mail" co.
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SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS BY SEPTEMBER 26,2014
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64-
COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS
■ Kett and James
■Took the gold
-Busy
Small battery size
-Jewish law
- Pro	
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Connect with
Provide
- Run of bird-song
- Convex molding
- Inward feeling
Writer Grey
-Earth Daysubj.
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Ity
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RRstop
-Apr. addressee
7th Annual
Celebrate
Learning
Week    I
I IDp   Celebrate
V«r O V* r Learning Week
October 25 - November 1,2014
ebratelearning.ubc.ca
@celebratelearn I #CLW2014
^^-Hiw%^
ro.
#
2i
" IBCI      a place of mind
JOIN
as we celebrate
teaching and learning opportunities at UBC Vancouver
Celebrate Learning Week is a week-long showcase to celebrate teaching and
learning opportunities at UBC Vancouver. The event highlights and promotes
student learning and development opportunities and explores possibilities of
further enhancing learning environments at UBC.
This year, Celebrate Learning Week will be held October 25 - November 1 at
various locations on and off campus, and will feature open lectures, information
sessions, student advising activities, poster sessions, workshops and more.
Most events are free and open to UBC faculty, staff, students and the community.
<\\\e Ubyssey
We've changed our pay structure to allow staff writers to
make money by writing articles, shooting photos, or creating
illustrations. For more information, come by The Ubyssey
office in room 24 ofthe SUB or email coordinating@ubyssey
ca for more info.
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Sept 11th answers

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