UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 28, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128572.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128572.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128572-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128572-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128572-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128572-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128572-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128572-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128572-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128572.ris

Full Text

Array THE UdYSStY
Vol. LIU, No. 67 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 1972
48,
228-2301
TOUGH SHIT. What more can you say to a poor fellow who found exam pressure was
more than the human body was ever equipped to endure. Fortunately, this man was a
— kini mcdonald photo
Ubyssey staffer, and carried a blanket-wrapped tape recorder to his end. "Looks like
cement down there," were his last words, and it was.'
3 AMS hacks on OFY money
By JIM JOLY
Three Alma Mater Society executive members
will be employed on various AMS-endorsed
Opportunities for Youth projects this summer.
Vice-president Gordon Blankstein, external
affairs officer Terri Ball and internal affairs officer
Lynne Phillips will each work on one of the eight
projects.
Ball said one of the reasons AMS executives will
be employed on the projects is that some of them
should be around the university during the summer
to plan for next year.
About 150 persons applied for the 75 positions
available, Ball said.
Applicants were placed by the AMS according
to any special skills they might have possessed
relating to the various projects.
"After that it was just first come first serve,"
said Ball.
The end of an era
This is it, folks.
A superbly magnificent year of campus journalism has come to
an end.
We've had our laughs.
We hope you have too.'
Now, as the year draws to a close, it is time once again for
Ubyssey staffers to consider other matters — courses, essays and
exams among them.
That is, for the staffers who've managed to survive the year
without dropping out.
So, to commemorate the finest year of campus literaria ever to
hit UBC, today's Ubyssey now brings you the beginning of the end.
The projects and Ball's unofficial estimate of
the number of people employed by each are:
A study of the feasibility of setting up a
campus credit union. Eight persons would be
employed.
A study of new teaching methods to use at the
UBC daycare centre. Ten persons would be
employed.
Construction of new daycare facilities including
playground equipment. Ten persons would be
employed.
A voter registration drive for provincial and
municipal elections employing 15 persons.
Keeping SUB open during the summer as a
recreation centre for underprivileged groups. Ten
persons would be employed.
A survey of students attending UBC, Simon
Fraser University and Vancouver City College to
determine their meal habits at lunch-time. Six
persons would be employed.
A study of various housing prospects open to
students attending UBC. Fifteen persons would be
employed.
A study of ways to improve community,
professor and student communications. Six persons
would be employed.
Ball said she thinks the two daycare centres,
voter registration drive and SUB recreation centre
projects stand the best chance of approval.
She added, however, the other projects remain
possibilities.
Students will learn between April 17 and April
21 whether their projects have been approved.
The maximum salary per person on any OFY
project is $90 a week. Projects run between May 15
and Sept. 15.
Ball said she hopes students are thinking about
other job possibilities in case their projects are
rejected.
"You never know if the project will be
approved," she said.
Inside today's Ubyssey
Maclowns
A special pullout section
Richard Nixon's Canada
Trudeau: hero or saviour?
The new schmuckismo!
Pierre & Sandy & Peter & Phil Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
Psych seethes with pessimism'
By BERTON WOODWARD
The psychology department is now in a
state of limbo on the questions about hiring
procedures raised by graduates in the
department.
Ron Douglas, spokesman for the psych
grad students association, said Monday he
believes the group's campaign for systematic
evaluation of profs in the department, sparked
by the controversial cases of Carol Marx and
Mike Humphreys, has now been heard by
senior staff in the department and most
believe "it won't happen again."
"Everybody would bet that nothing's
going to happen," he said.
PGSA member Clyde Curry added: 'The
whole   place   seethes   with  pessimism.  The
'19
junior faculty say 'sure I'd like to see the
cases reopened but it's going to cause a lot of
trouble if you push and there's no point since
they're not going to be rehired anyway.' "
But there are still some in the department
who would like to see further action on the
cases, Douglas said.
"Some of us are not satisfied to see the
cases swept under the rug.
"The students who have been most
associated with Carol and Mike are the ones
who are least satisfied," he said.
Marx and Humphreys were ,each denied
renewal of their teaching contracts last year.
Humphries, up for renewal of his second-year
contract, appealed his denial and had his case
reviewed twice.
A'fi CAWCA
MARCHING through downtown Vancouver, members of band Sunshyne spend taxpayers'
Local Initiatives Program grant money in effort to become real street band.
Marx was granted no review after her first
two-year contract was not renewed.
Curry said Humphrey's role in the dispute
may soon become irrelevant because he is
currently applying for a teaching position at
Purdue University in Indiana.
But, he said: "Carol is the one who has
really been shafted by this. She didn't even
get a review."
Douglas said a meeting last week held
between faculty and PGSA, attended by four
senior faculty members and more than a
dozen each of junior faculty and grad
students, tended to revolve around the
practicality of re-opening the cases.
"The ethical issue of what the hell is right
was hardly touched on," he said.
Asked if they thought department head
Edro Signori would change his stand of strong
opposition to the profs' reconsideration, both
spokesmen gave an emphatic no.
But, Douglas added: "My personal
impression is that Edro isn't as much of an
evil has he's made out to be by students and
staff.
"Senior faculty often say: 'Well we'd like
to reopen the cases but you know how Edro
is.' But really, while generally unhappy with
his decisions they just tend to blame
everything on him when it's actually their
fault for letting him run them around like
that."
As for any hope of direct action on the
two cases, Douglas said: "We conceded a long
time ago, before we started, that it wasn't
going to go anywhere for these two people
but we thought we could get somewhere by
raising the issues."
Asked if they had accomplished that end,
Douglas said: "No doubt about it."
WSS gets footloose, fancy free to Europe
If you're footloose and fancy-free but not
especially rich, Western Student Services
charter flights to Europe may be what you are
looking for.
If you hurry.
WSS representative Stuart Bruce said
Monday that although there was not an
appreciable increase in applications for WSS
flights to date, he expected one soon due to
the cancellation of many flights by other
services as a result of recent British toughness
on charter flights.
"As of now, all flights are still open but I
really can't see that situation lasting too much
longer," he said.
All members of the AMS, faculty and their
dependents are eligible for the WSS flights,
both one-way and return.
The first flight for this summer leaves
Vancouver May 1, with flights continuing all
summer.
Prices range from $115 to $250 - the
latter amount being for a one-way flight from
Winnipeg to London and the former the cost
of a return trip from Vancouver to London
and back.
WSS also offers intra-European charters at
prices that are often on one-half to one-third
the commercial prices.
For example, a flight from London to
Istanbul via WSS goes for about $90 as
opposed to the regular air fare of $200, said
Bruce.
The UBC office for WSS charter flights is
located in SUB 226.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day From Friday
4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. 4:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
5732 University Blvd. - Phone 224-6121
CIS
CO-OPERATIVE INSURANCE SERVICES LTD.
C.I.S. Insurance, a Leader in the field of Insurance innovations, has career
opportunities in the marketing of the Insurance product (Estate Planning —
Annuities — Pensions — and all aspects of Life Insurance; also
advising their clients on General Insurance, i.e. Auto Home — and
Business). The sound philosophy of Cooperation offers a young man or
woman an excellent opportunity to assist in advising the public on their
insurance necessities.
Please write or phone MARKETING SECRETARY, D. STONEY, C.I.S.
INSURANCE, No. 96 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C., 872-7454.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ TJ.B. & S.B. Suits
'+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe
688-2481
Drive Your Own Car
— Economically —
In Europe This Summer!
Drive a brand new car,
set your own pace ...
Your own itinerary on your own time -
economically. This is the best method to
enjoy and discover the U.K. and the
Continent. Tourist Car Services,
specialists in overseas car deliveries for
Canadians.
A brand new LEASE-A-CAR is
economical for travel trips of four or
more weeks.
Planning a new car purchase? Use our
PURCHASE-A-CAR plan, direct from
the manufacturer at factory prices.
Drive your new car, return it to Canada,
the savings are an added benefit and can
be substantial.
RENT-A-CAR plan offers greater
flexibility, depending on your itinerary
and period of car rental. Features
pick-up one city/country, drop-off
another city/country, (min. 14 days.)
N.B.  Special Students Ratal -
Laasa Grants $40.00 and morel
Renault
"We'rea Canadian Company"
MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY!
TOURIST CAR SERVICES US 4
185 Bay Street, Suite No.401,
Toronto 116, Ontario
Telephone 864-9598
/
I   am   interested   in   more   information,
please send brochure, without obligation,
on the following:
DLease      DPur'chase       DRental
Car Make & Model preferred . . .
    No. in party .
Planning Departure	
Length of stay	
Destination	
Name	
Address	
City	
In Dundas/Hamllton, 163 King St. Wilt,
Dundas, Tel: 627-1607
Clip this Ad for future reference
Celebrating
The Death and Resurrection of
the Christ
at the Lutheran Campus Centre
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SUNDAY
6:30
Seder and Sacrament
(2.00 for the Meal)
8:00       Good Friday Teneabrae
9:30
10:30
Breakfast — 50c
Resurrection Celebration
Students are invited to join our community in all of these
celebrations. Tuesday, March 28, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3.
Law students oppose building
By Laurence leader
There oughta be a law. At least
as far as the law faculty's selection
of a new building is concerned.
The seeds of a disagreement
between the faculty's student and
staff are growing. The foundation
of the argument is the faculty's
proposed new building.
Money for construction
became available last July after a
series of postponements. A
building committee comprised qf
students and faculty approved the
architect's rough plans.
But the students submitted
alterations to the preliminary
sketches. The architect, Fred
Hollingsworth, who works from
West Vancouver, claimed he was
not commissioned by the law
faculty to accept student
proposals.
Law student Hein Poulus
described the problem as "conflict
of ideas."
Faculty wants immediate
construction of the building. The
students are complaining of the
present plan's segregation.
Poulus said the students
consider the new building as
further separating faculty and
students by having separate
sections for offices, lecture and
common rooms.
The faculty rejected student
proposals for integrating common
rooms for both staff and students.
A   letter   from   law   student*
president Bill Wilson, to law dean
A. J. McClean, outlined student
opinion at a LSA meeting:
"BE IT RESOLVED:
1. That the LSA opposes the
construction of new facilities
based upon the existing
scheme.
2. That we remain convinced of
the importance of a new
facility designed so as to
encourage a sense of
community    and    to    allow
educational  flexibility  in the
future.
3. that   the   LSA  executive  be
directed  to  communicate our
dissent to the central university
planning   body   and   to   the
board of governors."
A fourth resolution declared
the LSA is prepared to jeopardize
existence   of the  new building's
existence over its recommendations.
Wilson also wrote: "We are not
convinced that all possibilities
have been explored... It is our
hope that faculty and students
may co-operate to plan a structure
that will be conducive to both the
teaching and learning of law."
A spokesman for the architect
said Monday that Hollingsworth's
major projects include the
People's Motor Inn in Nelson,
B.C., the Imperial Motor Inn in
Victoria, and "quite a list of home
residences," many after the style
of Frank Lloyd Wright.
Law students have voiced
doubts as to Hollingsworth's
qualifications    to    build    an
education office.
The student-faculty building
committee is meeting today to
plan its representation to the
board of governors. The board
will make the final decision on
acceptance of the new law
building.
All agreed the issue is a moot
point.
**.  i i    11 ii < i i
ONE TEN it says, and judging from the amount of daylight, it must be
p.m., which is of no help whatsoever to the poor sod in the library who
looks out to determine how much time he has until his 1:30 p.m.
in-class final. But to the woman on the top of the new arts tower it's
just another part of the grand and glorious city that is UBC. Amen.
—kini mcdonald photo
Exposure: a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
CHARTERS
More people probably get burned on
shady charter flights than actually fly on
them.
If you are planning to go on one this
summer or next fall, we have a few tips to
offer.
First, stay away from flights departing
from Seattle or, for that matter, from
anywhere in the U.S.
This is not merely Canadian economic
nationalism but involves certain
differences in charter regulations between
the two countries.
In Canada, money accruing to the
charter company must be held in trust
until the passengers have been returned to
Canada. Not so in the States.
If you leave for Seattle (starting from
that little bus station on West Georgia
near the Hotel Vancouver) for London
you may easily end up in Frankfurt only
to find that the instant company (just
add money, greed and stir) went broke or
has fallen afoul of the British Board of
Trade and isn't being allowed to land in
London.
The reason in this latter case is the
enforcement of the IATA agreement that
you must be a member of an affinity
group (i.e., the AMS) for at least six
months prior to your departure.
All other flights are — strictly speaking
— illegal. Nonetheless, according to one
downtown travel agency which specializes
in charters, 80 per cent of all flights
leaving Vancouver fall into this category.
A while back, Wardair was prosecuted
several times for contravening this
regulation but wiser and poorer, the
company now back-dates memberships so
it appears you've belonged to the group
for at least six months.
A final word of advice is to fly with
Western Student Services charters where
possible. You won't find that they are
cancelled at the last minute leaving you
high and dry in Vancouver.
IH FOOD
All is not happy at International
House.
It is about to be levied with a
discriminatory 14 per cent charge on its
gross food sales by university
administration vice-president Bill White.
The official reason: The university is
taking a cut to compensate for the light,
heat and maintenance services it provides
toIH.
The real reason: Since the people who
eat at International House don't currently
contribute through food purchases to
paying off White's "on paper" 10-year
mortgages (the buildings are, I'm told,
actually financed over 18 years), the IH
ART SMOLENSKY
. .. pizza mogul
food customers must be levied with a
special tax.
Barbara Gaylor, manager of the food
service outlet, isn't sure what will happen
April 1 when this charge goes into effect.
Because the very good, wholesome
international food is coupled with
reasonable prices, the service is operating
at a small loss. This loss, will, of course,
be parlayed into a grand ruin should the
14 per cent surcharge go into effect.
Shades of Nixonomics.
Incidentally, a sampling of IH regular
fare should prove exotic for western
palates. And if you don't like the daily
homemade soup there's a money-back
(no-foolin') guarantee.
A specialty of the house, by the way,
is Burgher Muesli, a tasty Swiss health
food dish consisting of raw oats, fruits
and nuts. The cost — 35 cents a bowl.
CHEAP ELECTRONICS
Hot tip of the week for students
interested in electronic stuff like TV's,
radios, tape recorders and stereo is a place
called Falcon Sales at 2162 West Fourth.
They have no stock to speak of (but
you can order anything) and the prices
are completely out of sight. The ,phone
(which isn't listed in their name) is
731-7267.
Why so cheap? Little stock combined
with a strict cash basis yields probably
the very lowest prices in town. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
Happy hunting, and all that
So, as the sun sinks in the west
and the final 1971-72 edition of The
Universal Daily Scoop is put to bed,
we feel constrained in our drunken
and nostalgia-sodden stupor to . . .
to . . .
Ahem, Er. . .
Beer bottles exploding like
grenades against the old printing
presses tell us it is time for some
final sage words about . . . about. . .
Hell with it. Uh . . .
The months have passed quickly,
and as the last installment in the
Great Newspaper Cycle of Life nears
completion we sense at least one
clear, immutable truth emerging.
And that is, that student power
moves are on the rise again across the
country.
Throughout this school year, and
especially this term, students have
started to fight back again.
No wonder. At UBC, we have
seen no signs of any improvement in
administration attitudes and
procedures and no improvement in
the mediocrity of teaching. In the
country at large, we have seen no
signs of improvement in the
employment situation, despite
Liberal band-aid efforts.
We have seen, however, increasing
student consciousness of the
situation and increasing action to
change it.
All things considered, we are left
feeling optimistic about the ideas
and actions students will bring to
UBC and other universities next
year.
And on that note, we leave you
until September.
Thanks for the stacks of letters
and the articles and ideas. Thanks for
the support on important issues.
Happy cramming, happy job
hunting, happy drinking, happy
smashing the state.
Irving Fetish and friends (choke)
bid you a fond farewell until
September, at which time we will
again return to straighten out all the
summer blunders and con-jobs and
get this operation
semblance of order
in a row.
Heh heh.
back into some
for the 54th year
Letters
'Theft'
My concern over an injustice
presently being inflicted on a
group of students at this
university has prompted this
letter. Considerable student anger
and resentment has resulted from
the activities of professor C.V.
Fir.negan in the department of
zoology with regard to his course,
Zoology 204.
The problem arose last spring
(1971) when each student in the
class was required to hand in a
$3-book of breakage coupons
(which is usual for science courses
with a lab). These, however, were
not returned to the students who
did not break anything (as is
usual). As a member of the class, I
questioned this and was told that
it was none of my business. There
are about 250 students in that
class and the total amount of
money involved was close to (250
by $3) $750. What happened to
this money?
There    was    no    glassware,
chemicals or expensive equipment
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 28, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
This is the campus — a sprawling formicary of human
emotions .. . love and hate, life and death, war and peace,
peanut butter and jelly. There are a million stories on the
campus; this is the worst of them.
My name is Tuesday; Rube Tuesday. I work out of
homicide. In my spare time I'm a private dick. This is the case I
call "The Rag in the Rue Morgue."
On a Monday morning just like any other Monday
morning; (it fell between Sunday night and Monday
afternoon), I walked into my office and my secretary, pert
brunette Paul Knox.
"Uncross those ravishing stems of yours and open today's
casebook," I said.
Continued on page 5
to damage in the lab at any time.
All that was involved was looking
through a microscope (all
accounted for at the end of the
year) at slides (produced by the
UBC technologist and costing less
than a dollar to replace; very few
of these were broken).
In October of 1971, I visited
the president's office hoping to
find out if professor Finnegan
could be prevented from repeating
this deed and I was politely told
by a secretary that the whole
matter was up to the board of
governors. This I assumed meant
that the board would back up the
professor under any circumstance;
so I let the matter drop.
I realize now that this was a
mistake. Professor Finnegan's
successful confiscation of the
$750 last year has prompted him
to double the amount of coupons
required to $6. This means that
(250 by $6) $ 1,500 are involved
this spring.
I personally do not believe that
the board of governors knows
anything about this money nor do
I believe they would agree with
such a policy. I have taken steps
to inform them and others who
should know. Hopefully the
situation will be rectified and the
money returned. If, however, I am
wrong about the board of
governors   with   regard   to   this
matter, then I can only say that I
and many of my fellow citizens
find this a difficult situation to
understand and even more
difficult to forget.
Name withheld,
Zoology 5
Wallace
When I read Mr. Kravitz's
second letter published March 24
I was tempted not to reply as he
was not telling lies about me
personally. But then I began to
wonder about his motivations in
casting aspersions on me and my
research.
Being a moderately paranoid
radical, it occured to me that Mr.
Kravitz might very well be a CIA
agent out to discredit me. After
all, I have always advocated that
social scientists should adopt the
disenfranchised and oppressed as
their chief clientele, and no doubt
the U.S. military are getting
worried now that I am applying
this principle to research on the
Quebecois.
Moreover, it can hardly be a
coincidence that Mr. Kravitz
chose The Ubyssey to air his
views. The Ubyssey, as we all
know, obtains most of its revenue
from the AMS. Barely 18 months
ago that body went on record as
supporting the imposition of the
War Measures Act, indicating
beyond a shadow of a doubt its
links with the American military
machine.
Of course, I know that The
Ubyssey publicly denounces both
Trudeau and the AMS, but the
way things are these days you
don't expect me to believe what
people say, do you?
So, it looks to me as if Mr.
Kravitz, aided and abetted by
The Ubyssey, is the centre of a
U.S. military plot to discredit
radical social science research on
this campus. It follows, doesn't it?
Doesn't it?
Michael D. Wallace,
Assistant professor
Department of political science
Award
Congratulations to The
Ubyssey are in order. You've done
a fine job exposing a measure of
the administrative power
corruption that exists within
various faculties on campus.
It is hoped that your successors
will continue the expose because I
strongly suspect you've viewed
only the top of the iceberg, or
looked under only one corner of
the rug.
Perhaps next year, The
Ubyssey could establish an award.
No, two would be more fitting. Tuesday, March 28, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
One could go to the faculty
administrator with the most
native cunning. This award would
be confined to those who have
had no formal administrative
training but have made their way
purely by experience.
A second award could be
established for the administrator
who had achieved the greatest
measure of acquired deviousness.
Obviously, this award would be
open to both the formally trained
and those learning by groping
experience. A close examination
of the backgrounds of
administrators at UBC shows that
most could qualify for either
award.
It seems indeed unfortunate
that as yet, this proper
recognition has not been given to
the Master Administrator while
we publicly honor and reward the
Master Teacher.
Can we afford to do less for
the people who really count at
UBC?
Name withheld,
Applied Science 3
Garbage
Re: your editorial of March
16:
A more hypocritical pile of
garbage I have never read! You're
complaining of being faced with a
love-it-or-leave-it situation: as
regards The Ubyssey, I've been
faced with a "love-it" situation as
long as I've been out here. If I am'
to be forced into something, I
would like to exercise some
control over the person applying
that force, namely, having to pay
for something called The Ubyssey.
Obviously, from your editorial,
democracy seems to be your
desire — or is it? You don't put
much faith in students and their
ability to properly exercise their
vote. To you it is a foregone
conclusion that: Students'
Coalition puts up one of 'their'
candidates; huge sums of money
will be lavished on his campaign;
everyone will be duped into
electing  him;  and,  he  will  be
F rom page 4
Taking the rose from his teeth and
placing it upon the closed casebook of
Michael Finlay, a drunken book-pedlar
found murdered in a Brock Hall urinal
two years ago, Paul handed me a letter
written in the unmistakeable script of
Leslie Plommer, aging socialite and
strumpet.
It seems this Plommer babe had
inadvertently precipitated the demise
of Nate "Pawnshop" Smith, the chosen
person of Jan O'Brien, head of the
False Creek syndicate. O'Brien had
been seen with Finlay the night he
died, outside a den of iniquity in
Oakridge. She and Oscar Andersen,
noted child molester and pinball-setter,
were trying to get Finlay to score an
em-ruler from Berton Woodward.
Woodward had perverted young
Davy Schmidt to a state where the
latter would eat a nun each night
before doing nasties to a photo of
Berton's Uncle Pierre. Woodward
himself came from a family of
horse-drawn taxi-drivers and he still
made much of the family hack.
But Smith was found dead outside
a credit union with a $2 IOU in his
throat, obviously the work of Sandy
Kass. Only two weeks ago I had tried
to nail Kass with a chair rap after
Kathy Carney (Balcony Bess) and Dick
"Dildo" Betts were found dead of a
heavy dose of Terminal Animal Act in
the back row of the Studio during a
showing of the Stewardesses.
They had pencils in their throats, a
trademark of Kass, but the DA pointed
out that the Teutonic humor of Lesley
Krueger, star reporter for the Daily
Planet, could have demanded revenge
for the theft of her Lowenbrau by
Sandi Shreve, the phantom of Phleet
Street.
I knew that Krueger had joined
forces with Vaughn Palmer's Mormon
gang to wipe out the Palm Springs
Health Spa, but my evidence would
never have stood up in court. Neither
would Krueger; she never stood up
anywhere.
But Palmer had been leaning on
handsome Lance Schendlinger against a
column in Pat Fitzgerald's movie
studio,    where   Mike   Gidora's   Jersey
nothing more than a lackey to the
executive, a group of people out
to shaft all right-thinking human
beings. Thank the stars that you
have recognized these evil people,
and are pure of heart to pass
judgment.
Please, no crap about 'If you
don't like it, change it by working
for it'. I don't like it, and much as
I do with my government I'll
attempt change other than by
working in the government. To
also work for The Ubyssey would
require more time than I have
available; unfortunately, I am not
an English or journalism major.
With any other newspaper the
freedom of the press is balanced
by the prerogative (sic) of refusing
to buy that newspaper. Please,
give me that right, and you can
have all the freedom you want.
W. Schwegler,
Law 2
We have always supported
people who attempted to
withhold their compulsory AMS
fees for any reason. Since the
student council allocates your
money, and some of it goes to
The Ubyssey, your best bet is to
stop paying that money.
Union
To UBC Employees for
an Independent Union,
Sisters and Brothers:
We in the Council of Canadian
Unions are very happy to hear
that the employees of the
University of British Columbia are
organizing.
Our   member   unions   are   all
independent Canadian unions. We
are  sure that they will all give
their support to your new unioa
R.K. Rowley,
ecu
More
The UBC Employees for
an Independent Union,
Sisters and Brothers:
At meetings this last week with
our national president Bill Behma,
vice-president    George    Brown,
Jock syndicate had paid Gord Gibson
for a nudie flick with John Gibbs.
Meanwhile, Ginny Gait, the
baroness of booze, had knifed Fat
Freddy Cawsey, the singing skag
salesman and pformer pfage pfriday
pfersonality, in the latter's lacerated
larynnx.
Kini McDonald, Daryl Tan and
Daryel Erickson, who were responsible
for the technical side of Gidora's porno
film, had been offed by Art
Smolensky, who had wanted the
ccontract all along, even though he
shuttered at the prospect of sharing the
loot with Brian Loomes, the
mastermind behind the John Twigg
kidnapping case.
Twigg had branched into his own
extortion racket after being
double-crossed by Stan Persky, who
funnelled his share into Conrad
Winkelman's sand factory.
Winkelman's gang, headed by
Lamont Cranston, Tom Stafford, and
Raymond Chandler, had all been taken
for a ride by Kent Spencer.
"Crazylegs" Spencer worked ori his
own, and since he had only a learner's
licence, it wasn't hard for Maureen
Sager and Secret Squirrel to push him
off a cliff near the notorious Gary
Gruenke ranch, the scene of the Sue
Kennedy-Brian Sproule yo-yo murders.
Everybody thought Maurice Binge
and Bev Gelfond had died in the crash,
but I knew they were recuperating at
Metropolitan Major General under the
eye of Dr. Mike Goodman and Pops
the janitor.
Their shattered skulls were all that
kept them from getting five to 10 for
their parts in the slaying of baseball
bigwig Warren Mayes, so I knew they'd
never talk.
Most of my contacts were dead, or
reasonably facsimiled, so my only hope
of closing the case was to talk to
Plommer.
I dropped into her penthouse in
Marpole late Monday. Without a word
about the hole in her ceiling, she sailed
over to me with open arms, my scanty
negligee revealing more than any
red-blooded American woman could
take sitting down.
officers and members of our
union, we discussed the situation
at UBC with regard to establishing
an independent Canadian union.
We agree with this position and
pledge to support you in any way
we can.
Jess Succamore,
National sec-treasurer,
Canadian Association of
Industrial, Mechanical
and Allied Workers
And more
To the UBC Employees for
An Independent Union,
Dear Sisters and Brothers:
The Pulp and Paper Workers of
Canada believe in the principle of
autonomous independent
Canadian unions and will assist
any group of employees who wish
to join this movement.
Please feel free to call upon us
for assistance at any time and I
wish you every success in your
endeavors.
Fred E. Mullin,
President,
Pulp and Paper
Workers of Canada
Faint
If I ever see an article or even a
letter in a future issue of The
Ubyssey in which the word
"capitalist" is used in other than a
pejorative sense, I will faint.
Paul Strickland,
Grad student, English
P.S. Your "neo-Marxist"
ideology, especially in your Page
Friday editions, is getting awfully
stale. Perhaps you should go out
and buy a new loaf.
Okay: CAPITALIST. (But
we're sure you're far too worldly
to faint.)
Ivory
%M# .^Wt^S* "*WX «* ii?&K>S. >i- *■$£$*
Fortunately, sfw came from
Rwanda. I remained erect and
demanded to know what her letter
meant.
"We can't talk here," she
breathed, and led me to a darkened
room with soundproof walls and a
floor so cunningly laid that no matter
where you stood, it was always under
your feet.
I heard the soft rustle of cloth
falling to the floor and made a mental
note to have Paul repair my negligee.
But Leslie wasn't listening; with an
almost imperceptible gesture she
flicked a switch hidden in the armpit
of her motorcycle jacket and two of
her strong-arms appeared in the room.
John Kula and Jim Joly! I had
thought they were through when
Bernie Bischoff had pulled the old
"spitball-behind-the-door" trick on
them five months ago. But there they
were, in the flesh, and ready to kill.
I had to think fast. Spotting a
Laurence Leader paperback entitled
"Playgrounds I Have Frequented" near
the desk lamp, I picked it up and
quickly thumbed through it
Finding the worst pun in the book
near chapter five, I hurled it at the two
thugs, hitting them square in their eye.
I whipped out my pistol and
pointed the loaded barrel at the
crestfallen Plommer.
"Now, sweetie, suppose you tell
me what this is all about," I snarled.
And she did.
In five minutes I had heard the
entire story of her feud with Mike
Sasges, the Snooker Czar, who had
hoped to chalk up another 10 grand by
hiring Jim Adams as a double agent.
But Adams had sent me a letter
just before he had died, signing
Plommer's name to it. Holding the
letter under the infra-red desklamp, I
found what I had suspected all along:
"The pun of my aunt is in the
masthead of my uncle," Adams had
cracked.
"Sorry, babe, but even Shane
McCune couldn't solve this one," I
laughed. The next day I mailed the
casebook to David Bowerman, along
with a can of Ken-L-Rations.
BIRD CALLS
NOW ONLY
25
*
Well, it's just about that time
of year again when many of us
students are preparing for final
exams. The question of
examination is reared towards us
See page 17: LETTERS
The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
A Souvenir of
Your Year on Campus
Available While Stock Lasts at
UBC BOOKSTORE - THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE IN SUB
>^^Sc<}i&^lfiiyS^SSi«£XSSf<SS^Z:: Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
In the year of the dog:
Secret Squirrel & animal show
By LESLEY KRUEGER and
SANDI SHREVE
Whina had its year of the dog,
but all UBC could lay claim to
was a year of blowhards, blunders,
blues and squirrels.
Not that the people and the
things voluntarily divide
thems'elves among these
categories, which are
uncomplimentary at best. But
when given a little push they just
seem to naturally fall into place.
For instance . . .
Prime among the blunders were
those made by department heads
in their efforts to retain some
degree of autocracy within their
departments.
These efforts were mainly in
the field of promotion and tenure.
The perpetrators were
anthropology-sociology head Cyril
(Bwana) Belshaw, English head
Robert Jordan, Slavonic studies'
Bogdan Czaycowski and
psychology head Edro Signori.
Over;eeing the whole animal show
was arts dean Doug Kenny.
B
belshaw started off the year in
fine style by recommending
against tenure for junior
professors Ron Silvers and
Matthew Speiers, despite the vote
in their favor by faculty members.
Belshaw finally decided in his
own favor and both Speiers and
Silver were axed. The department
members then voted 30-8 to
reconsider the cases but were
overruled by Belshaw again. They
voted to call in the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers to arbitrate the dispute.
That's how the situation still
stands: the two junior profs are
still axed, CAUT is supposedly
still coming and rumor having it
that Belshaw is still smirking in his
office.
Psychology   department   head
Signori had his groubles trying to
get rid of two of his profs — Carol
Marx and Mike Humphries. But
this time the dissention came
mainly from their students.
Marx and Humphries are
reputedly good teachers. Good
teachers are hard to find (in case
you hadn't noticed). Therefore,
the psychology graduate students
banded together to try and force a
reconsideration of the cases.
They, er, failed.
In the Slavonic studies
department it was Vera Reck and
Catherine Leach who got fired.
Frank Beardow was demoted
from assistant prof to lecturer.
Raymond Chandler has it from
reputable sources that Czaycowski
was responsible. Why? Graduate
students in the department
spearheading the protest against
the firings say all are good
teachers and have respectable
publishing records. Czaycowski
isn't talking.
Seymour Levitan was dismissed
from the English department by
head Robert Jordan. Support
from students was notable,
support from other faculty
members was lacking. There has
been no reversal of the decision.
To some the protests have
seemed to be an exercise in
futility. The profs are all out, the
heads are still in.
But it will not be so easy next
time.
Contributing to this was the
printing of secret memos from the
department heads— notably
Jordan — to arts dean Doug
Kenny. They revealed the inner
workings of the English
department and exposed the
reasons behind the tenure
decisions, regarded as many as
shaky at best. This
non-confidence in Jordan, and the
other heads, will make it more
difficult to continue the rule of
NEW SEDGEWICK  LIBRARY takes shape on butchered main mall. Crowded conditions continued in
1971-7-2, with promise of relief only in a few areas such as the library and earth sciences.
cronyism and thus more difficult
to get rid of good profs because of
inter-faculty political differences.
Although, God knows, there are
few enough good profs left to get
rid of.
V^ne other administration
blunder that has failed to escape
our notice is the construction of
the new Walter Gage residences.
Thrusting their obscene orange
fungi-like fingers into the sky
right outside The Ubyssey office
window, they are a prime example
of poor planning. Six students, all
of one sex, are supposed to exist
communally. Sharing a kitchen,
living room and dining area, the
six students each have their own
room — and their own rent of $75
per month. As a reader pointed
out, this brings the communal
rent to $450 per month — about
the rent of some of the better
houses in Vancouver. They could
better have used the money for
an, er, library.
Speaking of which, there's that
eyesore slowly sinking into the
soil beside Sedgewick. The
Sedgewick library extention
started a year ago and is set to be
finished a year hence. Until then,
we can look at the "lovely" old
houses of frat row . .. maybe.
Vancouver real estate
developer Frank Stanzl obtained
the option to buy three frat
houses. He plans to build
"habitat-like" residences for
students and faculty if he manages
to buy out the fraternities before
April 15.
At this point in the blunders,
the UBC Thunderbird football
team comes, uh, tearing in. They
managed to win three games this
year, which is some sort of a
record, but discontinued the
trophy game played every year
between UBC and SFU. Scores of
60-0 are pretty discouraging.
. ; . 0.'/ . b.3.4.> .'£. .. , .
DIAGRAMMATIC REPRESENTATION of philosophy behind Amchitka protest symbolized concern of
many cavalier attitude of Pentagon toward Pacific Rim safety. Dots represent earthquake zone.
^peaking of the downtrodden,
the federal government has
imposed a tax on the earnings of
already poverty-stricken TA's.
Reductions to the tune of $22 to
$30 per month will be levied on
TA's paychecks since the federal
government has decided to
re-classify some previously
non-taxable scholarships, bursaries
and fellowships as taxable income.
They will be reimbursed in June
but, until then, thirty bucks is
quite a- chunk for Uncle Pierre to
hold in trust.
Numbered among the
blowhards are Conrad Schwartz
and the Student's Coalition
'biggies'.
Health    services    psychiatrist
Schwartz kicked off the year with
interviews concerning
marijuana, users' memories,
concentration and sex lives. Not
only did these personal questions
arouse ire among students but the
principal investigator of the UBC
Medical Faculty Research into
Marijuana team was moved to
denounce it as an independent
study that was never approved by
UBC or the necessary federal or
provincial agencies.
A\nd even the university
administration displayed its
concern by conducting an
investigation into the matter. The
Committee on Research Involving
Human Subjects submitted
Schwartz's questionnaire to a
screening process to ensure it did
not invade the privacy of students
and then resolved the issue by
demanding he modify his
interrogation.
What 'happened to Schwartz is
left to speculation but it is safely
assumed he continued his
activities with the consent of
unsuspecting students acting as his
guinea pigs and confirmed his
already defiant stance against
marijuana, alleging it is used only
by the very insecure, emotionally
immature, passive, lonely,
socially-ill-at-ease and distrustful
individuals.
In October Cecil Green, the
founder of Texas Instruments
Ltd. which nets a profit of about
$30 million per year from selling
war materials to the Pentagon,
awarded the UBC alumni
association $60,000.
Despite protests that UBC
doesn't need American blood
money to finance guest speakers
(the purpose of Green's donation)
the gift was accepted and used to
convince Americans such as David
Rose from the Massachusettes
Institute of Technology and
Nobel Peace Prize  winner Tuzo Tuesday, Match 28, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Wilson to visit UBC and educate
Canadian students.
As to who are the bigger
blowhards - Green or his UBC
alumni cohorts — has yet to be
discovered.
It is difficult to categorize the
Student's Coalition strictly as
perpetrators of the blues. They
could; be as aptly thrust under the
heads of Blunders and Blowhards.
But the fact that they turned out
to be such blunderers and
blowhards is enough to warrant
giving them top billing in the
Blues category.
It all began on Oct. 28. The
Human Government, then the
Alma Mater Society executive,
fulfilled its original promise of
holding a referendum to see if
students wanted them to remain
in office for a full terra
The students ousted the
Human Government and in the
process voted against the SUB
expansion plans. And to replace
Hunlan Government, students
elected the Student's Coalition.
And the blues struck.
The SC executive was mostly
acclaimed — the only exceptions
were president Grant Burnyeat
and secretary Hillary Powell who
ran on a campaign of changing the
budget.
I hey alleged the Human
Government was determined to
destroy clubs and intramurals. In
point of fact, however the HG
allotted a total of $5,000 to clubs
(which by January had
squandered the money and had to
be placed under the guidance of
the finance committee) and also
gave them first priority on the
January margin.
And intramurals were given
$3,500 and the promise of sharing
first priority on the budget with
clubs should they not raise more
money on their own before
December.
The SC slate falsely charged
the HG with loaning the Georgia
Straight $5,000 and donating
$12,000 to the Unemployed
Citizens Welfare Improvement
Council. But the HG only gave the
UCWIC $2,000 and the Georgia
Straight loan was never made.
The Ubyssey printed
corrections to the SC allegations
in its October 26 issue but 13,000
copies of that paper was stolen in
an engineers' stunt.
As a result of the campaign
tactics the  SC contenders were
elected    over    independent,
contenders for the positions.
HG did not enter the contest
because of the referendum results.
In December the SC completed
negotiations for the first union
contract for its staff. (The
negotiations were begun by
Human Government, in August
1971.)
Some controversy surrounded
treasurer David Dick's hiring of
negotiator Ken Martin at $200 per
day — without council approval.
However, when he later took the
issue to finance committee his
action was approved.
Although council members
objected to not having .been
consulted in the matter, they
voted to ratify the negotiations in
January.
This marked a big step forward
for campus office workers'
unionization.
The next SC move was Dick's
attempts at imposing a $5 student
fee increase for next year.
The matter went to a
referendum in February and was
wholeheartedly rejected by the
students. A pat on the back for
the voters at least.
A major charge against the SC
was that it failed to accomplish
anything in the line of organizing
campus daycare and refused to
open SUB 24 hours a day even on
a trial basis.
H,
lowever it did manage to
begin negotiations to buy the
administration food services and
start a SUB expansion scheme.
Thus a second SC slate, headed
by Doug Aldridge (engineering)
for president and Gordon
Blankstein (agriculture) was
elected as next year's executive in
the February 3 elections.
In March two racist Red Rags
appeared on campus bringing
UBC's name to the fore in
Vancouver's daily press. Everyone
wanted to know who wrote the
jokes but no one would tell —
i n eluding the Engineering
Undergraduate Society whose
equipment was used to print the
newsletters.
Although the AMS held a press
conference in conjunction with
the EUS (president this year being
none other than next year's AMS
president Doug Aldridge) nothing
was accomplished.
Burnyeat, speaking on behalf
of the AMS, apologized for the
publications and theorized about
how it all came to happen.
Aldridge, speaking on behalf pf
the EUS, claimed the engineers
believed the whole issue was no
one else's business and thus
should not have met with any
criticism at all.
I he result has been several
faculty council meetings to decide
on a course of action, which has
yet to be announced.
The math department took
some positive action in supporting
the 10 professors who cancelled
engineers' math classes until they
could be held in rooms other than
those in the civil engineering
building.
And there the issue stood,
stands and forever more shall be.
Which brings us to the squirrel.
And who could we be talking
about but our very own Constable
S.F. (Secret Squirrel) Leach.
Notable for his aimless wanderings
around campus, Secret Squirrel
has been seen everywhere from
Memorial Gym (where he watched
the Thunderbird men's basketball
team win the Canadian
championship, and missed the
women doing the same thing) to
the SUB pool hall.
In SUB he was seen
nonchalently swinging his shotgun
while investigating a false alarm at
the "Bank of Montreal, thinking,
no doubt, of his similar fruitless
investigation of the Case of the
Stolen Ubysseys some months
before.
As he strode up the stairways
he was reputedly asked to
describe this year at UBC.
It is rumoured he belched.
Right on, Secret Squirrel.
THE PEOPLE'S CHOICE representatives Steve Garrod and David Mole, above, enter council on the night of
their defeat in referendum they called to test student reaction to their policies. Later the new choice of the
fickle people - Students' Coalition - shuffled to office under leader Doug Aldridge, below, a man who
reputedly couldn't stumble to the men's can on a busy night at the pub. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
Continued
bitterness
in poli sci
By ALLAN ROBBINS
and SCOTT FAST
The following article, written
by two PhD students in the
political science department,
attempts to analyze current
department disputes over the issue
of student participation in
department decision making.
As we limp toward the end of
another academic year, any
cursory review of recent campus
events finds elite rule still intact
but shaken.
Members of a number of
departments have been through
protracted conflicts this year, the
casualties of which are familiar by
name to readers of The Ubyssey.
Less famous is the continued
bitterness which attends the
day-to-day operations of the
department of political science.
The department is like others
in broad outline, and still has
something of a unique character.
It is a department that students
have never been involved in
running, and, paradoxically, a
department whose faculty
members, until the beginning of
last year, believed themselves to
be more progressive than its
students. Students are not now
nearer any form of
co-management, but the
undeniably reactionary ethos
brought out by a year-long
student democractization push
has at least stopped pious faculty
prattling about being progressive.
Political science resembles
other departments in its routine
sub-field battle over scarce
resources like new staff and new
courses (the winners:
international relations and Asian
studies; the losers; political
theory, comparative study of
advanced industrial  societies). It
also has its share of deadwood,
tenured senior faculty who would
not now merit appointment at a
junior level. And the dominance
of senior men (the department
employs no women save for
three secretaries) over junior men
severely restricts the range of
variations in how the younger
men may approach their work.
The department, like UBC
generally, attracts those whose
commitments are neither to the
university nor to their students,
but rather to themselves.
Unencumbered by a tradition of
quality teaching or service to the
university community, members
of the department of political
science typically cultivate a
minute area of expertise and
parlay it — in the best American
fashion — into an academic career.
Relations between faculty
members are pleasant enough, but
hardly very satisfying; There can
be no best friends on a staff of
senior mean and junior men, nor
among competitors. In these ways
the department resembles most
others of which we are aware.
Political science is unique, we
think, in its remarkable capacity
to delude otherwise intelligent
and perceptive adults into
acceptance of its fundamentally
perverse nature. The language
used to achieve this mystification
is replete with terms like
"community" and "membership"
(students have never been
considered to be "members" of
the department); the attempt is to
persuade junior men that they
have an identity of interests with
their superiors.
Each year- we find younger
men repeating the approved
formulations with a forced
sincerity indicative of a precarious
personal claim on the tenure
system. The giveaway that what is
happening is an orchestrated
performance rather than an
authentic personal attempt to
come to grips with a complex
issue is the utter absence of any
principled defence of the faculty
position.
We do not want to repeat what
Rob Stevens has described at
some length in his history of
attempting to prod faculty toward
sustained thought. (The
Ubyssey, March 23). Suffice it to
say that most experienced
graduate students doubt that the
newly-converted junior faculty
would, if left alone, invent such
an authoritarian line on the issue
of departmental governance. In
any case, even if they were to do
so, they would have the
intelligence to construct defences.
Political science, then, has a
long history of poor faculty-grad
student relations. This carries over
into the academic side of things as
well: The department has never
granted a PhD, and loses as much
as 80 per cent of its yearly influx
of MA students to a decline in
interest. The student desire for a
healthy share of decision-making
power on all matters of
consequence in the department
has been resisted by an effective,
if unimaginative, scheme of
quasi-encouragement of
"moderate" student elements,
while identifying a bewildering
variety of graduate students as
dangerous ringleaders,
manipulators and malcontents.
Thus far the "moderate"
students - Le., those who, while
disliking the present
arrangements, simply want to
leave as quickly as possible — have
not been a serious force on behalf
of any position in  the  dispute.
Occasionally all these
background factors and historical
conditions flash together in a
particularly revealing setting.
Graduate student Jack Miller put
the machinery of the
"Faculty-Graduate Student
Seminar" in motion for an
afternoon's consideration of
'"Current Departmental Issues".
The meeting took place Friday,
March 24 and was a bitter
continuation of past
confrontations.
See page 20: SECRECY
WE APPRECIATE
YOUR BUSINESS...
Hope to see you this summer
SALES and SERVICE
8914 OAK ST. (at Marine) PHONE 263-8121
MODERN METHODS
OF MEMORY
DEVELOPMENT
. . ."amazinglysuccessful"
Executive Institute of Memory
& Concentration Ltd.
1575 WEST GEORGIA STREET,
VANCOUVER 5, B.C.
TELEPHONE 683-0614
MEMO-DYNAMICS
Singles'Europe Adventure
We want you to run away to Europe
with us.
We'll drain our last pint o£ Guinness
at the Tournament Pub in Earlscourt,
London, hit the road south to the Channel
and be in Calais by sunset.
A month later, we could be in Istanbul.
Or Berlin or Barcelona. Or Athens. Or
Copenhagen. Or just about any place you
and your Australian, English, New Zealand
and South African mates want to be.
On the way, we'll camp under canvas,
cook over open fires, swim, sun and drink
in some of the most spectacular settings on
the continent.
We'll provide a small zippy European
motorbus and your camping gear and a
young cat to drive it who knows every
wineshop from here to Zagreb, plus how to
ask for a John, or how to find your way
back home to bed, smashed, later on.
You can go for as little as 28 days or
as many as 70. Spring, Summer or Fall.
The cost is ultra reasonable. And
we'll get you to London from here just as
cheaply as is humanly possible.
We've got a booklet that fills in the
details and prices.
If you're single, under 30 and slightly
adventurous, send for it.
We're booking now.
£         Please send me details, itineraries and an application.
A        Name	
Address.
City.
.Prov.
Mail to: Europe, Going Down the Road,
214 A Adelaide St. West, Toronto, Ontario.
UBC Worn out Maclown's editors .Where are they now?
Anne Murray on the yellowing of Nancy Greene
Lloyd Robertson and the new schmuckismo
CANADA'S MARGINAL MAGAZINE
Jl^!
PIERRE ELLIOTT TRUDEAU'hero or saviour? Maclowns
i
CANADA'S MARGINAL MAGAZINE/APRIL 1972/VOL. 85/NO. 3
WHAT'S REALLY UNDER FARLEYMOWAT'S KILT?
By Fletcher Markle
89
A TELESCOPE
By Farley Mowat
THE LIBERAL GOVERNMENT STINKS
By George Hees
77
SEZ YOU
By John Turner
23
OH, YEAH?
By George Hees
YEAH!
By John Turner
49
YOUR GRANDMOTHER WEARS ARMY SHOES!
By John Turner George Hees
86
EAT IT!
By George Hees John Turner
23
GEORGE HEES AND JOHN TURNER: A LOOK
AT INTELLECTUALISM IN CANADIAN POLITICS
By Bobby Orr
WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH
16,000 CODFISH SKIN LAMP SHADES?
By Frank Moores
49
EAT IT!
By Joey Smallwood
86
INSIDE GARBAGE CANS: READING MATERIAL
OF THE WOMEN BEHIND FAMOUS CANADIANS
By Kildare Dobbs
23
SUZANNE TAKES YOU DOWN TO HER
PLACE NEAR THE RIVER
By Lennie Cohen
50
THAT OLD RIVER I REMEMBER SO WELL
By Mordecai Richler
91
RIVER
By Arthur Hailey
62
HAILEY
By Suzanne
11
HOW TO GET A FAT LIP - NON-VIOLENTLY
By Pierre Vallieres
89
THE DAY GEORGE DREW UPCHUCKED ON THE
PODIUM AND CANADA LOST A PRIME MINISTER
By Walter Stewart
53
THE POPPYCOCK OF BRUCE HUTCHISON
By L. M. Montgomery
PETER THE NEW MAN: Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Christina The New Woman, Ralph Newman, Fred
Newman, JWattui GLmi.au. DESIGN DIRECTOR: Pablo Newman. ART
DIRECTOR: Bruce (flash) Newman. PRODUCTION EDITOR: Linus (Lino)
Newman. COPY EDITOR: Sam (stet) Newman. ASSISTANT TO THE
EDITOR: Little Peter Newman. EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Pasquale
Newman, Ahmed Ben Newman, Mordecai Newman. ADVERTISING
MANAGER: Lomax (Snake Oil) Newman. CIRCULATION MANAGER:
Horatio (Extree) Newman.
THE VIEW FROM
From Bona vista to
Vancouver Island and Beyond
It has been very nearly one
year since I first caught the
torch of the editorship of
Canada's marginal magazine, so
deftly thrown to me by my
friend Phil Sykes. In those early
days, as I gingerly grasped the
reins of power, I predicted in
these pages in what now seems a
moment of caution, that under
my tenure I expected Maclown's
would continue to renew and
embellish its sacred contract
the people of Canada.
For it was my vision, then as
now, and as always will be, that
it was the purpose of Maclown's
to provide that delicate link,
uniting the disparate parts of
this young giant astride this vast
continent, this magnificent
diverse creation which we call
Canada.
As I said, my prediction was
cautious, for regardless of the
difficulties facing me, and they
were formidable, I have
succeeded in my appointed task.
From Bonavista to Vancouver
Island; how well I remember
that phrase. But I swore Canada
would   be   my   beat,   Canadian
unity would be my scoop, and
the future of this country would
be my deadline.
For no sacrifice, can or ever
will be, too great in uniting this
behemoth, this Canada, Not that
Maclown's has or can take a
position on this issue, but we
feel it is our purpose to provide
a forum so those Canadians from
all parts of the country,
regardless of politics can show
just how wrong they are.
My success, and Maclown's
success has been echoed by
major and diverse figures of our
time; by Pierre Trudeau and
Gerard Pelletier, by Allan
Blakeney and Ed Schreyer, by
Ramsey Cook and Donald
Creighton, and yes by extremists
from right and left, such as Bill
Davis, and Claude Ryan.
And from those harsh friends
of mine, Canada's journalists,
have come accolades for my
success. From Pierre Berton,
Peter Gzowski and Stu Keate,
from Jack McClelland and Betty
Kennedy, and even from that
crusty old curmudgeon of
Canadian journalism, Gordon
Sinclair, I received assurance
that Maclown's has done its job.
Now  comes the time, when
once I have assessed the past, to
look to the future, to set new
goals. For I think it can hardly
be said that the second half of
the twentieth century belongs to
Canada.
My search for goals, I think,
is best typified by a conversation
I had with my friend Fred Davis
in a quaint cafe atop Place Ville
Marie in Montreal last month.
As we talked in quiet tones, I
realized for the first time in my
life that here was a man, an
astute commentator on the
Canadian political scene, a man
who understands the complex
fabric from which our curious
polity is woven, and a man who
perhaps could help me in my
desire to relate Maclown's and
Canada to the galactic social
milieu.
"Fred," I said, "as an astute
commentator on the Canadian
political scene, and as a man
who might truly be said to have
his fingers on the pulse of the
nation, and as a friend of mine,
can you tell me, how I, as editor
of Canada's marginal and only
magazine can relate and
illuminate the role of Canada in
the world, and, on a higher level,
in the Universe?"
And Fred Davis, that beacon
of progressive thought, looked at
me across the table, his steely
brown eyes seeming to peer
inside the very fabric of my
existence, and in careful
considered tones, with a spirit
mirroring all that has made this
country what it is today
answered: "Peter, I dunno."
Apres Moi C'est les Meme
Deux Nations
The recent selection, by Bob
Stanfield, leader of the National
Progressive Conservative party,
of a Quebec leader for his
troubled party, is a welcome
step on the rocky road towards
creating, once again, one of our
national traditions: a two-party
system.
Stanfield's choice, carefully
considered these last few months
as we hurtle toward the
inevitable federal election, was
Arnauld Gregoire Pheobe-Gladys
De Pamplemousse, five times
Rhinoceros party candidate for
alderman in the Eastern Quebec
village of Ti Christ Sur la Merde.
It was not an easy choice, in
fact one laboured over at the
national level for some time
now. Just last month, my
sources tell me, it was rumored
that Stanfield had struck a deal
with the CBC whereby a
national celebrity and TV
personality would take le metier.
But   though   Gordie   Tapp  was
seen walking down Sherbrooke
Street wearing a toque, plaid
jacket, gumboots, and whistling
Alouette, apparently the deal
collapsed at the last minute.
De Pamplemousse first came
to national prominence, and
hence to Stanfield's eye during
the tragic War Measures crisis of
October, 1970. In a fit of
righteous indignation he
singlehandedly turned in les
noms of 47 suspected FLQ
terrorists to the local branch of
the Quebec Provincial Police. He
was later discredited when it was
discovered that all 47 suspects,
incarcerated in the Ti Christ jail,
were in fact Liberal party
members. (Though all had had
confessions extracted.)
But as Bob Stanfield says,
with that little laugh that has
made him famous, "at least his
heart was in the right place."
De Pamplemousse, is a fat
balding five footer, who
formerly played hockey as a
utility man for the Montreal
Canadiens fifth-string farm club,
in the Laurentian town of
Constipee. His youth (56) plus
his link with the province's
beloved flying Frenchmen makes
him a natural for laying the
party's platform before les
Quebecois
A lover of politics, as are all
Quebecois, De Pamplemousse
eagerly looks forward to hitting
the hustings, having fond
memories of tort bees of his
youth. Already he is gathering a
list of rivers unbridged, roads
unpaved, and towns without a
new federal building.
Questioned on the
Conservatives' policy on
federalism, his pale blue eyes
sparkle and a wry smile comes
over his face. "You know my
frien," he says in quaint broken
Anglais, "here in Quebec we
have saying, which I think
someup the whole problem:
Apres moi, c'est les meme Deux
nations," Then his massive (260
lbs.) frame heaves with laughter.
De Pamplemousse's dilemma
reminds me of an old joke which
sifted around this most curious
province in the early sixties, and
which I think adequately sums
up the federalism-provincialism
crisis here.
If the FBI guards Kennedy,
and the KGB guards Krushchev,
who guards De Gaulle? Jacques
Plante!!!!
Exactement.
2 MA CLOWN'S/MARCH 1972
Congratulations to Peter the
New Man on his inauguration
one year ago as editor of
Maclown's. We are sure this will
bring about many improvements
in this magazine and offer him
our whole-hearted support in
doing this. We have noticed that
new blood often revitalises an
old organization. Such has
recently been the case with
Moores in Newfoundland, Davis
in Ontario and Lougheed in
Alberta. We are sure that you
will follow their example. We
can only hope that I will.
DERRIL  WARREN
continued on page 6 Richard
Nixon's
Canada
Canada.
Boiling surf on a grey-bleak
Newfoundland shore. The far-off
echo of a night train's whistle in
the heat on an Ontario summer
night. Miles of fading wheat
stubble and the scurrying figure of
a badger across the snowy
half-light of a prairie morning.
Wild-flower afternoons in the
meadows of the Rockies.
I guess I've circled the globe
more than a few times, lived more
than a few lives when you get
right down to it. But behind it all,
lies my vision of Canada.
Not just a great country, not
just an obsolete country, but a
rapacious and humble country.
And more than anything else,
this vision brings me back to this
country: back for yet another
healing dip into the natural
resources of a patient and humble
land; back for a glimpse into a
culture I like to think I've played
an infinitesimal part in shaping;
back, in short, to the state that,
although clinging tenaciously to a
rugged life, has never failed me in
hours of a spiritual need deeper
than the craters on the
wind-swept islands of the
northern Pacific.
This is Canada, the real
Canada. Nation of dreamers —
only waiting to grind their teeth
against the harsh realities of a
northern sleep.
So at the risk of drowning in
self-indulgence — an unfortunate
fate all too common among those
of us with the artist's eye for the
many faces of life — let me tell a
brief tale of this land, one which
sums up, I think, the canuck
spark.
Some years back, around the
time this country was signing a
defence treaty with its giant
neighbor to the south, a man
named Lester Pearson met a man
named John Kennedy. They liked
each other immediately. Both had
a vision.
"Mr. Kennedy," said Lester
Pearson, "have you heard the one
about the unemployed frog who
sat in a slum pond from sunrise to
sunset?"
"Mr. Pearson," said John
Kennedy, "I don't give a good
God damn. Just sign, for
Chrissake, and go home."
Lester Pearson was only one
man among many Canadians, but
his spirit is born of the land and
the people, a wavering candle
flame buffeted by the seas of time
and history.
And so it is with Canada, a
place, above all, to raise finger on
high in thanks to the Creator and
the created.
As I sit here in my rustic cabin,
far from the scurry of a Medicine
Hat business day, far from the
office and the telephones and the
lunchpails, I look back on the
honeycomb of a Canadian future
and on to the pounding waves and
the twisted arbuterus trees on the
small off-shore island.
,It begins to snow, as I sit here,
great thick flakes of the stuff,
covering the hamlet of
Lethbridge, silencing all, cleansing
alL
And it occurs to me, as the fire
burns low in the grate, that this
piece of the globe is like that
snow — wet, yet resiliant and
hopeful.
I begin to know, in the
darkling-spangled realms of a
consciousness    too     dim    to
remember, that the words spoken
by John Kennedy are still alive in
the hearts of Canadians.
"Mr. Pearson, I don't give a
good God damn. Just sign, for
Chrissake, and go home."
Home. Home to ice.
Windy-locked waters. Sleet.
Mountains. A boy winding
houseward with a small dead rat.
Burning sun. Bonanza. Coca cola.
The pause that refreshes.
And through all this I know
that I will sign, that I will, once
again, go home.
PIERRE SANDY PETER PHIL ETC.
The Bluntwick Hotel in
downtown Toronto is a seedy
little joint, no more or less
flea-infested than other
flophouses across the country.
Pushing through the heavy
outside doors, you are
immediately struck by the smells
of stale beer and urine, and, if it
is not your day, maybe a crazed
drunk as well. But there is
something different here. There
on the beverage room floor lies a
stack of Comfortable Pews, two
for 29 cents. And from the
corner, a curiously engaging
conversation catches your ear.
"Okay, Peter, I'll trade you a
review of your book in my
magazine for a Poppycock
feature on me in your
magazine."
"Hold it, Bob, I left
Maclown's, I think."
"No, I meant Newman. But
now that you mention, maybe
you got some pull yet at
Weekend and could swing
something for me there . . ."
"Be quiet, all of you." A new
voice. "1 have some good radio
time to swap for, maybe, a
weekly column someplace."
"Not interested. Hey, Pierre,
can you get me on Front Page
Challenge. I could use the
exposure and ..."
The conversation fades. But
there they are: Berton, Fulford,
Gzowski, Ross, Batten, Spears,
New Man, Lefolii, Sykes,
Templeton, the cream of
Canadian journalism, the Our
Gang of the media, the greatest
circle-jerk in Canadian history.
It's enough to make maple leaves
sprout in your navel.
Some people might say,
"Who cares?" Some people
might not. But we at Maclown's
care. Stories of national interest,
that's what we're all about.
Later, standing beside me on top
of a dead drunk at the urinal,
Peter Gzowski explains.
"So you want to do a feature
on Maclown's Editors — Where
Are They Now? Didn't I suggest
that? Maybe it was Sandy? No
matter, as you can see, we're all
here today. Oh, we've been
other places, most people have.
But something, something
nebulous, difficult to pin down
but, very powerful, keeps
drawing us back."
"Easy money, perhaps?"
"Could be. But I think it's
more than that. Don't you,
Phil?" Sykes has joined us and is
standing on the drunk's face..
"Sure. I mean I tried working
in other places but the best I
could get with my qualifications
was    landscape    gardening    in
Sudbury."
Sandy Ross, now perched on
the inebriate's knees, concurs. "I
went back to Vancouver when I
heard I might be able to get a
crack   at  Ubyssey editor.   I did
that once and it was a bit of a
lark. But it didn't work out this
time, so here I am again."
"Friendship, that's a big part
of it," says New Man, who is
struggling to stay on the rubby's
toes.
EDITOR SYKES in Sudbury
"Yes, and kickback for past
favors," Fulford adds as he
climbs onto the shoulders of
Gzowski and Sykes.
As Spears, Templeton and
Lefolii enter and build up the
pyramid, I wonder aloud about
the gathering at the Bluntwick
this day.
"It's a regular meeting," says
Berton, who refuses to join the
pyramid unless he can be on top.
"You see, every once in a while
we get together and cut a deck
of cards to decide who'll.be next
Maclown's editor. It seems the
fairest way of handling a
difficult problem."
Sykes remarks that he has
already won twice, Gzowski and
Templeton once each. But there
are consolation prizes, says
Fulford: editorships at the
Toronto Star, Canadian,
Weekend, or Saturday Night;
consultantships at McClelland
and Stewart; countless columns
and radio spots; television, you
name it.
"We were thinking of going
to the labor relations board to
get Toronto declared a closed
shop," says New Man. "But then
we figured, why make it
official?"
Indeed.
MACLOWN'S/MARCH 1972 HERO OR SAVIOUR?
Two eminent Canadians comment on the value of PET to CA-NA-DA
By Joe Borowski
H
By Morton Shulman
listorians 50 years from now
are likely to look back on the
period in which Canadians now
find themselves and say that it
was indeed one of the most
profound in our history. Torn
between an ephemeral giant to the
south and an equally insidious
cancer within, our country's
leaders have been placed in a
difficult, if not downright
unenviable, position.
For a time the feeble
meanderings of Lester Pearson
and his renegade predecessor filled
with despair those of us who
make our living commentating on
the listing of the Canadian ship of
state.
Amidst the optimism of our
centennial year, stresses and
strains between Anglais and
Quebeckers threatened to tear
apart the very fabric of our
nation. Then, charismatically, as if
in answer to our insipid
blubbering, a man appeared who
gave us a renewed sense of
national identity and purpose.
That man was Pierre Elliott
Trudeau.
There are those who attribute a
kind of supernatural quality to
Trudeau, maintaining that he is in
fact a "saviour" sent from heaven
to suture a wounded national
psyche. But, analytically speaking,
I think it is more accurate to say
that Trudeau has attained the
grandiose dimensions of a national
"hero", come to Canada to mend
our   deeply-torn   national  fabric.
What, then, does Trudeau
signify to the average Canadian.
What does Henry McMaple from
Bushtit, Ontario stand to derive
from the stewardship of a man
who manages to calm nervous
stockholders and strike terror into
the hearts of dangerous terrorists
at the same time? Certainly the
pipe-smoking armchair politicians
of our nation may gripe and lean
to more radical solutions to our
national dilemma, but one has
only to watch the prime minister
swing through a whistle-stop tour
of Northern Labrador to know
that this is no ordinary man. In
the faces of the smiling
prosperous children and in the
busy main streets of smalltown
Canada one can sense a spirited
flowing of all that is good in being
Canadian. Without malicious
intent, it is indeed possible to
draw a comparison between these
images and the sour-faced, ragged
elements who gather to voice their
psychologically-inspired
discontent wherever opposition
politicians go.
Trudeau himself takes a
characteristically candid, yet
unequivocally devil-may-care, view
of all this. In my conversations
with him I have been struck by his
accommodating manner, but at
•the same time I sense a kind of
aloofness, as if this giant of a man
were preparing to go out and slay
yet another dragon. There is
something unreachable about him,
and I was reminded, one day as
we dined at 24 Sussex Drive, the
prime minister's stately residence,
that this was the man who had
spent long years of
self-examination in Tunisian
bordellos   and   among   Lebanese
4 MACLOWN'S/MARCH 1972
camel thieves. Can a man who
once conquered 15 women in the
course of a night at a Yugoslavian
resort really learn to forget
American imperialism and love
Canada?
As we crossed the hall from the
dining room to the parlor, I
assiduously asked him whether he
ever regretted trading the safe life
in Montreal's fashionable
Westmount district for the
perilous helmsmanship of the ship
of state. "Well," he replied, with a
characteristic Gallic shrug, "you
can lead a horse to water but you
can never make him drink." This,
I reflected, was a measure of true
heroism. A man who shows no
kindness toward animals is hardly
fit to conduct surgery on a
Canada whose wounds are, if not'
mortal, deep enough to paralyze
our nation to the point of
stagnation in the years to come.
■ our years have come and
gone since Pierre Elliott Trudeau
appeared out of nowhere and
surprised the pundits by taking
over the prime ministership of the
federal Liberals.
At that time there was an
almost saintlike aura about him
and the masses crowded about His
feet in solemn devotion.
Now, four years later, despite
the fact He has been crucified by
the media and business
establishment, despite His
carrying the cross of the ship of
state, there are still those who
consider him a saviour.
This is clearly no longer the
case.
From the difficult perspective
of the present, let us take a cool
dispassionate look at the facts
surrounding the first coming of
Pierre Trudeau.
For in those days a call went out
from the House of Liberal, for the
elders to gather in convention in
the city of Ottawa.
And to . that city came
politicians from many ridings,
beating off in their socks by night.
And the prophets of Gallup
were against them, and they were
sure afraid, for the might of
Ahmed Ben Stanfield threatened
the land.
But lo and behold, an agent of
the CIA came to them, and the
glory of LBJ shone around them,
and they were filled with money.
And the agent said unto them:
Be not afraid, for unto you this
day is chosen in the city of
Ottawa a saviour, who is Pierre
Trudeau.
And this shall be a sign unto
you: You will find your saviour
wrapped in charisma and lying
amongst lawyers.
And suddenly there was with
the agent a multitude of Liberals
praising continentalism and
saying: "Glory to LBJ in the
highest, and as for Canada, sell it
to the USA."
And Pierre Trudeau went
throughout the land, preaching in
the gymnasiums and hockey rinks,
and the masses followed him.
And He saith unto them:
Verily I say unto you: There
was once a cruel shepherd who
abused his sheep.
And the cruel shepherd made
harsh laws and saith unto the
sheep,
Verily I say unto you that all
sheep shall be shorn of their wool
with the turning of the seasons.
And those sheep that do not
produce wool will be slaughtered
and roasted on a spit.
And all sheep must remain
silent, except to say baaaaaaa.
Then the sheep waxed wroth,
and revolted, and replaced the
cruel shepherd with a kinder
master.
And the new shepherd made
just laws, and saith unto the
sheep:
All sheep will henceforth have
the right to be shorn of their
wool.
And all sheep not bearing wool
will  be  posthumously   honoured.,
And   all   sheep   will  have  the
right to say what they choose in
the manner that they choose.
Then all the sheep together
voiced a loyal baaaaa.
And the masses shouted
"Landslide" and the forces of
Ahmed Ben Stanfield were
scattered, and many lost their
deposits.
(There are perhaps some
proselygytic indications in the
preceding account that Pierre
Trudeau is a saviour but the fact
He is not is shown in his record
since those early days.)
And later in those days false
prophets went down in the land
of inflation and spread ill tidings.
And the scribes and politicians
plotted against Him.
And the might of Nixonius
Rex threatened Him and
demanded bushels of shekels in
tribute.
And Pierre said: Give unto
Nixon the things that are Nixon's.
So Pierre lost his shirt and
went naked throughout the land.
And the people saw him, and
he was exceedingly ugly and the
people turned against him, both
the laborer in the unemployment
lines, and the farmer driven from
his lands and the tycoon selling
out to Nixonius Rex.
And he was smote by public
opinion, and taken to a place
called Parliament Hill, and there
crucified.
And Pierre Trudeau looked out
onon the masses, and shrugged,
and said: "Fuck you, baby."
And he was seen ascending to
33,000 feet, and was transported
in a cloud to a far away land,
which is called Yugoslavia.
And he promised to come
again, and to give a personal
interview with his disciple Peter,
who was last seen beating his
breast, and vending his rag and
crying out: "From the fury of the
Tories and the godless socialists,
may our good Pierre deliver us." THE NEW SCHMUCKISMO!
BYCHRISTINATHE NEW WOMAN
Today's trend in men as embodied by groping, gentle
misfit Lloyd Robertson
A couple of days ago — at a time when I was
wonrying the idea of the new schmuckismo around
in my mind — I saw a man who by his very presence
brought the whole subject into focus. It was outside
a movie theatre downtown and among all the young
couples waiting for the movie to begin was this guy
in the prime of his young middle age, an owner of a
hip leather crafts shop or custom motorcycle seats
boutique maybe, brigade boots, leather jeans with
front lacings and an officer's greatcoat turned up at
the collar with a red cotton bandana knotted
around the neck. He was lean in the manner of
somebody who had just hopped off a
Harley-Davidson and he had this great Latin
American coloring, thick curling hair and piercing
black eyes, and he looked as though, in another
time, by physical prowess, he might have defended
his honor against all slights. 1 kept staring at him
until he moved his assessing gaze from the "chicks"
in the line to me, in case we might have known each
other, but what I was thinking would not have
pleased him.
I was trying hard to figure out why it was that
10 years ago I would have considered him the
handsomest man I'd seen all week and now the way
he looked was somehow quaint. He was just too
sexual, too cool and too machismo. He just didn't
have it.
Before I go on, I'd better explain that I don't
think my response was particularly unusual. I'm
sure every woman in that line would have agreed
that today's trend in men is schmuckismo.
What most ladies would now respond favorably
to is the new schmuck — perhaps best characterized
by the groping, gentle misfit, Lloyd Robertson, as
he modestly stutters through The National.
To the modern man, to be schmuck, or show
schmuckismo (timidity/modesty/bashful ness) is
more important than anything else. A man can
prove he's a schmuck in many ways — being trod
upon by his boss, by his virtuous conduct with
women or sincere regard for money, sobriety and
good sense.
What schmuck means to the men who live by it
(and to the women who suffer under it, for at its
best it breeds insipid chivalry and sweaty palms and
by its very nature it attempts to achieve gallantry) is
illustrated in the lyrics of songs by the prototype of
schmuckismo, Pat Boone.
Schmuckismo     is    part    of    the    office-boy
mystique of high-rises and the wave of conservatism
that is sweeping the country. In true schmuck style
the men of the movement from the beginning
reduced women to the role of camp followers and
their leaders, Tommy Smothers, Al Ham el and
Dave Broadfoot only acknowledged them in the
punch lines of their jokes.
Because of the rise of schmuckismo a small
group of women began to trespass on the masculine
preserves of door-opening, cigarette-lighting and
other chivalrous activities. Now to go further with
this merry theorizing. The response to aggressiveness
from women has led men to display their own
supremacy. In other words, at a time when sexual
roles are becoming more ambiguous, certain men
lean harder on their schmuckismo.
For any woman who wants to go
schmuck-measuring while the schmucks are out
looking for doors to open and cigarettes to light on
'the coming afternoons of spring, the following
guidelines may help:
• The middle class male with pretensions to
schmuckismo may never achieve the total schmuck
look but he'll add schmuck touches to his everyday
wear: a dotted bowtie, brogue shoes, starched collar
and cuffs, creased grey flannels, reversible raincoat
turned up at collar and in the winter, a black
umbrella under arm.
• In the movies there are disappointingly few
schmuck heroes: most of the new stars are rough nd
tough types who abide by the adage, "Never lend
your gun, your horse or your woman." But
undoubtedly the greatest schmuck star of all time
was Fred Astaire in Gay Divorcee with Ginger
Rogers.
• Schmuck males never have men friends.
• The schmuck man tends to marry a loud,
domineering, nagging woman who shortly becomes
old and agressive, with lines in her forehead and a
furious look about her mouth that becomes more
pronounced when the schmuck comes home
without a raise.
• The schmuck hero tends to call an intelligent girl
who says intelligent things "a hussy who wants my
job". In fact, he is usually put off by any intelligent
and/or strong-minded woman (unless she happens to
be his wife) because he considers her to be a threat.
For all but the truly liberated woman there is
some terrible atavistic admiration for this attitude.
It seems, alas and hurrah, to be programmed into
the race.
Part of
our national
heritage
Available at
disreputable bookstores
from St. John's to Port Renfrew
MACLOWN'S/MARCH 1972 VIEW FROM EVERYWHERE/FROM PAGE 2
Gross exaggeration
I usually find that your magazine is accurate in its portrayal of my
husband. Therefore, in the true spirit of liberalism, 1 feel I must
correct a mistake made in the cover of this month's issue of
Maclown's. It would be unfair and misleading to let it stand
otherwise.
What   I  must  say  is this:   You,   sirs,  are guilty of a gross
exaggeration.
MARGARET SINCLAIR TRUDEAU, OTTAWA.
First refusal
My fellow Canadians: Olive, Sir John A. and myself have discussed
the matter and decided that, due to your pre-eminent position in
Canadian journalism (second only to the Canada edition of Time and
narrowly ahead of Reader's Digest) I should offer you the right of
first refusal on excerpts from my forthcoming biography of Peter
The New Man, which 1 have tentatively titled Renegade With
Distemper. Looking forward to prompt reply as 1 am already
considering an offer from Popular Mechanics.
JOHN G. DIEFENBAKER, PRINCE ALBERT, SASK.
Editor's note: Maclown's readers who wish to know more
about Mr. Diefenbaker, grand old man on the national scene, may
find all they wish to know in Renegade in Power (McClelland and
Stewart, $5.95 (hardcover) $1.95 (paperback) two for 29 cents
(Bluntwick Hotel newsstand).
The vagaries of Vegreville
Having just, uh, completed a thorough, uh, perusal of the cover story
in this issue of your respected and, uh, revered periodical, I am
moved to share with you an anecdote regarding one of my most
memorable experiences with, uh, the Prime Minister. It was on a day
in, uh, June, or perhaps it was, uh, May in 1968 when our paths
inadvertently, uh, crossed in Vegreville, Alberta. The Prime Minister
invited my to join him in, uh, relaxing from the rigors of the
campaign, uh, trail by paying a visit to a certain room in the Prince
Edward Hotel where, uh, I gathered to, uh, put it as politely as
possible, certain, uh, Liberal supporters in the area would be
attending to the Prime Minister's, uh, desires. I informed him that I,
uh, would be pleased to join him but would be embarrassed by a
rather large, uh, hole that I had discovered in my jockey shorts that
morning.
The Prime Minister understood, uh, my plight and
recommended a marvellous dinner that was being served in the, uh,
hotel dining room. I accepted his advice and can, uh, attest to the,
uh, marvellous delicacy recommended, as I'm sure, can certain
gentlemen, from, uh, Montreal to whom he, uh, recommended the
same meal some time later.
ROBERT L. STANFIELD, OTTAWA
* Can anyone tell me when the Prime Minister is planning his
next visit to Vegreville?
DAVID LEWIS, OTTAWA
* Can I go with you, dad?
STEPHEN LEWIS, TORONTO
*Me too.
MICHAEL LEWIS, TORONTO
* Don't forget me.
T.C. DOUGLAS, NANAIMO, B.C.
* I might have known.
W.A.C. BENNETT, VICTORIA, B.C.
* I knew it all along.
JAMES LAXER, KINGSTON, ONT.
Like a little big hawk
Dino, Frank and I were sitting around the pool at the Sands in Vegas
the other day and, well, Pete baby, I was telling the gang about the
hit mag you're turning out up there in the land where the buffalo
once roamed free and the grass is always green. Anyway, Petey
sweetheart, I told them my only beef is that you haven't interviewed
me in several months about the plight of our native people, the
noble redman who once watched the sun set over Burrard Inlet
without looking upon the White Man's cities. So look, sweetheart, if
you'd send Don Cameron or that sharp chick wife of yours down
here to talk to me, my heart would soar like a hawk.
CHIEF DAN GEORGE, HOLLYWOOD, CALIF.
Dual deanship?
Bravo for last month's article, "Jack Davis, Prophet or Seer?" It
provides a well-needed lesson in objectivity that hopefully other
magazines, both Canadian and American, will emulate. The idea of
having two deans of Canadian journalism — Kay Sigurjonnsson and
your own Walter Stewart — present their own thoughtful, yet
basically"differing views on the environment minister was first rate. It
allows us, your readers, to make up our own minds about the issue
by considering both sides of the question. Let's hope further articles
of this sort find their way to your pages.
P.L. LAWSON, REGINA
(Ed. note: See this month's cover story, "Trudeau: Hero orSaviour?")
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Disco Office Equipment
Pick Up & Delivery
253-2513
1928 Commercial Dr.
MACLOWN'S/MARCH 1972
TANSAR CRAFTS
SCHOOL
2006 West 4th Avenue
732-7721
Register now for classes in
leather, weaving and
pottery. Session begins
April 3rd
CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT.
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
EASTER ATTRACTION
fay,
D. H. Lawrence
WOMEN
LOVE
<i
m«
WITH
Allen Bates
at
OLD AUDITORIUM, U.B.C.
Friday & Saturday March 31 & April 1
Admission 75c
7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
NEXT ATTRACTION:
NED KELLY with MICK JAGGER Apr. 7 & 8
 WATCH FOR POSTERS
I An Arts Undergraduate Presentation!
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
o
□
a
n
n
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print)
City  - - Prov..
Phone: Home  Office	
Occupation   	
Age       Married □ Divorced Q      Male Q
Separated Q  Never Married Q Female □
Date first licensed to drive       .
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes □ No □ (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?          	
Are you now insured? .__     -.-	
Date current policy expires —  -	
This  coupon  is  designed  solely  to  enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile	
No. of cylinders 	
Horsepower 	
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area.,	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
- Days
_ Miles-
Yes □ No □
Car No. 2
.Days
Miles
Yes D No D
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car #1   Car #2
FPR UBC 55 It's easy to pose liberal solutions to Canada's
problems. It's easy to bugger around with
parliamentary politics. It's easy to cop out.
It's a lot harder to pick up the gun and start
fighting for your rights against the capitalist pig
bourgeoisie who are diametrically opposed to the
interests of the Canadian and Quebecois people.
But pick it up we must. If we want to achieve true
liberation.
We've got to start fighting. Not just for ourselves,
but for all those oppressed Canadians and Quebecois
whose interest lies in armed overthrow of the
Canadian government.
Because if we don't fight, nobody else will.
Canada and Quebec won't be saved by knights in
shining armor or manna from heaven. Only a popular
uprising   led by the most oppressed and  colonized
province of this country — Quebec — can lead to the
true liberation of Canadians.
Look around you. Is there a colony more
oppressed than Quebec? Is there a country with a
smaller potential for armed uprising?
Throw off the yoke of American and
Anglo-Canadian oppression, brothers and sisters of
Quebec. Only you can make it happen.
Understand we cant stand Canada
together.
Vive le Quebec fibre.
8 MACLOWN'S/MARCH 1972
The advertising industry and your community Board or Chamber. VIEW FROM EVERYWHERE/FROM PAGE 6
Try a little tenderness
Many thanks to your photographer for his touching picture of
Margaret Trudeau and her bonny wee boy. The tender expression on
our CKatelaine's face and the gurgling sweetness of baby Justin
remind one of such immortal masterpieces as Da Vinci's Madonna
and Child. Such subjects are infinitely more heartening than those
ugly and depressing pictures printed elsewhere in the name of
"relevance".
MRS. CATHERINE JOHNSTON, VICTORIA, B.C.
Hearty congratulations
We know the Maclown's editors are busy people, but we have taken
the liberty of sending you copies of our goon edition based on
Canada's Marginal Magazine.
To save you time in what must be a busy schedule of flack
freebies and hand-shaking, we have taken the liberty of forging Mr.
Peter The New Man's name to a couple of letters.
One is a regretful missive to our publisher, the Alma Mater
Society, in which Mr. New Man laments the education system which
gives rise to destructive and ill-clothed journalistic hoodlums such as
we. The other, cordially addressed to the editor of The Ubyssey,
offers hearty congratulations and bluff commendations to the paper
for producing a fine "spoof on Maclown's.
We trust Mr. New Man will find our actions satisfactory and
we  look  forward  to the impending sale of his magazine to the
government's Information Canada.
THE UBYSSEY STAFF, VANCOUVER, B.C.
JEEZ US
ASSAULT CHARGES WERE DROPPED last week when local motel
operator Priscilla Pelletier.(nee Dunbar) appeared in provincial court.
She was charged with slapping Harvey Swartz, an American
visitor from Lynden, N.J. Mrs. Pelletier told the court Swartz, a
large, beefy man, entered her motel office with a shotgun and
"talked in a strange language." The spry lady said: "He asked me if I
knew where he could get his hands on some good Canadian beaver.
He was grinning and I thought he was French". Judge Leo Dunbar
told Swartz, "you should be ashamed of yourself," and dismissed
charges.
THE BEAVER LAKE STANDARD,
Beaver Lake, B.C., March 1
LOBSTER FISHERMAN Monty Simms of Murray Corner, N.S., had
his fishing licence revoked after he returned from a trip with crabs
instead of lobsters. This violation was discovered by his wife Maude
who booted him out of the house and called the health inspector
from nearby Port Elgin. The inspector said Simms did not have a
permit to catch crabs. Simms has since moved to Pickton, N.S.
THE SACKVILLE TRIBUNE-POST,
Sackville, N.S., Jan. 21
MACLOWN'S REPORTER Anna Banana was bitten by a bear last
month while on assignment at Jasper National Park. The Park
warden said Boo Boo is "generally a friendly little feller and Miss
Banana must have been teasing him." Miss Banana reports she was
badly bruised and the doctor had to peel her for treatment.
JASPER EXAMINER,
Jasper, Alta., Feb. 10
A FINE TIME was had by all last Sunday at the hay ride and box
luncheon held in honor of Horace Blankstein and son Clem. The
popular pair were successful earlier this month in warding off
attempts by the Swine Meats Corporation of Chicago, 111., to buy
several hog farms in the Greater Biggar area. Horace explained at the
luncheon that he had been "getting riled" for several weeks when
Swine agents kept returning to his farm with new offers for his
spread. Finally he told an agent he would go into Swine's Regina
office the next day to make a deal. Horace and Clem then loaded
their 32 hogs into the family two-ton and deposited them in the
Swine office. Horrified company officials announced they wo,uld
stop trying to buy farms when Horace threatened to have all other
hoggers bring their livestock into the office. Swine has since closed
its Regina office.
THE NEWS AND VIEWS,
Biggar, Sask., Jan. 3
MACLEAN'S   DOES   NOT   appear  on' this  list   (of  the  Toronto
journalistic elite) because Maclean's is not a Toronto institution. It
is Canada's national magazine.
MACLEAN'S,
Toronto, April 1972 edition
Readers are invited to submit press clippings that offer some insight into Rural
Canadian Life and point up how urbane and sophisticated Maclown's is. (No
stories from American magazines or newspapers please.) Send along $5 and
we'll consider them, $10 and we'll publish them. This month's losers are:
Irving Fetish, Pat Nixon, Justin Trudeau, John (Lance) Turner, Wanda Lust,
Elvira Finch, Ma Murray, Simma Holt, Gordon Blankstein and Olive
Diefenbaker.
Beautiful
clothes.
PROTEST VIETNAM WAR!
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29
SUB ROOM 207
SPEAKERS, FILMS, SLIDES, ANTI-WAR DISPLAY
11:00-3:30
Learn how we are affected by this war!
MARCH « APRIL 15
ON THAT DAY NIXON WILL BE IN
OTTAWA. JOIN HUNDREDS OF
CANADIANS TO PROTEST THE
SLAUGHTER IN INDOCHINA.
1:30 assemble Thornton Park (CNR Station)
march to protest rally at
3:00 at the Federal Building
(Granville and Hastings)
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
FOR STUDENTS
JOB
•  To market essential teaching aids
EARNINGS
•   Averaged over $4,000 for our students last summer
STUDENTS
•   Are trained in sales and marketing psychology
•  Are willing to work long hours
•   Are willing to travel throughout British Columbia
and Alberta
,
•   Have a reliable car
CONTACT STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
For Interviews on
Monday & Tuesday, April  10 &  II,  1972
Teaching Aids Division — Grolier Limited
MACLOWN'S/MARCH 1972 Tuesday, March 28, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Letters
From page 5
like a big stick and many of us
quickly huddle into our cells,
spurred on by the fear that
perhaps we shall not be able to
return to this hallowed
ivy-covered walls of this higher
institute of education.
Before I return to my cage to
sleep, er study, for awhile I would
like to pass along my review of
one particular case in the French
department where the heavy hand
of the administration has again
come down upon any and all
parties who dare criticize those in
charge of courses or faculty
promotions. I am speaking
specifically of the case of J. L.
Brachet who has been a victim of
the purge presently going on in
many of the art faculties as I have
observed taking place so far this
year. Members of the Slavonics
department, Psychology and
Sociology departments et al,
many of whom were academically
more qualified as researchers and
more importantly as teachers have
been axed because they were a
threat to the tenured professors.
In Brachet's case he was not
given a renewal of his contract on
the flimsiest of excuses. A survey
of student opinion had been made
which indicated student disfavor
over his teaching abilities. Next,
Brachet wasn't in his office for
long enough periods of time for
consultation. Finally, Brachet has
not completed his dissertation for
his next degree. These reasons,
having been cited, the students of
our French class who supported
Brachet (which was literally all of
them) drafted to letters to the
head of the French department,
L. L. Bongie, asking for more
information as to the reasons why
Brachet's contract had not been
renewed.
In reply to both our letters,
Bongie attempted to placate the
class. First, he told us to find out
the reason for ourselves. Bongie
already having the reasons himself
did not see fit for some reason to
give us the information himself.
Our second letter, containing the
reasons for his dismissal and also
containing our request for a
review of the matter was given a
confidential reply once again from
Bongie. Once more, it deliberately
shoved aside the reasons for
Brachet's dismissal. We were
paternalized on the point that the
issue of Brachet's rehiring had
been looked at by senior faculty
members and therefore we should
no longer press the issue.
We were never given the
specific criteria for the
committee's decision. We were
referred to one page in the faculty
handbook outlining the very
obscure and intangible basis for
this decision. The only concrete
item given to us students by
Bongie was that four of Brachet's
classes had been surveyed. Who
the classes were, at what time
they were questioned and the
nature of the questions themselves
were part of the privileged
information we were apparently
incapable of viewing or to judge
for ourselves.
Whether or not Brachet was in
his    office    long    enough    is
ridiculous in comparison to other
professors I have attempted to see
in the past. Tell me how long and
often very many of them
anxiously remain in their offices,
awaiting the call of staff or
students? Not too many. At least
Brachet was in his office for those
students who did want to see him
during his office hours. Finally,
the matter of the dissertation was
dependent on whether Brachet
could teach at UBC again next
year. He had been authorized
ample time beyond the present
date to complete his work by the
university which sponsored him to
do so (UCLA). Hence the
dissertation question boils down
to which comes first, the chicken
or the egg. If Brachet is rehired
then he can continue on the
dissertation; if he doesn't then it's
not completed. Hardly a basis for
deciding on whether to rehire
someone.
To sum up, the incongruous
and often stern way in which our
simple requests were ignored
and/ or side-stepped in our
correspondence with the French
department was bewildering to us,
as all we wanted were the facts.
The basic problem seems to be
this: The administration at UBC is
afraid to allow into the various
departments faculty members
who might attempt to change the
courses presently offered.
Brachet's outspoken criticism of
French 110 was no exception to
this argument. Perhaps these new,
more critical, faculty members
might shake up those tenured
members of the faculty who have
been sitting back so complacently
as the years towards retirement
approach.
So often, instructors and
professors who are allowed to stay
on at the university are those who
will not raise questions within the
department which might be
embarrassing. As long as matters
of promotion and tenure can be
secluded from student scrutiny,
the methods of deciding who is to
teach and who shall leave will
remain unknown to us. Yet, we
are the ones directly affected by
these matters. We should, for the
present, at least know on what
specific grounds promotions are
made.
It is of the ultimate irony to
me that while over-all university
enrollment dropped over the last
year that the administration is
deliberately attacking and
chopping off those teachers who
had some measure of student
support, who might have brought
change to poorly organized
courses and hence might have
brought back some of the many
disenchanted students who are
steadily quitting the university.
Student apathy has grown
alongside of frustration as
possible avenues of change and
reform are consistently blocked.
The administration is literally
cutting its own throat in
attempting to secure positions
only to those members who will
tow the education line of whoever
is in power.
However, to those gentlemen
who are in such positions, I might
remind them that no longer are
students complacently accepting
the demands that they take
courses and keep their mouths
shut about what they're being
taught. University is not the great
job factory it once was. Students
need not put up with the courses
offered. If they can not change
what is taught to them, then they
may well go elsewhere to where
they can learn what they wish to.
So, to the members of the Ivory
Tower Club, I suggest you start
looking around your own office
to find the "culprits" who are
depleting student ranks (you'd
better hurry though, or you may
lose your tenured positions due to
lack of people to teach).
Well, I've said my piece. I
personally feel that unless
students are given the right to
decide what they shall learn and
who shall teach them, then
students may strike for what is
their right, or there might be a
rapid depletion of their numbers
from UBC as has already started,
or they might put up with the
present procedure. I don't believe
the last alternative will occur very
much longer if the dissension over
tenure which has been raised thus
far this year is any indication of
the coming storm.
I do not want my name or
address published with this letter.
While I have the right to freely
criticize what I feel to be wrong, I
am still aware of being under the
thumb of the bureaucratic
structure which plays on the fears
of people in order to silence
dissent. I wanted the facts of the
See page 18: LETTERS
SENSATIONAL 8-TRACK& CASSETTE SALE
CRX-1106 Jim! Hendrix
(Electric Ladylond)
CRX-2025 Jimi Hendrix
(Smash Hits)
CRX-2029 Jim! Hendrix
(Historic Performances)
CRX-2034 Jimi Hendrix
(Cry of Love)
CRX-2040 jimi Hendrix
(Rainbow Bridge)
CRX-2049 Hendrix in the West
CRX-6281 Jimi Hendrix
(Axis Bold as Love)
CRX-2032 Neil Younfl
(Harvest)
CRX-2035 Jethro Tull
(Aqualung)
CRX-6336 Jethro Tull
(This Was)
CRX6360 Jethro Tull
(Stand Up)
CRX-2037 Gordon Lightfoot
(Summer side of Life)
CRX-2038 Joni Mitchell (Blue)
CRX-2041 John Sebestian
(Four of Us)
CRX-2042 The Mother*
(Fillmore East)
CRX-2056 Gordon Lightfoot
(Don Quixote)
CRX-6267 Ario Guthrie
(Alice's Restaurant)
CRX-6293 Joni Mitchell
CRX-6376 Joni Mitchell
(Ladies of the Canyon)
CRX-6379 John B. Sebastion
CRX-6383 Neil Young
(After the Gold Rush)
CRX-6400 Jethro Tull
(Benefit)
CRX-6453 The Beech Boy*
(Surfs' Up)
CASSETTES
CWX-1774 The Collector*
(Grass & Wild Strawberries)
CWX-183S Moondonce
(Van Morrison)
CWX-1838 Hand Made
(Mason Williams)
CWX-1843 James Taylor
(Sweet Baby James)
CWX-1851 First Step
(Small Faces)
CWX-1859 Tom Northcott
(Best of)
CWX-1860 Deep Purple
(Royal Phil. Or.)
CWX-1869 The Grateful Deod
(Workingman's Dead)
CWX-1871   Black Sabbath
CWX-1887 Black Sabbath
(Paranoid)
CWX-1950 Tupelo Honey
(Van Morrison)
CWM-25S2 Peter, Paul and
Mary
(Best of Ten Years Together)
CWX-2561  Mud*Slide Slim
(James Taylor)
CWX-2562 Black Sabbath
(Master of Reality)
CWX-2564 Fireball
(Deep Purple)
CWX-2574 Face*
(A Nod is as good os a wink/
CWX-2585 Dionne Warwicke
(Dionne)
AC-7201   Led Zepplin   (3)
AC-7202 Stephen Still*
AC-7203  David Crosby
(If I Could Only Remember
My Name)
AC-7204 Graham Nosh
(Songs for beginners)
AC-7205 Aretha Franklin
(Live at Fillmore)
AC-7206 Stephen Still* 2.
AC-7208 Led Zepplin 4.
AC-8151 Wilton Pickett
(Best of)
AC-8202 Booker T. * the
M.G.'* (Best of)
AC-8229 Crosby, Still* and
Nath
AC-8216 Led Zepplin
AC-8236 Led Zepplin 2.
AC-8266 King Crimson
(In the Wake of Posldon)
AC-8295 Aretha Franklin
(Greotest Hits)
AC-8283 The YES Album
AC-8297 J. Giles
(The Morning After)
A8TC-33-266 King Curt!*
(Best of)
8-TRACK STEREO
8RM-2032
Harvest
Mail Young
A8TC-33-292 Be* Gee*
(Best of)
A8TC-33-316   Dr. John The
Night Tripper
A8TC-33-318 Iron Butterfly
(Live)
A8TC-33-342 Almond Brother*
(Idlewild South)
Mail orders promptly fitadt Just tick off the topes you wont; enclose
your list with remittance, plus 5% tax ond postage, and we'll oet your
order away  promptly.' First tape 35c—Each additional tape 20c postage
•WM-U3S
MaondaiK*
Van Morrison
A8TC-33-358 Delaney &
Bonnie (Motel Shot)
A8TC-33-367 Juicy Lucy
(Get a wiff of this)
A8TC-1569 Roberta Flack
(Chopter 2)
A8TC-7203 David Crosby
(If I Could Only Remember
My Name)
A8TC-81S1 Wilson Pickett
(Best of
A8TC-8295 Aretha Franklin
(Greatest Hits)
8RM-2038 Joni Mitchell (Blue)
8RM-2040 Jimi Hendrix
Rainbow Bridge)
8RM-2041 John Sebastian
(The Four of Us)
8RM-5195 Jimi Hendrix
(Bond of Gypsies)
8TC-8283 Ye* Album
8RM-6293 Joni Mitchell
(Song to a Seagull)
8RM-6341 Joni Mitchell
(Clouds)
8RM-4346 Ario Guthrie
(Running Down the Road)
IWM-M61
Mud Slide SDm
James Taylor
8RM-6376 Joni Mitchell
(Ladies of the Canyon)
8RM-6379 John Sebestian
8RM-6406 Little Richard
(The Rill Thing)
8RM-6453 The Beach Boy*
(Surfs' Up)
8RM-6462 Little Richard
(King of Rock & Roll)
EK8-74062 Tom Rush
(Classic Rush)
EK8-74082 Carly Simon
EK8-74088 New Seeker*
(Beautiful People)
EK8-75010 Judy Collin*
(Wales & Nightingale*
EK8-75014 Judy Collin*
(Living)
8WM-1772 Rod McKuen
(Greatest Hits)
8WM-1794 Rod McKuen
(At Carnegie Holl)
8WM-1838 Mason William*
(Handmade)
8WM-1843 James Taylor
(Sweet Baby James)
MANY OTHERS TO CHOOSE FROM
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
From page 17
.Brachet case brought to „ the
students' attention as I feel that it
is another attempt by the
administration to hide the real
reasons behind this case in
particular.
However, I do not feel that
anything will be gained by making
myself the scapegoat for any
recrimination which may be
forthcoming from the French
department concerning this
matter.
Name withheld,
Arts 2.
English
This is just a note to mention
yet another item in the ongoing
story of oppression in the
department of English.
Many students taking an
English course will be pleased to
feel that they are participating in
the evaluation of their teachers
when they respond to th,e student
questionnaire which is currently
being handed out. Don't kid
yourselves. In the case of one
group of teachers at least (the
sessional     lecturers),     the
Letters
department of English has chosen
to ignore completely the opinions
of students.
Last week department head
Robert Jordan and his cronies
went ahead and decided which of
these lecturers would be
reappointed for next year. Had
they waited a week, they could
have considered the opinions of
the students in each course taught
by each sessional lecturer. But
apparently the department of
English has no faith in a student
course evaluation, even when the
department itself has prepared
and administered the
questionnaire.
Is it a revelation to realize at
last that the powers that be are
interested neither in student
opinion nor in improving the level
of teaching in the department? If
they were, they would consider all
significant information (especially
the opinions of students) before
deciding who to reappoint.
Name withheld,
Department of English
Fine
Congratulations on another
fine year of Ubysseys. The paper
this   year   was   superb,   simply
MAJOR REPAIR WORK
®
_^^
We can save you money and give you the highest quality workmanship on
your VW, Mercedes, Porsche or Volvo. The larger the repair problem the
better off you are to come to us. If you have read this ad and don't own
any of the above, we can still be of service if you drive a B.M.W. Let us
quote on your next repair jobs.
SALES and SERVICE
8914 OIK STREET (at Marine)    Phone 263-8121
There's a plan that
can solve more than
just your money
worries.
It's called the
Regular Officer Training
Plan (ROTP).
It's a plan that pays
your tuition expenses
while you earn your
degree in Engineering.
Sciences. Or Arts.
It's a plan that solves
your summer employment
problems by paying you
every summer while you
train to become an officer.
It's a plan that
guarantees you an interesting, well-paying career
when you graduate. As a
commissioned officer in
the Canadian Armed
Forces.
It's a plan that gives
you 30 days paid vacation
each year.
Consider ROTP. Contact your local Canadian
Forces Recruiting and
Selection Unit at:
Building No. 104
4050 W. 4th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
Ph; 666-3136
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
tremendous. I couldn't have done
better myself.
Leslie Plommer,
Arts 4
Good
As the membership of next
year's biumvirate, may we take
this opportunity to congratulate
you on the high quality of this
year's Ubyssey. Presumably next
year's will be twice as good.
Collectively yours,
Jan O'Brien,
Arts 3.
John Andersen,
Arts 4
-BETTER BUY BOOKS~
P,Aou' CASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, PAPERBACKS, ETC.
Largest Selection of Review Notes in B.C.
MONARCH, COLES SCHAUAAS
AND MANY OTHERS
,_.        „, Located Near The Varsity Theatre At
Open 11a.m. Phone
to8p.m.     4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE   224-4144
<£*'.
Worth
At this time of year The
Ubyssey is always filled with
glowing accounts of the paper's
greatness through the past year.
Fair enough, but does anyone
stop to evaluate the worth of the
student body?
No name jove,
Former hack.
A STRIKING EXPERIENCE AND ONE WITH AN IMPACJ
THAT IS ALL BUT UNFORGETTABLE! A.vision of
undiluted harshness and language of
Untempered fury!"-Hottis Alperf, Saturday Review
Msed an the Award Winning play by Le RoT JOfieS
Coming THURSDAY 30th!   12.30&
OLD AUDITORIUM    50c      7:30
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
At the U.B.C. branches of the Bank of Montreal we
want to continue helping you
get your money's worth.
1. IF YOU'RE RETURNING TO SCHOOL NEXT YEAR, TO AVOID
DELAY CAUSED BY CLOSING AND OPENING ACCOUNTS LEAVE
A SMALL BALANCE IN YOUR PRESENT ACCOUNT AND WE WILL
KEEP IT OPEN FOR YOUR RETURN.
2. IF YOU'RE MOVING TO A NEW CITY OR ACROSS TOWN LET US
TAKE CARE OF YOUR MONEY MOVE - ASK TO HAVE YOUR
ACCOUNT TRANSFERRED TO ONE OF OUR MORE CONVENIENT
BRANCHES.
Congratulations to those students leaving U.B.C.
and to everyone best wishes and thanks
for your patronage over the past year.
\Ne want you to get
your money's worth.
tt
Bank of Montreal
The First Canadian Bank
Administration Building Branch: G. F. Peirson, Manager
Student Union Building Branch: T. Locke, Manager Tuesday, March 28, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
Gear study planned
response has come from applied
science dean W. D. Finn's office,
the two senators claim.
The   petition   will  be  passed
around in lectures.
Summer i
Two student senators who are
both engineers will present a
petition requesting the formation
of a committee to study engineers
and their education at the next
senate meeting.
"It is hoped that such a
committee would study the
present situation within the
applied science faculty and draw
conclusions as to what is or isn't
lacking in the engineering
curricula," the petition from John
Sydor and Jim McCune says.
Suggestions similar to the ones
brought forth in the petition have
been made before by curriculum
committees and by engineering
students,    but    little    positive
He makes up mind
After several weeks of making up his mind, Vancouver lawyer
Robert Thorpe has decided to run for chancellor of UBC.
He will contest the three-year post with Justice Nathan Nemetz
of the B.C. Appeal Court in a mail-in ballot to all UBC alumni and
faculty members June 7.
Thorpe's nomination was submitted several weeks ago by
friends, and it was not until he was contacted by registrar Jack Parnall
that he knew he was on the ballot.
He at first hesitated to affirm the nomination, claiming he had
to make sure the post would not interfere with other commitments.
Current chancellor Allan McGavin has decided not to seek a
second term of office.
UBC placement officer Cam
Craik urges students looking for
summer jobs to register at his
office, on the West Mall across
from the; armory.
The office, run by the
university and not affiliated with
Canada Manpower, will remain
open all summer.
PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
YOU CAN'T BEAT
ALMA
PHARMACY
224-4341
10TH&ALMA
HAPPINESS IS
Living better for less in '72.
Manufacturers samples and subs.
Sizes 7 to 20 at great savings.
Happiness is Boutique 4576 West
10th (across from big Safeway)
228-9931.
5% OFF FOR U.B.C. PEOPLE
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village)
224-3939
0 BARTON BUCKS  0
with each Gasoline Purchase
over $1.50 you will receive redeemable coupons
Good for Cash or Merchandise.
NOTICE
To All Faculty
During the vvet-k of April 17 to April 21,
1972 the Bookstore will buy back used
books for resale in September.
IN ORDER TO INSURE STUDENTS THE
OPPORTUNITY TO RECYCLE AS MANY OF
THEIR CURRENT TEXTBOOKS AS POSSIBLE,
THE BOOKSTORE ASKS YOU TO SUBMIT
YOUR LISTS OF REQUIRED FALL TEXTS BY
APRIL 14.
Your co-operation at this time will help
us to provide an adequate amount of
books for your classes well in advance
of September demands.
the bookstore
University of British Columbia
Tel. 228-4741
we
want
your
used
textbooks!
FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
get 50% in cash for used
textbooks scheduled for use
in the next fall session.
Highest prices also paid for discontinued texts.
the bookstore
university of british
Columbia 228-4741
April 17 to April 21
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
Secrecy inexcusable
From page 8
Three issues dominated the discussions: the status of prof Terry
Heinrichs, evaluation of the quality of department teaching and the
perennial dispute over the lack of student representation in
departmental meetings.
Heinrichs is a young political theorist who has single-handedly
enlivened the whole theory sub-field during his two-year stay. Student
support for his reappointment came in the form of a petition signed
by all but one of the PhD students, the overwhelming majority of the
MA students and most of the students in his large undergraduate
course. Many of the graduate students expressed the desire to work
personally with him, which is most unusual given the historic
weakness of the political theory staff.
Walter Young, chairman of the department, claims that
Heinrichs' contract is non-renewable, and that examination of the
correspondence between Young and Heinrichs would make that clear.
A representative of the graduate students did examine the
correspondence and reports that no such clarity exists in it: In fact,
what emerges is a large area of disagreement, and an apparent
misrepresentation of the substance of an oral agreement.
The matter is to come before a departmental meeting at which
no students will be allowed to participate at noon today.
The graduate students announced at the meeting that they
collectively would draw up, administer, and publish the results of a
department-wide evaluation of courses and teaching. Up to now,
evalution was random owing to the unwillingness of certain faculty
members to participate voluntarily in the process.
Results of the planned study, in addition to being published for
the benefit of students generally, will be mailed to incoming graduate
students and sent formally to the dean of arts for whatever future use
he may have for them.
Lastly, the chairman (Young) confessed his "astonishment" that
the bitterness which has surrounded the issue of student
representation persists.
The bitterness, it appears, will persist until the pervasive
duplicity and authoritarian tenor of the conduct of departmental
affairs are changed. Secrecy in departmental procedures might be
excusable if the end result were intelligent policy; nothing emerging
from recent departmental meetings justifies it currently.
Exams not fade away
way. Any courses that can
evaluate their students in some
other way are doing so right
now," he said.
Paintings shewn
Vancouver artist Wayne King
will show some of his water colors
and oils from April 6 to 14 in the
SUB art gallery.
King, who was born in Halifax,
has been working in Vancouver
for eight years.
IT*
There has been no significant
change in the number of exams
scheduled by the registrar's office,
assistant registrar K. G. Young
said Monday.
The registrar scheduled 878
exams this year, only slightly less
than the 908 exams scheduled last
year and 881 the year before.
"I think the number of exams
is holding its own," said Young.
"Most of the exams are in
science courses or large courses
where the professor hasn't the
time to evaluate students another
INCOME TAX
You'll purr with pleasure
at the satisfaction you'll
receive at H & R BLOCK.
Point your paws toward
H & R BLOCK and receive
prompt and guaranteed
accurate service. It's a
good place to place your
confidence.
COMPLETE
RETURNS
-_   R   ItOCK   1971
GUARANTEE
=________==___==.___=   bUAKAnitt _==______====--=-==.=
We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return.
If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or in-
terest. we will pay only that penalty or interest.	
HtR
(CANADA)
LTD.
Canada's Largest Tax Service Wifh Over 6000 Offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST.
3519 E. HASTINGS
T
6395 FRASER
3397 KINGSWAY
1685 DAVIE ST.
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARYl
327-0461
THE VIKINGS
HAIR DESIBHERS
Open All Summer
For Your Convenience
Student Prices
ON CAMPUS
UBC VILLAGE
2144 Western Parkway
For Appointment
Call 224-5540
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality  Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave. 879-0491
LONGHAIRS!
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
SUB Lower Floor- 9 a.m. - 5:30 Mon. - Fri. 224-4636
GRBfTSfiOeSKtifHB
jn<MXTcVJLLMmnXKXnON$
byuHANNA
shoe
Waxy Tan
Antique Leather on
Tire-tread Sole
Only $16.99
Open Thursday and Friday Nites
C.O.D. orders accepted. Credit and Chargex cards honored
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
'Design and Word Trade Marks in Canada of the Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd.' Tuesday, March 28, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 21
Hot flashes
Wald
on militarism
Harvard university professor
George Wald will speak at UBC
this week as part of the Dal
Grauer Memorial Lectures.
Wald, an outspoken critic of
American militarism, will speak at
8:15 p.m. today in the Totem
Park residence lounge.
On Wednesday, he will speak
on "The Origin of Death" at noon
in the Old Auditorium.
IH dance
The International Students
Association of UBC is
sponsoring an Easter dance at 9
p.m., Saturday at International
House. Tickets are $2 at the door
or at IH.
on the mass media in Canada at
noon today in Buchanan 106.
Author Shelagh Delaney,
French instructor Jean-Louis
Brachet and Vancouver poet
George Stanley will discuss
literature and social responsibility
at noon Wednesday in Buchanan
106.
A number of poets, including
former Ubyssey editor Tom
Wayman and Stanley, will read
their work at noon Thursday in
the SUB art gallery.
Also on Thursday, members of
Youngblood, an East End based
revolutionary organization, will
discuss art and the revolution at
2:30 p.m. in the SUB art gallery.
Kid di<
Feefies
The arts and politics program
continues this week with three
events.
Former Alma Mater Society
president Steve Garrod will speak
A directory of daycare,
pre-school and after-school
facilities will be released free this
spring to community groups and
individuals throughout the
province.
The Child Care Information
and  Resources Services wants to
Tween classes
TODAY
SUB ART GALLERY
Media    presentation    on    women's
liberation, 7:30 p.m.
SAILING CLUB
General    meeting   at   noon,   Buch.
104.
TAICHI
Joint hands practice at noon, SUB
205.
WEDNESDAY
ONTOLOGY
Couples In Love at noon, Buch.
216.
VOC
General meeting at noon, Angus
104.
ANTI-WAR CLUB
National student day of protest
against the Vietnam war. Speakers
from the Anglican United Campus
Ministry, the UBC teachers
committee on Vietnam and the
Vietnam action committee from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m., SUB 207-209.
BICYCLE CLUB
Last general meeting at noon, SUB
212-A.
THURSDAY
CCF
Fellowship at noon, SUB 211.
NEWMAN CLUB
Final general meeting at noon, St.
Mark's music room.
WEST COAST TRAIL
All those going on April 23 hike
meet at noon in SUB 241 (Ubyssey)
to organize equipment sharing, etc
New hikers still welcome.
FINE ARTS
Three films on Durer at noon. La.
104.
NDP
General meeting and election of
officers at noon, SUB 212-A.
ABORTION REPEAL COMMITTEE
Benefit dance, music by Daily
Planet and King Lux Sac, at Moose
Lodge, 112 West Broadway, 8 p.m.
Cost $1.
FRIDAY
UBC YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Report from first cross-Canada
abortion conference, 1208
Granville, 8 p.m.
know what's happening for
children in every provincial
community.
The group is interested in
hearing about co-operative child
care programs and experimental
facilities.
Exile to talk
Nguyen Huu Chi, a former
province chief in the Republic of
Vietnam who is now exiled, will
speak on War and Politics in
Vietnam at noon Thursday in
Buchanan 102.
Chi is currently a political
science professor at Carleton
University in Ottawa.
Raise sfiif?
Anyone who can drive or
attend the Seattle City Council
Friday hearing on the city's
development of Ross Dam is
asked to call the Environmental
Crisis Operation in Hut B-8 at
228-4402.
Group to meet
Women's Action Group weekly
meetings will reconvene at noon
April 7 in the blue room of the
Arts One building. The weekly
meetings will, it is rumored,
continue to meet and meet and
meet...
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
732-0311
BOUTIQUE
Handmade Clogs
Local Pottery
Open 9-5:30 Mon.^Sat.
till 9 Fri.
4430W. 10th
224-4513
Selling your home?
Ph. Joan Bentley, 224-0255
Rutherford-Thompson-McRae
733-8181
Tours of
Walter H. Gage
Residence
Noon -4:30 P.M.
Tuesdays - Fridays
and Sundays
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th
224-0034
ATTENTION!
FACULTY
STAFF
AND STUDENTS
. .       ..DOE3B
Mayflower
VJ INTERNATIONAL
363Q East 1st Ave. at Boundary, Vancouver, B.C.      291-7721
Mayflower is a franchisee! name for more than 900
firms in Canada and the U-S.A. and Free World. Lile
Mayflower International of Vancouver is one of these
firms and operates a 1300 sq. foot office and
warehouse for storing household goods. The latest
method is utilized: called "Palletized Vault". A vault
will hold the equipment of one room cf furniture. Lile
Mayflower International can efficiently handle your
move to any place in the Free World. — whether
moving locally in Vancouver, across Canada or the
U.S. or via vessel or air to overseas points. Your phone
request will expedite a representative to your
residence for a free estimate without obligation.
(24 Hour Phone Service)
Qualified to Handle Shipments
in Bond To and From USA
and Canada
Lile Mayflower, the agency at 3630 East First specializing
in storage and moving, of household goods, officially has
been qualified to handle shipments in bond, Gerald R.
Larson, vice-president and general manager reports.
DESIGNED
TO MOVE
WITH
PROGRESS
Announcing
G.S.A. ANNUAL
GENERAL
MEETING
12:30 p.m.
Thursday March 30
BOARD ROOM
Grad Student Centre
Announcing
G.S.A.
ELECTIONS
For the Offices pf
PRESIDENT
and
STUDENT COUNCIL REP
Tuesday March 28, 1972
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
GRID CEHTRE FOYER
CLASSIFIED
Rot..: Campus - 3 Unw, 1  day $1.00; 3 day. $2.50
Commwdol - 3 Uiw,  I  day $1.25; additional   '
Urn* Wk? 4 d«y» pita* of t.' t
Cbmiffodl ads «r« mat ace*f***t by tpfophom mmt mm jMQta&fe
* fttt MMMMtMh. DtMattm it. SttSQ tt4tt» «_» tlsjr btttxn jwiWiwwwt.
Publications Off<ce, Room 341 S.U.B., UBC. K*t 8, B.C.   .;
mmmmmmmWmwmmmmmmmmmmmmi>immmmm^
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
13
FOUND MAN'S GOLD WATCH IN
SUB, March 24. Call Jnidi, 228-2772.
LOST: WOMAN'S WRIST WATCH,
gold metal band, square links
22nd March. Phone Eileen, 261-5226
—reward offered.
Special Notices
 15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
NEW CONCERT BAND FORMING
— Point Grey area. Anyone interested phone 224-1910 or 684-
7750.	
DON'T ISOLATE YOURSELF
with snowf lakes on your shoulders,
get the RK Dandruff Shampoo at
Corky's Men's Hairstyllng. Money
back guarantee if it doesn't cure
your isolation. 3644 West 4th at
Alma. 731-4717.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone   684-8638.
UNIVERSITY TRAVELLERS
CLUB
Travelling this summer? Stay
overnight free! Stuck at home?
Host travellers. Meet friendly
people. Exchange privileges with
members in U.S.. and Canada.
Write now for full details: UTC,
P.O. Box 9147, Berkeley, Calif.
94709.
FLYING TO L.A.? NEED SOME-
one to accompany young daughter
—call Ann Marten, 738-4236.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sal*
21
•69 FIAT 850. EXCEL. CONDI-
tion. Best offers. Sporty. Econo-
mical.   731-3919.	
'65 EPIC, MUST SELL, $200 OR
best offer. Neil Kyle, home 291-
0772.   S.F.U.   291-4778.	
'65 AUSTIN 850 STATION WAGON.
Good cond. 55,000 miles $400 or
offers.  733-6703 after 5 p.m.	
1962 VOLKSWAGEN, 1966 ENGINE.
Asking $300. Call 987-7523 Must
sell!
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
CROSS YOUR HEART — YOU
never had a better haircut than
at Corky's Men's Hair Styling, 4th
& Alma — 731-4717.
HEAVY MECHANICS — GROOVY
prices — Hans et. al. now repair
Mazda, Toyota and Datsun cars
in addition to B.M.W.. Volvo,
Porsche, Mercedes and Volkswagen. Try us, 8914 Oak St. (at
Marine in Marpole) or phone us
at 263-8121.
Typing
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau. days 688-
5235, evenings and weekends 263-
4023.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829
from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.
ESSAYS   AND   THESES   TYPED
Experienced   Typists
Mrs.    Freeman—731-8096
TEDIOUS TASKS—FROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745.   Reasonable   rates.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced Essay and
Thesis typist. Beautiful work.
Mrs.  Ellis 321-3838.
Typing—Cont.
40
PROFESSION^!, BILINGUAL —
typing, IBM Selectric, open days,
evenings, weekends phone Madeleine at 738-3827 reasonable rates
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice — Theses, Manuscripts, Term
Papers, etc. Mrs. Troche. Phone
437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
STARTING SEPT. 1972. MARRIED
student to manage Totem Park
Canteen. Retailing exper. req'd.
Some knowledge of vending,
bookkeeping, etc. useful but not
essential. Please apply in writing
by March 30th giving full particulars of experience, etc. to: The
Manager, Totem Park Canteen,
6700 N.W. Marine Dr.
REQUIEM FOR THE EUS—WELL
—UH LOOK—LOOK YOU CAN'T
 PLEASE EVERYBODY	
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early. Limited enrollment. G< Alfred, 261-4764.
Tutoring Service
63
TUTORING BY HONOURS MATH
graduate. Phone Ron, 733-5445,
6-7 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
UBC's   Student   Telephone   Directory
Now only 25c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS  Publications Office
SANSUI SR1050C TURNTABLE —
belt drive, cost $100, sell for $60.
Phone Jim, room 163, 224-9962
after 6.
BLACK LIGHT — 48" BASE IN-
cluded.   Larry. 224T9045.
WE GUARANTEE NOT TO BALL
up your haircut at Corky'a Men's
Hairstyling, 4th & Alma — 731-
4717.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM. PRI-
vate bath, in lovely south Granville home for responsible male
student. On bus line. No cooking.
Quiet, conducive for study. Available May   1st.  Phone   224-6090.
ONE GIRL TO SHARE HOUSE
with 3 others. Collingwood and
3rd. May 1st. $70.  Phone 731-1304.
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT —
kitchen and laundry facilities —
handy to UBC. $40 per month.
224-1678.
SLEEPING ROOMS AT THE
gates. April or May 1st. Semi-
private entrance. $47/month during  summer. 228-9537.
STUDENT SUMMER SPECIAL.
Neat, quiet room, $45 a month
(no  cooking).  224-7623.
Room & Board
82
 SUMMER  STUDENTS   —  —
Room and/or board available on
campus, May 1st to Sept. 1st —
224-9866   —   2270   Wesbrook   Cres.
Goodbye til Sept.
Ubyssey Classified Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
NOON TODAY
EXPERIMENT IN INTERNATIONAL LIVING -
FRANCE ... a film made in France by last year's
Canadian group. There are* still openings for this
year's summer project... 2 months living with a
French family in France!
INTERESTED???
Room 402/404, 12:30 p.m.
International House
"     ~%    |A STRIKING EXPERIENCE AND ONE WITH AN IMPAC1
"**A.   [THAT IS ALL BUT UNFORGETTABLE! A.vision of
<£V    undiluted harshness and language of
unlempered fury!"-no...j Aip»n. Saturday »»m
Stud on ihe Award Winim* play by Le ROI JOfieS
[Coming THURSDAY 30th!   12.30&
OLD AUDITORIUM    50c
7:30
Get a new cav...
with aTERMPLAN loan
Life-insured at no extra cost.
ROYAL BAN K U
-the helpful bank
University Area Branch - DAVE STEWART, Manager
10th & Sasamat 224-4348
SCUBA
INSTRUCTION
GREG KOCHER'S Scuba Diving School will be in each
of the following locations during the summer months to
offer one week of Skin & Scuba Instruction. The
courses will be offered in:
PENTICTON   KELOWNA    VERNON
SALMON ARM  NELSON   CRANBROOK
TRAIL
As well, courses will be run regularly throughout the
Lower Mainland during the summer.
Course Fee
$5000
More information or Registration phone
All equipment supplied
NAUI Certification
Night & day courses
GREG KOCHER 733-5809
or write 406-1305 West 12th, Vancouver 9, B.C.
[SCUBA INSTRUCTION Tuesday, March 28, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 23
High Quality
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
n NATURAL
COLOR
Visit our Studio
736-0261 Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 28, 1972
Racism? At UBC ?
The following is a reply to an article in last
■ week's Page Friday which accused
anthropology I sociology prof Werner Cohn of
racism.
R
kacism is the notion that one's own ethnic
stock is superior. It is an ignorant, mean, narrow
emotion; it has led to mass murder in the only too
recent past. To accuse someone of racism, therefore,
is serious business; to do so falsely is reprehensible
and should not be tolerated. The Union of Radicals
in the Social Sciences has done just that in its
lengthy, anonymous attack against the discipline of
sociology, against various prominent social
scientists, and against me personally. (The Ubyssey,
March 24, 1972).
Some time before this attack was published,
members of the URSS called on me with the request
that I participate in a debate on race to be
sponsored by their organization. I declined this
invitation since I did not feel then, and do not feel
now, that a politically-oriented debate is the kind of
format which can throw light on the issues at hand.
Instead, I invited these members of the URSS to
hold discussions with me, to organize study sessions,
to examine the evidence together. My invitation was
not accepted. It still stands, for members of the
URSS as well as for anyone else.
A
it the time of my brief meetings with these
individual URSS members, I also indicated what my
position is, and suggested further readings to them.
In view of these briefings, the'tnisrepresentations
contained in the March 24 attack may well have
been deliberate. I sincerely hope that I am wrong in
this suspicion.
The reader must refer to the writings of
Richard Hernstein (The Atlantic, September 1971)
and Arthur Jensen (Harvard Educational Review,
Winter 1969) to judge for himself whether the
URSS attack against them is justified. Concerning
Jensen, whose work I have studied in detail, I can
now only quote his statement on the educational
implications of his research:
The necessity and desirability of eliminating
racial discrimination and of improving the
environmental conditions and educational and
occupational opportunities of all
disadvantaged persons in the population are
taken   for  granted.   These   approaches have
nothing  to   do  with  race  per  se,  but are
concerned with individual differences in those
characteristics most relevant to educability.
(Genetics,   Educability,   and   Subpopulation
Differences, in press, page 324. A copy of the
manuscript is available at the reserve desk of
UBC's main library.)
I have written quite a bit on ethnic groups, but
the URSS saw fit to refer only to a very brief book
review and to an even briefer reply arising from this
review. Altogether, these two items amount to 12
brief paragraphs. (Current Anthropology, April-June
1969. Februarty 1971). Most of my remarks had
nothing to do with the question of racism, although
one scholar thought that they might have such
implications. In reply, I devoted one of my 12
paragraphs to the following comments:
Finally, I would like to assure Hughes that I
fully share what I take to be his commitment
against all forms of racism. God knows that if
some final accounting were taken, all races
could be shown to be just about equally
corrupt, or, if you will, equally angelic. Killing
on a very large scale — in war, in
concentration camps, etc. — has been white
man's business, and I will not let Hughes
represent me as claiming a greater generalized
propensity to kill in Negroes. (Feb., 1971).
The article by the URSS does not quote from
this part of my statement. Why doesn't it?
In my original book review (April-June, 1969),
I complain that many studies on ethnic groups fail
to treat seriously aspects of minorities which are
bothersome to majorities. As examples I cite the
higher murder rate among Negroes but also observe
that "there is good reason to believe that Jews in
fact do tend to have business traditions which, like
those of the Gypsies, strike non-Jews as
'unethical'." My comments thus dealt with both
Negroes and Jews. The URSS calls me "blatantly
anti-Black" but not anti-Semitic, although their
simplistic logic would lead to both charges. Either
they think that it is quite all right to be
anti-Semitic, or they realize that this charge would
not stick because I am a Jew myself. In any case,
their selective, biased quoting from my book review
is curious indeed.
s
"ome readers may wonder what my views are
on the Jensen controversy. The URSS statement
claims that "Dr. Cohn follows Jensen." Again, there
is misrepresentation. Jensen is an unusually vigorous
and stimulating scholar, and many of his points are
very well taken indeed. Nevertheless, as I explained
to the URSS members who visited me as well as to
my classes, it is my opinion that there is a certain
conservative bias in Jensen's work, which leads him
to    overestimate    the    importance    of   tested
intelligence. An article by Baratz and Baratz ("Early
Childhood Intervention: The Social Science Base of
Institutional Racism," Harvard Educational Review,
Winter, 1970), a copy of which I furnished to my
URSS visitors, comes much closer to representing
my own point of view. If I "follow" anyone on this
question, it would Baratz and Baratz, not Jensen.
The URSS people knew this from my meeting with
them yet chose to write otherwise.
Briefly, my views are that the genius of Black
culture in North America cannot be apprehended
through the standard intelligence tests; that we need
a greater appreciation of those mental abilities (in
people of all races) which are not at the moment
rewarded in the standard school room; that we need
to liberate and broaden our schools so as to give
children of various types of talents a fuller
opportunity to develop their abilities. These are
some of the practical and educational implications
which I have drawn from my work over the years.
(An early statement of such views appeared in my
article "On the Language of Lower-Class Children",
The School Review, Winter 1959). All my life I have
believed, as I do now, in a radical transformation of
society in order to liberate the human potential, to
end racism and oppression. These views have always
been expressed as clearly as I know how. And yet,
the URSS chooses to class me with those who
believe that "society in its present form must be
shown to be the only possible society".
Ihe
I he URSS attack on my integrity is one of a
long line of anonymous, irresponsible attacks which
The Ubyssey has seen fit to publish against various
members of faculty. This sniping will not deter me
from my scholarly responsibility to seek for the
truth in my work. But I must warn the university
community that irresponsible attacks in the press
will have deleterious effects on scholarship in the
long run. When an expression of controversial views
exposes a scholar to a public campaign of
vilification, he might well be tempted to keep quiet
and to abandon the field to the purveyors of safe
platitudes. Who gains from that?
I know several of the students who have
participated in URSS activities. I feel that in this
case their concern for "struggle" has outweighed
their sense for truth and fairness. Nevertheless,
knowing these people, I can sincerely hope that
future dialogues with them may be held in a spirit
of studying issues and of learning from one another
so as to contribute toward the better world we all
seek.
Werner Cohn
March 27, 1972.
Whose ideas are correct?
Below is a rebuttal to Cohn's statement.
1. The URSS is a collective. The function of a
collective is to undertake tasks communally,
breaking down the competitive, individualistic
nature of education in this society. Further,
"anonymous" groups do not call for public
discussion in which they will be involved as an
organization.
2. In our open letter, we explained our
position on small elitist discussions of topics of such
great importance. Questions of such significant
social concern must be dealt with publicly.
3. The question whether we quoted out of
context and, therefore, misrepresented either
Hernstein or Cohn can best be answered by
reiterating the statement at the end of the article
that we will gladly make available copies of both
these authors' articles to anyone interested.
4. To the comment on anti-Semitism, perhaps
the message of the film 'The Garden of the
Finzi-Continis is sufficient response. It is fully
possible for a Black to be anti-Black, a woman to be
sexist, a Jew to be anti-Semitic; the attitudes of
people are determined by social conditions, not by
biology.
5. In today's letter Mr. Cohn apparently still
holds to his concept of a "higher murder rate among
Negroes" based on FBI research. Mr. Cohn states: "I
have believed" as I do now in a radical
transformation of society in order to liberate the
human potential, to end racism and oppression." We
find this to be in contradiction with his faith in the
objectivity of the FBI and his reluctance to see
"sociology and various prominent social scientists
criticized".
6. We agree with Dr. Cohn that irresponsible
attacks have harmful effects, not only on an
individual's scholarship, but on the totality of
human dignity. The URSS criticizes not only the
statements of "prominent sociologists" but any
ideas or practices we consider incorrect.
Furthermore, we encourage everyone to actively
criticize any ideas or practice they feel are
detrimental to the welfare of the individual and of
society as a whole.
Neither Dr. Cohn nor the URSS will determine
whose ideas are correct or incorrect in debates of
this nature. These will be determined by all those
people who are struggling for "a radical
transformation of society in order to liberate the
human potential, to end racism and oppression."
The URSS Collective,
SUB Box 149.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128572/manifest

Comment

Related Items