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The Ubyssey Jan 23, 1987

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 31
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 23,1987
228-2301
Students hit with fee increase
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
UBC students may have to pay
$5.50 more in athletic fee levies next
fall if the University Athletic Council has its way.
The UAC recommended, following a meeting on Monday, that the
Board of Governors at its January
29 meeting increase the student activities fee from $32 to $37.50.
AMS president Simon Seshadri,
who sits on the UAC, said the
athletic department cited increasing
costs as the reason for the increase,
yet approval of funds was made
without a budget.
"Increasing the fees without having a budget is questionable,"
Seshadri said. "There is a responsibility within the athletic department to provide information and
they had three months notice.
"Given that, there should have
been an increase of zero."
Four dollars out of the $5.50 will
go into a facilities reserve for construction of new facilities and most
of the remaining money going
towards a contingency fund and a
search committee to hire coaches.
The contingency fund will help
alleviate the problem of overexpen-
ditures caused by teams playing in
championships.
The university is chipping in
$100,000 as well as increasing its
current contribution by eight per
cent, or $50,000, for a total of
$150,000.
AMS Director of Administration
Martin Cocking said he could not
justify the recent increases.
"For two years athletics has been
collecting $32 and now they say we
need some extra money. Judging by
the reaction of student council on
Wednesday, students are pissed
off," said Cocking.
One of the biggest issues is the
appointment of a business manager
and who that business manager will
report too, he said.
"If the business manager reports
to the athletics director that doesn't
get us anywhere because budgetary
information will still be withheld
from the UAC."
Cocking is disturbed that Neil
Risebrough, former associate vice-
president of Student Services, has
claimed authority giving him the
power to approach the Board with
increase proposals, with or without
approval from the UAC.
"Judging by the last meeting, the
UAC is a bit of a farce," said Cocking." The UAC as a body cannot
make decisions by itself, then why
do we have it? We may as well turn
out the lights and go home," he
said.
Seshadri said athletics is
Risebrough's portfolio but his relationship with the UAC at present is
unclear.
Neither Risebrough nor acting
vice-president Student Service K.D.
Srivastava was available for comment Thursday.
Seshadri said despit all the problems, relations between athletics
and the UAC are getting better and
athletics representatives are admit
ting to problems.
"We're finally forcing accountability in athletics. The sloppy
practices that have existed for so
long will no longer be tolerated,"
said Seshadri.
Cocking said athletics has been a
positive experience but the way that
it is run bothers him.
"UAC has been sitting around
doing dick for two years," he said.
"Students are asking me, what
can we do to tell the university that
the fee increase is completely unacceptable? Those guys want student
input, they are about to get it."
Executives meet
By ROSS McLAREN
Spring is fast approaching and
young hearts are turning to . . .to
student council executive positions.
Most of the candidates described
their platforms to a small but appreciative group at an all-
candidates meeting in SUB yesterday.
Blair Longley, running for AMS
president, said he is in favor of a
student foodbank at UBC.
"I used to live in the bushes
around Simon Fraser University, so
I can sympathize with starving
students," he said.
Longley said he doesn't have
much interest in South Africa as it
is 12,000 miles away.
Rebecca Nevraumont, the other
presidential candidate was highly
critical of what she called "gross
mismanagement of the athletic
fees.''
"Hundreds of thousands of
dollars have been unaccounted
for," she said, adding she has
already confronted the UBC administration over the issue. Nevraumont would also like to see UBC's
board of governors divest itself of
its South African tied investments.
Running for vice-president is
Don Mustard, Carol Pedlar, and
Judy Woodward.
Students elected
By KAREN KLEIN
Election results for the Board of Governors and Senator at large
positions have been tallied.
For Board of Governors, AJma Mater Society president Simon
Seshadri received the most votes while in an upset, law student Doug
Stewart placed a second.
Seshadri was pleased with the results but not surprised.
"The Board of Governors is the highest level of university government. Obviously, the students wanted someone (on the Board) with
experience."
The Seshadri said his door is open for student input and to register
complaints, and that he will ensure that issues will be voiced at
meetings.
Doug Stewart, the second board member, was not available for
comment.
Martin Cocking, AMS director of administration, did not place
and said the results were a "rather devasting blow." He wished
Seshadri and Stewart the best of luck in their positions and is sorry
he won't be able to contribute.
Sheshadri and Stewart will take office at the first Board Meeting
on or after February 1, 1987.
In the Senate race, the results were not as surprising.
Don Mustard received the most votes, with 736 of the 5169 ballots
cast. Along with Mustard, Justin Williamson, Barry Dumka, Jim
Snell and Alex Speers will all take office in April.
Mustard feels the university is so dependent on its students, that it
is important for them to become involved.
Mustard is also running for vice-president of the AMS.
?'If I didn't feel 1 could offer the student body more than the next
person, I would not be a senator. I hope I can do my position
justice."
Mustard, who was recently reelected student senate representative, said the most important issue
facing the executive is student concerns.
He proposed a scheme to pair
older students with new students
during registration week.
Pedlar, current AMS external affairs coordinator, said her first job
would be to investigate rumors that
funds are not being fully spent in
the awards office, and to make sure
the money is spent on students.
Woodward said the position is
important because it is the liason
between student council and student undergraduate societies.
Stuart Campbell, Brett Clipp-
ingdale, Craig Lindsay, Michael
Moeti and Caroline Rigg are running for external affairs coordinator.
All candidates pledged to work to
improve conditions for students:
Some promised to work towards
reduced bus fares for students and
to improve student aid.
Nindy Duggal and Tim Bird are
competing for director of administration. Duggal said students
should be given preference over
businesses for bookings in SUB.
Running for director of finance
are Brad Craig, Don Isaak, and
Garth Miller. Isaak is in favor of
providing AMS clubs interest on
their money that is being held in
AMS accounts.
— Jennifer lyall photo
DEFENSE MINISTER PERRIN Beatty ..." Well, besides helping to improve our defences, perhaps the Good Lord may be persuaded to fix the
Gallup poll too ..."
Beatty calls for armed forces expansion
By RICK HIEBERT
Defence minister Perrin Beatty
said the federal government is committed to expanding the controversial Goose Bay air base and plans to
continue testing the cruise missile,
during a visit to UBC Monday.
Beatty, who spoke to 100
students in SUB 119 on the government's plans to refurbish and expand Canada's armed forces, said
the government strongly supports
plans to make the base a NATO
training facility.
"It's the best facility in the world
from the point of view of having
100,000 square miles open for flying," Beatty said. "With massive
unemployment in Labrador at the
present time, the strong support
that there is from local people could
be of tremendous benefit to the
people in the area of employment."
When asked about the opinions
of native groups; some of whom
have claimed that an expanded base
would affect their living patterns,
Beatty said, "There are two groups
of native people who are potentially affected: the Innu, who are the
larger of the two groups, have at the
present time not taken a hard and
fast position one way or the other.
The other is the Inuit who have
expressed concern. I think their
primary concern is the question of
policy for long term
development . . . that if any
development of any kind takes
place it's something in which their
rights are respected as well."
"I think we (the government) can
respect their rights and that can be
of benefit to everyone in the area,"
Beatty said.
When asked why Canada continues to test the cruise missile,
Beatty justified its use as Canada's
fulfilling its obligations to NATO.
"I believe that NATO is wise to
have cruise missiles," he said. Beatty added if Canada intends to use
the benefits of NATO, "honesty
and integrity" demands that
Canada help test the cruise missile.
"It's very much a second strike
device, it's not a first strike device
because it's so slow. If I were to initiate nuclear war I'd be much more
likely to use I.C.B.M.'s than cruise
missiles," he said.
The greatest  challenge  Canada
will have in the government forces
is to make the forces and their
policy relevant to ordinary Canadians, Beatty said. He added young
Canadians have to be included in
this debate as well.
Beatty said when the present
government came into power, the
armed forces asked for two things:
a feasible mandate for national
defense and the equipment and people to fulfill this mandate.
This process of improving
Canada's defences, said Beatty, includes dealingwith "The defense
and sovereignty threat in the
North" and the need to improve
our Pacific defences.
An improved defence in the
North, said Beatty, involves dealing
with a "growing Soviet threat from
the Arctic", mainly by emphasizing
moving and improving equipment
and personnel in the North.
Beatty said CF-18 bases will be
moved further north, intensive
forces training in the north will continue and the Distant Early Warning radar system will be improved.
One of Beatty's main goals, is
replacing equipment, much of
which is frighteningly obsolescent. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1987
Sexual grievance report coming
A report recommending sexual
harassment procedures at UBC
might be in UBC president David
Strangway's hands by the end of
February.
The presidential committee
originally planned to submit the
report by December, but committee
chair Bertie McLean said the four-
member committee has continued
taking briefs and oral presentations
into January.
"I would like to get it (a report)
off my desk ... by the middle to
end of February," said McLean,
UBC's associate vice president, on
Thursday. "I certainly would not
wish ... to see it carrying into the
summer."
Strangway appointed the committee of four faculty members last
summer to consider a statement of
policies on sexual harassment and
to report to him on their implementation. The committee has come
under fire for its lack of student and
union representation.
McLean said once Strangway
receives the report it is out of the
committee's jurisdiction.
Strangway has said the committee
report would probably be published
as  a draft  in the administration
Oooooops Persky no entertain
The Ubyssey reported incorrectly
in the Jan. 20 issue that the former
head of the Anglican Church of
Canada endorsed the UBC board of
governors plans to divest itself from
its South-African tied investments.
The BOG has sold its shares in two
companies that do business with
South Africa, but has no immediate
"plans" to divest further. Those
responsible have been boycotted.
Stan Persky declined to participate in today's debate over
South Africa with Doug Collins
because of $500 the Debating Society didn't give him.
Persky, a Capilano College professor and candidate for UBC
chancellor, said "I decided it (the
debate) wouldn't have anything to
do with South Africa at all and it
would just be entertainment. If I'm
going to entertain, I'd like to be
paid for my time and they (Deb
Soc) can have me for $500, which
isn't much compared to the $31,000
that was given to Kissenger."
The Debating Society's reaction
to Persky's decision was anger.
Byron Berry of DebSoc said Persky did not inform DebSoc of his
decision until they contacted him.
publication, UBC Reports, so that
the university community could
comment on it.
"If he (Strangway) wants to
publish it, it wouldn't bother me,"
McLean said.
UBC is one of only a few Cana
dian universities and colleges
without formal sexual harassment
procedures. A group of students
started a sexual harassment information clinic this week in the Alma
Mater Society Women's Centre in
SUB.
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$71.97 Friday, January 23, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Medical care system threatened
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
A recent decision by the B.C.
Supreme court has left medical
students thinking of leaving the
province after graduation and doctors are arguing that Canada's
universal medical care system is at
risk.
In a Jan. 7 decision, Justice Kenneth Lysyk ruled the provincial
government has the right to control
the number and location of B.C.
doctors by restricting billing
numbers. Without a billing
number, a doctor cannot collect
fees from the provincial health
plan.
On Jan. 21, two groups representing both B.C. and Canadian interns and residents announced they
would appeal the ruling.
The long-term effects of the decision are uncertain but a number of
other provinces, including Alberta,
Manitoba and Quebec have been
examining the act as a way to cut
health care costs. The immediate
impact of the ruling on medical
students is easier to assess.
"Already people are seriously
considering leaving the province
when   they  graduate,"   said   Pete
Tonseth, medicine 3, and president
of the Medical Undergraduate
Society at the University of British
Columbia.
While emphasizing the need for
more information, Tonseth said
higher numbers of medical students
are paying $100 to write American
board exams to keep their options
open after graduation. If
graduating students fail to get billing numbers in their areas of
choice, or fail to receive numbers at
all, Tonseth said they would likely
leave for other provinces or countries.
Tonseth was quick to refute the
idea, advanced by the provincial
government, that the legislation is
motivated largely by a desire to get
doctors to practice in remote
regions lacking adequate health
care services.
"This scheme is not directed at
rural areas and getting doctors out
there — it is a scheme to save
money," he said.
Tonseth and others see the Social
Credit restraint program as the
guiding principle behind the legislation, thus linking the massive cutbacks in social services begun in
1983.
Although billing number legislation was initially introduced by the
government in 1982, Lysyk's ruling
was the first to uphold this policy.
In his recent 65 page decision,
Lysyk ruled Bill 4 did not violate
the Charter of Rights and Freedoms
by denying the right to mobility.
A 1985 ruling by Chief Justice
Allan McEachern however, said
such legislation was "draconian,"
"Orwellian," and "short of imprisonment, the greatest deprivation of liberty."
Likening the legislation to "a
cancer which spreads from province
to province," Dr. David Mathews,
president of the Professional
Association of Residents and Interns of B.C., said the ruling could
be the "beginning of the end of
medicare."
He said doctors with billing
numbers will continue to practice
within the system, while others,
forced to practice outside, will be
accessible only to those who can afford to pay fees privately.
But Morris Barer, a professor
and health care economist at UBC,
who helped prepare expert evidence
for  the   B.C.   government's  case,
— malcolm pearson photo
PSST! YEA, I'M talkin' to you. Real pretty scene, eh? Well, I own it. Don't laugh ... I really do. I can let your
have it cheap. It's only been used by parkgoers, mostly on Sundays. Drop by the Ubyssey office. Ask for Raoul.
Government moves on forum plan
TORONTO (CUP) — The
federal government is finally moving on plans for the national forum
on post-secondary education, promised in the Oct. 1 Speech from the
Throne.
Provincial ministers of education
will meet with Secretary of State
David Crombie Feb. 2 and 3 in
Toronto to set the agenda for the
forum. The government pledged to
hold the forum early this year, but
has postponed it until October.
with Greg Sobara, Ontario minister
of Colleges and Universities, to lobby for the forum. Luc Rheaume, an
aide to Quebec Education Minister
Claude Ryan, confirmed a similar
meeting was also held there.
According to Boyd Pelley, communications director of the Council
of Ministers of Education of
Canada, Crombie has held similar
meetings in other provinces. Pelley
said he is confident CMEC will be
able to announce a full agenda for
Crombie met in late December    the   forum   after   the   February
Third vigil for clemency
The third annual vigil for Bruce
Curtis, the Canadian student serving a 20 year sentence for
manslaughter in New Jersey, will be
held tomorrow at American consulates across Canada.
Jennifer Wade, a Vancouver
member of the Bruce Curtis defense
committee that organized the vigil,
said the 1982 trial that convicted
Curtis was "most unjust."
The vigil, said Wade, is to call attention to Curtis's trial and to urge
the governor of New Jersey to grant
Crutis clemency.
Curtis maintains the shooting
death of his friend's mother was accidental.
Curtis, now 23, has been in a
New Jersey prison for four and a
half years. His third appeal was
denied in December.
"He is dispirited," said Wade,
quoting a letter Curis wrote before
Christmas in which he referred to
the "pain and hopelessness" of
prison life.
Curtis has decided not to appeal
again, in accordance with the
regulations which would allow him
to transfer to a Canadian prison.
Wade said the transfer procedure
could take up to 18 months, and
that the New Jersey governor could
still grant clemency even after a
transfer.
The vigil will run from 2 to 4
p.m.
meeting.
The forum is unprecedented, as
education is constitutionally a provincial responsibility.
Critics are wary of the provinces'
reaction towards the forum. "I
think Ottawa is going to be asked
by the people who appear at the
forum to take a more prominent
role in education," said Jeff Ince,
assistant to federal Liberal post-
secondary critic Roland de Cor-
neille.
"We're going to be asked to bash
the provinces," Ince said.
"The province that's going to be
the most sensitive is going to be
Quebec — they just won't allow
it," Ince predicted. "I don't think
Ontario will allow it either."
However, Sorbara aide Bob
Richardson said "the minister is
generally supportive of a national
forum on educational issues."
Rheaume does not see the forum
as a threat to the provinces' constitutional right to control education. He denied federal guidelines
would be established.
"It is not the intention of the
federal government to control
education," he said. "Quebec
wants to discuss financing with
ministers from other provinces . . .
it is not dangerous to Quebec's
sovereignty."
said it is extremely unlikely that the
ruling would lead to such a two-
tiered system.
Barer said patients would only
choose to see doctors outside the
plan if there were problems of access, with unreasonable waiting
times for appointments. He added
this need should be perceived by
local committees which will correct
the situation by recommending new
billing numbers.
But Mathews argued this is not
currently the case. He cited the experience of Christianne Maxson, a
doctor who wished to practice in
Kelowna. Although Maxson had
already obtained admitting
privileges to a local hospital and the
statement of need from the relevant
committee, she was denied a billing
number.
"In Kelowna, if you want to see a
female doctor, you must wait from
six months to a year," he said.
"Christianne has patients who want
to see her and a doctor who wants
to go into practice with her, but the
government won't give her a billing
number."
At the heart of the issue is
money. With net health care expenditures of 2.8 billion or 35 per cent
said limiting the number of doctors
is a balanced, reasonable way to
control health care costs. B.C.,
shich has traditionally had more
doctors per capita than other provinces, currently has one doctor for
every 511 residents, compared to a
national average of one for every
577 people.
Barer said economists have
observed the demand for medical
services increases, in proportion to
the number of doctors added to the
system, with additional costs for
hospitals and drugs also incurred.
He cited a Manitoba study of
solo general practioners in Winnipeg during the ten year period
between 1971-81. During that time,
the number of physicians doubled
and the number of services per
capita almost doubled as well, as
patients were seeing a greater
number and variety of doctors.
But Mathews, critical of the
strategy of limiting doctors, said,
"The logic goes like this — if you
have no surgeons, therefore you
have no surgery. Therefore you
don't spend any money. And you
don't spend any money on the
nurses or intravenouses or the other
things    associated    with    an
of the 1986 provincial budget, Barer    operation.''
Policy disliked
By SUZETTE C. CHAN
Canadian University Press
OTTAWA (CUP) — Native
students are frustrated by a decision
of the federal Department of Indian
and Northern Affairs which could
discourage hundreds of native
students from pursuing academic
careers.
Ron Crowe of the Saskatchewan
Indian Federated College (SIFC)
Students' Association says an arbitrary deadline for application for
proof of enrolment constitutes "a
denial of treaty rights for Indian
post-secondary education."
To be eligible for a network of
Indian and Northern Affairs
assistance, students were required
to apply to the department by Nov.
1, 1986, but SIFC registration did
not begin until Nov. 17.
Students had for years been asked to apply sometime before the end
of the first semester, but the
government imposed a new
deadline as a result of an accounting policy.
Because students could not apply
for assistance on'time, Crowe advised students to drop out or risk incurring massive personal debts.
"They are not fully eligible for
student loans, mostly because of
what the Department of Indian and
Northern Affairs can give them,"
Crowe explained.
Emphasizing a possible constitutional breech, the district chief con
sul of Touchwood File Hill at
Qu'Appelle is launching court action against the government on
behalf of 39 students caught in the
red tape.
The Touchwood group will ask
the government to change the
deadline.
Crowe said the issue is especially
contentious in Saskatchewan
because it has the country's highest
concentration of native students.
He estimated the deadline affects
100 Saskatchewan natives directly,
and hundreds outside the province
who wish to attend SIFC.
Despite .support from the University of Regina, its students' union,
the Federation of Saskatchewan
Native Indians and the Assembly of
First Nations, the federal government has been silent mum.
"The Assembly of First Nations
has been trying to contact Bill
McKnight (the federal minister
responsible for native affairs and a
Saskatchewan MP)," said Canadian Federation of Students
organizer Derron Hoover.
"There was a demonstration Jan.
7 at the regional office of Northern
Affairs in Regina, but he's acting as
if nothing's wrong," said Hoover.
Crowe said SIFC will stop appealing to the regional office.
"Dealing with the regional office
is fruitless because it's a national
problem," said Crowe.
Students ref erendumb
An Alma Mater Society referendum on the sale of South
American tied products is set for next week but according to a
Ubyssey mini-poll, most students don't know about it.
At Wednesday's student council meeting, the wording of the
referendum question was chosen:
"Should the AMS, after the liquidation of existing stock, stop the
purchase and retail sale of products produced or distributed by corporations'whose country of control (as defined by Statistics Canada)
is South Africa?"
A list of the Carling O'Keefe and Rothmans products affected will
also be included on the ballot.
A random poll of 40 students in SUB yesterday showed that 28
people had not heard about the referendum.
When a rough wording of the question was put to these students 21
said they would vote yes, 9 said they would vote no, and 10 were
undecided.
Allan Surette, Arts 3, said that people have to decide for
themselves.
"If people want to buy it they'll buy it".
Bonita Hoppen, Arts 1, said "There's a lot of other products on
the market. We don't need to buy those products which are encouraging the problem".
Voting on the referendum will take place at the same time as the
student council executive elections, Jan. 28, 29 and 30. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1987
Hell no
In 1985 the students of UBC learned they were going to fork over
an additional $32 from their meagre budgets.
The AMS at the time, threatened to sue the university. But the
costs of a suit were seen as prohibitive, and the administration offered to set up a University Athletic Council, with 50 per cent student representation, to monitor the expenditures of all this new
cash.
Last Monday, the UAC, complete with student watchdogs,
allowed a $5.50 increase of that fee. And what do we get for all that
dough?
Well, we get a men's ice hockey team, which has a budget of
close to $100,000. If you go to one of their games you will see
almost no fans, bad hockey, and little media interest.
And not only do we all pay for it, now we're going to pay more for
it.
As it stands, the AMS and student representatives on the UAC
should demand a repeal of the fee increase.
Upon the failure of this resolution, students should not only
refuse to pay the fee increase, but the entire athletic fee. The
athletics department would find out rather quickly that they need
the students more than the students need them.
Bureaucracy denies access to Christmas marks
Does your Christmas transcript
matter to you? Have you ever tried
to see it?
Very few people realize the strong
impact that Christmas grades can
and do have on professional and
graduate schools' admissions committees when evaluating applicants.
One would assume that professors
and administrators, who may
themselves be involved in selection
committees, would be aware of this
fact, but it is apparently not the
case. Many professors give little, if
any, attention to the scores they or
their TA's submit to the registrar's
office.
I am certainly not indicting all
faculty and teaching staff based on
the several occurances of Christmas
score errors I personally am aware
of, but these oversights are enough
to keep an applicant out of a professional or graduate school thereby
costing them many dollars to enroll
in qualifying years, or at worst
costing them a career.
The situation can only be improved by all instructors taking a closer
look at grades before they are submitted. But let's face it, most instructors are finished their degrees
and don't give a damn. Therefore,
it's up to you.
So what do you do if you don't
trust your professor to report your
scores accurately, or the secretaries
in the registrar's office to record
them correctly? Excuse my cynicism, but I can't leave my future
in the hands of a bored and tired
secretary at 3:30 p.m. on a Friday
afternoon. The only way to ensure
that your all-important transcript,
that is to be mailed to other institutions, is correct, is to see it for
yourself. This is easier said than
done!
First I tried the registrar's office.
I   politely  asked   each   and  every
secretary in the office to show me
my Christmas transcript to ensure
its accuracy, and each one replied,
"I'm sorry I can't let you see your
marks, it's against policy." Reasons
given for this ludicrous policy ranged from, "I don't know" to "Ask
someone else." Who made the
policy?        Answer: "The
Committee." What committee?
Answer: "I don't know" or "Ask
someone else." Needless to say
frustration began to set in at this
point.
Plan B was to try the faculty office; in my case, the office of the
Dean of Science. The staff here proved slightly more helpful; I was told
my class standing but not my actual
grades. When asked why I couldn't
see my grades, the secretary
answered with the now familiar
"It's a policy, and I don't know
who made it." Let's keep in mind
that these are my grades, not the
Society persecutes business people
Following the controversy over
Jim Pattison's honourary degree,
many vocal, yet misguided, people
have jumped on the bandwaon to
condemn him and his practices.
Pattison's distribution of pornography may be objectionable,
hower, the unyielding attacks on his
business practices by many exemplifies the scourge that truly
dishonours our society: the persecution of business people.
The businessperson, the
capitalist, is denounced by many
who fail to grasp what has brought
society to the level it is at today. It is
a mark of a free society to not
discriminate against minorities.
Racial and religious minorities are
protected, but one minority is condemned at large: the businessper
son. The same brutal injustice that
some minorities are protected from
is regularly suffered by the
businessman. For example, condemning one group and absolving
another, regardless of relevant
facts. When applied to some, this is
abhorred, but it happens to
btrsinesspeople all the time.
Many will deem the businessperson guilty in any conflict with a
labour union, regardless of the
facts, and refuse to cross the picket
line "right or wrong". Many
recognize the worker's right to a living (wages), but deny the
businessperson's right to a living
(profits).    When   workers   want
higher wages, it is called social gain.
When businesspeople want higher
profits, it is called selfish greed. If
THE UBYSSEY
January 23, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
"Hey. . "What?"
"Bet you a beer that you can't name everyone that contributed to this issue of the Ubyssey."
"Okay . . . Mary McAllister. Patti Flather. Michael Groberman. Scott McDonald. Jennifer
Lyall, Karen Klein. Malcolm Pearson. Dan Andrews, Katherine Monk. Svetozar Kontic.
Allison Felker. Evelyn Jacob, Debbie Lo, Jeffrey Swartz, Wendy Baker. Ron Stewart. Janice
Irving, Scott Beveridge. Ross McLaren, Sailen Black, Valerie Harris and Neil Lucente . . .
How's that?"
"You forgot Rick Hiebert."
"I did not!"
"Did so."
"Did not."
"Well okay, but you don't have to be a supercilious twit."
"Qjt»y ■ ■ ■ So do you think tha Ubyssey is going to print funny mastheads or not next week?"
workers' standard of living is low, it
is blamed on the businesspeople.
But when the businesspeople expand markets, increase returns, and
increase wages, it is denounced as
commercialism. When unions stop
working, there is sympathy. If
businesspeople stop working, who
knows what would happen. The
discrimination against this group
doesn't stop there.
There are actual laws which
discriminate against businesspeople
and grant the same rights to others.
If a business charges prices that are
too high, it is prosecuted as an illegal monopoly, while the government is itself a monopoly in many
cases. If a business charges prices
that are too low, it is prosecuted for
unfair competition, while the
government "gives away free"
many services. If a business charges
the same price as others, it is prosecuted for collusion, while the
government itself regulates many
industries to the same price level.
Indeed, businesspeople are
persecuted, yet they enrich society.
In fact, they define our society as
different from many others. They
are the one group which
distinguishes capitalism from
totalitarianism. Workers, farmers,
professionals, scientists, and
soldiers all exist in dictatorships,
albeit in terror, but businesspeople
do not. Their place is taken by armed dictators and bureaucrats.
Businesspeople are persecuted, and
yet it is they, like Jimmy Pattison,
who are the symbols of a free society-
Jeff Friesen
arts 1
secretary's nor the Dean's nor
anyone elses'; I feel I have a right to
see them!
Plan C occurred to me while standing in line to request that my
unverified transcripts be sent out
anyway. It was, to have a copy sent
to myself in addition to the various
schools I was applying to. Well, obviously in their zeal to prevent
students from seeing their grades,
the mysterious "Committee" plugged this loophole by only allowing
transcripts to be sent to recognized
institutions.
Plan D was a lucky one for me in
that I have a relative (my mother)
on the faculty at SFU, so I simply
ordered a copy to be sent, at a cost
of $4.00, to SFU. The story is not
over. Two weeks later, I received a
call from a terribly busy secretary
who had nothing better to do than
inform me that she couldn't send a
transcript to a direct relative. I
don't know about most people, but
I don't mind if my mother knows
my grades, and in fact I keep her as
well informed as "The Committee"
allows me to!
Plan E involved the associate
Dean of Science. When I explained
my situation, the sympathetic Dean
agreed to let me see my grades in a
few weeks. Unfortunately, "a few
weeks" didn't occur until after the
transcripts went out. What does the
associate Dean think about policy?
"It's ridiculous, I remember voting
for it."
I was finally able to locate both a
non-relative faculty member at SFU
who agreed to receive my
transcript, and a UBC faculty
member   who    understood   my
predicament  and agreed  to get a
copy for me.
A few things should be kept in
mind: I was only trying to see my
own grades not anyone elses'; these
grades have the potential to keep
me out of professional school if
recorded incorrectly as did occur
with my sister, a UBC graduate in
1985; at least one recording error
has been discovered on my
Christmas transcript up to this
point. I can only hope that the
transcripts that are presently being
mailed are correct since many professors are reluctant to send out
correction letters to other institutions in fear of tarnishing their own
impeccable reputations.
Obviously, "The Committee" is
too covert to make their identity or
the rationale behind this ridiculous
policy of not allowing students to
confirm the accurate recording of
their Christmas marks, known to
anyone.
The UBC system is a sea of red
tape bordering on a bureaucracy
rivaling any government in the
world. Perhaps we should paint the
general services administration
building like the White House and
call K. G. Young, registrar, Oliver
North, transcript security advisor.
At the very least the president
should commission a committee to
inquire into the feasibility of recommending the possible future alteration of the policy that was originally
recommended by "The
Committee".
Beware, sworn affidavits to use
the washrooms are next!
Samuel J. Gutman
science 3
Being four eyed is cool
I would like to address a problem
that occurs fairly frequently on this
university campus, that is, a "corrective lens vanity". It has come to
my attention that those persons
who wear eyeglasses are unnecessarily discriminated against by
the non-wearing majority. This prejudice is obviously not blatant, but
rather more implied. I say this
through observations, statistics and
experience.
The fact of the matter is we, as a
society, are too preoccupied with
looking attractive. Humans have an
underlying fixation to impress upon
others.
With this in mind, I point out
that two-thirds of North Americans
wear corrective lenses of one form
or another, (this ratio can be applied to be higher on university
campuses). I have observed that
most of the students on campus do
not wear eyeglasses, this leaves the
wearers as a considerable minority
on campus.
It is well known that ey*glasses
are esthetically "unattractive" and
many wearers will attempt to switch
to contact lenses as soon as they are
able to. This is where my observations come into view. Most of my
friends wear contact lenses.
I know a few people who would
not come to school if they had to
wear glasses. Even my sister refused
to wear glasses when her eyes were
infected with conjunctivitis.
Last term I went without my contacts and found people to be more
socially unreceptive. This term, I
find the opposite as I wear my contacts again.
The point I am trying to make is
that there is absolutely nothing
wrong with wearing glasses and that
people should not be so stuck-up
with their vanity as to frown upon
eyeglass wearers.
Gary Mark
science 2 Friday, January 23, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
UBC sucking up to low lifes
It's good to see that despite the
continuation of UBC's shameful
record of toadying to any two-bit
corporate tire-kicker who it thinks
will bring a few dirty sawbucks to
convocation, a few individuals are
willing to stand up and fight back.
Former Alumni Chronicle editor
Terry Lavender and former Senate
vice-chair Jean Elder are to be held
in esteem for their refusal to accept
the UBC establishment's pandering
to Socred hack Leslie Peterson or
porno pusher Jimmy Pattison, both
in line for prominent UBC honours.
Lavender is absolutely right in
stating (Jan. 6/87) that it was wrong
for the Alumni Association to endorse Peterson for chancellor and
use the Chronicle as it's propaganda vehicle. It also shows how
petrified the establishment really is
of underdog Stan Persky, who as
chancellor might actually criticize
the Social Credit government's
pathetic underfunding of education
in B.C.
And Elder is clearly speaking for
many in saying that to honour Pattison with a degree despite his
ownership of a sleazy porn mag
distribution   system   is   uncons
cionable.
The height of arrogance is scaled
by current chancellor Robert
Wyman, who says that any protest
against Pattison's degree would
''embarrass the university.'' He and
his friends have already embarrassed the university by putting forward
Pattison's name for his "outstanding contributions to Canada."
Perhaps someday UBC won't
need to constantly suck up to these
low lifes. Perhaps the fact that such
pygmies cast such long shadows only shows how late in the day it is.
Bill Tieleman
Toronto
In praising Martin Luther King
("King's legacy celebrated; Jan. 20,
1987), Janna Stark has hypocritically led her own attack. She notes the
"overwhelming Arab propaganda
and military campaign" but fails to
mention its equally shameful Israeli
counterpart.
May I remind her that in the
world of power politics, it takes two
to tango. And what about those
heinous deaths of innocent Palestinian university students? And the
countless slaughters, bombings,
and forays to which both Jews and
Muslims fall victim?
Furthermore, if Israeli independence was, in fact, un-
disputable, would it have ever been
subject to so much controversy and
Thanks for help - monitors
We'd like to thank the students
who use Main and Sedgewick
Libraries. Most of them helped us
to keep the libraries clean and quiet
during the fall term. Our jobs were
made easier because so many
students agreed  that  libraries  are
places for research and quiet study;
not for snacks and socializing! We
hope we can rely on students' continued support.
Thanks and Happy New Year!
The Library Monitors
(alias "Library Vice")
r"
BANKRUPT CLUBS?
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WE WANT YUU!
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upheaval?    Brush    up   on   your
history, Ms. Stark.
Finally, by claiming that "Jewish
students join hand with all of God's
children", is she implying that
Arabs are conspicuously absent
from this group? If I have
misunderstood, accept my
apologies. If not, I'll accept yours.
I, too, want to see Middle
Eastern turmoil end. But extremist
attitudes like hers simply inflame it.
Remember, Ms. Stark, Dr. King
was a proponent of justice, not
fanaticism. Peace be with us all —
Jews, Muslims, everyone.
Pinky Manji
arts 1
DAR LEILA
lestamnt
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— only 4 Lebanese restaurants
in Vancouver. This one is the
closest to UBC, offering great
prices.
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(between Broadway & 10th Ave.)
222-1101 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Calling on all AMS executive
election candidates: all those prospective politicians wishing to include an interview in Tuesday's
issue of The Ubyssey. please come
to The Ubyssey office, room 24IK
SUB, today between 3:00 and 5:00
p.m., or on Monday before 4:30
p.m.
UBC
Israeli propaganda equally shameful     1L
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LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
JAN. 31st
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for full refund any time up to JANUARY 31, 1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
228-4741 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Clever premise
lost in alcohol
V>° o^v>\>V^ Ts*'0
^*CfQ       <#* ^W%«f "\>V>
^V* >? .*&> **r»*
»*  *.
Fabulous Frenci
Flight of tricks and magic
By JEFFREY SWARTZ
In dutiful reverence to last year's
onrush of air disasters, James
Graham's slides jab tentatively
through the darkened space, slip
across two burnished "wing section" constructions, only to squa'
oblique and impatient against the
gallery walls. The cycle repeats.
gallery
foil
By James Graham
Contemporary Art Gallery
until January 31
There are only three slides, each
of a newspaper story of tragedy.
We could read the stories, the captions, but we probably will not. For
the images are spread elongated
down the walls and floor, intermittently flashing. The wing sections,
one vertical, the other lying flat, are
dull, diminished by the intensity
and size of the projections in the
darkness. Probably this subordination was not intended.
So what was intended? We return
to the exhibit's title, foil. We have
just this word before we enter the
gallery, and inside its designations
abound. For the wing sections,
these are the objects called "foils",
instruments of aerodynamic efficiency, necessary for stable
horizontal flight.
And flying horizontally in
straight lines across them are the
projections of light which carry
another "foil". Yet this time it is
"foil", the action. To foil: to cause
failure. Thus slides of failed flight.
To cause failure can be a good
thing, like when the forces of evil
are foiled. But what about with
flight, with humans flying in air-
foiling machines?
We believe we have nothing to
learn from such failure except how
to avoid it happening again. That's
why amidst the wreckage we search
for a little black box which will tell
us what happened.
And James Graham's foil is also
a little black box, a darkened
gallery — but there are few answers
inside.
There are lessons here, perhaps
even the lessons of that archetypal
failed-flier Icarus. Like Icarus, our
civilization has extended its
freedoms with newfound
technology, though often such
freedoms are extended too far, with
disasterous results.
Graham's installation at least
breaches the subject, raising questions which beg conclusions. The
message is not didactic in the least,
nor heavy-handed. Yet as Graham's
exhibit hinges overdependently
upon the double-entendre of the title, his attempt at an artful play can
be seen as so much conceptual
trickery. With Icarus, Graham may
be censured for soaring too high
with too little.
By JENNIFER LYALL
The Freddy Wood Theatre has a
hit on its hands.
It's Moliere's The School for
Wives, and though it was written
300 years ago, it's still as relevant
and appealing as ever — especially
when it features so many strong
performances.
The School for Wives
By Moliere
Directed by John Brockington
Frederic Wood Theatre
until tomorrow night
The play is a comedy, but
beneath the farce and melodrama
lurk serious comments about the
position of women and the dangers
of attempting to exercise control
over the lives of others. It strikes a
nice balance, neither too frivolous
nor too heavily moralistic.
Determined not to be cuckolded
like so many of his friends, Ar-
nolphe, a small minded, middle-
aged social climber, has carefully
molded his ward, Agnes, to be the
perfect wife — stupid, naive and
subservient. Having raised her to
the age of seventeen, he is preparing
to marry her, when he discovers
that she has fallen in love with
Horace.
Arnolphe is caught in his own
trap; betrayed by the one he hoped
would prevent the possibility of his
ever being betrayed. Jealousy, intrigue, and plenty of mistaken iden-
ties ensue, creating hilarious comedy for the audience and personal
tragedy for Arnolphe.
Bruce Harwood is magnificent as
Arnolphe, whose initial self-assured
cockiness gradually gives way to
jealousy, rage, and despair as he
realises he loves Agnes "to distraction." His anguish is unmistakable
Coward's fine wit enlivens local stage
By WENDY BAKER
For an evening's amusement,
drop into Coward Cabaret, a revue
of Coward songs and scenes, at the
Arts Club Revue Theatre. The cast,
including musical director and onstage pianist Lloyd Nicholson, have
a wonderful time working their way
through many of Noel Coward's
most popular songs and skits. Their
energy and enthusiasm quickly ignite the small theatre, drawing the
audience into the fun.
The cast does a fine job with all
the songs; the only problem is the
strength of Annabell Kershaw's
voice which, in chorus with the
other four voices, threatens to completely overwhelm.
Kershaw, by far the best singer of
the group, brings an exciting
vibrancy to songs like Louisa and If
Love Were All.
Bernard Cuffling, Kevin McNulty and Karin Konoval all have good
HALDER, KONOVAL .
smooth, quick-paced.
. . solid.
voices, and they blend them well.
Ron Haider's voice is the weakest,
but still good enough not to mar
others'   performances.   The   only
stage
Coward Cabaret
By Noel Coward
Directed by Bill Millerd
Arts Club Revue Theatre
number in which Haider's poor
voice becomes a serious problem is
The Red Peppers, in which he appears with Karin Konoval. Haider's
acting, though, is quite engaging.
Actually all of the acting is very
good.   The   cast   moves   capably
through everything from the
melodramatic caricature of Louisa
to the boisterous energy of Cockney
Songs, to the sudden sadness of
Brief Encounter.
The performer who really captures the relaxed casual humour of'
Noel Coward is Bernard Cuffling.
Whether he is mimicking an English
general in Mad Dogs and
Englishmen, aping old ladies in A
Bar on the Piccola Marina, or
strolling about the stage with droll
elegance in I Went to a Marvelous
Party, Cuffling is the ultimate
Coward sophisticate.
Together the cast provides a
solid, smooth, quick-paced presentation of Coward's works. Coward
Cabaret is an evening of fun, light
entertainment. Friday, January 23,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Decay and attack swans
By SCOTT BEVERIDGE
Welcome to the Zoo Hotel.
"If you go down to the woods today you're sure of a big surprise . .
." Human beings are animals. We
exist by eating, sleeping and
reproduction. The only difference
between us and other living
creatures is that we utilize
technology and communication.
The outcome, however, is not
always beneficial.
film
A Zed and Two Noughts
Directed by Peter Greenaway
Royal Centre
A Zed and Two Noughts, which
spells "zoo," written and directed
by Peter Greenaway (The
Draughtsman's Contract), is a
macabre comedy focusing on the
pleasure we take in creating cages
for   ourselves;   and   prisons,   like
humans, come in all shapes and
sizes.
The somewhat complicated plot
revolves around an accident in
which the wives of two zoologists
are killed in a Mercury driven by a
woman named Alba Buick (Andrea
Ferreol), who loses both of her legs
to an attacking swan.
Searching for an answer to death
and their preoccupation with grief,
the two zoologists (Brian and Eric
Deacon) revealed later to be
Siamese twins separated at birth,
embark on experiments to find
answers to the concept of decay.
They do this by photographing
dead, rotting animals over extended
periods of time. The more animals
that decay around them, the more
alike and symmetrical the twins
become.
And I haven't even given away
the good parts.
The movie is commenting on
forms of decay in our society —
money, abuse of sex and abuse of
science. Conundrum after conundrum is explored.
Unfortunately, one does not
know whether to laugh or look
questionably off into space as people slowly lose their appendages one
by one, and maggots eat away at
animal carcasses in time lapse
photography.
As Alba Buick, Andrea Ferreol
manages to provide most of the
entertainment in the film. Her
wacky portrayal of the legless
French socialite whose libido is in
constant activity is the only completely believable character. She
dives head first into the role and exercises complete control over the
situations she is placed in. One
might remember her from
Fassbinder's Despair and
Truffaut's The Last Metro.
Brian and Eric Deacon as the
twins make less of a mark on the
audience. At times they are dry
when they should be flamboyant,
and the humour usually comes from
the situations they are placed in,
and not from their performances.
Granted, they have not been given
the easiest roles, but next to Ferreol
their "play it straight" attempt at
humour is usually lost.
It is very much a Greenaway film,
and as is sometimes the case with
pet projects, the end result is an intimate collection of ideas that fails
to reveal enough about theme, and
ends up an act of the director's subconscious.
Greenaway fails to give the film a
continuity and gets bogged down in
erratic, misplaced scenes.
Nevertheless, the film is anything
but boring. Add to the cast a few
bizzarities like Venus De Milo (a
prostitute whose dream is to make it
with a Zebra), and a deranged
surgeon who removes gorilla legs
for fun, and you have a film that
has its funny moments, and does
deliver a few insights into our own
insanities.
But it is,'ultimately, a confusing
attempt at the surreal.
*•
&'
:**
cS<
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n*&
farce
as he tries to win her love through
threats and force and finally prostrates himself at her feet in his
desperation.
Yet despite the tragedy and irony
of his position, Arnolphe remains
essentially a comic figure, and Harwood keeps the audience roaring
with his hilariously melodramatic
antics and facial expressions.
Even as Arnolphe is discovering
the errors of his ways, Agnes is
discovering her own intelligence
and developing from an ingenuous
simpleton into a strong willed and
independent woman. In the opening scenes, Victoria Maxwell as
Agnes is a charming, wide-eyed innocent who wants to know if babies
are conceived through the ear, and
she gives an equally convincing portrayal of Agnes' rebellion and
development into a thinking human
being.
It is easy to see why Agnes falls in
love with Horace, played by Neil
Ingram, the very image of chivalry
and romance.
Complementing these three
strong comic performances, an element of outright slapstick farce is
provided by Michael Fera and Tan-
ja Dixon-Warren as Arnolphe's
daffy servants Alain and Georgette.
I dislike very few things about
this play. Perhaps the set is unnecessarily detailed and extravagant, but the rest of the audience seemed to like it; there was a
general gasp of awe and a burst of
applause as the curtain rose. The
scene in which Agnes is made to
read aloud the rules governing a
good wife is belaboured and almost
painful for its monotony and lack
of development.
Towards the end of the play Arnolphe's friend Chrysalde, trying to
be consoling, tells him that
"cuckoldry is what you make of
it." The Freddy Wood Theatre has
made a very good thing of it.
Beautiful images in biased focus
By SAILEN BLACK
From the director of The Killing
Fields comes a biased vision of the
struggle between 18th century
secular and religious forces for control of a small tribe of Paraguayan
Indians. The Mission focuses on the
efforts of one priest to establish and
maintain a mission in the jungle
against initial native resistance and
white opposition.
The Good White Men are clearly
identified in the opening part of the
film: the Jesuit missionaries who
want nothing more than to convert
the native Guarani to Christianity.
They go armed only with their
faith.
The Bad White Men are slavers
who raid the innocent and peaceful
Guarani to supply Spanish and Portuguese settlers with labour. They
go armed with muskets, which (the
film shows) the Guarani did not
have. In reality, the Jesuits had
been arming the Indians on their
missions for the last century.
While writer Robert Bolt may
have chosen to emphasize only the
disparities between the whites and
Indians involved, his characters
seem stereotyped. Guarani did participate in wars against the whites,
and some slave traders were Indian
or mestizo (mixed-blood). The
Spaniards originally supported the
Jesuits, and the Jesuits were not
always strictly ethical in their
methods or claims of conversion.
As a historical treatment, The
Mission concentrates too narrowly
on that small mission.
In spite of its biased portrayal of
events, The Mission's — like the
Jesuits' — intentions are good, and
it succeeds on most levels. As in The
Killing Fields, the
cinematographer's lush and
dramatic jungles give tragedy a
beautiful setting. The jungles of
Argentina and Colombia, where
The Mission was filmed, offset the
film's constant human conflicts.
Some may find this distracting.
film
DE NIRO . . . torn between doctrine and his sense of justice.
The Mission
Directed by Roland Joffe
Vancouver Centre and
Richmond Square
The acting in most of the leading
parts is superior.
Jeremy Irons' noted sensitivity of
portrayal is convincing in his role as
the all-faithful priest who offers his
life to establish a Christian outpost,
only to have it sacrificed by his
politically-minded Church.
Although Robert De Niro
threatens to recreate his Taxi Driver
role, he successfully delivers up a
reformed and devout initiate faced
with a moral dilemma similar to
that of Irons' Father Gabriel. De
Niro's character is torn between
doctrine and his sense of justice.
The Mission's characters face
divisive moral questions. Is the use
of force against force justified if a
"higher" moral issue is at stake,
such as slavery? Should priests
follow their own conscience against
church orders in such issues? May a
church abandon its own converts to
preserve established gains? In all
cases the question is: Do the ends
justify the means?
The film's realism is sometimes
damaged by the military tactics supposedly employed by the Guarani.
By all accounts, they were a jungle
tribe accustomed to stealth and ambush with bows and spears. I found
it hard to believe that, among other
incidents, they would make an open
charge against cannon and musket-
fire. Guerrilla tactics would have
been more realistic in their situation.
Fortunately, the film's flaws do
only slight damage to its effect.
While The Mission's intensity lacks
the massive grief and tragic beauty
of The Killing Fields, director
Roland Joffe has crafted another
moving tale of tragedy and determination. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1987
Dungie Tells All
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Scorned by a high school director
who refused to cast her as Yenta,
forced into roles like Auntie Em,
Lorie Dungie, now 29, has pursued
a career in improvisational theatre,
where she can play whoever the hell
she wants.
Today she contorts herself into a
myriad of bizarre and pathetic
characters as one of Vancouver
TheatreSports' most popular and
least inhibited performers.
But, this lack of inhibition is
new. Insensitive high school casting
directors robbed her of her shaky,
youthful confidence, and it all came
tumbling down on grad night.
Her grad date, with "this totally
ranged "after eleventh hour
negotiations with his sister," ended
in adolescent disaster, "neither of
us were assertive enough to get the
first article of clothing off."
Theatre classes at Simon Fraser
University changed all that.
"It was wild," she remembers
fondly, "If they knew what we did,
they would have shut us down. It
was like psycho theatre."
She remembers, "just hanging
upside down," and "dressing up
and walking downtown in our
characters . . . and a lot of
Chekhov's stuff is about really
neurotic people."
interview
with Lori Dungie
performing in
Vancouver TheatreSports League's
A Night in the Alley
at The Back Alley Theatre
(formerly City Stage)
opens next Wednesday
The moment of which she is most
proud is, "doing a strip-tease while
reading a letter that August Strund-
berg had written to his wife."
It was at SFU that a new theatre
prof, Arne Zaslove, made a big impression on her, and she followed
him to UBC (where he currently
teaches).
Her last year at UBC she dropped
into a TheatreSports workshop at
City Stage, and she shone.
"There was a bunch of really bad
people there that day," she explains.
She soon got onto an improv
team, and entered her first match.
She remembers that night, "I was
brilliant." Dungie had come a long
way from another night, years
before, a disappointing night with
Aaron Swartz.
And she's stuck it out at
TheatreSports for five years now,
doing some Arts Club and
Touchstone shows on the side. She
says it's unusual for a woman to
hang around TheatreSports that
long, "It's so competitive and aggressive, it doesn't seem to attract
and keep women." She figures her
longevity is because, "I've yelled
'piss off back."
In the years she's been at
TheatreSports, she's seen it go from
being a shunned, fringe part of
Vancouver theatre, "People used to
take if off their resumes," to being
accepted to the point where there is
enormous cross-over between people working in other city shows and
working TheatreSports.
Dungie is now teaching the drop-
in, improv sessions that she once attended herself as a student. She
doesn't teach the more complicated
TheatreSports games, but concen
trates on the rudiments of improv:
"You don't learn to act by doing a
play. You lie on the floor and ooh
and ah. We play follow the leader,
screaming and yelling all the way."
The purpose of all this introductory
screaming is, she says, "to create an
atmosphere where people don't care
if they stink."
Next week Vancouver audiences
will decide if they think a new
TheatreSports production stinks —
or not.
TheatreSports, until recently just
the popular late-night tenant of City Stage, has played Godzilla to City Stage's Tokyo, and consumed
the whole building. City Stage will
re-open next Wednesday night as
The Back Alley Theatre.
"Well, it borders on an alley,"
explains Dungie, becoming defensive, but adds that the name relates
more to the internal decor.  "It's
like a fifties musical back alley. It's
a happening kind of place."
In addition to the regular
TheatreSports tournaments every
Friday and Saturday nights at 8 and
11, they're trying something new
Wednesday and Thursday nights.
The evenings will begin with a
straight improv tournament,
followed by The Times of Your
Life, in which an audience member
will be interviewed, and have his life
performed before him on stage.
Finally there will be an installment
of the situation comedy satire Leave
it to Weasel, in which the audience
determines the situation.
Will TheatreSports lose its edge
now that it's gone establishment
and prime time? Dungie thinks not,
and she assures us that the late night
shows Friday and Saturday will remain "a little bit raunchy and
rude."
This Window offers a
distorted, predictable view
By JANICE IRVING
and RONALD STEWART
"... Our next movie on At the
Flicks is The Bedroom Window, a
slick new thriller directed by Curtis
Hanson."
film
The Bedroom Window
Directed by Curtis Hanson
at Vancouver Centre and Richmond
Square
"That's right, Ron. Bedroom
Window follows the story of Terry
Lambert, played by Steve Gut-
tenberg, the veteran of the Police
Academy movies. The film begins
on an original note, when Sylvia
(Isabelle Hupert), Terry's married
lover, witnesses an assault from
Terry's bedroom window."
"Hence, the title of the film,
Janice."
"Very astute of you Ron. As
Terry's boss's wife, Sylvia feels she
cannot come forward as a witness.
Terry, therefore, becomes a surrogate witness."
"But not a very effective one. He
blows it in court, and the bad guy
(Paul Shenar) — also suspected of
raping and murdering other women
— gets away."
"Right, Ron. So Terry and the
assault victim, Denise (Elizabeth
McGovern), plot to capture the
creep and clear Terry's name, since
he's now suspected of the crimes."
"Well, Jan, I thought this movie
was a status quo thriller. The plot
was a combination of Perry Mason
meets Scooby-Doo. My greatest objection to this film, other than the
fact that it is boring and predictable, is that it exploits women's
legitimate fears of assault."
"Ron, I agree with everything
you say except when you call the
film unexciting. It was technically
well-made; cinematographer Gil
Taylor backed up the plot with a
dark, cold and imposing atmosphere, effectively using
Baltimore's intimidating marble
buildings and eerie backstreets."
"Fine, Janice, the film looked
nice. But what about the lack of
characterization? Denise did not
reflect the emotional trauma of a
near-rape victim. She's too trusting
of Terry when he becomes the
suspect. Their only romantic scene
is forced and awkward. She proves
herself smarter and braver than
Terry, and so it is disappointing
when he saves her like the
stereotypical white knight."
"A good point, Ron. I'm surprised that you made it. Terry is also
unbelievable — so much of a goof-
ball that I was surprised the police
MCGOVERN. BRAD GREENQUIST . . . two thumbs down
thought him capable of tying his
shoelaces, much less murder. Gut-
tenburg, with his goofy smile and
adolescent manner, plays the same
role he always does. The affair
which he goes to such lengths to
conceal is nothing more than a
childish game of comeuppance with
his boss."
"Exactly,   Janice.   This   film  is
merely entertainment, and lousy
entertainment at that. It had the opportunity to say something about
the obligations of the witness or the
effects of rape on women, but it
didn't."
"Well, I think we agree on this
one, Ron. Two thumbs down for
The Bedroom Window."
"A middle finger up, more like." Friday, January 23, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
vista
Vancouver has a free Arts Hotline where a
living human being, not a recording, answers
all your questions about entertainment. Call
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday:
734-ARTS.
music
Colin Jamas, at Tha Town Pump (66
Water St.), tonight and tomorrow night at 8
p.m.
Roots and all that Jazz, African instruments and rhythms and their influence on
music and dance in America and the West Indies, at the UBC Museum of Anthropology, Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
The Marriage of Figaro, Mozart's opera,
in Italian, at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
(Hamilton at Georgia), tomorrow, Tuesday,
Thursday and January 31 at 8 p.m.
Nelson Freire, the Vancouver debut for
this famous Brazilian pianist, presented by the
Vancouver Recital Society at the Vancouver
Playhouse (Hamilton at Dunsmuir), Sunday
at 8 p.m.
Faculty Recital, a performance by UBC
faculty member Hans-Karl Pilz on viola, in the
Recital Hall (Music Building), next Thursday
at 8 p.m.
The Smithson String Quartet, performing Mozart, Beethoven, an Haydn, at the
Recital HaH (UBC Music Building), tonight at
8 p.m.
film
Easy Rider, with Peter Fonda, in SUB
auditorium, January 26, at 7 and 9:30 p.m.
The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare
with Elizabeth Taylor, SUB auditorium,
Janaury 27 at 12:40, 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Antonia: portrait of the woman,
biography of conductor Antonia Brico, SUB
auditorium, January 28 at 7 and 9:30 p.m.
galleries
Aspects of Contemporary Canadian
Art, from the collection of the University of
Calgary's Nickle Arts Museum, at the UBC
Fine Arts Gallery (north end of Main Library,
downstairs), until March 6.
stage
Many theatre tickets can be purchased for
half-price on the day of the performance at
Front Row Centre (1025 Robson, 683-2017).
Rattle in the Dash, a compelling story
about two young men driving from Detroit to
Vancouver, featuring some fine performances, at The Arts Club Seymour Street
(1181 Seymour, 687-1644), Monday to Friday
at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.,
matinees Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. Students
hot flash
There will be a blood donor clinic
January 26-27 inclusive in the SUB
co-sponsored by the Forestry
Undergraduate Society and the Red
Cross. The clinic will be held on the
main floor from 1000-1600 and will
include refreshments. A draw of all
donors names will be made at the
end of the clinic on Wednesday for
the following prizes:
• (2) 10 visit drop in cards for the
Fitness Group on 4th Ave.
• dinner for 2 at the Fogg'n Sudds
on W. 4th Ave.
• gift    certificates   for    Earl's
restaurant on W. 10th Ave.
• gift   certificates   for   the   Red
Robyn restaurant on W. Broadway
• gift certificate for Carlo's and
Bud's restaurant on Pacific Ave.
• plus other prizes to be announced at the clinic
THANK HEAVENS
KINKCSISOPEN
SUNDAYS
At Kinko's, we offer complete
copying services seven days a
week. We could be the answer to
your prayers.
kinkcs
Great copies. Great people.
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
half price for all shows.
Jacques Bral is Alive and Well and Living in Paris, a brand new play written and
directed by Mario Crudo and without Ruth
Nichol (the woman who made Sourieux de
Dieu a common expression), at The Arts
Club Granville Island (687-1644), same
times as Rattle, above.
Coward Cabaret, feeling adventurous and
irreverent once again. Bill Millerd flirts with
the boundaries of good taste in mounting a
new show by the young British playwright, at
The Arts Club Revue Theatre (Granville
Island, 687-1644), same times as Rattle, above
the above.
Brides in Space, a new play crash lands on
Granville Island and critics try to figure out
what it was supposed to be, at The Waterfront Theatre (Granville Island, 686-6217),
Monday to Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at
6:30 and 9:30 p.m., until January 31.
Out of the Hat, a musical revue of the
British comedy duo, Flanders and Swann, on
its way to London's West End, at The Arts
Club Revue Theatre, (Granville Island,
687-1644), tonight, next Tuesday and Thursday at 5:30 p.m., tomorrow and January 31 at
4 p.m., Sunday at 5 and 7 p.m., and 1 p.m.
next Wednesday.
Master Class. David Pownall's play about
a fictional meeting of Stalin, Shostakovich,
Prokofiev, and William Hutt, all former greats,
at The Vancouver Playhouse (Hamilton at
Dunsmuir, 873-3311), Monday to Saturday at
8 p.m., Saturday at 2:X p.m., until February
14.
Ramona and the White Slaves, an exciting production, perhaps the best show in
the city right now, by George Walker and including the line, "I would have combed my
hair in January, but they took away my fork, "
at the Firehall Theatre (280 East Cordova,
689-0926), at 8 p.m., until Sunday, with a
matinee Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
Cheers to... paul
LEPPER
AMS#
11741837
You are this week's lucky
Fogg n' Suds AMS Card Winner.
WESTERN
MBA
Learn more about the
MBA experience at
The University of Western Ontario
School of Business Administration
Date: Jan. 30, 1987       Time: 9:30-11:00 a.m.
Place: Room 215 Angus Building
Please join us.
W\f\
V*£
i?v*avi
■■?*tc
o/v£
Ofy£
TRIATHLON CLINIC
Saturday, January 24
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Rm. 60, Home Ec. Bldg.
Coffee and Snacks will be Served
"CYCLE TO VICTORY"
with guest speaker
KORI SINCLARE
(National Cycling Team Member 1981-84)
and
TERRY LEWIS
(Third Place Finisher in Penticton
Ironman Competition)
Topics Include: Cycle Tips for
the Novice and the Advanced
(43C //dMMiAaSs ■.. (jOb  (food  SpOVtiS
/
TheatreSports, competitive improvisa-
tional theatre that is often rude and occasionally clever, at the Back Alley Theatre
(where City Stage once lived, 751 Thurlow,
688-7013), Friday and Saturday nights at 8
and 11 p.m.
Scared Scriptless, another improvised
comedy show by the Theatresports crowd,
this one at The Arts Club Revue Theatre
(Granville Island) Fridays at 11:30 p.m.
A Night in th. Allay, still another offering
from Theatresports, this one brand new, with
three formats: straight improv, an interview
with an audience member, and an episode of
Leave it to Weasel, starring Lori Dungie and
her friends, at The Back Alley Theatre (751
Thurlow, 688-7013), Wednesdays and
Thursdays at 8 p.m.
The School for Wives, in keeping with
Freddy Wood's mandate to present French
Restoration drama in translation, and so they
can wear those costumes again, at Frederic
Wood Theatre (here, on campus, 228-2678),
until tomorrow night, at 8 p.m.
A Family Portrait, an original musical
about a family, written by a high school
teacher, and including a good song, and performed with all the unbridled, shameless enthusiasm of the as yet unburned adoloescent,
at Eric Hamber Secondary School (5025
Willow), tonight at 8 p.m.
Fen, a play by Caryl Churchill, and performed by UBC theatre students not fortunate
enough to receive roles in the upstairs farce
by Moliere, in the Dorothy Somerset Studio
(around the back of the theatre building,
228-2678), January 27-31, Tuesday to Friday
at 8 p.m., Saturday at 5:30 and 8:30 p.m.
CAREERS IN BUSINESS
Representatives from Canada's largest GRADUATE
MANAGEMENT SCHOOL will be visiting your campus.
Come and meet us!
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
anytime between 9:00 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
Room 215, Henry Angus Building
University of British Columbia
FACULTY      OF
ADMINISTRATIVE STUDIES
MDRK
ALMA HATER SOCIETY
THE GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
is now accepting Proposals for the
1987
BRAD CLASS Gin
Proposals must:
!; 1) Be as specific as possible;
2) Include the following information:
-*«-«3$3S««»«.».»^»-»8»e-8«-»W
name of group requesting funds
number of people working on project
name of a contact person (include telephone #)
who will benefit from the project
description of the project in detail
a   summarizing   paragraph   including   the   most
salient points
the amount of money requested
sources of other funds if applicable
:|: There is a limit of one proposal per particular group of ?
? graduating students. <
:!: There is an upper limit of $3,000 of each proposal.
Each group must be prepared to give a short presentation of their idea to the members of Grad Class Council
held at the end of February.
The deadline for proposals is 4:00 p.m. Tuesday,
| February 24th, 1987 and is final. No proposal will be
: accepted after this date.
:    Proposals will be received at SUB Room 238.
: : Please contact Tom  Dallimore,  care of Val in  SUB 238,
:j; 228-3971 if you have any questions.
fccw»»«»»8*y»»a»-g&«*?»-»w-»*»^ Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
AMS SPEAKERS AND UBC
DEBATING SOCIETY
Doug Collins v. Harry Rankin in a debate about
South Africa, noon, SUB ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC hosts leading Calgary Dinosaurs and
nation's leading scorer, Paul Geddes, in Canada
Westaction, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
Bzzr and popcorn fest. 4:30-7:30 p.m., Buch.
lounge.
SUBFILMS
"The Gods must be Crazy," 7:00 p.m., and
"They Fly," 9:30 p.m.. SUB auditorium. Also,
"Rocky Horror Picture Show," midnight, SUB
auditorium
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym night, 8:30 11:00 p.m., Osborne.
UBC ASSOCIATION FOR
BAHAI STUDIES
Presentation on "World Peace, Let it be Now,"
followed by a dance, 7:30 p.m., UBC Graduate
Centre.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr garden and Movie night (no cover), 4:30
p.m., SUB 215.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Michael Wallace   -   "Cruising with a Grain of
Salt," noon, SUB 205.
LE CLUB
General meeting, noon, International House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet level two and three, 8:30 10:00 a.m., SUB
party room
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie Cup game vs. B.C. champions Vancouver   Island   Reps,   2:30   p.m.,   Thunderbird
stadium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC hosts Calgarv Dinosaurs in hard hitting, intense collegiate hockey, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Arena.
SUBFILMS
Rocky Horror Picture Show, midnight, SUB
auditorium. Also, "The Big Chill," (7:00 p.m.),
The Fly (9:30 p.m.), SUB auditorium.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Sushi Sake Night, 7:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m., SUB
party room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Wine and Cheese party with dancing, 8:00 p.m..
Alliance Francaise.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 12:00 p.m., Basement
auditorium,, 2490 W. 2nd Ave.
CAREERS IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
one of the fastest-growing health
professions in Canada
ACCELERATED DEGREE PROGRAM
BScOT in 23 months
(based on two years' previous university)
Application deadline: 1 March 1987
for details write or phone
Department of Occupational Therapy
University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2G4
(403) 432-2499/5949
Super Bowl
<oV
in
ai> The Pit
**
r**
**
*+**
*
°*4-
BIG SCREEN
FREE
Drop into
the Cove
for Lunch
or Dinner!
JERRY'S COVE
Neighborhood
Pub
Order any two of our delicious Burgers and receive the least
expensive one for absolutely FREE when you present this
coupon.
OFFER VALID 11:30am-1:30pm Mon.-Sat.        Expires Jan. 31/87
4:00pm-9:00pm Mon.-Sat.
3681 West 4th Avenue 734-1205
SUBFILMS
"The   Big  Chill,"  7:00  p.m.,   "The  Fly,"  9:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion Service, 10:00 a.m.. Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Frostbite Regatta, 10 a.m., Jericho Sailing Centre.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
Winnie  and  Nelson   Mandela,   free  admission,
everyone welcome, noon, SUB auditorium,
MONDAY
SUBFILMS
Jack Nicholsen in "Easy Rider," 7:00 and 9:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
CAMPAIGN AGAINST SEXUAL
HARASSMENT ON CAMPUS
Organizing meeting, noon, Women's Centre.
STUDENTS FOR CHOICE
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 205.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediate Mandarin class, noon, Buch. B325.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet,   level   one   and   two,   8:30-10:00  a.m.,
Beginners Jazz, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Jazz, level one,
5:30-7:00 p.m.; Ballet and Jazz one in SUB party
room;  beginners Ballet and Jazz in SUB plaza
South.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Study and discussion group, all welcome, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
TUESDAY
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome,  noon,  Lutheran
Campus Centre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz level one and two, 8:30-10:00 a.m.; Stretch
and strength,  noon;  Jazz level one,  1:30-3:00
p.m., SUB party room.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on Obstetrics, Guest speaker Dr. Effer,
noon* 1:20 p.m., Wood #1.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2:00 p.m., SUB 215.
SUBFILMS
Taylor   and   Burton   in   "The   Taming   of   the
Shrew,"   12:40 and 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.,   SUB
auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists group, meeting, noon,
SUB 111.
AGGIES present
FARMERS' FROLIC
with
ELO & WALL ST.
Saturday, January 24th
7:00-1:00
ARMOURIES
NO MINORS
TICKETS: $5
AMS Box Office
AGGIES Office
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977 Vl^
5 - COMING EVENTS
FOOD IRRADIATION A PUBLIC HEALTH
CONCERN? A forum sponsored by Agora
Food Coop. Sun. Jan. 25, 7 p.m. 17th &
Dunbar. For further info call Greg 731 -0894.
FREE MOVIE PASSES to "Dead of Winter"
available in AMS Business Office. Date of
showing: Thurs., Jan. 29, 8 p.m.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
8:15 p.m.
PAUL SAMUELSON
Nobel Laureate
Professor of Economics
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
"THE ECONOMIC
FUTURE"
Lecture Hall 2, UBC Woodward
       IRC Building
10 - FOR SALE - Commercial
VANCOUVER
FUN MARKET
"A   FLEA   PLACE   TO   SHOP"
703 TERMINAL
east of Main St. Skytrain Stn.
8-4 SAT., SUN., HOLIDAYS
'Bargains      "Clothes
'Bikes "Furniture
685-0666 Info & Bookings
Free Admission With Ad
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1975 MERCURY BOBCAT station wagon.
78,000 mi., one owner, good running
cond., $700 or offers. 987-6035 eves.
■66 DODGE CORONET, 318 V-8, automatic,
well-maintained, runs great. $600 OBO.
224-5209.
'73 FORD GRAN TORINO, automatic,
87,000 mi., runs well, snow tires and
chains, needs new tailpipe, $600 obo.
734-5974 eves.
20 - HOUSING
41st & SELKIRK. Female share 3 bedroom,
2 bathroom house. On 41st bus route to
UBC. $185. 266-2636. (Tom).
LGE. 1 BR. & extra study rm. Gd. floor
& own entrance. Close to UBC. Feb. 1st,
$485. 669-7788.
1 B.R. in 6 B.R. in shared house in Kerrisdale
to rent now 'til April 30. $267/mth. Call
261-2368. Close to buses.
ROOM FOR RENT: UBC Village, 1 blk. from
campus. Non-smoker. $230 & $20 util.
From Feb. 1st. 224-2662 (John).
25 - INSTRUCTION
INTENSIVE HANDS-ON instruction in word
processing (WordPerfect, WordStar,
Word). 2 per class. Wordpower 222-2661.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by graduate of Juilliard
School of Music. Morning & early afternoon lessons arranged at your home.
321-4809.
SPANISH LESSONS. Beginners, Inter
mediate & Advanced. Call 224-2447 after
5 p.m.
30 - JOBS
WEEKEND WORK leading to approx. 30
hrs./wk. after exams. Person is needed to
sell Ef accept some managerial responsibilities. Lady sporting goods shop located
on 4th Ave. near Alma. Phone Brett for an
appointment at 733-1173 (except Wed.)
HUNTING CAMP COOK, northern B.C.,
Aug. 15-Oct. 15/87. Must be fluent in German & English. Capable of meal prep, for
15 hunters. Prefer outdoor exp. Send
resume by May 1, 1987: Grizzly Outfitters,
Box 1684, Fort Nelson, B.C. VOC 1R0.
35 - LOST
CAT ESCAPED VET at 16th & Dunbar.
Adult black male, name Sable. No collar.
Friendly. Please call 738-2480.
40 - MESSAGES
CONGRATULATIONS  to  Cody  Smith  on
winning the D Phi E raffle!!
70 - SERVICES
CRISIS PREGNANCY! Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests.)
EXPER. SECRETARY with home typewriter,
will do research, in library or archives, of
any facts, historical or otherwise, required
by writer of university books or theses.
732-0701.
EXCELLENT EDITING SERVICES. Professional editing for readability, organization.
Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547 or 327-4761.
PENTACARE DAYCARE has limited * of
openings for children 3-5. Behind daycare
gym on Acadia Rd. 228-5420 (days),
224-3078 (eves.).
RESEARCH PAPERS
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
1^213-477-8226 49
Or. rush $2.00 to: Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. #206-SN, Los Angeles, CA 90025
Custom research also available—all levels
75 - WANTED
HUMAN TOE. $200 cash. To continue
world famous Sourtoe Cocktail drink. Capt.
Dick Stevenson. Ph. 875-9054.
BOOK ILLUSTRATOR for teachers &
children. Undergrad. Economics bkground
req. Dr. H. Day 943-4911 mornings.
DIVISION 1 mens floor hockey team needs
goalie, interested call Ron at 224-2530.
80 - TUTORING
EXPERIENCED TUTOR
Structural Engineer (M.Sc. in Civil
Engineering) tutors Math. & Physics
261-3761
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
WORDPOWER- editing, proofing & word
processing — Custom, self-serve in eves.
Stud, rates. 3709 W. 10th at Alma.
222-2661.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a pro
fessional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50 per page.
Letter quality. Theses my specialty.
Call Cathalynn 324-5921.
THE ORIGINAL fast accurate typing. $1.25
a page. Dunbar area. Ph. 228-1517.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
Resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies, 224-0763. Student rates.
LEGAL TYPING SPECIALIST, speed and
accuracy. Students discount. Near UBC.
Phone E.T. 224-TYPE.
TYPIST WILL TYPE essays, theses, etc.
$1.00/page. Call 224-4834 after 4:00.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227 24
hours.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Professional elec. typing, fast, accurate,
reas. call Jan 271-6755 Richmond.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses, tech.
equations, letters, resumes, bilingual.
Clemy. 266-6641.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Friday, January 23, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Conscience Canada loses legal battle
By SCOT MacDONALD
Conscience Canada, a Victoria
based group who, for moral
reasons, refuse to pay the part of
their taxes used to pay for Canada's
military, has lost the first round in
its legal battle with the government
in the Tax Court of Canada.
The legal battle is centered over
Jerilynn Prior, a professor of en-
drocrinology at UBC medical
school, who refuses to pay the 10.5
per cent of her taxes that is spent on
defence. She lost her case on Jan.
14 but plans to appeal.
Prior, through her secretary,
declined to be interviewed.
Conscience Canada, which is
paying Prior's legal costs, bases its
position on legislation from 1791,
allowing conscientious objectors to
pay a poll tax, instead of having to
serve in the militia. The tax was to
pay for replacement to serve in the
objectors place.
Edith Adamson, the president of
Conscience Canada, said Thursday
that conscientious objectors should
not have to pay taxes to support the
fighting of a war, even if they did
not actually have to fight. Even if
they do not have to serve in the
Armed Forces, as no one in Canada
is required to do.
Adamson said that paying to
finance a warf for others to fight, is
the "Same as the difference between killing someone and paying to
kill someone. In both cases you are
charged with murder."
Adamson said the group has a
broad membership of over 300 people, including 54 Quakers, of whom
Adamson is one, and "a lot of
secular participation." Adamson
said they "tried to get charitable
status, but have been turned down
twice," but they will "try again."
The Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security and
Children for Peace, have given
grants to the group in the past.
Employment and Immigration
Canada gave the group a grant for
"A job creation program when we
hired four people to help put out a
video"  for educational purposes,
said Adamson.
Adamson did not know if Prior
would win her case. "We don't
have a crystal ball," she said, but
"hoped that support would grow,
encouraged by Jerilynn's
example."
In a survey of Conscience
Canada's members, the group
found that only one of its supporters wanted their money spent.
The rest of the members wanted
their money kept in trust. If they
are forced to pay the unpaid portion of their back taxes they want
their money available to repay the
government, said Adamson.
Adamson said she would "like to
see he government set up an official
fund" for citizens who do not want
to have their taxes used for the
defence of Canada.
"We're prepared to support
search and rescue, Canada's
peacekeeping forces, and the coast
guard."
She said Canada's peacekeeping
forces, on Cyprus, the Golan
Heights, and in the Sinai, are not
funded by the Department of
Defence, and said Canada "Pays a
certain amount into a fund to the
UN, whether Canada is participating (in the peacekeeping,
force) or not."
"Canada's Defence Department
is obsolete in many ways, and it
could be paired down a lot," said
Adamson.
"Search and rescue is not the
Armed Forces priority and they
often do not arrive in time because
they are doing military things."
WEN-DO
WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE
*SIX WEEK COURSE
Location:
PLAZA NORTH SUB
Registration:
WOMEN'S STUDENT'S OFFICE
BROCK 203
Starting:
THURSDAY, JAN. 29/87
3:30-5:30
Cost:
STUDENTS $20
NON-STUDENTS $30
women fight back
Bring your plate
up-to-date
If the decal on your number plate is "FEB 87" your auto
insurance and vehicle licence must be renewed by the first
of March. Set a date with your Autoplan agent this month.
Take time to discuss your insurance needs and changes
that become effective January 1,1987.
For the majority, increases will be under
$25. About a quarter of a million will pay
between $26 and $50 more. For about 5,000
commercial vehicles with larger premiums
than private passenger cars, the increase
will be over $50.
For many motorists, an increase inThird
Party Legal Liability premiums will be offset
to some extent by a reduction in the cost of
Collision coverage. Those who do not carry
Collision will be most affected by the premium increases.
Liability Limits
A limit of $15 million Third Party Legal
Liability is now available for all vehicles.
Weekly Payments Increase
The weekly "No-Fault" payments for disability or death increase from $130 to $145
for victims of accidents occurring on or
after January 1, 1987.
Weekly dependent survivor payments
increase from $30 to $35 for victims of
accidents occurring on or after January 1,
1987.
Equipment of a MotorVehicle
Revised coverage will apply to new and
renewal policies issued on or after January 1,
1987 for most private passenger and light
commercial vehicles. Attached equipment
supplied by or available from the vehicle
manufacturer is automatically covered with
no dollar limit.
Coverage for equipment not supplied
by or available from the vehicle manufacturer has dollar limits:
• a $500 limit applies to coverage for permanently attached sound and communication equipment;
a $1,000 limit applies to coverage for any
other permanently attached equipment,
e.g., special paint finish and canopies.
Where it is of benefit to the motorist, the
new additional coverage will also apply to
existing 1986 policies for accidents occurring on or after January 1, 1987.
Some premium comparisons for motorists with a four year claim-free discount:
Medium priced
vehicle
Lower Mainland
Vancouver Island
Fraser Valley and
Northern B.C.
South
Central and North
Southern Interior
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
1987
Pleasure use only
$441
$402
$426
$361
$329
$349
$381
$348
$370
$368
$335
$355
$406
$368
$390
To or From Work
543
500
527
445
410
432
469
433
456
453
417
439
501
459
482
Business use
666
553
571
546
453
467
575~l
479
494
556
461
475
619
511
525
1987 AUTOPLAN
MOTORIST KIT
Information at
your fingertips!
Pick up your copy
from any Autoplan
agent or Motor
Licence Office.
□ INSURANCE
CORPORATION
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,1987
Choice club formed
By KATHERINE MONK
Amid talk of anti-abortion forces
growing stronger under the new
provincial government, a group of
UBC students has formed a pro-
choice club.
The club is designed to "make
people aware that there are people
who believe in pro-choice", said
Freyja Bergthorson, Arts 3, and
one of the founders of the new
club.
The long term goals of the new
club are to "increase awareness,
and make information more accessible to the people who need it",
said Bergthorson last Thursday.
"Well over 87 per cent of the
population is in favor of abortion,
but this unfortunately is not a vocal
majority", said Allyson Jeffs, co-
founder of the group.
Approximately 25 peole attended
the club's first meeting on Wednesday, which was highlighted by an
address by Nora, organizer for
Concerned Citizens for Choice on
Abortion.
Dr. Percival Smith, Medical
Director of Student Health
Sciences, when questioned about
the need for a pro-choice group,
said he "has never known any harm
in education", and "feels there is a
need for politicians to know there is
a large number of people who feel
that women should have a choice
about reproduction.
Smith added that it was his job as
a physician "to help and discuss
what can be done, not what should
be done."
Campus Pro-Life representative,
Selena Headley, had little to say
about the new club.
"Obviously, we have opposing
views", she said, but expressed no
plans for confronting the group.
"We feel we represent a good part
of the population, and also the unborn, those who can't speak for
themselves".
Students need treatment
By ALLISON FELKER
One in 100 students may have
schizophrenia and many are waiting
to get treatment, said Dr. Barry
Jones, Director for UBC's new
Schizophrenia Service.
"There is no disease more
devastating for those in their late
teems and early twenties," said
Jones.
The service, started in February
of last year, currently has 20 inpatient, 17 day patients and is looking for funding for an outpatient
clinic.
"UBC is in a position to do world
class brain research in
schizophrenia. With proper funding, we have the opportunity to do
something other centres can't do,"
Jones said.
Funding for a clinic is coming
"slowly but surely" he said. Money
comes mainly from government
funded-medical industries, such as
pharmacy.
"Data suggests that research into
schizophrenia receives one one-
thousandth of the funding that is
given to AIDS research on a per
capita basis," added Jones.
The treatment of schizophrenia
lacks funding because it is a socially
stigmatized disease, said Jones.
"There is a myth that mental il-
Protesters
acquitted
Eight members of the Nanoose
Conversion Campaign were acquitted last week of charges of trespassing on Department of National
Defence property because they picnicked below the high tide mark.
The eight women were arrested
last August when they held a symbolic picnic on Winchelsea Island to
protest the Canadian Forces
Maritime Experimental and Test
Ranges, used to test both Canadian
and U.S. weapons, in the Georgia
Strait. They were acquitted on a
technicality: they picnicked in the
intertidal zone, which is considered
public, not defence, property.
Campaign member Laurie
McBride was pleased with the acquittal but disappointed the group
didn't receive the opportunity during the trial to contest the presence
of the test range and defence base.
"(The acquittal) is a victory but
it's got mixed blessings," said
McBride. "We didn't get what we
had hoped to get which was
dialogue with the government.''
The campaign will continue to try
to pressure the government through
political lobbying and protest actions, which may include more low
tide picnics, she said.
The 'Motherpeace trial' created
"a huge amount of support," for
the campaign, McBride said, adding she hopes it will spur other
disarmament groups to hold more
non-violent protests.
lness is a product of our society."
Jones  said  professional  groups
are largely to blame.
"We promoted the idea that
schizophrenia was caused by
families and society. It's like telling
someone that they're responsible
for someone else's cancer or
leukemia."
Several people from UBC have
Come to The Ubyssey for
eyepopping
photo-opportunities.
been admitted for treatment, Jones
said.
"Schizophrenia may start during
school. Often people who have
schizophrenia don't know they have
it." However, other people may
notice changes in the individual's
behavior. Some symptoms are "a
break from reality. The individual
may think people are plotting
against them, and they may hear
voices telling them what to do,"
said Jones.
He added, "they may also
withdraw from personal relationships, and keep to themselves a
lot."
CLOSE COVER
Cain the confidence
and prestige of being
a newswriter! Join
the Ubyssey!
FEN
by Caryl Churchill
A New Play by the Author of Top Girls and Cloud Nine
Directed by Roderick Menzies
(Preview) JAN. 27
Opens JAN. 28-31
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Two Shows Sat., Jan. 31 @ 5:30 &8:30 p.m.
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
The University of British Columbia
Doors Open 15 Minutes Before Curtain
FREE ADMISSION
VC^i items on
^yvN N y>   our menu
' "■" .* 2for1
r      Pizza
Spaghetti
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BBQ Chicken
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get one
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7970 GRANVILLE ST. VANCOUVER
OPEN 7 DAYS FROM 4.00 p.m.
MON.-SAT. to 4a.m. Sun.& Holidays to 2a.m.
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
22B-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon.-Fri    11:30-9:00 p.m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
k    Sundays and Holidays   '
4 00 urn   9 p m
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Station
Master of Public
Administration
Queen's University
at Kingston
A three-term (ten-month) professional graduate
degree program, with an interdisciplinary approach to public policy and administration.
Admission Requirements B.A. (Honours), or its
equivalent, with upper second class standing,
all fields of study.
Information/Applications are available from:
School of Public Adminstration
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Telephone 613-545-2159

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