UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 18, 1969

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128581.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128581.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128581-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128581-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128581-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128581-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128581-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128581-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128581-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128581.ris

Full Text

 Vol. U, No. 19 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1969
48
228-2305
-John kurtz photo
•-■■ y'-^m%% a picture
of Moratorium/:
downtown Saturday.
Story on page 3.
What's behind the women's liberation movement?
On this page and pages 5, 6 and 7 is a special Ubyssey report on
THE WOMAN MARKET
By Victoria Smith & Judy Fitzgerald
Liberation News Service
Women may serve a variety of functions in American
society, but a function all women serve is that of a
domestic market.
And they serve it faithfully, almost eagerly, it would
seem.
American women, perhaps more than any other
women in the world, must fulfill their role as heavy
consumer. If they don't, their whole identity—an identity
created primarily by business and advertising—will be
shattered.
When a woman reads in her favorite women's
magazine that "Unfortunately, the trickiest deodorant
"problem a girl has isn't under her pretty little arms," she
starts to worry. Is my vaginal area ("the most girl part of
you," the ad gurgles) giving off offensive odors? she
wonders.
"Could you be the last woman to be using just ONE
deodorant?" an ad for another vaginal deodorant queries.
She may not smell all that bad, but just to make sure,
she picks up a container of FDS (feminine deodorant
spray) and Alberto-Culver Co. scores another point.
Alberto-Culver and other companies in the woman
market understand the American women. They know
she's insecure, often unhappy with the narrow perimeters
of her life, desperate in her efforts to catch and/or keep a
man.
So the company anticipates a female insecurity that
can be turned into a need, and creates a product to fulfill
that newly-discovered need. If the product is successful,
the company's profits increase, If not, there's always
another "need."
Basically, there are two problems with corporate
America's approach to women-which can apply to its
approach to all people.
First, business can hold no real concern for women as
human beings. It must objectify all women as a "market"
in order to increase growth and profits. Business is
concerned only with the ways it can get women to buy.
Whether the products sold are of any real use, or meet real
needs, is unimportant.
Second, American business creates excessive waste of
resources, particularly through products made for women.
People do not need 50 different kinds of soap to choose
among, or 100 different types of lipstick. But American
companies continue to produce dozens of varieties on the
same useless themes, and thus divert energy, resources and
money from more productive human goals.
In 1968, for instance, $3.1 billion was spent on
television advertising, twice the amount spent on the
poverty program in the same year.
The advanced technological age that America has
recently entered should make for greater freedom for
Americans.
But American technology has generally granted the
opposite effect, and American women are the most
alienated from and enslaved by it. As a group, women
have little control over production and planning. They
relate to the technological society primarily as a consumer
market.
Of course, there is nothing inherently wrong with
consumption. But in American society, women are forced
to consume large quantities of goods and services they
really don't need or want.
Advertising is the mouthpiece for the companies that
create products for the woman market.
On a very basic level, the advertising and editorial
content of women's magazines like McCall's, Seventeen,
Cosmopolitan and Mademoiselle are insults to women as
human beings. So are the women's sections in newspapers
and daytime TV.
Let's look at some of these insults and the ways in
which they are used to keep women in their place as a
domestic market.
Teenage girls are a market in training.
The people who run Seventeen magazine, the slick,
top-selling teenage publication, understand the
importance of the youth market.
An ad in the New York Times, June 18, 1969, reads:
"The Seventeen award to American industry for its
investment in the country's young women under 20".
"Once again advertisers have demonstrated their
realization that youth sets the pace. And once again
Seveteen, their magazine, has broken all publishing
records for a single issue. This August is a new high,
carrying 357 advertising pages, 245 in 4/colour ..,.
Seventeen is the biggest circulation magazine in the young
women's field—for 16 consecutive years, it has carried
more advertising than any other woman's monthly
magazine. That's the strengh of Seventeen."
The "strength of Seventeen" is not that it informs or
educates young women, but it sells advertisers' products.
The ad congratulates American industry for
To page 6: see WOMEN Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 18, 1969
Apathetic trial
for Joe Apathy
By SHANE McCUNE
It could be said that Joe Apathy was absent from his own trial
last Friday.
Only 40 people were present at the noon hour mock trial in the
old auditorium.
Apathy (Walter Clark), arts 2, struggled violently with
policemen John Davies, Tom Wayman, Brian Sproule, and Mark
Warrior as he was led to the prisoner's dock.
Court clerk Dick Betts read out the charges against the
defendant, which included criminal negligence, consipracy with the
U.S. with intent to kill, and general ignorance.
Several times during the proceedings, Apathy interrupted
prosecutor Stuart Rush to protest the accusations, denying the charge
of ignorance on the grounds that "I read Time magazine and the
Sun," and defending the U.S.-Vietnam war, pleading that "It's those
damn Commies they're fighting."
The prosecution pointed out Apathy's failure to participate in
any demonstrations or other protest activities against the war, the
plight of the California grapeworkers, or the recent Amchitka test.
Rush concluded by demanding the severest penalty of the law to
punish Apathy.
Defence attorney Ralph Stanton replied by admitting his
client's ignorance and lack of participation, but protested the
prosecution of one individual among so many like him.
Judge Erik Brynjolfsson considered both arguments before
returning a verdict of not guilty.
Apathy was dismissed with a severe reprimand and a court order
to observe the moratorium by attending the demonstration of his
choice.
Did prof club rig
grape boycott vote?
By COLLEEN HAMMOND
Did the faculty club rig the ballots in the vote on a recent issue?
Some club members are suggesting that in the vote concerning
the serving of California grapes in the faculty club some members did
not receive ballots because they might have voted against it.
A mail ballot taken on the buying of California table grapes
favored purchasing them. A faculty club general meeting hand earlier
voted, to support striking California workers and boycotting of the
grapes.
But several members of the faculty club did not receive ballots
for the last vote, which went 277 to 265 in favor of the grapes.
Some were told that because they were new members a
computer had been unable to address their mail.
However, one younger member of the faculty who did not
receive a ballot said he has been with the club for three years. He was
told his ballot was probably lost in campus mail.
For English prof Ronald Tanaka, the issue became a personal
decision. He came to UBC from California and knows what the
situation is for the farm worker there. Tanaka has resigned from the
faculty club.
Economics prof David Bond, chairman ofthe faculty club board
of directors, said: "I believe that a satisfactory' solution for everyone
is impossible. "There was no attempt that I am aware of to rig the
ballots."
VISIT OUR NEW VARSITY BRANCH - 4517 West 10th Ave.
(1 blk. from U.B.C. Gates)
ffrbank's
Downtown Brentwood Park Royal
10% Special U.B.C. Discount — Students and Faculty
PIZZA
EAT IN .TAKEOUT. DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
HEAVEN
*tiEbb
This week
WlGGl
SYMPHONY
Next week
HIGH FLYIN
BIRD
3730 wt 10th. ave.
224-1415
B.C.'s NEW LOW-COST
CAR INSURANCE
is your auto insurance priced too high?
Shop for a better rate.
DEAL DIRECTLY WITH WESTCO AND SAVE $20, $30,
$40, $50 OR MORE THIS YEAR ON CAR INSURANCE.
A phone call may save you hundreds of dollars
over the years on auto insurance Compared to
the rates of most other insurance companies, you
can expect a saving of $20. $30, $40, $50 or
more .   .for the same protection you have now!
This is not so-called "good driver" insurance. You
need not be accident free or over 25 years of age
to qualify. Even if you are currently on a preferred
risk type of insurance, WESTCO may still save
you a substantial amount of money
HOW CAN WESTCO OFFER
LOWER RATES?
Under the new car insurance legislation just
proclaimed and soon to be implemented by the
B.C. government, all motorists in this province
must carry auto insurance. The driver who fails to
do so will face a fine of not less than $250 or
imprisonment of not less than three months or
both fine and imprisonment. On January 1. 1970,
car insurance will be compulsory in B.C. — it no
longer needs to be sold.
So, WESTCO is a direct sales company with head
office in B.C. and without salesmen or agents.
In this way, WESTCO does not have to pay sales
commissions, one of the most expensive operating costs of typical insurance companies. This
saving is passed directly to you in the form of
lower rates.
These lower rates are available to you now.
WHAT ABOUT CLAIM SERVICE?
Should you be involved in an accident, again you
avoid the middle man. You don't contact a sales
person, you speak directly to a specially trained
WESTCO claims adjuster.
WESTCO has reorganized the entire claim
service system, including their own Claim
Adjuster Training Program, to eliminate delays
and excessive paperwork which are the major
causes of the increasing costs of claim
adjustments which in turn cause higher insurance
rates.
WESTCOs approach is to settle claims quickly,
fairly, without red tape. You'll appreciate the
service as well as the savings.
CAN YOU QUALIFY FOR
WESTCO S LOW RATES?
If you are presently without auto insurance, if
you need additional insurance to meet the new
government requirements just proclaimed,
or if you plan to change or renew your present
coverage in the next few months, phone
WESTCO today and find out how much you can
save
There is no obligation and, of course, no
salesmen will call because WESTCO doesn't
have any.
ACT NOW!
MAIL THE  COUPON  OR  PHONE TODAY.
NO SALESMEN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
COMPLETE AND RETURN TODAY FOR WESTCO RATES.
No obligation—Na salesman will call.
Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print)
Year of automobile —
Make of automobile .
No. of cylinders 	
City
Prov._
Age_
Occupations	
Phone: Home Office	
Married  □     Single  □
Male  □    Female  □
Number of years licensed to drive	
Give number and dates of accidents in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your fault).
In the last five years
Has your license been suspended?.	
Are you now insured? Date it expires-
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.	
Days per week driven to work, train
or bus depot, or fringe parking area
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business {except to
and from work)?	
Car No 1
Car No 2
Yes D No Q
Yes Q No D
Give number and dates of traffic convictions in last 5 years.
This coupon is designed solely to enable non-policy-holders to obtain
an application and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
#1   n
%
%
%
%
%
%
^mm
COMPANY
INSURANCE
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC 1 Tuesday, November 18, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Two-day moratorium rehashes Vietnam atrocities
It was a grim moratorium.
For the relatively few UBC students who boycotted
classes to attend the Vietnam teach-in Friday, it was day
for sober thought and more sobering facts.
In a marathon program lasting from 10.'/0 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. concerned faculty members from science and
social sciences related grim realities about the Vietnam
situation or exploded popular right-wing myths
concerning the war.
The scientist has a responsibility to speak out on
social issues, not as a professional, but as an ordinary
citizen, agreed a number of UBC scientists in a seminar
Friday morning.
In answer to the question of whether or not a
scientist should repress information which he feels may be
of harm to society, genetics prof James Miller said: "The
same agent can be used by society in different ways."
Society should have control of the scientist's
products, he added.
Political science prof Mike Wallace, expressed strong
doubt that a major bloodbath would follow U.S.
withdrawal from Vietnam.
CULTURAL REVOLUTION
"Granted, those presently supporting the Thieu-Ky
government, that is, certain bureaucrats and members of
the military, would be very unpleasantly eliminated if
they stayed. But the point is they won't. They'll all follow
their bank accounts to Geneva," Wallace told 50 in Angus
lounge.
He predicted the less powerful supporters of the
Saigon puppet government, such as junior officers and
-"-Js******* twins |
SILENT VIETNAM PROTEST march Saturday on Granville attracts members from three generations. Dissenters aren't
just radical degenerate hippie university students.
250,000 mass in peaceful protest
WASHINGTON (CUPI) - Three days of anti-war
activity throughout Canada and the U.S. were capped by a
mass demonstration of more than 250,000 in Washington
Saturday-the largest mass march ever held in this city
according to officials.
The march was on the whole peaceful as 2,000
•marshalls sometimes linked arms to hold back the huge
crowds marching a mere block away from the White
House.
But police used tear gas to break up a crowd of
10,000 who left the Washington Monument grounds after
the Saturday afternoon rally and surrounded the justice
and labor department buildings.
Some of the demonstrators broke windows in both
buildings, threw a red paint bomb at the justice building,
burned a U.S. flag, and pulled down a U.S. flag from its
pole and ran up a Viet Cong flag in its place.
The mass demonstration was the second of what
antiwar mobilizers hope will be a monthly series,
continuing until the war is stopped by the American
government.
In Canada students turned out in the thousands this
weekend to protest American involvement in the
U.S.-Vietnam war.
The   demonstrations
almost no arrests.
were   mainly   peaceful   with
About 120 students from McGill university and other
Montreal schools and universities blocked two CNR
freight trains scheduled to cross the border Friday,
delaying them a total of three hours.
The trains were blocked to protest Canada's
complicity in supplying arms to the Americans for use in
Vietnam.
One student was arrested Saturday during a brief
scuffle with right-wing elements as 3,000 turned out for
an otherwise orderly march from Queen's 'Park (the.
Ontario government buildings) to Toronto city hall.
Demonstrations were also held in Calgary, Kitchener,
Saskatoon, Sackville, N.B., and Vancouver (see story
above).
some village chiefs, will be simply absorbed by the new
regime.
He said two recent developments back up this
conclusion - first the North Vietnamese
acknowledgement that some very severe errors were made
in the first years of their regime and secondly the cultural
revolution that has taken place in the hierarchy of the
Vietnamese Catholic Church.
In the past members of the reactionary church were
the first affected by any Communist purges, he said.
A black man's impressions of love and hate led off
moratorium discussions Friday afternoon in SUB
auditorium.
As students listened folk singer Abdullah sang of
the plight of millions of innocent souls throughout the
world whose lives are being affected by the U.S.-Vietnam
war.
The first speaker of the afternoon program, political
science prof Kal Holsti, spoke on Canada's role in the
war.
"During the regime of Pearson and Martin Canada's
essential role was to explore quietly all possible avenues of
solution without openly offending either side," Holsti
said.
"Mitchell Sharp's foreign policy has been restricted
to discussions on NATO and tours of the Middle East," he
said. "The state of the Arctic waters seems to hold as
.much interest for the Trudeau government as the war in
Vietnam."
Economics prof Curtis Eaton told students: "The
U.S. defense budget is now $25 to $30 billion per year.
After the Vietnam war the most optimistic estimate is an
$18 billion decrease in the budget. One set of figures I saw
predicted a $0 to $5 billion decrease."
In his particularly intense presentation, soil science
prof  Jan   Vries   showed   the   thinning  audience   films
depicting the cold-blooded destruction of the Vietnamese
countryside and ecological balance as a strategy of war.
YANKS SPRAY CHEMICALS
As he spoke, American soldiers in the film sprayed
chemicals on farmers, rice crops while other soldiers
collected already-harvested rice into large burlap bags for
dumping over ravines.
In a rather grisly recent development, man-eating
tigers attracted by gun-fire and the sharp increase in food
supply have overrun Vietnamese jungles, he said.
The last speaker ofthe day, zoology prof H. J. Kasinsky,
told the remaining students scattered throughout the
aiditorium that Canada, Britain, Australia and the U.S.
are linked in a four-way agreement to share research and
information on chemical and biological warfare.
"If you're going to be a peacemaker as Canada claims
she is you can't help one side increase its stockpile of
chemical weapons," Kasinsky said.
He said the U.S., now has enough nerve gas to kill 30
billion people.
Kasinsky termed CBW "anti-people but
pro-property".
"CBW reserachers call chemical warfare basically
humane ... It will kill everyone but their buildings will
still be standing."
Approximately 7,000 people marched in two
demonstrations through downtown Vancouver Saturday
to protest the war.
In one demonstration, about 5,000 marched from
the Canadian National Railway station on Main Street to
the Vancouver courthouse. Shouting slogans such as "Ho,
Ho, Ho Chi Minh", and "Withdraw U.S. troops," many
demonstrators carried red and black flags.
Members of the anarcho-syndicalist Industrial
Workers of the World added color to the march by
running with their red and»black flags, causing the rest of
the march to run forward in periodic "charges".
In the other demonstration, about 2,000 people
marched in silence to honor the war dead. Following three
coffins, the demonstrators walked slowly north on
Granville Street to the courthouse where they united with
the other marchers.
The result was the largest anti-war rally held in
Vancouver to date.
Feel scientific?
The academic activities committee seventh
annual science symposium will be held this
weekend at Miracle Valley in Haney.
The symposium, entitled "Scientific
Knowledge and Social Progress", will be addressed
by Montreal lecturer and biologist Hardial Bains as
well as several UBC profs from various
departments.
Interested students and faculty members are
asked to register in advance at the Alma Mater
Society office or at the Academic Activities office
in SUB 234. The registration fee of $9 for students
and $12 for faculty includes transportation,
sleeping facilities and meals. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 18, 1969
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
NOVEMBER 18,1969
One
"What I relate is the history of the next two
centuries. I describe what is coming, what can no longer
come differently: the advent of nihilism. This history
can be related even now; for necessity itself is at work
here. This future speaks even now in a hundred signs,
this destiny announces itself everywhere; for this music
of the future all ears are cocked even now. For some
time now, our whole European culture has been moving
as toward a catastrophe, with a tortured tension that is
growing from decade to decade: restlessly, violently,
headlong, like a river that wants to reach the end, that
no longer reflects, that is afraid to reflect."
jFRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, 1887
Two
"I think life is a very sad piece of buffoonery,
because we have in us, without being able to ascertain
how or why or from whom, the need to fool ourselves
continually by the spontaneous creation of a reality
(one for each and never the same for everyone) that
from time to time reveals itself to be vain and illusory.
"Whoever understands the game can no longer fool
himself, but if you cannot fool yourself, you can no
longer derive any enjoyment or pleasure from life. So it
goes.
"My art is full of bitter compassion for all those
who fool themselves, but this compassion can't help but
be succeeded by the ferocious derision of a destiny that
condemns man to deception.
"This, succinctly, is the reason for the bitterness of
my art, and also of my life."
PIRANDELLO, 19091
Three
"Our universe is not merely bankrupt; there
remains no dividend at all; it has not simply liquidated;
it is going clean out of existence, leaving not a wrack
behind. The attempt to trace a pattern of any sort is
absolutely futile.
"This is acceptable to the philosophical mind when
it is at its most philosophical, but for those who lack
that steadying mental backbone, the vistas such ideas
open are. so uncongenial and so alarming, that they can
do nothing but hate, repudiate, scoff at and persecute
those who express them, and betake themselves to the
comfort and control of such refuges of faith and
reassurance as the subservient fear-haunted ind has
contrived for itself and others throughout the ages.
"Our doomed formicary is helpless as the
implaccable Antagonist kicks or tramples our world to
pieces. Endure it or evade it; the end will be the same,
but the evasion systems involve unhelpfulness at the least
and in most cases blind obedience to egotistical leaders,
fanatical  persecutions, panics, hysterical violence and
crueltv" H. G. WELLS, 1945.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City     Nate Smith
Managing    Moshe Curtis
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire    Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
The rumor hit the office like a
mid-summer tornado on the Kansas
Prairie. (Eat you heart out, creative
writing department.)
Chuck Wagon said he'd heard
something about exams and most of
the staff rushed off to find out what
courses   they're   taking.   Those   who
stayed were Robin Burgess, John
Andersen, Colleen Hammond, Shane
McCune, Nick Orchard, John Llngley,
Christine Krawczyk, Murray Kennedy,
Dave Keillor, Sandy Kass, Bev Gelfond
and Jennifer Jordan. Leading the
no-shows was Jim Davies.
Meanwhile, the editor's office began
to rival the darkroom for weird
gatherings. Finlay's assistants included
Fritz Nietzsche, Lou (wonder wop)
Pirandello, Herbie wells, Georgie
Jonas, Heraclitus, Joel Yates, Gyorgy
Porkolab, Celine, Baudelaire, Crazy
Kraut Shopenhauer, Jean Genet,
Frankie Kafka and Al (the fearless
frog) Camus.
Photogs were Maureen Gans, Dave
Enns, John Kurtz and Dirk Visser.
Sporting types must once again remain
anonymous because Maddin blew it
and forgot to turn In a list.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Oh yeah?
The following letter was left
discreetly on the editor's desk
late Friday. With the letter was a
rather tattered copy of Friday's
Ubyssey, from which the pages
containing 'Tween Classes and
sports news had been removed.
On page 4, the word "flicking"
was circled
Mr. Finlay:
I am returning this paper with
the suggestion that you stop
allowing your writers to print
things like I have circled on page
4. I have torn out page 24, 26 and
27 because they have the only
worthwhile news today. You have
no right to print things (sic) in our
paper — this paper is supported by
the students and this type of thing
is only causing people to ignore it.
If this sort of thing keeps up, you
and your co-editors will become
as useless as you say the AMS is. I
am not leaving my name or phone
number for two reasons:
(1) some way will be found to
put it in next week's paper with
some dirty remark, and,
(2) if this irresponsible policy
goes one, you will see me in
person, and I'll be twice as angry
as I am now. You are lucky you
had left by the time I got here
(4:45).
A VERY IRATE READER
In Friday's issue there
appeared stories on: the Vietnam
Moratorium, the UBC senate
meeting, MLA Dave Barrett's
speech at UBC, the establishment
of a free university by Simon
Fraser University PSA students,
Canada's relationship with racist
African countries, the effect of
global pollution, the effect of the
taxation white paper on students,
the barbarism of the Arkansas
penal system, the experiences of
UBC's blind students and the
Unemployed Workers Welfare
Improvement Council.
Also, there was Bill Willmott's
analysis of the present state of the
U.S .-Vietnam war and what can
be done about it, national news
on the Moratorium, violence in
Montreal, demonstrations at
Montreal's Loyola University,
disturbances at St. Mary's
University in Halifax and a long
feature on the state of things in
Newfoundland.
Also, there were brief reports
on the future of the education
faculty, Vancouver's free
university,   a   club   for   people
playing war, activity in the grad
student association, and
oceanographers looking for
sea-monsters.
Also, there was an article of
opinion by Nick Orchard, letters
to the editor and an editorial.
Also, there was Page Friday,
with a playlet, humor by
Sinclair-Dickin, musical comment,
drama reviews, the last writings of
beat movement king Jack
Kerouac, a film review and one
man's statement on drugs.
And you found 'Tween Classes
and sports the only worthwhile
parts of the paper.
'Nuff said. - Ed.
1
Shaddup!
Editor,
To my right, the proper
method of knitting a sweater is
the focus of (loud) attention. To
my left, two "love birds" are
pecking away and chirping sweet
nothings (loudly) to each other.
Behind me a discussion of playoff
football is the main topic. Ahead,
a game of tag involving crumpled
paper is taking place.
Where am I? Brock study (??)
hall! Come on kiddies, let's get
serious. Christmas is coming so are
exams.
Peace ... and quiet, please!
D. GIFFORD
phys ed 3
Semantics
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In your editorial of Nov. 14
you state your amazement that
anyone could misconstrue your
stand on the Vietnam war, as
expressed by Kula's cartoon.
It apparently didn't occur to
you that not everyone considers
fucking an automatic synonym
for exploitation.
However, no one should have
been surprised by that dismal
cartoon. Offended yes; but not
surprised. It's obvious from your
paper that sex is a dirty word
around the Ubyssey office this
year, and that exploitative sexual
attitudes are the only kind you
recognize and approve of. That's
too bad, because sex is a lot of
different things, not just a
technique for putting women
down. The cartoon just assumed
that everyone shares your view.
The Ubyssey was a good paper
for a long time, but this year it's a
drag. We all lose.
NANCY CORBETT
grad studies
We differentiate between one
person "fucking" another and two
people "fucking". If you do not,
we have utmost sympathy for you
and the state of your personal
relationships. — Ed.
Concern
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
What is usually referred to as
student "apathy", with regard to
recent campus elections, has led
me to some reflections on the
changes which this university has
undergone, and which it may be
expected to undergo in the future.
Senior students will recall that,
several years ago, UBC was a place
of personalities—AMS and
Ubyssey, mostly—who, thanks to
The Ubyssey, reigned over the
students like American football
players. Of some, such as Gabor
Mate, one regrets the loss; of
others, well ... Campus politics,
social events, and public debates
occupied the attention of most
people, who, amid a circus-like
environment, did their work, and,
slightly confused, wondered why.
However, starting last year,
something happened. People
stopped reading The Ubyssey. No
one individual stood out. A sort
of activism, marked by the march
on the Faculty Club, became
noticeable. And, above all,
students were extremely
confused. Now, finally, politics is
dead, The Ubyssey is being given a
kind of critical regard for the first
time, and students are not
confused. What has happened?
It appears to me that UBC has
finally evolved from the
"American", rah-rah class of
university into a place where
students are concerned with their
own lives (to which campus
politics, as they have been, are
irrelevant). This is, of course,
extremely inspiring. But, the
question remains, what of the
students' environment in the next
two or three years? What of The
Ubyssey, for example? Personally,
I hope that sincerity and
meaningfulness become the
keynote of this newspaper and
that an element of maturity and
awareness increasingly informs the
university as a whole.
IAN RUDKIN
arts 4 Tuesday, November 18, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
THE
WOMAN
MARKET
—mcgill daily graphics
What Vancouver women are doing
Fighting the stamp of inferiority
By Robin Burgess
Birth control and abortion are human rights
for women—so long as women do not have the
right to control their bodies economic
independence is impossible.
Canadian working women make less than 40
per cent of what men earn.
The discriminatory channelling that women
face as workers begins when they are students.
So, in a voice that's gaining strength all the time
women-housewives, students and working women-all
over the western world are starting to demand basic rights
they feel are denied to them as human beings.
Fighting oppression collectively   4
In Vancouver the Women's Caucus, dedicated to the
liberation of women is making itself heard particularly
strongly.
"We're-trying to give women the knowledge that they
are members of an oppressed group and that this can only
be fought collectively."
The speaker, a member of the caucus, is Liz
Briemberg, typical of the new breed of feminist that make
up the Vancouver caucus.
They are for the most part young, radical and highly
articulate. They know the problems involved in being
women and they know how to talk about them.
For one thing the new feminist wants more than
equal suffrage-she wants a complete change in western
society.
"The suffragette movement was struggling for a place
within society instead of trying to change the whole
socio-economic structure," said Linda King, a UBC
student and caucus member.
The seed for the caucus was first sown a year ago at
the great SFU sit-in.
"The women involved in the sit-in felt they were
treated very poorly by the men radicals," said Liz
Briemberg.
"They felt they did have something to offer but if a
woman got up to speak within a few minutes everyone
would start talking among themselves."
So the decision was.made to form a women's group.
In early spring, according to Liz, a split occurred in
the caucus and the working women involved broke away
to form a separate group that met monthly at the Labor
Temple on Broadway.
A few months later the breach was healed, and after
some discussion the groups agreed to come together again.
The newly combined group adopted the meeting
place and schedule of the working women's group and
decided to hold one general meeting a month down at the
labor temple.
The atmosphere of the public meetings is kept
friendly and informal—deliberately. The idea is to
encourage new members to relax and talk.
Women students in blue jeans, middle-aged
housewives and concerned grandmothers smoke and talk
quietly over the month's events. Projects are discussed and
criticized.
At a recent general meeting, for example, discussion
centered around the Vancouver-sponsored Western
Regional Conference on Women's Liberation, held a week
before. The conference is the caucus's most ambitious
project so far.
Women from liberation groups as far' away as Regina
and California had participated in the sessions and
workshops dealing with the problems of being women in
our society.
A debate on "female aggressiveness" that had come
out of the conference resumemed.
Simon Fraser University Chemistry prof Margaret
Benston commented, "One of the reasons why you join a
women's group is so you don't have to be aggressive and
competitive as an individual."
"It's good to be outgoing and to say what you feel,"
said SFU teaching assistant Marcy Cohen.
UBC student Ellen Woodsworth agreed and pointed
out that those who could articulate and had experience at
speaking dominated the sessions, a situation that would
have to be overcome at future conferences.
Men are too 'articulate'
The fear of many women to get up and express their
views in public had been one of the problems of the
conference.
"That's our hang-up in men's groups," said member
Ann Roberts. "The men are very articulate, very
theoretical."
An earnest girl in rimless glasses and long hair told the
group that she had participated in women's liberation
groups in San Francisco and Seattle but came to
Vancouver because of interesting rumors about the
activities of the group here.
"In San Francisco," she told the gathering, "everyone
is still in small groups talking. The same is true in
Portland."
New members' names and addresses were recorded
and plans made to hold orientation sessions.
The real action of the caucus happens outside the
general meeting, explained. Liz Briemberg.
Smaller umbrella groups within the caucus, involved
in organizing particular projects meet and plan their
strategy individually.
"For example we realize that child care is really
important, but the group organizing that is just at the
talking stage," said Liz.
Artists' co-op in Gastown
Another specialized group of women artists have
rented a warehouse in Gastown as their project and
formed an artists' co-op. The idea is that by working
together away from the influence of male artists, they can
build up their confidence and critical abilities, said Liz.
During the spring caucus members interested in
education received permission from the authorities to talk
to high school girls' guidance classes about the
socialization of the female.
In one of the bigger projects involving the entire
group last August, caucus women took advantage of the
summer courses for teachers held at UBC and set up a
panel on the subject of "women in the schools."
Wherever they reach out into society, caucus
members explained, they find women suffering from the
same problems and frustrations. It's here that the caucus
is fulfilling it's greatest need.
"The caucus gives women the chance to talk about
their personal problems and see them in a larger context,"
said Ellen Woodsworth.
"So many women feel that you must be like a man to
make it in this society. We all need continuous support."
Liz and Ellen talked about the effects of socialization
on women from the viewpoints of their respective
roles—Ellen as a student and Liz as a housewive and
mother.
At university it is assumed women fall into two
categories, said Ellen. They're either intellectuals or
non-intelligent sex objects.
"In my classes if women are listened to
intellectually then it is assumed they can't be anything
but intellectual.
To page 7: see IT'S
A professional career with
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Our representatives will be pleased to discuss your
plans for a career in Chartered Accountancy during
their annual recruiting visit at the University of
British Columbia.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1969
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1969
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3,  1969
There will be openings in the Vancouver office of
our Firm as well as throughout Canada for 1970
graduates in Commerce, Science, Arts, Engineering
and Law.
Please contact the Student Placement Office to arrange a convenient time for a personal interview
on campus or to obtain a copy of our recruiting
brochure.
If the dates of our visit do not suit your time schedule,
you are invited to call Mr. R. G. WIGINTON, in our
Vancouver office, at 682-7821.
SWING IN
PSYCHEDEUIC
SOPHISTICATION
Absolutely the
Last Vancouver
Appearance of
5 MAN CARGO
Wed. to Fri.
8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Sat. ■ 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
5th Ave. at Fir-736-4304
THIS  COUPON  GOOD  FOR
$1.00
OFF   REGULAR  ADMISSION
WITH  STUDENT  CARD
WEDNESDAY   &  THURSDAY
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP (SUB)
Has
3,000 Records
ON SALE
SKY
DIVING
FILMS-25c
THURSDAY, NOV. 20
12:30 NOON
BUCHANAN  102
WORKSHOP ON
AFRICA
DISCUSSION ON
DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA
SATURDAY, NOV. 22
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
FREE
EVERYONE WELCOME
FREE Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 18, 1969
TAYLOR & BURTON
WHO'S AFRAID
- OF-
VIRGINIA WOOLF
by EDWARD ALBEE
Thursday
Nov. 20
5:00
Friday
Nov. 21
7:00, 9:30
HEBB
THEATRE
50c
It's a combination of all those
little tricks every woman
knows. Like tilting your head
at exactly the right angle when
you ask a special favor. Or
knowing just when to wear that
particular dress. It's knowing
how to squeeze every minute
out of every day and living it to
the fullest.
That's why Tampax tampons
can be mighty important. They
keep you free to be every bit a
woman, every bit of the time.
They free you to wear
your most flattering
clothes. And to be
completely comfortable and confident no matter
where you arc or what you're
doing. The reason's simple:
Tampax tampons arc worn internally, so nothing can show;
no one will know.
Convenient Tampax tampons
lit easily into pocket or purse.
They're completely disposable.
And they come in three absorb-
ency-sizes: Regular, Super and
Junior.
I
DEVELOPED  BY  A  DOCTOR
NOW USED BY  MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE  MADE ONLY   BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE,   ONTARIO
Vn anijel
Mamsm
Wk
is created,
not born
Exquisite Form creates new beauty in
this superbly fashioned line of bras. 3 - section
cups for natural shaping. Lycra Leno stretch
back, sides and centre panels. Angelic creations
in light, delicate lace, or, for extra shaping
and control in a lightly lined version.
Angel is fitted for you personally, perfectly.
Lace Bandeau
White  and  Sof-tan,  sizes  B34-
38; C34-40     Ea. 7.50
D34-42; DD34-42 ..... Ea. 8.50
Lined Bandeau
White only, sizes A32-36;
B-C32-38     Ea. 6.50
>>:.*-'^.3~
;.**?#,?-■?!
f.Tsr.a.*.-. ,..*r"***"i
m
THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME
Objectification of women in advertising is prime grievance of liberation movement.
'Women serve as housewives
to buy more things for the house'
From page 1
"investing" in these young women, much as if industry
were investing in some kind of new automobile or
hairspray."
The focus of the advertising and editorial in
Seventeen is fashion—clothes and cosmetics.
The projected image is young, super-slim, tall, carefully
made-up to look "natural", tastefully (and not
inexpensively) dressed and (despite an occasional
anglo-looking black model) white. The impossible
teenager.
And the youth market booms.
Young American girls move into young womanhood
with a number of insecurities, mostly about sex and boys.
Industry helps formulate dreams
Seventeen and the youth marketers have a beautiful
answer. It lies in the right kind of clothes, and makeup.
You "pamper" your skin, "cultivate the flowery look that
becomes you," and "highlight your hair, especially if it's
brown on the shady side," (Seventeen, June, 1969.)
In America, a young woman's buying habits and
personality develop side-by-side.. Corporate America
insures that the two will not be separated. What she wears
and what she puts on her face become as important to her
as what she studies in school and how she relates to other
people.
If the advertisers play it right, a girl will no more
abandon her Revlon blusher or her Clairol "Born Blonde"
than she would abandon her fondest dreams.
And industry can even help formulate her dreams for
her: Wallace Sterling, De Beers Diamonds, Lenox china,
Springmaid Linen. The make-up, the clothes, the diets,
the hair pieces and hair-colorings for an individual girl all
point to one goal-to catch and keep a man. This
type-casting of women is so obvious in the women's
magazines that it never has to be made explicit.
As the young female consumer grows so does her
spending power. Industry summons its resources to meet
her new "needs".
Whether she's going to college or working in an
office, she is told that she must maintain, even amplify
the image created for her as a teenager.
Her magazines are Glamour, Mademoiselle,
Cosmopoltan, especially if she's white and middle-class.
Glamour calls her "the breakaway girl," independent,
energetic,    strongwilled    and,   of   course,   chic.   The
breakaway girl is an important market, Glamour tells
advertisers.
In fact, she has broken away from nothing. She may
not rush out of high school directly into marriage, but she
still fits herself into whatever image industry creates for
her in a given year.
A fashion article in the June issue of Mademoiselle
begins: "During the big jump from High School grad to
free-wheeling college frosh, the look changes. Adapts,
chameleonlike, to the college spirit. Not only clothes—hair
and faces too."
Mademoiselle tells her she's "freewheeling," so she
can flatter herself that she's independent while being told
what she must wear to college.
With Glamour and Mademoiselle hitting the college
market, Cosmopolitan, perhaps the closest thing to the
girl's version of Playboy, confronts the working girl.
The magazine's editorial policies and advertisers use
the image of the sexually-liberated young woman to sell
products.
American women are far from sexually liberated, a
fact that publications like Cosmopolitan effectively
betray. For instance, the lead article in the July
Cosmopolitan is "39 Men Tell a Nice Girl Like You Want
Turns Them On." Another article discusses the best
tactics" to use in seducing married men. The magazine
never talks about genuine love among human beings.
Sex is just another sales gimmick. The "breakaway
girl" provides an excellent market, but she herself is a
product, packaged and sold with the help of industry and
advertising, to the man of her choice.
Women's World is the home
Marriages mean good business. Every new household
is a new consumption unit, TV Guide indicates in a New
York Times ad, Nov. 6, 1968.
"Nothing makes markets like marriage. There's
setting up the house, and future business in raising a
family. All together it's big business, appliances and house
furnishings to bigger cars."
"Why is it never said that the really crucial function,
the really important role that women serve as housewives
is to buy more things for the house?' writes Betty
Friedan in The Feminine Mystique.
"In all the talk of femininity and woman's role one
forgets that the real business of America is business.
Somehow, somewhere, someone must have figured out
that womf
under-used,
of being hoi
Since a
have no coi
effectively c
the media.
Her W'
McCall's, L;
and Good I
children, be;
The Ji
articles on
The Sun Ci
Church Soc
Love; Audr
League Mot
Only o
breaks throi
'Sell the
The d
generally-1
require mi
rather than
other thing
even more
new produ<
All pe
and busint
their home
Asarr
"In a :
need for ne
"And
new produ
is more ci
manipulate
speed up tl
Men 1
that there
by helping
give her li;
replace tha
So he
meaningful
the family
from gern
cleaning t
course, hei
by feedinf
their wond
To mak
Althoi
middle-to-*
sell to any
pays the pi
So we
York subw
squirming
magazine.
We ha
often of
Cosmopoli
woman nu
And they
cosmetics
synthetic \
Or if
success—th
appliances-
inferior to
around in
decorate tl
Ameri
needs of 1
success is a
But th
should stn
advertising
she canno
want to t
woman ma
An ex
puts the v
grad recall*
and Garni
products t
the recruit
buy them,
put shit in
it."
AndV
run in Ad1
intent of a<
" 'But
"nude  loc Tuesday, November 18, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
ill buy more things if they are kept in the
leless-yearning, energy-to-get-rid-of state
ves."
lomemaker the American housewife can
over the world outside her home, she is
?f from the rest of society, particularly by
is the home. Her magazines — like
Home Journal, Woman's Day, Redbook,
:keeping — talk almost exclusively about
food and housekeeping.
;sue of McCall's, for instance, includes
brnia and New Orleans patios: Beauty:
rs, Menues for the Family Reunion, The
id Supper at the Sea; A New Life, a New
lepburn at 40; The Case Against Little
uid the Faith of Mamie Eisenhower,
tide — The Revolt of the Young Priests -
ie perimeters of the woman's world.
hat they ought to want'
work   of   the   American   housewife   is
» -arid  repetitive-and  certainly  doesn't
hought. Business is aware of this. But
g to alleviate her work so she is free to do
porations in the woman market bind her
eating new household problems and then
"solve" those problems,
desire creative forms of self-expression,
tows housewives can be convinced that
ag tasks are creative.
:ional research expert put it:
iterprise economy, we have to develop a
iducts.
that we have to liberate women to desire
'e help them rediscover that homemaking
than to compete with men. This can be
; sell them what they ought to want,
onscious, move it along."
is motivational manipulator understand
ip to be filled in the housewife's life-not
e conditions and institutions that would
re meaning, but by selling her things to
ling.
ves are told, of course, your work is
important. Why, mother is important to
is the protector—she protects her family
using Lysol spray disinfectant and by
let bowl regularly with Sani-Flush. Of
las meaning. She keeps her family healthy
l "Wonder Bread to make the most of
rs."
look like the models
iost advertising is aimed at the white,
middle-income American, industry will
ieh or poor, black or white, as long as she
scenes like the one we observed on a New
poor Puerto Rican woman, with children
i her, reading the latest issue of Vogue
ked with young girls from poor families,
1 or ethnic minorities, who read
id Glamour. They learn that the way a
is by looking like the models in the ads.
large parts of their salaries on clothes,
:h they apply too generously) and
ces that fool no one.
lan simply can't afford all the regalia of
tty products, the clothes, the household
lay see herself as a failure as a woman, as
amourous magazine creatures who swish
scarves,  go on high protein diets or
;ng rooms in Italian provincial,
dustry doesn't even pretend to meet the
American women. Beauty and feminine
thing, a thing that requires money,
sn't mean that poor or non-white women
o fit the image created by business and
woman can afford the image financially,
d it in terms of her humanity. We just
jut the class and racial nature of the
from Forbes Magazine, April 15, 1968,
;rass process on the line: "One Harvard
i-campus interview with a P&G (Proctor
;cruiter several years back. 'We sell
:n't much different from anyone else's',
him. 'We sell them because someone will
:cause they are socially good. If we could
and the customer would buy it, we'd sell
fer the Magazine Publisher Association
g Age, April 21, 1969, helps clarify the
ng:
;r' " (says a Beautiful Blonde modeling a
shion)  "  'Underwear would hide my
fashion accessories.' "
"It wasn't long ago that all exposure was indecent.
Today it's vogue. Admittedly spunky. But not spurned
even in the safe suburbs.
"How did it happen?
"Magazines.
"Magazines turned legs into a rainbow. Magazines
convinced a gal she needed a flutter of fur where plain
little eyelashes used to wink.
"Magazines have the power to make a girl forget her
waist exists. And the very next year, make her buy a belt
for every dress she owns...
"Magazines help distressed damsels remake their
wardrobes, faces, hair, body. And sometimes their whole
way of being.
"And the ladies love it. And beg for more.
"When she gets involved with herself and fashion, in
any magazine, she's a captive cover to cover..."
When you're a "captive cover to cover," all the talk
about "breakaway girls," and happy homemakers with
more free time, more money and the powere of
femininity sounds pretty irrelevant.
And the "ladies" don't really "love" being captives;
they are afraid not to play the game. The roles a woman
can hold in American society are so limited that to
relinquish her function as consumer (and all that involves)
would be very threatening.
A woman is a body, not a person
So as captives, American women continue to carry a
heavy social and economic burden that allows American
corporations to expand markets and increase profits.
It is ironic that as little as an American woman may
think of herself, business brains think she's great, in
somewhat the same way that Standard Oil of New Jersey,
which holds heavy interests in Latin America, thinks the
Venezuelan workers are great.
It is useless and absurd to ask corporations to think
of women as human beings. Corporations cannot possibly
do this.
In fact, as long as there are markets, prices, buying
and selling and profits, technology cannot be used in
human ways. As long as technology is controlled by men
pursuing profit and corporate expansion, human beings,
especially women, cannot participate except as
investments and markets.
Alice Embree clarifies the transformation of woman
as human being to woman as object:
"A woman is supposed to be a body, not a person—a
decorated body. If she can successfully manage that
transformation, then she can market herself for a man.
The commercial creates commercialized people in its own
image; and the marketed commodities, create people who
think of themselves as marketable comodities."
Think about these things the next time you pick up
one of your favorite women's magazines. Perhaps your
human (and naturally beautiful) face will tingle from a
corporate slap.
It's women
vs. capitalism
From page 5
The main difficulty however, she pointed out is that
many women students feel forced to cash in on their
"femininity".
"If you're a girl and you're asking for an extension on
a late essay from a prof you don't talk rationally, you
come across with the feminine charms".
Housewives, caucus members agree, are among the
most oppressed of all western women.
The labor of these women who play the essential role
as homeowners and mothers is accorded no value by
society's measure of value-money, one group publication
notes.
"A man will help his wife with the housework," said
Liz, but it's always done as a kind of concession. The
woman feels guilty because she's been socialized to feel
this way."
As the mother of two children under five, Liz,
attacked the concept that it is unnatural for mothers to
leave young children in order to work or go about the
process of leading their own lives.
"A women at a faculty party was telling me that since
she's started spending a few hours away from the house
during the day the relationship between her and her child
have improved 100 per cent," said Liz.
Most important, the women fighting for their
liberation do realize very clearly the enormous
consequences of the changes they're striving for.
"So many of these ideas about women are
deep-rooted within our capitalist society," said Ellen.
"To attain any of our objectives there has to be a
radical change in the society we live in. That's not
something that will happen in one generation."
A uditions for
ii
AS YOU LIKE IT"
by Wm. Shakespeare
Thursday, Nov. 20 Friday, Nov. 21
Room 112 — Frederic Wood Theatre
12:30 - 4:30 p.m.
- STUDENTS and STAFF WELCOME -
GRADUATION
Special r«fe$ oa Grad 3P6jrtraits »5W ia    ■*.
effect at CkmpMI Stodfo'8' where
we've been taslda^ .Orad Portraits for
&epast2»yedN;    ' '■'[     ■   ••./'-
' c&ippbe'il, ^^^'^^^^m^f\^ ';*.
; <mes of $oa^:$lpcffl^
. ■   ,.-,.*-     . ■,**■- --'.-■>*, V-i*.' •£,*>.!./•» x->., -.->*». ■**•*.-.■-'■    -'*--
•' xQwam^%$$&?$£. •w*if^r-f<Mt'^.
V '-- „ •'■?   J?* TPRSwT™^'''?**™ "J*^*' "-.t ■.«'"-Tift-v**-*
■."TmWBRsfW
Pte*m«e
Wi*-* *   *
d'-M
x*:
2580 BURRARD STRBBT VAHCQUVEflf*, RC.
TONIGHT - 8 P.M.
"Brim Brtinance."
"ArtontsMnf VfrtrosHjr... A Phenomenon!'
"Such Consummate Artistry Is A Rare Experience!":
"Roused His Audience To Thunderous Applause!"
"Subtle, Amating Virtuosity Simply Unbelievable!"
New York Times
Het Parool, Amsterdam
Aftonbladet, Stockholm
New Dally, London
Frankfurt Allgemeine
BALLROOM - SUB.
U.B.C. Students $1.50
Others $3.00
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT DOOR
o     -     .   ,      - "i"> '- /-'A''*SX;#& ' ' ••*• s**",*r-i *<'W\
TONIGHT - 8 P.M. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 18, 1969
Food wanted for poor
By JOHN LINGLEY
A group of UBC students is
planning a city-wide effort to raise
money for the purchase of food
for Vancouver's poor.
The campaign, organized by
student members and friends of
the Unemployed Citizens' Welfare
Improvement Council, is part of ]
the group's attempt to remedy
some of the abuses of Vancouver's
welfare program.
The program was initiated at a
meeting Sunday. Jeff Marvin, arts_
7, said members of various
campus organizations were invited
to the meeting and were asked for
their groups' support.
"Since poverty is beyond any
ideological considerations, we feel
all groups can help," Marvin said.
The Alma Mater Society was
asked to send a representative but
none attended.
The food blitz will take place
Dec. 3 and 4. Money raised will be
turned over to the UCWIC, who
will use it for the purchase of
food.
The UCWIC, made up of
welfare recipients who have
determined to do something
about the present system's faults,
can manage distribution far more
effectively than anything the city
does, said Marvin.
On Dec. 3, a campus-wide
campaign will attempt to raise
money from the students and to
enlist volunteers.
The following day, students
will move into Vancouver to
continue their efforts and to make
known the state of the city's
welfare program as the UCWIC
sees it. The group hopes to enlist
2,000 students to help.
A rally is planned on Dec. 2 to
initiate the campaign. Marvin said
the    group    will    have    some
Bellingham college
has piggy contest
BELLINGHAM, Wash. (Staff) - A pregnant pig is the
homecoming queen at Western Washington State College here.
The pig, whose name is Grenalda, weighs 345 lbs. and was
sponsored in the contest by the college rugby team.
Two of the other three candidates withdrew from the race when
they found out they were running against a pig.
David Tomaras, head of the athletic department at the college,
suggested that due to the pig's delicate condition the usual formalities
be dispensed with.
The pig did not receive the regular helicopter ride and red carpet
treatment, usually accorded a homecoming queen, but was crowned at
a simple ceremony.
UBC  English  Department  presents  ALBEE'S
WHO'S AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF
with ELIZABETH TAYLOR & RICHARD BURTON
HEBB
THEATRE
50c
Thurs. Nov. 20 - 5:00
Fri. Nov. 21 - 7:00
9:30
(DihUndbosL
0Aamatic
Our    new    Fall   collection    is    contemporary    in
design   .   .   .   traditional   in   quality.
CONRAD MAINES -
795
West
Georgia
•JEWELRY  UP.
Special  10%   Discount to Students & Faculty
prominent social workers and!
politicians as speakers.
"This is an opportunity to
frame links between the university
and   the   community,"   he   said.
He said an information booth
will soon be set up in SUB.
HEAVEN
i 3-/30wTltth-224-
224^415
nm
•EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
STOCKS and BONDS
An Outstanding Investment Opportunity!
Anyone Wishing a Free Copy of the Report
Published by the Investment Survey of Canada
on
VALLEY COPPER MINES LTD.
Please Fill Out Attached Coupon and Mail to:
Please Send Free Copy of Report
on VALLEY COPPER MINES LTD.
NAME	
ADDRESS	
CITY PROV.
TEL. No	
J
MR. BARRY GILL,
534  Burrard  St.,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
Ph. 688-3477 Tuesday, November 18, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
PFage Tuesday
As announced in last week's Page Friday, THE FALL AND REDEMPTION OF
MAN by John  Bowen, will be presented in the Dorothy Somerset Studio
November 19 to 22 under the direction of John Brockington.
This play is a reworking of the English Medieval Mystery cycles, and
basically follows the story of the Bible from the Creation of man to
Crucifixion. Among other episodes, it includes for instance the
famous   "Second   Shepherds   Play",   the  "Slaughter  of  the
Innocents", and the story of Cain and Abel.
The evening is composed of many small playlets skilfully
woven together.  The whole play is designed to be
performed by a a small company of twelve actors,
who play at least six parts each — ranging from
Cain's horse, to Christ himself.
The cast will be all UBC theatre students,
and the design is by Astrid Janson.
Tickets   are   available   in   Freddy
Wood 207 (or phone 228-2678);
Students $1.00; adults $1.75.
>K     ' ;    ~N-R-
De Sade
The wrong
perversions
By MARK JACQUES
The film De Sade propounds the thesis that the Divine Marquis
really wasn't a bad guy after all, since his mind was messed up by his
parents, his lecherous uncle, his frigid wife and bitchy mother-in-law.
With all those nasty people, how could you expect a guy to stay
normal? Like he says near the end, "I could have been different...
perhaps some day you'll be able to understand me."
In short, this is a nice simple tale (for simple minds) almost
worthy of Walt Disney. But something (?) gets lost in the translation,
a ridiculous mumbo-jumbo of flashbacks which prompted someone
sitting in front of me in the show to exclaim "What's going on?"
about halfway through the film.
About that time I was asking, "All right, when's he going to
wake up?" Patience was rewarded in time, and sure enough, at the
film's end, the Marquis (played by Keir Dullea, still wearing his old
Hot poop on page 10
man makeup from the end of Space Odyssey) woke up ("Gee, Martha,
it was all a dream!") and then promptly expired.
So although the logic of the film is thus perhaps excusable as a
dream, its subject matter isn't. Not to say that the film is dirty - it
isn't. There's eight scenes (count 'em - eight) in which there's an
abundance of tits and ass. These scenes were the subject of a recent
Playboy pictorial, and much like that magazine, the film adopts a
"let's show 'em lots of tits and ass but no cunt" attitude.
There is none of the perversion for which the Marquis was
noted, whether it was in his head, on paper, or in real life (though the
last is doubtful). There is none of his celebrated coprophagic (that's
shit-eating) interests, not even any sodomy, cunnilingus or fellatio
(though the censor's scissors may have been at work here), no perverse
attacks on religion, and no attempt to draw any correlation between
sadism, perversion and orgasm.
If there is any real perversion in the film, it comes at the
beginning when the Marquis' future wife turns out not to be shapely
Senta Berger, but plain Anna Massey, a highly laughable situation
when the audience consists of Playboy mentalities believing that the
only chick worth screwing is one with nice tits, a big ass, and groovy
looks — in other words, all the idealistic pseudo-aesthetic appeal of a
centre-fold.
If you're really desperate enough to see this monsterpiece of a
film, an insult to one of history's great perverts (and why not tell it
like it was?). Then go see just its last ten minutes which contain a
*'wild sexual romp" (complete with tits, ass, and a possible glimpse of
beaver if you don't blink too much), a filmically kaleidoscopic
purple-hued sex orgy intermingled with flashbacks of the entire plot,
the Marquis' death and a neat moral tacked on.
Or better still, stay home and read the books. Not only De
Sade's books, but any books. ..
If you think
you can cut it#
Alcan has a job
for you.
H'-SEK.
Alcan is one of the world's largest
aluminum companies. And a continually
expanding organization.
So it's a good place for you to grow.
At Alcan, graduates in science and
engineering of all disciplines find they
can extend their skills to include technical development, production management
and planning, systems analysis and operations research, control of raw materials
or products and any of numerous other
areas.
Thus, a large proportion of line and
staff positions in Alcan Production Departments as well as Purchasing, Traffic,
Systems and Personnel are held by science and engineering graduates.
And we offer such graduates as
much responsibility as they can handle.
We're a goal-oriented company  and
believe that good work, initiative and
ingenuity deserve recognition.
That's why an Alcan employee who
seeks it will find that opportunities and
responsibility grow in direct proportion
to his interest and contribution.
Not to mention more tangible rewards.
In fact, it's worth a trip to the Alcan
recruitment office on campus to find out
more. Especially if you're interested in a
good deal more than just a job.
Alcan is on campus next week, so
come on over and chat a while.
We've got the opening if you can
cut it.
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD    •'ALCAN
A
'">. Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 18, 1969
Hot
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
Carlos Montoya demonstrating flamenco
mastery tonight in SUBallroom at 8:00. Reasonable
tickets available at AMS office - $1.50 for students.
THEATRICAL EXCITEMENT
The Fall and Redemption of Man, medievalish
play by John Bowen opens this Wednesday night in
Dorothy Somerset Studio. John Brockington
directs.
POOp  -^^ mmmzammm
UBC MUSIC BUILDING RECITAL HALL
Presents   a   revolutionary   string   quartet   by
radical  composer  Arnie  Schoenberg tomorrow at
noon.
MORE MUS. BLDG. RECIT. HALL
Viola-harpsichord recital this Thursday at noon.
YET MORE MUS. BLDG.
UBC Choral Union Concert this Friday at noon.
Music by Brahms, Kodaly, and Victoria.
TUESDAY
SCM
Bill   Willmott   will   lecture    on   Vietnam in Angus 104 at noon.
MEN'S  TRAC&  AND   FIELD  TEAM
Practices moved to Armory on Tuesday,    Wednesday    and   Thrusday    at
4:30 p.m.
UCC
General meeting,   noon,  SUB  207-209.
CIASP
Training meeting at 9 in SUB 119.
SOCRED   CLUB
General meeting at noon in Bu.  224.
UBC   FLYING   CLUB
Meeting at noon in SUB 105A.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL    EDUCATION
Discussion  at  6:30  p.m.   in  SUB   125.
BLACK   CROSS
Meeting   at   8   p.m.   at   3791   W.   7th
Ave.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY  OUTDOOR CLUB
General  meeting,  noon,   Ang.   104.
CANOE   CLUB
Meeting   and   film   show,   noon,   Ang.
110.
'tween
classes
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Mrs. Guerin from Indian Agency wUl
talk at noon in SUB  119.
CHRISTIAN  SCIENCE
Weekly testimony meeting at noon in
Bu.  3201.
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
Phyllis   Mailing   and    Purcell   String
Quartet  will play  at  noon  in  recital
hall of the music buUding.
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting at noon in SUB 211.
STUDENTS   INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION   SOCIETY
Introductory   lecture   and   discussion
at 7:30 in Bu. 202.
UBC  DROPOUTS
Packing session at 7:30 in clubs' workshop, SUB 216.
ACADEMIC   ACTIVITIES  COMMITTEE
Discussion on Leonard Cohen at noon
in Bu.  106.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Carlos Montoya is here  at 8 P.m.  in
SUB ballroom.
UBC   PLAYERS   CLUB
General meeting at 7 p.m. in upstairs
of International House.
GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
Meeting at noon in SUB 211.
PSYCH   CLUB
Dr.   Papageorgis   speaks   at   noon   in
Ang. 24.
SAILING   CLUB
Lecture  at noon  at Bu.   104.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting at noon in SUB 105B.
UBC SPEC
Panel discussion at noon in SUB 207
and 209.
THURSDAY
ENGLISH   DEPARTMENT
Film   —   "Who's   Afraid   of   Virginia
Woolf"   in   Hebb   Theatre   on  Thursday at 5 p.m.  and Friday at 7 and 9
p.m.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Battle,   12:30-4:30 P.m.,   SUB  105B.
UCB  SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
RaUyette at noon in SUB traffic circle.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS SQUARE
DANCE   CLUB
Meeting,    12:30-2    a.m.,    SUB    rooms
L & M.
CHINESE   VARSITY
General   meetin,    noon,    SUB    clubs'
lounge.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Viola-Harpsichord recital at noon, recital hall, music building.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
John de Wolf will speak at noon in
Ed. room 1.
UBC   DROPOUT
Sky-diving films at noon in Bu.  102.
ONTOLOGICAL  SOC.
Film and talk at noon in Bu.  106.
HEAVEN
-ffflEbb
3730 wt. 10th.   224-1415
•3261W. Broadway     736-7788,
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
TAYLOR & BURTON
WHO'S AFRAID
-OF-
VIRGINIA WOOLF
by EDWARD ALBEE
Thursday
Nov. 20
5:00
Friday
Nov. 21
7:00, 9:30
HEBB
THEATRE
50c
• FESTIVAL 70
• FESTIVAL 70
• FESTIVAL 70
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-*:;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
The Festival of the
Contemporary Arts 1970
has $'s to back your ACT
Festival Fone 228 - 2462
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE AND FREE POOD. THE
Swamp and the Viceroys Friday,
Nov. 28, 9:00 p.m.. Hallmark Hall.
5550 Fraser. Tickets $1.75 from
NOP  Club,   SUB  216C.	
WIGGY SYMPHONY IN PERSON
Thurs. to Sun. This week only.
Dance 9 to 1. Doors 8 p.m. Heaven
and Hell, 3730 West loth Ave. 224-
1415.	
SOUL DANCE C. V. C. PRESENTS
The Trials of Jason Hoover—SUB
Ballroom, 8:30-1:00 Sat., Nov. 22
—Groove and get rid of your pre-
exam  blues.
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST RING FRI. NITE THE
Reward.   263-3056.
BARN
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY FREEDOM
$18.00 per month, including insurance. See the volume dealer in "Two
Wheel Freedom" for details. Hi
Performance Honda, 3712 W. 10th
at  Alma.   Phone   228-9077	
GIRL REQUIRES IMMEDIATE
ride to Edmonton. Hitc.hike or
share gas. Please phone Daphne,
collect  534-5139.
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.
SAVE ON BLANK CASETTE
tape C-90, Ampex lifetime guarantee, $2.95 each; C-60 B.A.S.F.,
$1.95 each. Plastic box included.
Call or see Peter Jim, 224-9062
or   320   Okanagan.
LICENSED DAY CARE CENTRE
has vacancies; location, 1550 West
33rd   Ave.,   261-6711
BLOW-UPS (2'x3') MADE FROM
photos taken in our studio or from
good negatives or prints. Black-
lights, largest selection of posters
in BiC. Jokes gifts, cards. Post
Office. The Grin Bin. 3209 W.
Broadway. 738-2311 ( O P po s i t e
Liquor  Store &  Super Valu).
WIFE OF STUDENT DESIRES
poodles to clip. Expert work, reasonable,   Lorna,   733-6881.
AQUA SOC SPECIAL NOTICES ON
club notice board indicate Thurs.
afternoon fun  and  foam.
AQUA SOC. DIVE TO GALIANO
Is. this weekend Nov. 22-23. Two
days of great diving. Sign in
Club's  lounge.
SIGMA CHI HOUSE-RATES ON
request for room only, weekly or
monthly. Meal tickets or full room
and board. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
224-5530.	
LEARN TO SKI AT
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
6 weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transportation for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver  9.  Tel:  738-312S.
NOV. 18 GOETHE'S FAUST (Film)
OLD AUDITORIUM 12:30, 4 p.m.-
8  p.m.
NOV. 19 BRECHT'S T H R E E
Penny Opera (Film made in 1931!)
8 p.m. Recital Hall, New Music
Building.
EVERY MONDAY EVENING FROM
Jan. 12 - March 16th you are given
an opportunity to hear a variety
of speakers on the topic of human
sexuality. Sign up in SUB Monday, Nov. 24, Wed. 26th & Friday,
28th at 12:30.
Travel Opportunities
17
OVERLAND TOUR TO KATMAN-
du. May to August 1970. E. Wilks,
No. 45, 2560 Whiteley Crt. N. Van.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
FOLD-AWAY OR 10-SPEED Bicycle.   Phone  435-1629
WANTED: ANTIQUE BROWN
leather sports jacket, three-button
single breasted, men's size, 38-39.
Phone   261-4978
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1968 RENAULT 10, EXCELLENT
condition. Leather seats, radio.
Ph. 683-8631 (8:30-5:00), 874-2568
after   5:00.   Ask  Miss   Miao.
1961 CHEV. BELAIR FOUR DOOR
auto. 6, very clean, $475, eves.
327-8220,   good  tires.
'60 VOLVO 544, PHONE 738-6784.
Back of 2315 W. 8th. Asking, $500.
Must sell.
1961 V.W., 40,000 MI., GOOD TIRES,
reconditioned motor, radio, very
clean.   Call  collect,   532-1071
"•62 STUDEBAKER S.W., SNOW
tires, R. & H., V-8, runs well,
Spotless cond. $400 or offer. 224-
5194.
1964 CORVAIR MONZA—4-speed, 2-
door, radio, good condition. Call
Jim Milljour at  872-2035.
1967 T.R. 4A, B.R.G. I.R.S. 228-8124,
4449  W  14th  Ave.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying 32
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds   35
Rentals—Miscellaneous 36
Scandals
37
WOOD IS GOOD BARB IS BEST.
Love. J.G.C.
HEAVEN AND HELL CUSTOM-
ers wanted for Thurs. and Sun.
Due to overcrowding on Fri. and
Sat. nights. This week, Wiggi Symphony Thurs.-Sun. 3730 West 10th.
224-1415.
LAW STUDENT
can't raise sufficient numbers to entertain 250 women
at their exchange tonight at
the Daisy.
All males welcome
Tickets — $4.00 at the door,
Drinks 3 per $1.00
STARTING JANUARY 12th. HU-
man Sexuality Course. Sign up in
SUB next Monday, Wed. and Fr.
at   12:30.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING, 35c
page (10 copy) call Mrs. Duncan
228-9597.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 321-2102.
TYPING   OF   ESSAY ETC.,   DONE
neatly,    efficiently, and    quickly.
30c   a  page.   Phone 224-0385   after
5 p.m.
NORTH SHORE STUDENTS: Essays, papers, typed by typist with
5 years experience. Reasonable
rates.   988-6798.
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work, reas. rates. 738-6829
after nine a.m.  to nine p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants requires part and full-time
wairesses. Attractive girls, 18-25.
Apply in person only, 2676 West
Broadway. Shifts available at all
four   restaurants.
GIRLS: GUARANTEE YOURSELF
a job for this summer. Phone Mr.
Stevens at 526-7821 from 10-5
soon!
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm   —   vacation     employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants require young men with
cars for part-time general kitchen work. Apply in person only,
2676 West   Broadway.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
SUB-SIDIZE YOUR INCOME BY
earning money in your spare
time, retailing Holiday Magic
Cosmetics on campus. No. 6 —
1557  W.  Broadway.   733-6316.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
Language Instruction
61A
QUALITY  LANGUAGE  TUTORING
and
CERTIFIED TRANSLATIONS
CONVERSA-SCHOOL OF
LANGUAGES
1603   W.   4th   at  Fir  — 736-5401
Chargex Cards Accepted
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
at ihe Bookstore,
AMS Publications Office
and Thunderbird Shop
100% "DOWN" SKI JACKETS AND
Terinit (Helenca) track suits.
Variety of colours and sizes. Lowest prices in town. Interested?
Come have a look in Room No. 305
War Memorial Gym. Mondays and
Thursdays 12:30-2:00 p.m. Contact Hank Lyth in gym or phone
683-3442  eves.	
TWO PAIRS WOOD SKIS, 205;
185 cm. Double boots, ladies 8-9.
732-6480.	
EMBROIDERED SUEDE APGAN
coat $100.  Vest $50.  Ph.  228-8802.
MEN'S KOFLACH SKI BUCKLE
boots. 11 medium — value $115.
worn eight times, asking $85.
Phone  Jim  after  5  p.m.   325-4286.
CUSTOM BUILT TWO - MANUAL
portable organ, two Jensen 15 in.
speakers in boxes, Bogen Challen-.
ger    50    amplifier.    Phone    Bernie
298-5810.	
VR 17 207 cm. SALOMON BIND-
ings, unused about $150—224-9854,
Tom Rm.  14 leave Ehone number.
KOFLACK SKI BOOT, SIZE 9. 985-
1146 after 6:30.	
BRAND NEW, UNUSED KNEISSL
White Star Racer RS skis, 200 cm.
$140.00.  224-5142.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS ON CAMPUS, FURNSHD.
Full facilities, $40—dble; $70-sngle.
2250   Wesbrook,   224-5745	
LIVE CHEAPLY ON CAMPUS !
Room with kitchen privileges,
only $50. For male students. Board
available for $45. TV, plus weekly linen. Very quiet. Also large
lounge, 5760 Toronto Rd. or phone
224-0327	
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR RENT.
Kitchen priviledges. Available Dec.
1st or Dec. 18th. $50.00, $5*5.00.
3592  S.W.  Marine  Drive.  Ph.  263-
4172. 	
ON CAMPUS ROOMS; STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards;
room only $60 mo. Room and
board $115 mo. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy   Rd.,   224-5530.
STUDENT    HOUSE    ROOM    TO*
rent.   $35  month—use  house  facil.
kit,   etc.   ph.   873-1117.	
ROOM, BOARD $70. STUDENT
must be clean - cut, responsible.
Transportation available; Chinese
welcome. John Anderson, 6391
Fleming,  Van.   15.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Colour T.V., Sauna, 5785
Agronomy  Road.  224-9684.	
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD
for senior male student. Near
gates. Phone 224-4866, 4595 W. 6th
Avenue.	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE —- LARGEST
room on campus; two lounges, and
dining hall. Free room cleaning
service, laundry, color TV, good
food. Come out and see us, 5725
Agronomy, 224-5530.  Evenings.
ROOM, BOARD,, GOOD FOOD,
clean house, two minutes from
SUB, 2120 Wesbrook Cres. Phone
224-5243   or  224-9073
Furn. Houses & Aprs.
83
GIRL  21+   TO  SHARE APT.   KITS .
area,   $65.00  mo.   after  7,   731-6448. '
WANTED A GIRL TO SHARE
furnished apart. near Jericho
Beach, own bedroom. $45 per
month. Tel. 736-4764 after 5.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Tuesday, November 18, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
SPOR TS
—dick button photo   \t
"NOW LISTEN JUNIOR. Go sit in the corner," counsels Bob c
Crawford of the Powell River Regals to the Birds' BarnyJ/VHcgx.
Crawford   easily   won   this   confrontation,   so  Wncox   played
playmaker instead of policeman and picked up four assists. *-
Ice hockey birds
split away series
The UBC Thunderbirds played four and a half periods of good
hockey this weekend, but it wasn't quite good enough to win their
two games with the Powell River Regals.
Friday night the Birds had a hard time getting started. The
desire was there, but the players, only two hours off the bus, couldn't
get up their speed.
Powell River took advantage of the situation by employing a
fast break which resulted in four early breakaways, three of which
proved fruitful.
The second period score was Powell River 6, UBC 2.
In the third period the Birds scored two goals in the first ten
minutes to get back into the game at 6-4, then a mistake proved costly
as Regals dumped in another goal.
The most notable feature of the game was the officiating,
which would have been hard pressed to adequately handle a ping pong
game.
The Birds came out with both the desire and the legs in the
second game. Wayne Schaab slapped in a pass from Barry Wilcox at
the two mintue mark of the first period and the Birds never looked
back.
Midway through the period, Doug Buchanan flipped in another
pass from Wilcox on a power play to give the Birds a two goal
^cushion.
X£ p?    There was no scoring in the second period, but the Regals began
^ ^skating and had some excellent opportunities.
^   1     > rT'*|-L.    -. *L  1   «_ J **  _ r* _*«*>   n!^ -*1-.«~  A*^-f- rt *       4* It  <****.      *4^^*-«   j*****. *4       II K
Birds
bounced
The Thunderbirds soccer team
fared as expected Saturday against
the league-leading Victoria
Royals.
The 5-1 defeat of the Birds
belied their overall play which was
generally sound.
UBC controlled the play for
much of the game, but the breaks
did not go in the Birds' favor.
"What it amounted to," said
Coach Joe Johnson, "was we were
a little too charitable around our
goalmouth."
This Saturday UBC plays
North Shore to decide who gets to
stay in the cellar.
Intramural
Notices
On Wednesday, Nov. 12, the Men's
Intramural basketball league started.
All games are being played on Monday
and Wednesday at night-time or on
Monday and Friday at noon. We encourage spectators to come out and
watch the action at the War Memorial
Gym.
Tweedsmuir House—47, Aggies I—31;
For. HI/Eng VI; Law II/Totem III; St.
Marks—45, PE in—41; Carey Hall—38,
Robson House—23; Union IV/Eng VII;
Sherwood Lett House—41, Arts English
—33; Ed in—40, PE II—35; Union n/
Totem II; Varsity Christian Fellowship
—35,  Eng IH—20.
BASKETBALL—Nov. 19, 7 p.m.: St.
Marks vs. Totem IH (ct 1); PV III vs.
PE III (ct 2); Aggies vs. Law II (ct 3).
8 p.m.: Eng VI vs. Phi Delt II (ct 1);
For III vs. PE VI (ct 2); Eng VII vs.
PE V (ct 3). 9 p.m.: Union IV vs. Med
II (ct 1); VCF vs. Totem II (ct 2). 10
P.m.: Ed ni vs. Union III (ci 1).
.   *-*' The big disappointment of the period was the Birds' inability to
^?score with a two man advantage.
In the third period, both teams played good hockey, but the
Birds were the opportunists.
At the five minute mark, Jeff Wilson took a pass from Doug
Buchanan and broke into the clear, faked out the goaltender and
banged the puck into the net.
With six minutes left in the game, Dwayne Biagoni deflected a
shot from the blueline by Laurie Vanzella to wrap up the scoring.
The defensive play of the game came from UBC defenseman
Steve Fera in the third period. Regal center Al Small smoothly skated
around the defense and broke in on the right side. Bird goaltender
Rick Bardal, who had a' great game in goal, played him perfectly
and Small was forced to skate around the net.
Meanwhile, Bardal was checked out of the play and as Small
shot at the empty net, Fera sprawled and knocked the puck off his
stick. Mike Darnborough cleared it to preserve Bardal's first shutout
of the season.
Big guns for UBC over the weekend were Wayne Schaab with
three goals, Barry Wilcox with four assists, and Jack Moores, who
picked up three assists Friday night before being injured.
In other action this weekend, the Braves downed Maillardville
Carlings 6-3 Friday night at the Winter Sports Center. This is the fifth
win in a row for the Braves who are proving to be the powerhouse in
their league again this year.
Birds bomb
Capilanos
By SCOTT McCLOY
It's been a long time coming
but the Thunderbirds rugby team
finally put it all together
trouncing the North Shore
Capilanos 25-0 Saturday at
Ambleside Park.
"I can't say there were any
individual stars, it was just a fine
team effort, something we've been
waiting for for a long time," said
Coach Donn Spence.
After the Birds settled down
they weren't to be denied. Dave
Austin opened the scoring after
ten minutes and then three
minutes later Ray Banks scored
again. Eric McAvity crossed the
goal line next, followed by
Austin once more. The score at
the end of the first half, 14-0.
In the second UBC struck early
on a picture try by Spence
McTavish. Minutes later Graham
Price scored on a penalty goal and
then scoring closed with a try by
Bob Jackson that was converted.
Unusual for the Birds, they
find themselves in the happy
position of a completely healthy
team.
Being 100% is especially
important now as next weekend
the team takes on the Meralomas,
currently riding in second place
after their loss to the Kats last
Saturday.
As this game will be the last for
UBC in the Miller Cup series,
Coach Spence would like to finish
with a win. This would increase
the players' morale, readying
them for inter-collegiate play after
Christmas.
"I can't see the future as
anything but upward if we
continue to play the way we did
today," said the coach.
Inter-collegiate play should suit
the fast-running Thunderbirds.
For one thing teams at this level
have less experience than those
teams of the city.
The Birds have shown that
they can compete well at the
collegiate level. Earlier this season
they lost to the University of
Calgary, one of Canada's better
college teams, 6-3 and later
crunched University of Alberta
24-0.
DISCOUNT
RECORDS
At
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP-SUB
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS, DARK SUITS, TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just   One   Block   from   Campus
In  The Village
(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber  Shop)
WE  SERVE  GOOD  CHINESE  FOOD
AT    REASONABLE    PRICES
For   Take-Oiit  Service  Ph. 224-6121
OPEN   TUES. ■ TO   -  SAT.
11:30 A.M. TO 10 P.M.
SUNDAY & MONDAY 5 TO 10 P.M.
KNOW NEWS
iX Promotes a W. C. Fieldian Approach
To Life.
iX Champions creative speting.
iX etc.
iX At your news stand.
TYPEWRITERS
SALES • SERVICE and
RENTALS
_  LOW  STUDENT  RATES  —
West Point Printers
and STATIONERS
4514 W. 10th        224-7818
2 blocks East of UBC Gates
UBC English  Department presents ALBEE'S
WHO'S AFRAID OF
VIRGINIA WOOLF
with ELIZABETH TAYLOR & RICHARD BURTON
HEBB
THEATRE
50c
Thurs. Nov. 20 - 5:00
Fri. Nov. 21 - 7:00
9:30
THE  FALL AND  REDEMPTION
OF MAN
by JOHN BOWEN
(Based on Medieval Mystery Cycles)
Directed by
John Brockington
November 19-22
Evenings 8:30 p.m. — Matinee Nov. 20 at 12:30 p.m.
in the new
SOMERSET STUDIO
Tickets: Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre — 228-2678
Students: $1.00 Adults: $1.75 Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 18, 1969
ANATOMY
OF NATIONAL
LIBERATION
The Popular Movement for the Liberation
of Angola has been fighting for independence from Portugal for several years.
Jacques Roi of the African Relief Services
Committee took these pictures in 1968
while setting up a field communications
system for the movement. Right, guerrillas
prepare to move into action in Angola's
eastern zone with arms captured from the
Portuguese and supplied by the Organization of African Unity. Below, guerrilla
leaders Spartacus Monimambu (facing)
and Anibal DeMalo (back to camera) are
greeted by villagers deep inside liberated
Angola.
Xt&
Right, a 17-year-old brigade leader. Because life expectancy in Angola is only 28 years, responsibilities
come early. The African Relief Services Committee's
organizational meeting at UBC will be held Thursday
in SUB 215. Students who want to help the native
Africans' struggle are asked to attend.
Representatives of
THE  INTERNATIONAL  NICKEL COMPANY
OF CANADA,  LIMITED
will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post-graduate students in
ENGINEERING  ■ mining ■ metallurgical ■ chemical
■ electrical ■ mechanical ■ civil
CHEMISTRY GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 3rd, 4th and
post-graduate years
NOVEMBER 24 and 25
We invite you to arrange an interview through the Office
of Student Personnel Services
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL
The International Nickel Company of Canada, Limited
Copper Cliff, Ontario; Thompson, Manitoba

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128581/manifest

Comment

Related Items