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The Ubyssey Mar 22, 1966

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Array No
Malcomtents
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 63
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1966
CA 4-3916
Mac backs student
voices for senate
It's logical place,
they'd provide a link'
—  kurt  hilger  photo
AH, SPRING, muses vibrant Val Zuker, music I, having
lunch with be-shaded heavy date in Buchanan quad on
Monday,   officially  first day  of  silly  season   of   spring.
Skeleton rattling
in old arts closet
The  arts undergraduate  society has  a  skeleton  in  its
closet.
The skeleton's name»is the
artsNand science undergraduate
society, and its constitution
says that all arts and science
students may vote in the elections of the ASUS.
Unfortunately, when the arts
and science faculty split up in
1962 the AUS never got around
to making up a new constitution.
So 50 representatives of the
black and blue tried to vote in
the arts general meeting Friday.
And president Ian McDougall refused to recognize
their votes.
On the basis of this refusal
science president Dave Williams moved in council Monday night that the results of
the meeting be ruled invalid,
On the recommendation of
constitutional revisions chairman and amid the protests of
McDougall and incoming arts
president Don Wise, the
motion passed.
Commenting on his motion,
Williams said,  "Arts has been
called   the   only   non-cohesive
undergrad society on campus."
He said he wants to cohese
them.
By  ANNE  BALF
UBC president John Macdonald said Monday he supports
the idea of student representatives on the university senate.
He was commenting on a report sponsored by the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada and the Canadian Association of University
Teachers.
The report itself did not
definitely recommend student
members on the senate.
(But one of the report's authors suggests student representation on the board of governors. See story on Page 2.)
"If we are to have students
in the government of the university, the senate is the logical
place for them," said Macdonald.
STUDENTS 'USEFUL'
"Grad students could be useful on the senate," he said.
"Their judgment would be
backed by the experience of
four years studying at the university.
"And they would be a good
link between the faculty and
the administration."
Macdonald refused comment
on the possibility of the three
grad students presently running for senate positions being
elected.
"It all depends on the merits
of the particular individual,"
he said.
"I don't know the students
involved."
Macdonald was unenthusias-
tic at the report's suggestion
that students elect a rector to
represent their interests on the
board of governors.
"I have no objection to the
idea, but would it really solve
the issues?" he asked.
"Doesn't the president serve
the same purpose as the students' representative?
"There are other things that
would accomplish more for the
students  than  a  rector."
(He did not elaborate.)
DISAGREES
Macdonald disagreed with
the report's recommendation
that the senate be a purely academic body.
"The senate should also include non-academic representatives to express the views of
the general community on education," he said.
"I find the report's suggestion a little inconsistent with
its description of the university as a window on the world.
"The university should not
restrict itself only to academic
attitudes," Macdonald said.
Macdonald called the report
"on  the  whole reasonable.
REASONABLE
"It recognizes some of the
problems faced by Canadian
universities today," he said.
"But the application of its
solutions will have to vary according to the individual university."
Macdonald also disagreed
with the report's recommendation that heads of departments
and deans be rotated.
"It is a good idea in principle but it is certainly not
practical," he said.
"I see no good reason to
move a man who is doing a
good job in his position just
because his time is up."
JOHN B. MACDONALD
. . . supports idea
End in sight
for Ubyssey
—exam time
The end  is  in sight.
Friday's Ubyssey will be the
last one forever before exams.
Reason for ceasing publication is so Ubyssey staffers, who
are in reality students, can
start studying and maybe pass
their  years.
But this does not happen
until after the last press day
Thursday.
Staffers who are studying
now are urged to cut it out
and come down to work.
The annual banquet, complete with awards awarding
and entertaining entertainment, will take place at Capi-
lano Gardens Friday evening
and you can only get in if
you  come and sign up.
So come.
THROW  PRESS  OUT'
AT  LOWER  MALL
Malcolm metes meeting advice
A parliamentary advisor
sat in on the Lower Mall
Resident Association's meeting Monday night and his advice was to throw the press
out.
The advisor was residence
director Malcolm McGregor.
He was attending the meeting
to discuss the resignation of
LMR's president Reg Handford after only two weeks in
office.
McGregor said he saw no
reason why the -press should
watch any society "wash its
dirty linen" if the society did
not wish it to do so.
He suggested council move
to expel the press from the
meeting.  The  Ubyssey  repre
sentatives at the meeting were
by chance also members of
the LMRA.
McGregor then suggested
the council ask the reporters
present to give their word of
honor that nothing they heard
would be printed.
He asked them to say they
were only present in the capacity  of residents.
Council acted as McGregor
advised, but later in the meeting when the issue was reopened, it defeated a motion
suggesting a press release be
made.
Under McGregor's watchful eye the council apologized
to Reg Hanford for suggesting
student court might back up
malcolm McGregor
.  . "advisor"
a move to censure him for
resigning and passed a motion
of regret at its handling of
the  last  meeting.
Advisor McGregor prompted LMRA president George
Kropinski with "call the questions" and "'Yes" and "No"
advice on issues."
Irate Lower Mall resident
Gary Wood asked why the
students had to put up their
hands to be recognized and
McGregor just spoke out to
Kropinski who sat at his elbow.
"I am addressing the
chair," said McGregor, "I'm
simply closer so I just say,
'Mr.  President'." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March  22,   1966
DUFF-BERDAHL  AUTHOR SAYS:
'Put students on UBC senate
By   PAT HORROBIN
Ubyssey Ottawa Bureau
OTTAWA — Professor Robert Berdahl, co-author of the
Duff-Berdahl report on university government in Canada, Friday called for students
to be seated on UBC's general
faculty council until the senate is reformed.
He said at present the general faculty council outranks
the senate as an academic policy-making body.
The report, officially released Friday, suggested students should sit on senate.
"Whenever we use the
term academic senate, we
mean the highest academic
body in the university," Berdahl said Friday in an interview with The Ubyssey.
• •      •
"At this time at UBC this
would obviously be the general faculty council," he said.
"This is exclusively an academic body — there are no
outsiders on it."
Berdahl, 39-year-old political science department chairman at San Francisco State
College, said educational policy-making is where the student can make relevant judgments.
"He   can   be   immediately
useful in this   capacity," Berdahl said.
The report recommended at
least three members of the
board of governors sit on senate, as well as a minimum of
three "junior" faculty (assistant professors, lecturers and
instructors), but did not specify the number of student
members, dwelling more on
bringing students into joint
committees with senate.
• • •
Alumni and all other outside representatives, who now
sit on the senate in what the
commissioners consider largely a public relations capacity
would sit instead on the new
body.
Earlier Friday, Dr. Jacques
St.-Pierre, University of Montreal mathematician, said he
essentially agreed with criticisms of the Duff-Berdahl report put forward at the conference by The Ubyssey.
St.-Pierre emphasized that
he spoke as an individual,
rather than as president of
the Canadian Association of
University Teachers.
As stated by The Ubyssey,
first criticism was students
are being given only an Uncle Tom or Tonto type of representation on the board of
governors by the commissioners' recommendation that stu
dents  elect  a  non-student  to
speak for them on the board.
Second criticism was of
the commissioners' stated feeling that although assistant
professors, lecturers and instructors make up a majority
of the faculty, it is preferable
they should be limited to
token representation on an
approximately 50 - m e m b e r
senate and seems to indicate
the implicit philosophy of,
"never trust anybody under
thirty."
•      •      •
Co-authors Berdahl and Sir
James Duff, 68-year-old former vice-chancellor of the
University of Durham, rejected these criticisms.
Neither students nor junior
faculty have as much time to
sit on these bodies as senior
faulty and some confidential
matters discussed at board
meetings should preclude students, they said.
The report also recommends
all faculty who (have been on
the staff three to four years
should make up the electorate for senate positions.
However, only associate or
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full   professors   should   stand
for senate membership.
The exception is three seats
for junior faculty members
for whom the electorate
would be the faculty below
associate professor.
St. Pierre said, "If we think
this kind of board representation will do for students,
we're just kidding ourselves.
"If it's felt the student
point of view should be represented, then it should be by
a student."
St. Pierre said he has always been convinced of the
high quality of student participation on anybody that is
"willing to get down to brass
tacks and do something."
NOON TODAY
The Canadian Premiere of the New
ALAN NEIL TRIO
and"
GERALD WALKER
direct from THE NEW SCENE
Auditorium 50c - Members 25c
A JAZZ SOCIETY PRESENTATION
"THE" PLACE
to meet
yoar  friends
is  at the
tDo-Nut Diner j
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.35
Ifs Really Good!
Full course meals
within your  income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
THE  LYRIC  THEATRE   PROUDLY  PRESENTS
A FESTIVAL
OF RUSSIAN FILMS
WED.
MAR. 23
The Idiot
7 & 9 p.m. Only
THURS.
MAR. 24
Don Quixote
7 & 9 p.m. Only
FRI.
MAR. 25
Dimka
7 19 p.m. Only
SAT.
MAR. 26
SUN.
MAR. 27
Ballet of Romeo & Juliet   2,7t,P.m.
 Starring  Ulanovo	
Tchaikowsky's  Immortal   Opera
Eugene Onegin
2,7 & 9 p.m.
MON.
MAR. 28
TUES.
MAR. 29
Alexander Nevsky     7&9P.m.oniy
A Summer to Remember 7 & 9 p.m. 0„iy
765 GRANVILLE
683-2044
'$♦<►♦♦
C.U.S.O. Volunteer Mary Stewart
Reports from Zambia
Dear Friends:
Zambia, the former Northern Rhodesia,
got its new name and its independence just
about one year ago. It is aptly described on
postmarks and in travel brochures as
"Zambia in the Sun" — but it is hardly
that blazing, intense sun that is characteristic of many parts of Africa. Located about
15 degrees south of the equator, with an
average elevation of about 3,500 feet, Zambia's climate rivals that of a fine summer
in Algonquin Park. The North American
concept of Africa has ibeen greatly warped
by exposure to too many comic strips of
the "Tarzan" variety. It's not all — or even
mostly — a steaming jungle.
But this is not to say that Zambia lacks
colour. Indeed, we have the best of both
worlds, since it is warm enough to support
semi-tropical plants, yet cool enough that
plants from our own climate can- thrive too.
I have seen whole hedges of geraniums,
tomato plants that seem to multiply in no
time, and strawberry patches which may
give two crops a year. My own garden is
producing enough mulberries to keep me
busy for the next two months, eating —
and, if I'm so inclined, making jams and
preserves.
But let it not be thought that CUSO
volunteers do nothing but admire the African scenery — I was sent here to teach at
a secondary rc'iool. and perhaps it's time
■ -> bit.
The working day starts iat 7:30 a.m. —
quite a shock at first to a nighthawk like
myself. Six 40-minute teaching periods fill
the morning, with a half hour break just
before 10:00 and, after a two-hour lunch
break, the day finishes with three more
periods. I teach eight periods a week of
English, 15 periods of French and four
periods of art, all to students working at
levels comparable to our grades IX and X.
Co-educational schools are rare in Zambia,
so I'm doubly pleased that I happen to be
working at one of them.
It may come as a surprise to some of you
that African adolesents are more like Canadians than they are unalike. They have
the same passionate adoration of the Beatles; both sexes are quite clothing-conscious
on occasions when they can wear other
things besides their school uniforms; the
girls hoard old movie magazines and admire pictures of Elizabeth Taylor; and
everyone loves football, although in our
case it's British football we play. There
is exactly the same range of personalities
in the classroom: the shy ones, the aggressive ones, and talkative ones, the restless
ones, etc. They too have their in-groups, out-
groups and cliques.
The Africans are a musically well-developed people: good sense of rhythm and the
ability to harmonize almost instantly are
far more universal among them than among
us. A highlight of each school term is an
inter-house singing competition into which
all dormitories and both sexes eagerly enter.
It is not rare for the boys to make their own
instruments, particularly tin flutes and a
species of four string banjo, using a large
flat tin or a pie plate as the drum. Although entirely self-taught, many of them
play very skillfully, and the instruments
themselves are a surprisingly acceptable
imitation of commercial models.
These, then are the first impressions of a
CUSO volunteer in Jfanubia. It would be
emphasizing the obvious to conclude by saying that Zambia is a part of me already
and that I know even now that I will never
regret the two years I spend here. I am
certain that all CUSO-ites return to Canada
better Canadians for having served and
learned in an emerging nation.
—MARY STEWART
Mary Stewart is one of 11 volunteers in Zambia at present. Last year UBC sent
28 volunteers overseas and to date has 34 applicants to place. Applications
from International House will be open until the end of April for those wishing
to begin in September.
Selection is not competitive and aims only at an adequate assessment of a
candidate in order to place him in the field more satisfactorily according to his
preferences and ability. Positions far out number volunteers forthcoming and
CUSO can place any number of applicants whatever the qualifications. Tuesday, March 22,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
THEY'RE IN TROUBLE'
—  kurt  hilger  photo
DRAB OLD ARMY HUTS opposite armory w ill be faced by new music building. Workmen are starting construction on new note factory behind Lasserre building.
WEAR MEN  OUT,  SAYS CO-ED
'Legal prostitution a drain
Legalized prostitution would
mean a drain on manpower, a
UBC co-ed debater said Monday.
The availability of prostitutes will wear men out, Dav-
ida Morrow said.
"They will die younger,
and there are already enough
widows."
Miss Morrow was arguing
against the resolution that
prostitution should be legalized
in   a   debate   against   Acadia
CANADA'S 2nd LOWEST
B.C. gov't slow
on student aid
A study of provincial government support for higher
education shows B.C. ranked second-lowest in per capita aid
to students during the 1963-64 academic year.
The reports, compiled' for the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada, tabulates
student aid in the form of bur-
aries, loans, scholarships and
provincial operating grants
per capita of college-age population and per full-time enrolled student.
Newfoundland provided
most aid to students with a
grant of $294.58 per capita and
Saskatchewan came second
with $291.19.
B.C. contributed only $29.99
for each student. Only Nova
Scotia's $15.50 grant was lower.
B.C., however, came second
in the per capita of college age
population operating funds
grants.
Only Alberta's $90.06 was
higher than B.C.'s $70.63.
Due to B.C.'s proportionally
high student population, the
province ranked fifth in the
provincial grant per full time
student.
National high was Alberta,
$1,087, and low, Newfoundland, $210.
B.C.'s grant was $617.
The report notes the "marked differences in the level of
provincial government support
in relation to enrolment, college age population, total personal income and total net provincial general expenditure.
"In general, Alberta's effort
was greatest, Newfoundland's
was least."
Wayman wins
lot 11 Wilson
scholarships
Ubyssey editor Tom Way-
man is one of 11 UBC students who have been awarded
Woodrow Wilson fellowships.
The students are part of
1,408 Woodrow Wilson fellows
who will receive free tuition
and a $2,000 living stipend to
attend one year at the graduate school they choose.
The fellows come from 380
colleges and universities in the
United States and Canada.
The UBC Wilson fellows are:
Fred N. Affleck (history),
Aline M. Allard (English),
William D. Irvine (history),
David W. Livingstone <sociol-
ogy), John C. Murchison (Spanish).
Frederick L. Radford (English), William T. Stanbury
(economics), William W. Wadge
(mathematics), Robert A. Watt
(English) and Thomas E. Way-
man (English).
Victoria College won four
fellowships and two each went
to the Universities of Alberta
at Edmonton and Calgary.
Campers John Mlorton and Vic
Hamm.
But she and partner Mary
Jo Anderson of Delta Gamma
fought a losing battle and
judges ruled Acadia camp the
winner.
Morton demanded prostitution be brought into the open
and controlled because it has
been proclaimed an institution.
"I can safely say prostitution
is an institution of the highest
degree," he said.
The Delta Gammas emphasized acceptability and future
businesswomen.
"How would you like your
daughter to say 'when I grow
up I want to be a prostitute
like the one daddy goes to?"
asked Miss Anderson.
"Can you imagine a dominion board of pimps?" asked
Miss Anderson.
Miss Morrow brought up the
question of entering the profession for monetary benefits.
"The girls that can't make
enough money as tellers and
clerks will whip out and become prostitutes," she said.
Some ministers
say God is dead
By STEVE BROWN
Orthodox church leaders are moving to
connected with UBC who are sympathetic
atheism   movement,   the   head   of   UBC's
department charged Monday.
William Nicholls told 200
students such ministers, contrary to public belief, are not
converts to atheism.
"They are believing men
who identify with Christianity
but are alienated by some of its
aspects," he said.
Nicholls said religion could
be dying because it has played
itself out as a social-cultural
phenomenon in today's secular
society.
He said the controversial
"God is dead" theology is a
movement that is only foegin-
ning.
"Some of us find it a sign
of hope because we are unhappy with the contradictions
in standard theology," he said.
Death-of^God theologians are
not giving up their beliefs, but
expel clergymen
to the Christian
religious   studies
simply facing the fact that God
is not necessary today, said
Nicholls.
"All secular sciences, including religious studies, proceed very well without the
hypothesis of God.
"If knowledge can exist
without reference to God, so
can life."
God may have deliberately
gone into hiding at this point in
history, he said.
But the God that is professed
to be dead is "the God of the
NICHOLLS
. .  . religion obsolete?
human mind". There may well
be a true God beyond the God
Christian theology has conceived.
Nicholl's lecture was the
first of three on the God is
dead theology, sponsored by
the Student Christian Movement.
Today, Rev. Alan Jackson,
UBC Anglican chaplain, will
speak, and tomorrow Dr. Keith
Clifford.
UBC medical researcher
wins $50,000 award
A UBC medical researcher has received a $50,000
fellowship.
Dr. A. R. Cox, assistant professor of medicine at the
school's Vancouver General Hospital branch, won the
Canadian Life Assurance five-year research award.
Medical dean John McCreary said Cox's award is
"outstanding".
"I am delighted to see our young teacher-scientists
being so recognized on the Canadian scene."
Cox is currently working on a project involving
measurement of the effects of exercise on the heart.
"'"'■    ■■'•A.,Via* *      ■'"•£_*.■ «-'_,.."i."**   *
i. ."."ISt-.;*■•*• ,*-<??:• ■ ,. .-,;-. ,vw_ar-___ __.-_--____-.-m~, —»-t_ «
—powell hargrave photo
'IT'S A RACKET' cries lawyer, left, tusslin g with phys. ed. player for possession of ball
in intra-mural lacrosse Monday. Physical education downed law 4-3 in springtime
match. mnrssrr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throuchout the university
year by tbe Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1966
"And God fulfils Himself in many ways.
Lest one good custom should corrupt the world."
—Tennyson
Yes, vote no'/
We're against the proposed $2 AMS fee increase.
Now we're not just opposed to it because this university came out for lower fees this fall to enable anyone
wtih the brains to attend this place.
The fact of the matter is that the AMS is groaning
under a $15-a-year allotment for theunion building
project, which leaves precious little for the treasurer
to disperse.
Especially when only $8 of the $29 AMS fee students now pay is available for discretionary allotment,
after all the must items — such as $5 for athletics — are
paid off.
Now for hard-pressed, hard-working, but often berated AMS treasurers Mike Sommers and Lome Hud-
sen, the new $2 would be a godsend.
Undergraduate society demands on the AMS moneybags are increasing in leaps and bounds as facilities
such as science get rolling in a big way, with hints of
arts to follow.
But to us, paying another $2 into the kitty is like
the proverbial farmer welcoming back his prodigal
son who has realized the error of his ways — and then
giving him another $33,000 so he can maintain himself
in the style to Which he has become accustomed.
In short, this $2 increase isn't going to solve anybody's problems.
In the air, however, is a solution that will.
AMS vice-president Charlie Boylan's planned referendum in October will request a year's lay-over in the
progress of the Great Mistake while a clear-sighted look
at the mess is taken by the new SUB chairman.
All the sold-out bank airea and cafeteria space, the
huge ballroom, the too-small theatre, and other play
areas will be set for a final attempt at a snow job by the
Brock types.
And if the student body in October has the sense
to put the thing in cold storage for a year to let various
rational minds look at the disaster, the $15 binding fund
can accrue to general revenue.
At best that's a temporary measure, too, but a) it
doesn't involve a fee increase, b) it's $15 worth of temporary measure, and c) it makes damn sure that both the
Mistake and the resultant financing millstoije won't be
around the year following.
Logically
We of course raise a mighty cheer at the findings
of the Duff-Berdahl report which urge a stronger voice
for students in the administration.
As long as its authors don't pull a Bladen, and
announce in a few days they didn't really have the
courage of their convictions and what they meant to
suggest was that students be dropped from universities
completely, we find much that assesses adequately the
current state of affairs on Canada's campuses.
While it is too bad the brief expresses just about
what everyone is thinking — instead of coming up with
some more far-reaching guidelines for the future — the
fact that the document is as progressive as it is shows
that university administrators have become more realistic
in their attitudes.
Just one illogicality sticks out, a relic of formerly-
held concepts.
The report recommends students should have a
voice on the board of governors, but that it shouldn't be
a student who sits there.
The inherent fallacy of this reasoning is too much. If
student views are worth hearing, and if a person over
21 is a legal adult, then surely even the last remnants of
pre-Berkeley thinking among the Duff-Berdahl minds
can see that a student on the board of governors follows.
Enter Randy Enomoto, 22, stage left.
. and I think the time has come to find some way to eliminate
costs, in order to keep the AMS fees down!"
LETTERS TO THE   EDITOR
Eggs  not
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We have become accustomed to the juvenile rantings
of Mr. Ian Cameron.
I understand that he plans
to be a teacher.
I must therefore admit that
my own faculty bears some
responsibility for his presence
on this campus and must
share with you some of the
blame that must surely accrue
to those who make possible
his execrable appearance in
print.
I am utterly appalled by
his latest effort, supposedly
humorous, on the possibility
of children being hatched
from eggs.
It was horrible, nauseating
and in utterly bad taste.
If you have any interest
in maintaining your occasionally deserved high reputation
in Canadian university journalism, you would be well
advised to relegate Mr. Cameron to the obscurity which
he so richly merits.
I would strongly urge upon
him that when he seeks a
teaching position he carefully
conceal his journalistic efforts from any prospective
employer.
His   latest   atrocity   hardly
"* < *'   ' .C fit;:',■$&>&„
IN  THE  EAR
the  real  George'
suggests    that    he    possesses their howls of indignation at
even a modicum of that sensi- not having their votes recog-
tivity one looks for in a pros- nized.
pective mentor of the young. Sorry about that g^
GEORGE S. TOMKINS It  won't  happen  again  —
Associate Professor you won't be there.
Faculty of  Education Or perhaps you will if our
inference that you are serious-
"k     ~k     if ly reconsidering your profes-
SINCERE THANKS' Si°nal aspirations is correct-
SINCERE THANKS Really feUM> who wantg tQ
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir: be   a   regimented   industrial
We would  like to  extend Soon all his life?
our   sincere   thanks   to   the It's not too late. The regis-
sciencemen who attended the trar is very understanding.
arts general meeting last Fri- q0 see nim
day.
. Then maybe next year we
Their   active   participation ^n. count your vote>  f       if
in the  constitution  filibuster you are on our train
initiated    by   our   ex-prexy-
ousted indicated their intense IAN McDOUGALL.
concern for the well-being of interim-
the AUS. DQfl WISE   elec.
We hereby acknowledge Arts   presidents
W^rs-r-sr'-r-. .     .   '%\-;\-~%*.*   .---    »-   ,•/„•; »-      sc •   , * -    \^^»,
EDITOR: Tom Wayman Why   not   drop   down   sometime
Maw.                                        -__ „.._, to that office in North Brock and
™.w.    .              non Riter see  if you  got  an  editorial  board
Associate              George Reamsbottom Position.     Monday   was   the   first
r!fc,                                             ., _       ,, day of spring.   Judy Bing covered
tny Al Donald it.      Denis    Gans    covered    death
Photo           _       _                  Norm Batt* and    so    died    Steve    Brown.    Val
Snort.                              ""       ej ri    l z"ker     covered     something,     and
7, '-     ea c,nrk Jim Good found  out about  (gasp)
Ass t News                            Dan Mulfon Prostitutes.     Dave   Williams,    the
Richard Blair, Robbi West first  of  the  refugees  from  council,
Ass't Citv                     n™.. c.nu__- came down and made like a crime
ass t City                     Danny SfoHman reporter.     Hrushowy    was    there,
rage Friday     John Kelsey too.   Anne Balf was hungry,  Kurt
Managing       Ian Cameron Hilger  turned  reporter,   Halverson
Features           .           Mike Bolton Ie» a meeting because he couldn't
r„-                                            "      _. ,, speak   Greek,    and   Bruce    (never
tu^                                            "on Hull forgotten)   Benton  ran   copy.
BY IAN CAMERON
God-blessed Ian tells all
Not one out of the thirty'
or so answers we got on our
vital facts quiz was right.
1. Sal  Durante caught the
fly ball.
2. Peter Best was the original Beatles drummer.
3. 45 years
is the average age for
o r a n g -
utangs.
4. V e r non
a n d Gla dys
Presley. Not
Mr. and Mrs.
5. Middle
name   of   Joe
Claude Jodoin
CAMERON
Workman   is
6. Carol Doda's original
measurements were 34-25-36.
After the injections they
were 44-25-36.
7. Newhall factory made
pins (not Newhalls). Production was  1,000,000 per day.
8. There were 11,233
people in jail in Spain.
9. AAONMS is Ancient
Arabic Order of Nobles of
the Mystic Shrine.
10. There are .0252 myria-
grams per hogshead.
11. Ian, John, etc. means
'Blessed in the light of God'
in Hebrew.
12. 70 more miles of sewer
pipes   than   water   pipes   in
Vancouver.    (City   municipal
works dept.)
13. Zog was King and
president of Albania, 1928-
1939. He was not Zog II's
father. His son was named
Sam.
14. One out of 14 Englishmen claims to have seen a
ghost.
15. About 600,000 student-
hours will be spent writing
exams this year. This is 70
years, or almost one life-time.
When you figure what
Bach, Brahms, Einstein, Edi-
son4 Lincoln, Jesus and Roger
MacAfee did in much less
time, well ... Tuesday, March 22,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOBEGROUND
Randy gives  the good word-
Mr. Buchanan 'unavailable'
The Ubyssey early in March
approached chancellor candidates Randall K. Enomoto,
grad studies, and fish magnate John M. Buchanan with
11 questions on the stale of
the   university   today.
Here are Randy's replies.
Buchanan, who declined to
be interviewed by telephone,
was sent a special. delivery
A letter     with    the     questions
March 9. At least an acknowledgement of his intention to
answer them was requested.
The Ubyssey was informed
by phone the following day
that he was 'unavailable', hav-
' ing gone out of town. No-one
knew where he was, when
he would return,, or whether
or not be intended to reply.
Subsequent checks up lo Monday reveal the same stale of
affairs.
1. What do you think of
student   radicalism?
Student radicalism in North
America is unique insofar as
it stems from university students who come from middle-
class families.
They have discovered that
their lives have a political
dimension and that the middle-class values they have
been brought up to believe
in are somehow irrelevant to
what goes on in the world.
How can a man get a university degree, marry, buy a
home and then happily settle
down when whole sections of
society suffer . the tyrannies
of racism  and  poverty?
• •     •
2. Do you think the march
last October was an effective
means of making the public
aware of the student protest
against  the  fee  increase?
Yes I do. When 3,500 students march against the fee
barrier to education, they are
extremely visible.
We weren't ignored by the
Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada and
k I am certain the administration at UBC was affected by
our protest.
3. Do you think sfudenls
should   take   direct  political
A action  (i.e.   fee   agitation   in
Canada, demonstrations in
Berkeley) on issues thai concern them?
• •      •
Yes. First of all, it is important to realize that there
is no exit as far as the political process is concerned. To
do nothing is just as political
as taking action.
Not to protest the fee structure of the university, for
example, means that I believe 60 per cent of university students in Canada should
come from 15 per cent of the
population.
In political terms, inaction
often means reinforcing the
status quo.
4. Are you in favor of
free education—including tuition, room and board, and
books?
Yes. The idea that physical work makes a better stu
dent is basically anti-intellectual.
For a student to have to
work at a dreary job at nights
or on weekends to get through
university is in no way ennobling.
5. What would be your
main goal as chancellor?
In broad terms, I would
work to democratize the university. The university is for
faculty and students, and it
is they who should determine the policy decisions
which affect them.
•      •      •
The main decision-making
body of the university, the
board of governors, exists by
appointment. According to income-bracket, business interests and position in the social
pecking order, the governors
constitute a narrow and non-
representative clique.
The government of this university needs a constituency.
The directions and developments of the university need
RANDY ENOMOTO
. . . Chancellor?
to be related to the concerns
of those who are in daily experience of its conditions.
Obviously, election promises cannot change this situation, but I would act as a
voice for change.
6. Do you think university students should lake a
definite stand on Canada's
policy in Viet Nam?
I go back to a previous
answer.
We cannot escape the political circumstance. The decision not to do anything constitutes just as much of a
political stance as "taking a
stand".
•      •      •
7. Do you think it is a
good idea lo have a student
on the board of governors?
Why (nol)?
My main fear at this time
is that the students will be
tricked into accepting piecemeal concessions.from the administration.
In at least one eastern Canadian university, the administration has t taken a few
specimens out of the bureaucracy of the administration — where they do absolutely nothing to represent
the views of the student body.
So I would say yes, it is a
good idea to have a student
on the board of governors,
but only if his presence challenges the present terms of
reference of that body.
If the student were to maintain the secrecy of the board
on matters vital to student interests, then his presence
would be hollow and meaningless.
8. Why do you want lo
be  chancellor?
I believe that students
should have representation on
both the board of governors
and the senate.
The mechanics of university government are such that
the only way a student can
get onto the board of governors at the present time is
if he runs for the chancellorship.
9. If there was something
of vital concern lo the students brought up al a board
of governors meeting, would
you inform the students of it,
i.e.  come out  of  camera?
Yes, because my constituency is the student body, not
the administration.
10. What do you see as
the purpose of a university?
The most serious theme of
the student today is his alienation from the values of the
society he is expected to contribute to.
• •      •
The problem as I see it is
not the alienation the student
feels. If in fact there is
something wrong with our
society, then it is quite right
for the student to be alienated
from that which he morally
rejects.
We as students have been
trained to be one-dimensional
in our personalities and
double-think in the way we
look at the world.
Our responsible father figures, including our government leaders, speak in what
Norman Mailer calls "totalitarian prose" — their sentences are bricked-in power
structures.
This routine is not interrupted at university.
Here, truth, justice and
freedom are broadcast at us
and we are taught to perform a la Pavlov in order
to obtain THE DEGREE.
• *      •
The problem of intellectuals in the university now is
really to avoid a finite purpose, to stop the university
from servicing the demands
of mass society, to prevent it
from becoming (Berkeley
president) Clark Kerr's multiversity.
11. What do you think of
The Ubyssey?
I am critical of its sensational presentation at times,
but I think it has done an
excellent job this year.
To the consternation of
both the administration and
student council, it has been
very autonomous in its operation and independent in
its criticisms of their policies.
CHANCELLOR'S DUTIES
opening of the Woodward Library
Spring Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos Colored Tails
$6.50 Jackets $8.50
$7.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
IAKEHEAD UNIVERSITY
PORT ARTHUR, ONTARIO
The University is in the process of expanding rapidly,
and we invite applications from qualified faculty members, civil servants and others for the following positions:
Assistant and Associate Professors of ECONOMICS
Assistant Professor of POLITICAL SCIENCE
Associate Professor of SOCIOLOGY
Assistant and Associate Professors of GEOGRAPHY
Lecture and Associate Professor of ENGLISH
Please write to me, enclosing a personal data sheet
and the names of three referees.
W. G. TAMBLYN, President.
SPECIAL     EVENTS
PRESENTS
TOMORROW NOON
Auditorium 35c
JACK GLATZER
Sensational American Violinist from Portugal.
Direct from a Tremendous European Tour.
Playing PISTON, BACH and BRAHMS Sonatas.
Don't Miss This Exciting New Violinist. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   22,   1966
FEE BALLOT AS  PLANNED
Vote set for March 29
By ANNE BALF
Despite a concerted effort
by the AMS executive, the
referendum to raise the AMS
fee by $2 will be held March
29 as planned.
The incoming and outgoing
councillors had decided at a
joint executive meeting to kill
the referendum for the time
being.
Peter Braund, speaking on
behalf of the executive, said
at the council meeting Monday
night the referendum would
probably fail because of the
athletic referendum to be held
at the  same  time.
Several student councillors
supported the motion to reconsider the referendum motion.
Ian McDougall, arts president, said Fort Camp residents
were against the referendum
to  raise AMS fees to  $31.
Incoming first vice-president
Charlie Boylan said Acadia
camp also was hostile to the
referendum.
Braund suggested if the referendum were defeated now,
it wouldn't have a chance of
getting through for a long
time. .
"But if we kill it now and
present it in October or November, when there's a good
political climate, it may get
through."
Eric Newell, incoming engineering president, told council personal publicity efforts
by the undergrad presidents
would get the referendum
passed.
"With a lot of hard work
and persuasion we've  got the
engineers behind it," he said.
"If the other councillors do
the same we're set."
McDougall informed council
The Ubyssey editorial policy
was against the fee raise.
"If The Ubyssey is opposed
you might as well pack it up
right now," said president Byron Hender.
Incoming treasurer Lome
Hudson was also against holding the referendum next week.
Council passed the motion,
and also provided $200 for publicity expenses for the referendum.
Media meet
at Ubyssey
The media will meet in The
Ubyssey  office  Thursday.
Staffers from Canada's greatest campus newspaper will be
interviewed and photographed
by staffers from one of Canada's greatest television networks at 9 a.m.
The CBC'ers will then move
on to the AMS general meeting in the armory to take pictures of the masses.
The resulting film footage
will be shown during the summer on a CBC special television documentary called
Campus 66.
Staffers who want their
faces to appear on the boob
tube should push their way
past the cables, lights,, and
funny bearded men with cameras Thursday at 9 a.m.
C.U.S. IX SEMINAR
Waterloo University, Ontario
August 28 - September 3
IDENTITY & ANXIETY
Crisis of a Student Generation
Applications in A.M.S. and C.U.S. Office
Deadline for Applications Thurs, March 24
U. S. S. R.
9'm 9ett'H9 fitame4' . •
"I
Consultant, Mr. R. Yacht
Please   forward   more   information   on   wedding   invitations,  etc.
NAME _     _     _     	
ADDRESS
ira CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-401
,!
THE   GREATEST  NAME   IN
SUITS
$95
TAUOR.D EXCIUSIVEIY BY
PR0<.RU5   BfinflP   (LOTtK*
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
Clothing for campus and dress-up occasions
742 Granville MU 1-5625
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
April 1-8
Final Play of the Season
THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
Hilarious Comedy by Moliere
DIRECTED  BY DONALD SOULE
with Mariko van Campen and Robert Orchard
STUDENT PERFORMANCE
MONDAY, APRIL 4-7.30 p.m.-75 cents
Note: — Tickets at 75 cents available for most other performances.
We are  official  agents  in  B.C. for the  Government
Tourist   Offices   of   the   U.S.S.R.,   Poland,   Hungary,
Rumania,  Bulgaria,  Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia  and
*5»»8"    East  Germany.  Although  travel  to   these   countries
^ 1CTW ^ 's eas'er ,nan '• was, it still needs careful prepar-
♦^ ■ v'.^j? ation, and we've been  doing  this for several years
now.
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagen's Travel Service Ltd.
HAGEN'S
736-5651
2996 W. Broadway
PLAYHOUSE  THEATRE  CO.  PRESENTS
THE WORLD PREMIERE
LIKE FATHER, LIRE !UN
by ERIC NICOL
Beloved Campus Humorist for 10 years "Jabez"
Opening March 24 - April  19
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
Be sure to see this fresh new comedy
by famed   humorist Eric  Nicol
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Student Court and Discipline Committee
Applications should be made by letter to the Secretary of the Alma Mater Society not later than Friday,
March 25, 1966 for
Student Court:
The Chief Justice must be a student entering
third year law. Other positions on the Bench are
open to any student.
Clerk of the Court:
This position is open to any student.
Discipline Committee:
These positions are open to any student.
Assistant Co-ordinator:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Ass't. Co-ordinator. Applicants should apply in
writing to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. All applications must be accompanied by an
eligibility form.. Applications will close on March 24,
1966.
Brock Management Committee:
Applications are now being accepted for positions on
the Brock Management Committee. They should be
sent to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. Applications must be submitted by March 24,
1966.
Chairmen Needed:
Applications are now being received for chairmanship
of the following committees:
Brock Art Manager
Open House Chairman
Totem Editor
Leadership Conference Chairman
College Shop Manager
Academic Activities Committee
All  applications  shall  be  in  writing  and   shall be
addressed to the Secretary (Box 54). Eligibility forms are
available in the Secretary's office (S. Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m.
March 24, 1966.
Academic Symposium Chairman:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of chairman for 1966-67. Write to ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM COMMITTEE box No. 2 Brock Hall.
CUS IX Seminar:
Aug. 28 to Sept. 4 at Waterloo University (Ontario).
Topic: Identity and Anxiety: Crisis in the Student
Generation. Application forms in AMS office and
CUS office. Deadline for Applications Thursday,
March 24. 8 delegates. Costs paid by the Can. Union
of Students.
Seminar will consist of a discussion of the political,
psychological, and institutional causes of student unrest and identity problems.
Anyone may apply. Tuesday,  March 22,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
BIRDS BATTLE BEARS ...  but lose cup
— powell hargrave photos
CAL GRABS WORLD CUP
The Birds came close at UBC Saturday
but close only counts in dancing and horse
racing.
Birds trailed the University of California
Golden Bears 13-9 with less than five minutes remaining in the final game of the
World Cup rugby playoffs, when Thunder-
ibird winger Gary Rowles made an electrifying 45-yard run which brought the partisan crowd of more than 3,300 to their feet.
Rowles was tackled on the Bears' five
yard line where he passed the ball to teammate Charles Pentland1.
Pentland was jarred loose from the ball,
ending the Birds drive.
Each team won two games in the four-
game series but the Golden Bears won the
cup on total points, 45-35.
The Bears have won the cup 14 times
in the 27 years the two teams have met,
winning the last five years in a row.
UBC led 6-3 at half time on two penalty
goals by Mike Cartmell but the Bears came
back quickly in the second half with two
converted tries.
Birds lose to end
unbeaten record
All unbeaten streaks must come to an end, and the
longest one at UBC came to an end Saturday when the
Thunderbirds field hockejr team was edged 2-1 by Jokers
in a knockout tournament.
Football strip
This week is the last chance
for 'Birds to draw or replace
next year's strip in advance
Wed. 11:30-1 p.m. or Thursday 12:30-2 p.m. Any 'Birds
who wish to have anything replaced must be at Wolfson
field at the above hours.
The Birds had previously
played 36 games without a
loss.
The game was played' at Pitt
Meadows in driving wind and
rain.
Ex-UBC star Joost Wolsak
opened the scoring with a brilliant reverse-stick shot in the
second half.
Bruce Hodgson evened the
score, but Victor Warren pushed a rebound off goalie Brian
Rattray into the net in the
second period of overtime.
The Birds wound up the season with their sixth consecutive league championship,
while Braves took the third
division title.
Tomahawks, who lost 2-0
Saturday to Hoppers B in
knockout play, finished in second place in the fourth division.
BAY
FATHER CAME TOO
Jamas Robertson Juttte*
U»l»   Phillips,   Stanley   Baxter
plut
SEANCE ON A WET
AFTERNOON
Rich.   Attenborough,  Kim  Stanley
(Restricted) students 75c
IT'S THE SHIRTS at Ggldaan
DELTA
March 23 A 26
NAKED AMAZON
Plus
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
Cliff Richard
Is it bad it your collar has a 2 inch roll
and your neck is only l inch long?
Don't you know? The more collar, the more style! And
you can be the most stylish in your class this semester
wearing Murray Goldman famous High-Collar, even if
your neck is only half an inch long! The High-Collar
comes complete with button-down collar, a box pleat in
the back, and shirt tails, for that in-group slob look. The
High-Collar also features a tapered body, in case yours
isn't. So, for sport or dress ... for giraffes or turtles . . .
you can't go wrong with the High-Collar by Murray Goldman.
Murray Goldman
774
"E
Iranville
What's new,traveller?
THE ALEXANDR PUSSYCAT!
Here's a new way, the "in" way to get to Russia. The
Alexandr Pushkin* offers you the first direct transatlantic
passenger liner service between North America and the
U.S.S.R. On board you'll enjoy a variety of Russian cuisine,
Russian films and music as well as free Russian-language
and ballet lessons. There are six sailings this year between
Montreal and Leningrad via London, Copenhagen, and
Helsinki. You can board or disembark at any one of these
ports. For complete information and reservations contact
MARCH SHIPPING AGENCY LTD:
400 Craig Street West, Montreal, P.Q.
842-8841
•Registered in U.S.S.R.
ENGLISH STUDENTS
u
Revised  and Comprehensive  1965-66
COURSE SUMMARIES'
Including Old Exams
Especially Useful For Final Exams
ENGLISH 200 at $7.95 per set
Some unrevised English  100 "Course  Summaries" are
also still available at $6.95 per set.
The Quality Speaks For Itself
COLLEGE SHOP (Brock) and at
BETTER BUY BOOKS (4393 W.  10th)
Our Man in ANTRON
finds a runaway favourite
VICTORIA LEATHER streamlines the getaway.
And how! We're talking about the windcheater.
"University". In ANTRON nylon and cotton. The
obvious choice. Rugged wear with no holds
barred. Dauntless good looks. Topnotch performance. Luxury all the way down the line.
And style that simply purrs.
  ANTRON
»■*
CANADA
the n.itnn you can trust in fibre.-- Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   March   22,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Alan Neil trio blows
Concert of the year: The
Alan Neil Trio and Gerald
Walker: noon today in the
Aud. 50 cents. Members 25
cents.
PRE-MED
The last lecture of the year
is Wednesday noon in Wes.
201. Dr. Tischler, from Woodland's school will give a lecture and show a film. Let's
have  a good turnout!
PHE-LAW  SOC
General meeting noon in Bu.
221. Bob Cruise speaks today
on Law  and  Society.
SEAFORTH  HIGHLANDERS
Parade 7:30 tonight in Armories. Lectures on 9 mm pistol
and map  using.
DESERET   CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 3252. Elections for
next   year's   executive.
PRE-DENTAL   SOC
Tour of the dental hut SW2
behind and to the left of the
B.C. Research Council building.  All  welcome.
ASIAN   STUDIES
Lecture Wednesday noon in
Bu. 104 on China's Place in
World History.
ACE
General meeting for elections Wednesday noon in Ed.
204.
SCM
' Death of God Series. Rev.
Alan Jackson speaks on God
Is Absent noon today in Bu.
100. Dr. N. K. Clifford speaks
on What Will They Think Of
Next? Wednesday noon in Bu.
100.
EL   CIRCULO
Spanish speaking day in IH
today. Everyone welcome. Coffee  available.
IL   CAFFE
Italian Day Wednesday in
IH. Modern "Pop" music at
noon.
GUERRILLA SOC
Meeting noon today in Bu.
3210. Elliot will officiate. All
attend.
10%   Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
CASH   and  CARRY
Vogue Flower Shop
2197  W.   Broadway 736-7344
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
O TRADES > TERMS
A RENTALS      6 REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic  Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
CINEMA   16
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 106. All series and
club members may attend.
Elections and end-of-year reports.
PHYSICS SOC
Prof. Philip Morrison of the
Dept. of Physics at MIT, speaks
today at noon in Hebb. on the
Output of Supernova.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office. Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost k Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publication! office, Brock Hall. Local M,
E24-324t.
LOST — SMALL, BROWN CASE
containing all ray Identification.
Finder  please  phone  Lucy,   CA 4-
9009.	
LOST: 1 PAIR GLASSES IN
brown leather case, in or near
eii«ineerinfr bldg. l'hone 224-975'8,
Km.   109.
FOUND A      WATCH     DURING
March 10th Sports Car Rally. Pick
up   at Publications   Office,   Brock
Hall.
LOST RING OF FORD KEYS.
Phone 987-7588. C-lot, Woodward
Library,   March   16,   1966.	
LOST: ONE RED KEY CASE. IF
found,  phone  .327-5552.	
REWARD $25. FOR RETURN OR
information leading to the return
of the notes and texts of A.E.T.
Bentloy taken from the third floor
stack entrance. Urgent. FA 7-4603.
No  questions asked.
WILL THE PERSON WHO TO.OK
my brief case from the Main Library Sat. noon. Please return to
same place — with instructions on
where to send $25 reward. (No
questions asked.)
FOUND WALLET BELONGING TO
John Dooyeheerd — phone 922-7064
after  6:00.
$25 REWARD FOR GIRL'S GRAY
carry-all bag missing March* 16,
Chem. 230 lab., with notes (zo.
301, 302, 304; Chem.), glasses
Beige wallet with I.D. Urgent —
no questions asked. Finder please
phone  H.  Clark,   224-0720 after "fi.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
WEST   VAN   EX-GRADS   '62   to   '64
2nd   Gleneagles   knockout.    Apr.    2.
Tickets Kim's Drugs,  Park Royal.
WANT TO LEARN TO RIDE
horseback? Then come out to Willows Stables, 7226 Balaclava. (S.
of Marine Drive) or phono 266-
4219    for    information.
.1EEK SWEETS THOUGHT WE'D
wish you a Happy Birthday a
week late 'cause . . . A.J.J.T.L.'C-
M.A.R.L.L.P.T.
CAREY HALL — FOR THE RIGHT
man for the job — GET ELMER
EPP.
STOP THE SHIEKS STOP LONDON RT.IRUT NY LA VANCOUVER   STOP.
ANYONE SEEING S.O.B. HIT YEL-
low Morris Minor in C-lot Friday
please contact Barry at 327-7514
after 5 p.m.
Wanted
15
WANTED — SKI BOOTS (9%-_0),
poles and skis (app. 195 cm.). 876-
9740.
Travel Opportunities
16
AMS CHARTERED FLIGHT: ONE
Way London to Vancouver. Leaves
Aug.   13.  Only  $200.   Call  Ken   RE
I WOULD LIKE TO FIND A GTRL
to travel with in Europe during
June. Phone Julie, Rm. 333. 224-
9883 or 224-9908.
Automobiles For Sale
21
1952 MARK VII JAGUAR, 3.5 LITRE
Overhead Cams. Engine & Body
excellent, leather Walnut Interior
$400.   Robert   RE   3-8765
T958 VAUXHALL, VERY GOOD
condition, must sell immediately.
Phone 731-3405' leave message 'for
Sara.
1965 DATSUN 1,500 SPORTCAR
13,000 miles. Phone: 731-9544
evenings.
1957 CHEV — PERFECT ENGINE
And, 1955 Olds 88. Power steering, power brakes, fully automa'tic.
Phone   BR   7-8476.
MORRIS 100 1958 RECOND. E>T
GINE. Good body. Poor fenders
$280.    939-0648.
TR-3. MUST RE SEEN, FULLY
equipped, wire-wheels, over drive,
Michehn tires, radio. 2 Lucas
lamps, ski-rack & chains, 40,000
miles, black-red interior. Phone
224-3121   (Barry).
Motorcycles
27
1965 DUCATI MOXZA 250 cc. LIKE
new. 1,000 mi. Best offer, 224-9069
Hans.
Business Opportunities       30A
FOR SALE IMMEDIATELY —
note publishing business now well
established at UBC. Gross annual
sales exceed $2,400; good profit.
Ideal opportunity for commerce' or
business-minded student. Terms
available. Box 255, Postal Station
A, Van. 1, B.C. or RE 3-3614 or
AM   1-6251.
Orchestras
35
THE   VANCOUVER   DIMENSIONS.
Now     available     for     engagements
phone   "Tom"  261-6705   "Jim"  261-
7435.
Scandals
39A
SANDALS:
THE  BLIND  OWL
2057   A   West   4th   Avenue
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
43
TYPING 25c PAGE or $1.95 HR.
West End 685-5539 eves. Campus
pickup and delivery. $1.00 for short
papers.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, reports, etc.
Mrs. U. V. (Rae) Chambers. Phone
AL   5-9493.
WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME.
25c page. 738-6829. Call Monday-
Thursday  after  10 a.m.
FAST,     ACCURATE     TYPING    OF
thesis, essays, etc. Phone 733-0789.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
YOU CAN EARN NEXT TERM'S
Fees by selling advertising for The
Ubyssey. This is an excellent opportunity for several ambitious
students to gain sales experience
and to earn worthwhile commissions. Work to start early next
September. If interested apply to
A. Vince, Manager of Student Publications, Brock Hall. (Afternoons
only.)
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
GUITAR    INSTRUCTION    IN    i'IN-
ger  style,   jazz,   popular,   and   semi-
classical.   Bill   Lepine,   CA   8-8101.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
"PROMETHEUS" VOL II NO. 3—
Now available at Book Store. No.
A retrospective look at the U'BC
Teach-in & the Berkeley Student
Strike. Also authors Wayne Cannon, Wm. McCarthy, Henry Rosenthal,   Walter   Young,   R.   Riley
and   Dahren,   etc.
TENOR  SAX.,   $140.   Phone   224-9845
Dave RM. 3.     .
FEMALE STUDENT REQUIRED
for relief work, May to mid-September, for downtown dental office.
Please reply in own handwriting
to Dr. J. A. Folkins, 907-925 'W.
Georgia, Vancouver 1, B.C.
RENTALS   &   REAL ESTATE
Room & Board
•a
ROOM   AND   BOARD   ON   CAM.PUS
Fraternity.  PhPone 224-9790.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL WANTED SHARE SPACIOUS
West End Apt. Own bedroom, very
reasonable. Ph. 684-9648 Evenings
Apr.   1.
SENIOR GRAD STUDENT AND
mother, abstainers will give good
care and pay rent for furn. house
approx. May 15 to Aug. 31. 683-
1551.
HOUSE, MAY' - SEPT. 1 BDRM.
Gas Ht., El. Stv., & Wt., Lge. Lt.,
Nr. Bus. 20 min. to town, (car)
YU   8-0138.
SUITE TO SHARE FOR SUMMER
months. Good location. Very reasonable  cost.  Call  Ted,   738-2656.
ALBERTA COUPLE WITH 14 YR.
old attending Crofton require two
bedroom suite or home. Must "be
furnished and nr. UBC or Kerrisdale. Required from April 15] to
June 20. Excellent refrences. Price
no object for right place. G. A.
Bartley,  Box 1000, Red Deer, AJta.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
DE LUXE SUITE FOR RENT.
Available April 1. Private garage
and garden. Wall to wall carpets.
Fridge & stove, good view. Near
Spanish Banks. Suitable for husband and wife or 2 persons. Phone
224-0124.
ARTS & COMMERCE GRADUATES
Opportunities exist within our Company for 2966 graduates to train as Marketing Representatives. The successful
applicants will be interested in sales and related field
administration work, have some mechanical interest and
aptitude and be willing to relocate within the Province.
The established training program will toe modified to fit
the education and experience of the successful applicants.
DIRECT ALL APPLICATIONS TO:
MR. D. W. HOLME, Personnel Division,
STANDARD OIL CO. OF B.C. LTD.,
355 Burrard Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
HI-ALL-YU-WEN
School  District No. 35
(Langley)
Interviews for teachers seeking elementary and
secondary positions.
March 23rd -24th
PERSONNEL BUILDINGS, HUT M4, U.B.C.
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m.
Applicants will be given full details of positions,
etc., by:
Secondary Schools
R. E. Mountain
D. M. Hanson
R. C. Winter
Elementary Schools
A. E. Angrignon
F. C. Cudlipp
J. R. MacDonald
J. A. McTaggart
R. S. Price
Mrs. I. Robertson,
Primary Supervisor.
FRANTIC!!
Moving
Across
The Street
ALL STOCK MUST GO BEFORE WE MOVE
SUITS*™*. 5
TIES 25c and 95c
SOCKS ALL 69c
SPORT SHIRTS from $1.95
oo
This is an
honest to
goodness Sale
of last season's
Merchandise that will save you
dollars, don't miss it, come in
now! Stock up on your summer
requirements.
Sweaters
from $4.95
Dress Shirts
from $2.95
SUITS $8Rl9do $4950
$85.00
ALL STOCK MUST GO
ABBOTTS
Broadway
Store
2906  WEST BROADWAY
Only
ONALD

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