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The Ubyssey Oct 20, 1967

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Array 3AGE CONDEMNS VIOLENT CAMPUS STUNTS
Acting President Dean Walter Gage appealed
d students Thursday to curtail dangerous stunts
n campus.
Here is a statement Gage issued Thursday
fter he consulted with deans of faculties in-
olved in two separate incidents at the Buchanan
uilding and The Ubyssey office:
"In recent days there have been a number of
astances in which, what started as harmless
tunts, have developed into situations which re-
ulted in students being hurt and property being
amaged.
"We urge all students to refrain from any
ctivities which might provoke or lead to phys-
:al injuries or destruction of property."
When asked for comment on the science-arts
lash in Buchanan, dean of science V. J. Okulitch
aid:
Neanderthal mentality at its worst.
"I can't really say I'm really excited or indignant or anything.
"It's good clean fun and okay."
But Thursday's incidents provided a good time
to say a few wise words for the good of everyone,
he said.
Okulitch suggested the Alma Mater Society
take disciplinary action when necessary.
"If we ought to have student government,
then students have to govern themselves."
Meanwhile, William Armstrong, dean of applied sciences, said older faculty members "get
quite incensed" about engineers' pranks.
"I think we should put a stop to them," Armstrong said. "But I'm not sure I have the jurisdiction. The stunts take place at noon hour."
Engineer crowds can get carried away, causing considerable damage, he said.
Neanderthals
are sterile
'ol. XLIX, No. 14
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1967
£«„   Wj* «*ii'ili.U
224-3916
Reds, blacks, vent frustrations
Artsmen evict
SUS invaders
By PAUL KNOX and PAMELA MUTCH
An attempt to wash down Buchanan lounge
Wednesday ended in a cursing, shoving clash
>etween science and arts students.
At a science undergraduate society meeting
Thursday noon, vice-president John Taylor railed the support of 150 sciencemen in a con-
piracy against "artsholes".
"We're going to take this barrel of water to
he artsie-far .sie lounge and dump this dry ice
«l the barrel," he said.
"Then they'll have lots of good clean foam on
heir floor.
To the rhythm of "arts eat shit" the science
nen marched from Hennings to the terrace in
iront of the lounge, where they were met by arts
council president Stan Persky and four fire hoses.
"There are hundreds of people here willing
;o commit violence to stop you from coming in
his building," Persky said.
He asked for a science representative to come
lorward and explain science intentions.
-   In answer, several sciencemen began pushing
_ barrel up the steps in front of the terrace.
Then, some artsmen sprayed them with the
loses. Others, led by Persky, pushed the science
men back down the steps.
Buckets of water from the hordes of science
men, soaked Persky and other arts leaders.
Persky repeated his call for a science representative. Finally science president Robin Russell
stepped forward.
"We were going to do this harmless stunt
>n the terrace," said Miss Russell. "It's a protest
against unclean hippies and arts types.
"We asked an arts council executive member,
John Churchland, if we could pull this stunt and
he agreed."
Persky called Churchland over to the confrontation.
Suddenly Miss Russell sounded a cry of retreat. The column of sciencemen returned to Hennings.
There they were met on the main mall by
jubilant engineers returning from a foray to The
Ubyssey office.
Taylor told engineer leaders that science had
planned to wash the lounge. Then the two faculties swore revenge on arts.
"But not today," said Jim Lightfoot, engineering 3, Alma Mater Society co-ordinator.
Back in Hennings 200, science leaders criti-
jized their followers for leaving Buchanan.
In an interview later, Churchland said he told
the science council they could do anything that
didn't interfere with arts students.
"But I didn't give them licence for this stunt,"
he said.
TO PAGE 2
— lawrence woodd photo
DEFYING SCIENTIFIC MOBS, arts president Stan Persky grits
his teeth and surveys the situation on Buchanan steps. Senator Ray Larsen waits in background, in a  similar stance.
Kidnapped copy
causes clamor
By JADE EDEN
Thursday's copies of The Ubyssey ran into
unexpected snags — about 400 of them.
It began at 10:30 Thursday when The Ubyssey
delivery truck was hijacked by red-coated students, alleged to be engineers, who made off
with 13,000 copies of the 16-page publication.
It ended with production, advertising, and
property losses estimated at more than $2,000,
and a paper-strewn Ubyssey office that took three
hours to clear.
After the truck was emptied, the few hundred other papers that had already been distributed began to disappear. Large stacks were
seen being carried by the same red-coated students to a building directly behind the bookstore.
Two Ubyssey staff members investigating the
disappearances said the building appeared to
be the engineering building. Upon entering they
were told to leave or be forcibly locked up in a
washroom.
Meanwhile, scores of puzzled students flocked
to The Ubyssey office to inquire about the absence of the paper.
The UBC RCMP detachment was called in an
attempt to recover the kidnapped copies, but no
action was taken when a patrol car arrived. The
incident is still under RCMP investigation.
Later, about 400 students with an unshaven
leader, who later identified himself as Lynn
Spraggs, engineering president, filed slowly into The Ubyssey office, clogging the Brock stairs.
Inside the office, shouting, chanting red-
jackets threw stacks of papers about, crumpling,
ripping, and shredding.
"Watch the light, keep 'em low," said
Spraggs, ducking as a light panel crashed to the
floor beneath a well-aimed thrust from one of
the dozens of cohorts milling around him.
Soon the engineers were knee-deep in paper,
tripping over each other's feet and singing "we
are the engineers" as the paper rain continued.
Ubyssey staff, slightly vexed by the inconvenience, continued to type copy until their typewriters were completely submerged in paper.
The siege continued for about half an hour,
when having expended their supply of Ubysseys,
the laughing redcoats retreated.
A new press run of Thursday's issue was
made today and will be distributed in addition
to the usual Friday edition. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October-20, 1961
STUDENTS  MAKE
NO  DIFFERENCE
Senate still the same
By BO HANSEN
Ubyssey Senate Reporter
There is nothing different about senate because of the new student members, says senate
secretary J. E. Parnall, UBC registrar.
In an interview Thursday, Parnall said he had
no comment on personalities of the four senators
elected in Wednesday's AMS elections. They are
FROM   PAGE   I
Persky said he was amazed at the self-righteousness of Miss Russell.
"No-one has the right to disturb people who
are eating or studying in the lounge," he said.
SCIENCE STUNT—LATE FLASH
Late flash: Arts president Stan Persky said
late Thursday an arts council meeting has decided on an arts policy of non-violence "for the
foreseeable future. "If any group comes we will
try to talk them out of any disturbance but will
not try to stop them in any physical way,"
Persky said. The arts president denied a science
claim arts had agreed to the science stunt. "It is
not so that we condoned this — this is self-
justification by science after the event.".
Ray Larsen, arts 5, Kirsten Emmott, science 4,
Gabor Mate, arts 4, and Mark Waldman, graduate studies 3.
"Every point of view is welcome on senate,"
he said. "I hope the students will add to the
breadth of topics discussed."
Parnall denied reports of senate secrecy.
"I really cannot think  of  anything  that  is
secret in the senate."
He agreed that senate meetings are not open to the public.
"But open gallery might inhibit some members from speaking."
Senate seldom discusses anything interesting enough to provide anyone with an evening's
entertainment, anyway, he said.
"Besides,    the    senate    and
board room (on the second floor
of the administration building)
just isn't big enough."
The   senate  nominations  committee  has  already made recommendations as to committee
appointments for the newly elected student senators, Parnall said.
These recommendations will be presented to
Wednesday's senate meeting.
PARNALL
'Anti-calendars essential'
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Students are easier on professors than professors are on
students, says an American
authority on teacher evaluation.
"Student like faculty," said
Dr. William Langan, a professor of nayal science who helps
grade teachers at the University of Washington.
Langan spoke to 50 persons
at the third session of the Colloquium on University Education held in the education
building Wednesday night.
"The faculty inspector system employed now is the worst
possible way of evaluating
teaching," Langan said.
Student evalution of professors is vital, he said.
"Anti-calendars are important because they are the only
formal criticism of faculty
made."
However, they are not scientific and do not present the
views of the professor, he said.
At the University of Washington, Langan seeks confidential student evaluation of a professor if the professor requests
it.
"This allows the teacher to
see what students think of him
without the reports being published," he said.
Former UBC science undergraduate president Frank Flynn
defended the science anti-
calendar, Black and Blue, as
scientific and helpful.
"One professor improved 100
per cent after the anti-calendar
criticized his teaching methods," Flynn said.
At   the  meeting,   a  faculty
U.B.C. Beauty Salon
In The Village
Hairpieces
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Reasonable Prices
NO   APPOINTMENT   NECESSARY
Open Tues. - Sat. Tel. 028-8942
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Charter Flight Director
Applications are now being accepted for the position of
A.M.S. Charter Flight Director. The appointee will be
responsible for arrangement of flight. He or she will
co-ordinate promotion for the flight and be responsible
for the sale of seats. Letters of application should be
addressed to Penny Ann Cairns, A.M.S. Secretary,
A.M.S. mailbox number 54. Applicants will appear at
a meeting of Students Council, Monday, October 30,
1967, at 7:00 p.m., at which time the appointment will
be made.
anti-calendar was suggested so
that the teacher could see how
his colleagues felt.
The final session of the colloquium, entitled Further
Guideposts for University, will
be held in the education building auditorium Wednesday at
7:30 p.m.
Endowment land housing
gets aldermanic backing
A suggestion to provide faculty housing on campus
was strongly supported by city alderman Tom Alsbury
Thursday.
Made by associate English professor Thomas Blom in
a Ubyssey interview, the suggestion calls for endowment
properties closest to the campus to be put aside for low
cost faculty housing.
Blom said this would entice more scholars to UBC
and stimulate a necessary intellectual intercourse between
faculty and students.
"I think he's got something there, and I'm certainly
interested," Alsbury said.
Alsbury suggested that UBC consider letting the city
administer the land they might choose for faculty housing.
Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A meeting will be held in Chem. 250
Tuesday, October 24 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
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Committee Appointments
Applications are now being accepted for the following
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Student Housing
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton, 1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
From left to right: literate neanderthal examines his favorite reading matter, all hell breaks loose as crimson neanderthals  attack  Ubyssey  office,  The  Aftermath.
SUS prez Russell meets AUS prez Persky.
Barrels go rolling in front of Buchanan.
Scienceman vents his anger at senator larsen.
Ubyssey photographer Kurt Hilger captures the sinister faces of neandei^ab as they destroy 13,000 copies of Thiirsday', paper. Final picture shows last eviction rm invjef
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press service*
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23: advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
OCTOBER 20, 1967
Prankly speaking
A gang of thugs Thursday stole 13,000 copies of The
Ubyssey, then destroyed them. Total damage, including
printing costs and lost advertising revenue, totalled more
than $2,000.
There were other costs — intangible ones. Most important of these, of course, was the psychic damage
suffered by students unable to read Thursday's edition
of Canada's greatest newspaper. Fortunately, much of
this intangible damage will be repaired—an extra 10,000
copies of the Thursday paper hit the campus at 8:30 this
morning.
Now, we don't consider $2,000 worth of property
damage the most evil of deeds. Far more reprehensible
than damage to property, we believe, is damage to people.
A random example of the latter sort of damage would be
the throwing into a pool of a person who does not wish
to be thrown into a pool.
There are some who treasure the right of university
students to commit personal assault and property damage on campus.
We don't.
Our disagreement doesn't stem from any undue
•reverence for law. For when a law forbids something
harmless or beneficial — like smoking marijuana — we
don't revere it at all.
But we're not aware of any scientific proof declaring
property damage and personal assault harmless.
There are still laws against such behavior. We urge
that these laws be retained — and enforced.
Thanks, Robin
Barefoot, in the kitchen, and preferably pregnant.
That's the best state for women, we say, and let the
suffragettes suffer.
Women, we like to believe, never helped anyone,
especially themselves, by tampering in a man's world.
They especially never helped anyone, says our theory,
by butting into the man's world of politics.
, Female politicians, we have found, are perversions
of womanhood — they're aggressive and they've got bad
breath. Sex? Forget it.
But exceptions are always popping up to ruin our
theory. Exceptions like Alma Mater Society vice-president Kim Campbell and new senator Kirsten Emmott
who make valuable contributions to politics but remain
ladylike.
Our tottering theory got a shot in the arm Thursday,
though, when the news came in about science president
Robin Russell. Apparently a female, Miss Russell led a
troop of hulking sciencemen into battle at the Buchanan
building. After her forces were rebuffed, it is said, she
tried — unsuccessfully — to use the female face-slapping
prerogative in a confrontation with arts president Stan
Persky.
Pretty unladylike behavior, we'd say. See what
politics does to women. Our theory was right: let's keep
'em barefoot, in the kitchen, and preferably pregnant.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City  Stuart ©ray
Senior.  Pat Hrushowy
News  Susan Gransby
Managing  Murray McMillan
Photo  Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Blmle, Kirsten Emmott
Sports Mike Jessen
Wire  Charlotte Haire
Page Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
A bleat, mournful and stagnant,
persisted. The last sheep shambled
away, leaving a torn and crumpled
carpet of newspaper. Slowly, the
odor dissolved. "Doesn't that get
your goat?" asked Irving Fetish.
But everyone was rocking with
laughter. "I've never seen such low
foreheads," gasped Ann Arky, between breaths. "Their grunts," Leo
Tolstoy wheezed. "Their grunts."
Then back to toil went an unruffled
legion,   including   Paul   Knox,   Jade
Eden, Steve Jackson, Pamela Mutch,
Mike Finlay, Bo Hansen, Irene
Wasilewski, Hew Gwynne, Mark De-
Coursey. Ted Syperek and Alexandra  Volkoff.
Norman ("Trudge") Gidney went
marching while Jane Kennon, Fred
Cawsey, Judy Young, Richard Baer,
Laurie Dunbar, Jim Luckey and
Denis Newman translated hieroglyphics in between sighting unidentified flying objects. Lin Tse-Hsu
waddled back, at last.
Gurgling in the darkroom were
Chris Blake, Lawrence Woodd, Bob
Brown, George Hollo and someone
with a black mask and an axe.
So far 187 boxes of fried blorgs
have been ordered for the free session of debauchery and scandal
Saturday night — the year's first
pub party. Limp down for shocking
details. Black tie is the dress for
today's editorial blorg meeting, to
be held in the Brock coke machine.
A news seminar for staffers,
prompted by Ali Akbar Birnie,
follows.
"Who the hell are
LETTE RS TMM HI E DlfOli
Co-op  books
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Students on this campus
have long been dissatisfied
with the high prices and
limited service characteristic
of the UBC bookstore.
A number of students are
now sufficiently dissatisfied
to start a truly non-profit cooperatively run bookstore,
which will sell books and
magazines at a minimum
cost) and which will offer a
complete order service and
used book re-sale service.
Where to put the store? A
part of the large, presently
unallocated area of SUB
would be suitable. SUB would
thereby become more relevant to student activities.
This is a project which the
AMS would do well to support, if they, too, desired to
become more (?) relevant to
student interests.
Anyone interested in working for the co-op bookstore
should drop into the academic
activities office in Brock extension.
DAVE GRAHAME
BLAINE  KENNEDY
ELAINE WISMER
JEREMY LANG
I. DOUGLAS
BMJF's BS
Editor. The Ubyssey:
To Mr. BMJF of Grad Studies
who so strongly stands by his
opinions and convictions that
he cannot even sign his name,
I address this letter.
Special Events, on a minimal
'budget is able to bring some
good performances to UBC because people like chairman
Gerry Cannon and treasurer
Angela Raino work hard.
Mr. Khan specified in his requirements for staging that the
lights be left on so that people
could read their programs easily during the performance..
His agent also specified staging and electrical requirements
which were carried out as fully
as possible in an auditorium
which has inferior facilities as
was written about after the
Buffy Saint Marie concert last
year. A bare stage was required
and the electrical system was
delayed because the hired electrician was late and Mir. Cannon was required to set everything up himself.
It is the policy of Special
Events that we try to allow as
many people as possible to see
an event. Because of the many
who waited to buy tickets at
the door, we decided that rather
than turn them away, that "we
should let them sit on the uncomfortable floor if they were
that enthusiastic about seeing
the performance.
Mr. Khan raised no complaints about such a huge
crowd, their seating arrangements or the fact that they
quietly walked in during the
prelude part of the performance. Perhaps he was complimented that such a young audience was so appreciative.
If we're still in "the bush
league", then that's only because you, Mr. BMJF, and many
other students are not willing
to get out and show the ignorant how to run really good performances—it's so much easier
isn't it to sit back on your behind and write letters.
My only suggestion to your
complex, Mr. BMJF, is to just
try to ignore our "bush league
efforts". Your kind of criticism
with no constructive solutions
is surely a waste of space in
The Ubyssey.
MARILYN HILL, arts 3
Special Events Committee
'Bowling  urgent'
€ditor. The Ubyssey:
I would like to challenge
The Ubyssey statement that
"Hardly anyone goes bowling
any more."
The example in Wednesday's
Ubyssey that the lavish Park
Royal Alley has gone bankrupt illustrates only that the
American game of 10 pins has
failed to replace the Canadian
game of 5 pins.
Improved bowling facilities
are urgently needed on campus.
Hidden in the cellar of the
gymnasium are six lanes now
serving 200 people a week.
In spite of these conditions
the UBC bowling club has increased its membership by 400
per cent during the last two
years. Bowling is an excellent
recreation for all students.
The proposed new facilities
in SUB will be available to
students at all times. I am sure
that these lanes will be used
and that the bowling alley will
pay for itself.
Definitely, bowling popularity will increase upon the installation of the eight new
automatic five pin lanes in
SUB. Bowling is not a dying
sport.
JON STROM
president,
UBC Bowling Club
Couth
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Re: the engineers at the foot
ball game: We think thej
showed couth!
MIKE HURLER
science *
MIKE MELANSOK
arts t Friday,
iday, October 20, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
THE &TUDEHT
AS MGGZB
By JERRY FARBER
Part 2
Finally, there's the darkest reason of all for the
master-slave approach to education. The less trained
and the less socialized a person is, the more he constitutes a sexual threat and the more he will be subjugated by institutions, such as penitentiaries and
schools. Many of us are aware by now of the sexual
neurosis which makes white man so fearful of integrated schools and neighborhoods, and which makes
castration of Negroes a deeply entrenched Southern
folkway. We should recognize a similar pattern in
education. There is a kind of castration that goes on
in schools. It begins, before school years, with parents' first encroachments on their children's free
unashamed sexuality and continues right up to the
day when they hand you your doctoral diploma with
a bleeding, shriveled pair of testicles stapled to the
parchment. It's not that sexuality has no place in the
classroom. You'll find it there but only in certain
perverted and vitiated forms.
PERVERSION IS INTELLECTUAL
How does sex show up in school? First of all,
there's the sadomasochistic relationship between
teachers and students. That's plenty sexual, although
the price of enjoying it is to be unaware of what's
happening. In walks the student in his Ivy League
equivalent of a motorcycle jacket. In walks the
teacher—a kind of intellectual rough trade — and
flogs his students with grades, tests, sarcasm and
snotty superiority until their very brains are bleeding. In Swinburne's England, the whipped school
boy frequently grew up to be a flagellant. With us
their perversion is intellectual but it's no less perverse.
Sex also shows up in the classroom as academic
subject matter — sanitized and abstracted, thoroughly divorced from feeling. You get "sex education"
now in both high school and college classes: everyone determined not be embarrassed, to be very up-
to-date. These are the classes for which sex, as Feiffer
puts it, "can be a beautiful thing if properly administered;" And then, of course, there's still another
depressing manifestation of sex in the classroom: the
"off-color" teacher, who keeps his class awake with
sniggering sexual allusions, obscene titters and
academic innuendo. The sexuality be purveys, it
must be admitted, is at least better than none at
all.
UNDERNEATH THE PETTI-PANTS
What's missing, from kindergarten to graduate
school, is honest recognition of what's happening —
turned-on awareness of what's underneath the petti-
pants, the chinos and the flannels. It's not that sex
needs to be pushed in school; sex is pushed enough.
But we should let it be, where it is and like it is.
I don't insist that ladies in junior high school lovingly
caress their students' cocks (someday, maybe); however, it is reasonable to ask that the ladies don't, by
example and stricture, teach their students to pretend that they aren't there. As things stand now,
students are psychically castrated or spayed—and for
the very same reason that black men are castrated
in Georgia: because they're a threat.
So you can add sexual repression to the list of
causes, along with vanity, fear and will to power,
that turn the teacher into Mr. Charlie. You might also
want to keep in mind that he was a nigger once
himself and has never really gotten over it. And
there are more causes, some of which are better
described in sociological than in psychological terms.
Work them out, it's not hard. But in the meantime
what we've got on our hands is a whole lot of niggers. And what makes this particularly grim is that
the student has less chance than the black man of
getting out of his bag. Because the student doesn't
even know he's in it. That, more or less, is what's
happening in higher education. And the results are
staggering.
For one thing damn little education takes place
in the schools. How could it? You can't educate
slaves; you can only train them. Or, to use an uglier
and more timely word, you can only program them.
HANDS IN SOME CLAY
I like to folk dance. Like other novices, I've gone
to the Intersection or to the Museum and laid out
good money in order to learn how to dance. No
grades, no prerequisites, no separate dining rooms;
they just turn you on to dancing. That's education.
Now look at what happens in college. A friend of
mine, Milt, recently finished a folk dance class. For
his final he had to learn things like this: "The Irish
are known for their wit and imagination, qualities
reflected in their dances, which include the jig, the
reel and the hornpipe." And then the teacher graded
him A, B, C, D, or F, while he danced in front
of her. That's not education. That's not even
training. That's an abomination on the face
of the earth. It's especially ironic because Milt took
that dance class trying to get out of the academic rut.
He took crafts for the same reason. Great, right? Get
your hands in some clay? Make something? Then the
teacher announced that a 20-page term paper would
be required—with footnotes.
At my school we even grade people on how they
read poetry- That's like grading people on how they
fuck. But we do it. In fact, God help me, I do it.
I'm the Simon Legree of the poetry plantation. "Tote
that iamb! Lift that spondee!" Even to discuss a good
poem in that environment is potentially dangerous
because the very classroom is contaminated. As hard
as I may try to turn students on to poetry, I know
that the desks, the tests, the IBM cards, their own
attitudes toward school, and my own residue of
UCLA method are turning them off.
MAKE THEM WILLING SLAVES
Another result of student slavery is just as
dangerous — students don't get emancipated when
they graduate. As a matter of fact, we don't let
them graduate until they've demonstrated their willingness — over 16 years — to remain slaves. And
for important jobs, like teaching, we make them
go through more years just to make sure.
What I'm getting at is that we're all more or
less niggers and slaves, teachers and students alike.
This is the fact you have to start with in trying to
understand wider social phenomena, say, politics, in
our country and in other countries.
Educational oppression is trickier to fight than
racial oppression. If you're a black rebel they can't
exile you; they either have to intimidate you or kill
you. But in high school or college, they can just
bounce you out of the fold. And they do.
Rebel students and renegade faculty members
get smothered or shot down with devastating accuracy. In high school, it's usually the student who gets
it; in college, it's more often the teacher. Others get
tired of fighting and voluntarily leave the system.
But dropping but of college, for a rebel, is a little
like going North, for a Negro. You can't really get
away from it so you might as well stay and raise
hell.
ORGANIZE FOR FREEDOM NOW
How do you raise hell? That's another article.
But for a start, why not stay with the analogy? What
have black people done? They have, first of all, faced
the fact of their slavery. They've stopped kidding
themselves about an eventual reward in the Great
Watermelon Patch in the sky. They've organized.
They've decided to get freedom now, and they've
started taking it.
Students, like black people, have immense unused power. They could theoretically, insist on participating in their own education. They could make
academic freedom bilateral- They could teach their
teachers to thrive on love and admiration rather
than on fear and respect, and to lay down their
weapons. Students could discover community. And
they could learn to dance by dancing on the IBM
cards. They could make coloring books out of the
catalogs and they could put the grading system in a
museum.
They could raze one set of walls and let life
come blowing into the classroom. They could turn
the classroom into a "field of action" as Peter Marin
describes it. And they could study for the best of
all possible reasons—their own resources.
They could. They have the power. But only in
a very few places, like Berkeley, have they even
begun to think about using it. For students as for
black people, the hardest battle isn't with Mr.
Charlie. It's with what Mr. Charlie has done to your
mind.
— Reprinted from The Indian Head. THE      UBYSSEY
' Friday, Uctober zu, >v.
Our headline contest reaped a so-so harvest. There was the
usual unimaginative expose type: Persky Unmasked As Head of
Nark Squad, Atlantis Found 28,000 feet Under the Ocean.
There were a few really good ones, though, some from the
fertile brain of Dirty Old Man Mike Coleman. "B of G Executed
in Sullivan Coup" we liked, also "Hoye Hands $29 Cash to Each
Student." Then there were "Dief Elected Liberal Leader", "Stan-
field Wears Jockey Shorts", and "Little Mountain Erupts,
Thousands Homeless".
Some girls who read the recent flap over birth control pills
for unmarried coeds are wondering what all the fuss is about.
There's a doctor in the area who doesn't like to see girls suffer
from illegal abortions ...
The red horde who invaded Our office yesterday stood right
under a huge sign reading "Fascists Unite" . . .
Persky and Hoye battled it out again for the ratings, with
four mentions apiece in this week's Ubyssey. Shaun Sullivan and
Dean Walter Gage got three: CUS, Kirsten Emmott, Ray Larsen,
Gabor Mate and maraijuana got two each, and engineers can make
of that what they like.
Emmott's victory should prove a good woman for her uncle
Alan, reeve of Burriaby, who has an election of his own coming
up.
And Larsen is all set to go out and sell the Georgia Straight.
"t hope I get arrested," he toid Radsoc on election night.
4 Now that three members of a faction generally out of favor
oii campus have been swept into office, here's a handy phrase
often hurled at The Ubyssey: "Them radicals are responsible for
ai| ouj: troubles, and they are also irresponsible!" x
i We heard a prominent campus Liberal went racing through-
a small city in Washington state shouting, "Vive Quebec Libre!"
bit were unable to verify the tale. Our informant believes he
had blown his mind on a depressant drug.
The f our narks in Arts One are concentrating rather heavily
on a small group of students.
Speaking of frosh, we doubt if anyone noticed that leadership conference was canned this year.. Nobody applied last spring.
But there are suggestions as to what to do with it: "Let's take
- all the frosh up to the woods in buses," suggested one bright
lad. "We drop them off without food, drink, toys, sleeping bags,
or upperclassmen and roar off. Leaders will emerge!"
Neo-colonialism Sunday
A seminar on neo-colonialism will be held Sunday at International House.
Dr. Conor Cruise O'Brien, author and diplomat, will give
a short talk and moderate a general discussion at 1 p.m.
Tickets will be available from the Alma Mater Society, the
academic activities committee and at the door.
NOTICE TO '68 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Location - Oct. 16-30
Huts by Brock
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard 736-0261
IOPICS
REV. H. MJORUD
(former Lutheran Evangelist)
speaks on
CHARISMATIC LIVING
in the
TWENTIETH CENTURY
—Lawyer finds Christ
—Lutheranism and the Charismatic Renewal
—Healing Ministry
Monday through Thursday Bu 202
Full Gospel Students invite all.
Angry architects protest Chinatown freeway plans.
— bob brown photo
Give us help Mr. Hellyer,
freeway protesters say
Please Change Freeway, said Chinese and
English characters on the 30-foot banner hanging
from the Georgia street fire escape.
Curse You, Tom Terrific, read the placards
bobbing around Hotel Vancouver.
This was the scene Thursday as 50 UBC
architecture and planning students protested
the new freeway route cutting through Chinatown.
"City council made an arbitrary decision to
put the freeway there," a spokesman said.
"Or as our other placard puts it, Freeway
Act is Thin Think."
Transport minister Paul Hellyer, who cooperates with municipalities in the final plan
for the proposed Burrard Inlet crossing, was
holding a press conference at the hotel.
In an interview later, a spokesman for
Hellyer said the final decesion is up to the city
and provincial authorities.
He said the freeway has nothing to do with
the proposed crossing.
"We're protesting emotionally the loss of
Chinatown, and rationally, the whole planning
system," said Lim Cosland, planning 2.
City council Tuesday voted to approve an
elevated freeway link which would cut a 120-
foot swath in Chinatown and join the new inlet
crossing.
"Besides the buggering up of Chinatown,
we're protesting the way council makes decisions
without fully knowing the facts," said Riley
Burke, architecture 1.
"The city council acts too much like the
AMS."
Students carried a huge Red-Guard style
banner, also in English and Chinese, reading
Mr. Hellyer, Give Us Help.
Ws like working
with tomorrow'
Ron Murray, a programmer with London Life
"When I was in university, I often
heard students say the insurance
business is dull. You can toss
that idea out the window. As a
computer programmer with London Life,
I tackle a wide variety of business
situations. My task — to help
London Life serve nearly 2 million
policyowners faster and more
efficiently through electronics.
To do this I often work with
forecasted future situations. And I
have to keep up with the
lightning-quick developments
in the computer field.
It's like working with tomorrow."
Ron is a 1963 Queens University
graduate in honors math. Asa
senior programmer he analyzes
new developments in the computer field
to keep London Life in the forefront
of business electronics. If you
are interested in a career in
computer programming and systems
analysis, see your placement officer
about opportunities with London Life.
Or write to the Personnel Department,
London Life Insurance Co.,
London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada ax#s®l&ir
^^$gMKii ;J5«!
he tragedy in Vietnam indicates
the extent to which it is possible to hide
or disguise terrible crimes, and it is time that
people in the West raised their voices
for an end to the bloodshed.
-Bertrand Russell pi
OCTOBER 20, 1967
ON THE COVER:
Photo by Tony Strayski
taken at last year's peace
march. See story on pf8.
March tomorrow, 11 a.m.
from City Hall.
GREAT EARTH MOTHER.
judy bing
FATHER FIGURES:
Stephen scobie, bert hill
SIBLINGS:
arnold saba, bob brown,
kurt hilger
He works in a crummy
basement room.
He has a $7,000 budget.
He gets $8,000 a year
salary.
Yet he consistently
brings some of the most exciting things happening in
contemporary art to UBC.
His name is Alvin Balkind, curator of the Fine
Arts gallery in the library
basement, a man whose
work is insufficiently
known or appreciated by
most students.
The current show in the
gallery, running to October
28, and reviewed in the
column next door, consists
of three exhibits: 11 pop
artists — the New Image,
Drawings from the Betty
Parsons Collection, and
New Directions in Print
Making.
Where else in Vancouver
could you see such a comprehensive survey of the
history of art since World
War II, covering developments of the period from
abstract expressionism, pop
and op, to hard edge?
If all this can be done under Balkind's present limited conditions, how much
more could we except if he
were given the facilities he
has a right to expect, if he
were given the opportunity
to realize his dream of making the gallery, as he said,
"not just a gallery but a
meeting place — a place of
noise, confusion, and excitement" large enough to
accommodate the scale of
contemporary painting, and
with- music, coffee, and a
comfortable lounge.
It would be fun to discover the answer to these
questions—but unless they
come quickly, we wouldn't
be at all surprised if Balkind were lured elsewhere
by opportunity for experiment free of economic restrictions.
ABOVE: Andy Warhol's "Jackie"
BELOW:  "Paris Review Poster" by Marisol
art
Warhol,  Marisol
collages, comics
and that's not all
By DENNIS WHEELER
In the sense that Andy Warhol's film Chelsea Girls lives for
three hours on a screen in the Bay theatre, I suppose the images,
(performed as they are at random) excite, bore or anger you
in much the same way as the real lives of the artists behind the
screen would. It is then, as much as they chose to control it,
their own creation and holds something of themselves within it.
That same energy is at the disposal of all of you any time
you want it, in the basement of the library, the university's
own Fine Arts gallery. Andy Warhol is there and that seems to
be something of a problem for Jackie Kennedy. The darling
of the press for her selling power, she becomes through Warhol
the icon.
So what does all this mean? That the show is static? That
all that pop art performs is the replacement of icons with process
as the new monument? I can't quite make it round to see the
whole of the circle of events, but if you can make out anything
like this in what clings to the basement walls, that's all a part
of the reflection. The prints mostly are covered by a thin sheet
of plastic, which like glass spits your face back at you; what
do you see?
There is in Peter Philips the excitement of an Englishman
too long away from England, closer to Big Daddy Roth than
any Queen ever came to him, and what's more, he doesn't have
to kneel.
And that brings another controversy to mind. Smouldering,
and not beneath the surface, but on it, is Marisol's Paris Review
Poster, the gesture being appropriate to time and place tells us
again, as do so many of the reflections in this show, that figurative art has returned to the scene, in order that it might deliver
blow upon blow to the midrift of any intestinal container placed
within reach. The pun is the pun is the pun arid this isn't a pun.
And that makes it worthwhile to ponder; the ambiguous, the
complex, the contradictory, the object, the sign, any emblem,
all this is meat for the eye, and as Marisol points out, the
mouth.
The human scale, it is nice to note, hasn't been lost. Whatever the initial reaction of the unprepared observer may be,
there now takes place, in those that are at all interested, the
investigation. A tour de force in which you are the pin-ball in
front of the elastic bat, and the object, not of the game but of
the quest, is to come to terms with yourself in the realms of any
given number of unfamiliar intelligences which may surround
you, of which at this showing there are about 26.
Besides the controversy there are a lot of sketches, in the
Betty Parsons show especially, which should cause problems
for one, the qualities being apparent to even the laziest eye.
Fortunately several of the artists are represented in numbers
rather than by a single work, which would offer no chance for
comparison.
The Rosenquist things in this show don't seem to me to be
very strong examples of what he has done in the last few years,
but are still good prints to see, as the subject matter he makes
use of is one of the most overt collages of the bombardment you
would receive going over any downtown bridge in Vancouver,
where the combination of suburban, industrial and commercial
facades all combine in a kaleidoscope of shapes, images and
colours.
Jim Dine has several prints that show a real confidence in
the dynamics of what was not too long ago considered a dated
medium. The rigid three dimensionalism of From Tool Box contrasts well with the almost abstract expressionist shapes and
coloured leaks onto the format of his Calico; again it is the popular image that identifies Dine as constructive, except the image
here is one of reduction, the chisel. A tension through contradiction, the simple begets the complex through the strength
inherent in the stability that shapes Dine's visual statement.
Dine recedes from a presence in much the same way as
Warhol manages to contract engagement with the accessible
"ready-made" pop icon, the familiarity here being part and
parcel of the world and the philosoghy of so much of the psychic-
raining we receive from any of the media. The air carries it.
This show is one of the best to come to the Fine Arts gallery
and deserves to be seen, especially since the downtown gallery
offers a quality, though somewhat less exciting, comparison in
its Prints International, which is seldom afforded a small centre
such as Vancouver.
)! 2vm
By SCOTT LAWRANCE
Arguments with those we love are the
most painful. It is very sad when these
arguments concern politics, the essential
purpose of which is to create unity. Nevertheless, we do argue, and a result of one
of the latest skirmishes, here are some
reconsiderations regarding the forthcoming Anti-America in Vietnam march (city
hall to courthouse) on Saturday, October
21, at 11 a.m.
The argument is one of means, as frequently happens, even if the end, or several ends are agreed upon. The end I aim
at is a libertarian community, non-violent
in all aspects. But this must neither be
exalted above, nor subordinated to the
means.
The means to any end may be viewed
in two aspects; efficiency, and much more
importantly, morality. The means must be
compatible with the end; must therefore
be libertarian non-violent means. I decry
violence and those who would support it.
In the case of Vietnam, I will not deny
the Vietnamese recourse through violence,
but it must be remembered that no vio
lent revolution will ever create a nonviolent society.
As to the march itself, I have mixed
feelings. On one hand, I view it as a useless action, a mere token which often creates a self-satisfied feeling on behalf of
the demonstrator. So often the extent of
an individual's anti-war action is the yearly march, attendance at a study group, at
an anti-war movie or two, and perhaps the
writing of a letter to the "people in
power." On the other hand, the war in
Vietnam is a cancer, and must be stopped.
But it is n ot only this war that is a cancer;
all wars are and all wars must be stopped.
This must be remembered. People so often
tend to regard the war of their own time
as the only war. This is not true. Until
mankind has eliminated the coercive institutions that are responsible for man's
inhumanity to man, there will always be
wars.
Perhaps a great number of people assembled on a particular day at a particular place really does influence governmental decision, but I think we would be
truly deluding ourselves if we worked on
that assumption. The truth is, govern
ments today are satisfied with the present
allocation of power and they will do theii
utmost to preserve it. More than influencing the power structure, marches are im
portant in that they get people togethei
to express a common dissatisfaction. Dis
satisfaction is contagious. Maybe marche:
have" some effect on the political conscious
ness of the masses. I hope so, and I wil
be there Saturday spreading my own mes
sage of peace, joy and revolution, addin.
my voice to that community of voicei
that believe man and man can be humai
to one another.
We must be prepared to offer ou:
bodies in actions of civil disobedience (a;
are our friends in Washington, D.C. thl
weekend) to stop the war machine..
Finally I implore you all, to eliminab
the war in Vietnam in your hearts. Ex
plore yourself, straighten yourself out. I
is not the war that is causing your un
happiness, but rather your unhappines
that is causing war. There are many way
to realize your divinity, to discover whi
you really are. Some of these are trans
cendental meditation, yoga, subud, psyc
hedelics, Krishna consciousness, art, music
and poetry. Advance on all fronts.
contents-
art   pf2
outside   in   _.    pf2
chairs   — pf3
music       pf3
tetters       pf3
    PM
poetry     pf4
cults     pfS
theatre     pf5
ideology     pf6
protest     pIS
Friday, October 20, 196', All seats are taken
letter
% By MIKE BOLTON
It's curious that in our land of affluence and plenty we are constantly
talking about shortages. In one breath
we note our standard of living is the
second or third highest in the world; in
the next, we decry our shortages of
homes and apartments, park space and
the tight money condition.
The incongruity of it all: is man to
arrive at the twenty-first century as a
technological waif, an inhabitant of curb-
sides armed with a TV?
On Broadway, near the centre of the
odd number half in the 3200 block west,
stands an inobtrusive and musky shop
called The Mews, boasting restored olde
and antique furniture.
If you skip inside, you will be greeted
by cascades of warm and dusty, friendly
and frayed furniture.
Presently a young man with a fuzzy
brown beard will pop up, grinning pleasantly, especially through his eyes, and
deliver a spirited: "Good afternoon!"
"Do you have any stools?" I asked,
explaining: "I've been searching all over
and I can't find a stool. You see, I've just
built a desk and it's too high for chairs
. . . except maybe a baby high chair.
Even an old ice cream parlor stool would
do."
"Like this," He pointed among a
cluster of neat old mirrors and wooden
chairs, where like a veritable oasis a
charred metal stool stood shakey tiptoe
on four woven steel legs.
"That's perfect," I cried. "It's absolutely perfect. Where did you get it?"
"I can't remember. It's not really for
sale, but if you really need it, I'll sell
There's a real shortage of stools these
days — you can't find them anywhere."
Stools have been scarce for several
years. With the advent of minimum
charges, cafes are consuming more
booths and less stools; the classic ice cream
stool has fallen victim to automobile
technology which demands drive-in cones;
keyboard mishaps caused by revolving
stools have caused pianists to look to,
benches for security.
"Even more significant," he continued
"is  the burgeoning  shortage   of chairs."
I frowned and sat hastily on the coveted stool.
"You can see that I've still a few
chairs left," he said, gesturing at a ramshackle  pile-up  of wooden  chairs.   "But
I can't get any more and these are disappearing very^quickly."
Then, prophetically, "In a few months
you won't be able to buy a chair anywhere."
It seems that manufacturers of fancy
chrome and dainty upholstered chairs
have put the old maker of hard, sturdy
wooden chairs out of business. More
chairs have been produced in the past 10
years than ever before, but they have a
fastsr depreciation rate and the total
output of viable chairs is lagging behind
the output of sitters.
"By the way, what are you charging
for the stool?"
His delighted glow returned. "Can you
afford $6?"
"Sure." I said. As I placed the money
on my stool, he took a piece of paper
labelled  "invoice" and wrote:
"No. 140 ice cream stool — $6 and
30 oifehts for tax."    ■
Happily, I hoisted my stool and headed home, wondering what the world
would be like if every Broadway merchant had The Mews attitude.
■*<**Io»0^__MMN_M>^__MM___MM___M>^_»OW->41
Editor, Page Friday:
Before Scott Lawrance's
Moon column and Steve Gar-
rod's embarrassing collapse in
page friday are repeated or imitated, I would like to comment.
I once read a short story
called The daring young man
on the flying trapeze. The
young man had no job, tried
to survive by reading great
books, and quickly starved to
death. He's one Of my favorite
heroes, but he's not me.
Like him, Scott and too
many dreamers are thinking in
terms that have no realities.
"Essential Divinity" reads
like a bad poem. "A cosmic
tune of love and peace" is a
word combination. And who
would know a saint to follow
if they saw one?
If you want to speak to us,
come back to earth and learn
the language. We would probably listen.
J. KENNON
arts 3.
joy
MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME
NEEDED TO KNOW MUSIC
~ \
By PHIL HOLLENBECK
The city of Vancouver was the recipient of
_ rare and beautiful musical offering last Friday
light, and the overflow audience, students,
'hippies", Eastern enthusiasts, and some of our
Indian brothers, filled the auditorium in patient
mticipation for a presentation of Indian ragas
ay world-famous master sarodist Ustad Ali
\kbar Khan. It was a night of joy, love, good
vibrations, and warm smiles on the faces of the
P5s happy beings who received
the trio of musicians with the
silent respect due them, although, to many, it was a first
exposure to live Indian music.
Ali Akbar Khan, who, together with his brother-in-law,
Ravi Shankar, has played a
major role in creating the
. j \J, ''•■yy ^L current enthusiasm toward
.■BI ,. tWk Indian culture, humbly greet-
HOLLENBECK ed his audience, bowing beside
As two accompanists, his son, Ashish Khan,
ind Pandit Mahapurush Misra. Gracefully seat-
id, legs folded, and attired in an embroidered
xrhite Bengali suit, Ustad Khan listened in-
;ensely to the notes of the drone instrument,
he tamboura, and began to stroke the shining,
land-crafted, multi-stringed sarod.
This exotic, 25-stringed instrument, so for-
:ign in its appearance to many Westerners, has
i history dating back to the 13th century. Originally from Afghanistan, it has gone through
nany dynamic changes, evolving, with its music,
:o the present construction of a teak body, a face
>f skin and metal, and metal strings. This current form is said to have been perfected by
Jstad Khan's father and teacher, who began
nstructing his son at the age of three in the
ntricacies of, possibly, the world's most complex classical music system. Many years of
>atient study and practice produce the musician
vho has achieved a proficiency and mastery as
las Ali Akbar Khan, bearer of the title "Ustad",
he Moslem equivalent to the Hindu "Pandit"
master or learned one). Pandit Shankar claims
hat "more than one lifetime is necessary to
ruly know the music."
Such is the case of the mastery of Indian
irums, and one could not neglect to give praise
o the young (35) tabla drums piayer who backed Ustad Khan and played a vital part in providing the trio's empathy, and the audience's
enthusiasm toward them. Pandit Mahapurush
vlisra is recognized as one of India's most bril-
iant tabla masters. A former pupil of the late
Pandit Anokelal, Pandit Misra is an extremely
:olorful performer and is gifted with hands that
move at blinding speed over his two drums, the
tabla and banya, played with the right and
left hands, respectively. During the second half
of the performance, Pandit Misra improvised a
solo number in Jhaptal, a ten matra (beat)
phrasing, first calling out the mnemonic symbols
of the particular finger strokes, then playing
the phrase at slow speed, double speed, triple
speed, swirling into improvisation.
The evening's performance, in addition to
the drum number, included ragas Mishra-Shiv-
ranjani, a heavy evening raga in Rupak tal
(7 beats) and Teental (16 beats), with a long
Alap (invocation) and Jor (rhythmic improvisation without drum); and Maunj-Khamaj, a raga
composed by Ali Akbar Khan and using the
Sitarkhani tal (16 beats). His choice of the latter
tal and raga was especially pleasing, since the
rhythm and apparent melody line weave a pattern of sound comprehensible to the Western
audience, giving emphasis to beats 1,4,5,8,9,12,13
and 16 — relating to upbeats and downbeats in
a 4/4 measure.
Equally pleasing to the UBC audience were
the exciting question-and-answer style.exchanges, trading of individual time-cycles, between the
two masters: the -sarod improvising a complex
rhythm change, and the tabla equaling and complementing the same rhythm within a 16-beat
phrase, then within an 8-beat phrase, and so
forth, until the two are trading individual notes.
At this point the sound has crescendoed tremendously and the fingers are just a blur. This
matching of wits is truly exhausting, both for
the musicians and for an intimately involved
audience. Western music can not come close to
duplicating such rhythm.
Western music, moreover, has not evolved
from such a deep spiritual awareness as has
the music of India, deriving directly from origins
of Vedic verse, the divinely inspired holy works
of India. The music, to the musician, is the
realization of karma yoga; simply put, through
the playing of music, one achieves a union of
his consciousness with the Absolute, or God. In
other words, the raga is a vehicle for transcending the mind to a higher level of consciousness.
To the musician, this is of ultimate value, and
this aspect must be understood by the aware
adherent of Indian music.
One might have only wished that Friday's
performance had been longer, as it might have
been in India, and hope that Vancouver will
receive and respond to many more such events
in the future.
Jv*£ $#ft
Mme
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Canadian Premiere of a New British Comedy
LITTLE MALCOLM
AND HIS STRUGGLE AGAINST THE EUNUCHS
by David Halliwell
October 12-21    —    8:30 p.m.
STUDENTS: 75c ADULTS: $1.50
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre
Room 207 or 228-2678
riday, October 20, 1967 Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
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buttdctP
By ANDREW HORVAT
Recently a Japanese, film-maker, Yoko Ono, produced a
full length feature film on human buttocks. For decades now
Japan has been exporting a variety of movies, which have featured breasts in abundance, however of buttocks there has been
a definite dearth.
"You do not show your buttocks to people, whom you do
not love," said Miss Ono in a recent CBC interview. I agree
with Miss Ono's premise and hope that with this article I may
show an aspect of Japan unseen by outsiders.
The attitudes which Miss Ono wished to express were ones
of optimism, and while in the West, breasts, buttocks and the
like are usually associated with lust, there being no doctrine of
original sin in Japan, naked body parts are not considered
impure.
In Japan, the system, whether the family, the club at school,
of the company, is so all-involving, so protective and so tolerant
that the Japanese at any stage of his life always seems less of
an individual and more of a member than his western counterpart.
The overwhelming power of the system thus Jesuits in an
allotment of responsibility which amazes westerners.
When I cashed a Canadian cheque for ten dollars at the
Bank of Tokyo, it passed through no less than twenty hands,
and: was signed and sealed and stamped until the responsibility
was sufficiently diffused.
I questioned a Keio student about the social structure of
Japan. "Can noodle delivery boys become university students?"
I asked. The answer was that they wouldn't want to be anyway
and then look at how truly happy they are. Happy, happy noodle
delivery boys.
I once shared an apartment at the Kasaharas, with a student called Sakamoto, son of a wealthy Hokkaido businessman.
When he first took me drinking he told me that we should have
met earlier as his students days will soon be over. Up till that
time he had spent six of his four undergraduate years running
from bar to bar.
I saw him drunk several times. He hardly ever went to
class. When the tenant next door, a lawyer, got engaged, Sakamoto and he went out and returning at three in the morning,
they came into my apartment and began singing old school
songs.
That was the last drinking bout Sakamoto ever had, although the Kasaharas never complained about his hours.
The week after that even if I offered him a cigarette he
wouldn't take it. Not even an American cig. He rarely went
Take Out
Service
BUY 3 PIZZAS
GET 1 FREE
*$& HTCEBTHfi
drinking and began to spend more time with the Kasaharas.
When I asked him about his change of behavior he replier'
that his student days were over and he must make every effort
to become a salary man.
I never met Sakamoto's girl friend. She lived in some faraway suburb — whether of his mind or of Tokyo, I never found
out.
I shocked university students when I mentioned that in
Canada boys and girls, can if they wish sleep together. Innocence
in friendship and effort at conformity seem to be ethics oi
Japanese students.
Friendship in Japan is more on a homosexual basis than ir
Canada. One can see boys and boys walking down Shinjuki
hand in hand. And boys horse around much more and to a latei
age than here. Giggling high school girls in sailor suits walkinj
arm in arm down the street is not at all a strange sight.
The system of group behavior, built on the optimistic faitl
of its members is an ideal society for the overcrowded highlj
homogeneous society of Japan. But when this optimistic fait}
in the group breaks down as it did after the last war, everythinj
ceases to function.
Stories of people breaking down and crying in front of thei:
radios, or of public utlities such as railways, electricity, sewagi
disposal all coming to a halt because the workers thought tha
the world as they imagined it had come to an end are not rare
With the Tokyo Olympics and international recognitioi
the system came back into better standing. But still every sprini
when the bigger universities hold their entrance exams, one cai
read the occasional articles of high school students who con.
mitted suicide because the system failed them.
*dL
Company picnic
poetry.
*. --S
Each of these "poems" uses only words appearing in Ihe headlines
of last week's Page Friday.. All the words are used in each poem, and
no word is used more than once. The headlines  were:
Hip is dead
Bloody marvelous the way he chides those simpletons
And how did you like Japan?
Reviews
Norwegian  print   wins big   prize
Ragas  like  religion
Film
The  outside in
Zap being a weekly column of rumour and uncalled-for opinion
Senate: prestige but no power
Che
Power still in ragas,
Japan   is   uncalled-for.
You  like Che? Zap! He being
dead,   Norwegian  religion
(wet outside, but hip)
wins those   big simpletons — and  how!
The prize print of the film,
like prestige walkway and no
rumour, dead power, and wet simpletons. Zap)
A weekly way — senate chides
bloody marvelous opinion.
In Japan,  a  Norwegian way  of being  hip
still wins  no prestige.  Che is bloody,
but he did those ragas,  and  reviews
how the opinion column chides uncalled-for
rumour,  dead  power,  and wet  simpleton* Zap!
(Outside,  marvelous film   like senate  walkway.)
You print the big prize weekly, like religion.
The senate column in the walkwayl
Norwegian rumour chides those reviews.
Like, how did you zap   hip simpletons?
But still, way outside Japan, he wins
uncalled-for ragas, and dead religion
(being of no weekly power).
A prestige prize like opinion  is bloody wet!
Film Che? Marvelous! And  print big!
By STEPHEN   SCOBIE
Readers are hereby invited to submit found poems composed of the
headlines in this issue.
Friday, October 20, 196 -cults
Reviewer Malcolmtented
Being a piece inspired by Cinema 16's offering last Monday
night, D. W. Griffith's classic film Intolerance.
Mountain girl comes out of the east, Babylon 500
B..C. and Hollywood 1917. Four hens and ditto geese
(a very important myth) corresponding to goats, I
suppose. g^
Goats' milk in a cup, it dribbles down her chest ^»
and she stretches out her arms in joy. ^5[
She came unto us on Monday night, petulantly sit- ^Sa
ting, refusing all comers but for the king, who loves ^^
another. We shall dance to you forever, Mountain ^pp
Girl, more than a woman. Were you ever a girl, or ^^
were you always Mountain Girl ? ^^
A strong-jawed jane. Women have gone downhill Hfl
^*   the last, 2,500 years. She dons armour and never misses ]^M
?^   with her arrows. Mountain Girl! We love you. No one ^^*
£ rules you, runs you, pays you, lays you for  fun or *bm
^^   profit. fe^t
•^ She died a virgin, and what other qualification is  £*
•fl^ there ? Maybe she will live forever, perhaps never die ^^
^^J in our hearts. Partially unforgettable, somewhat im- •»
Z^J mortal, Mountain Girl! Dressed in five consecutive ^p
m —    gunny sacks; we all need somebody to love. fc^|
•p^   *-   Mountain Girl, this is only the beginning. ^^0P
CO-ED Footwear Fashions
• NEW TOES AND HEELS
(Just Right for Campus Wear)
• GOLD AND SILVER EVENING SHOES
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of attractive winter bootsl
THE MAN ON CAMPUS
• BROGUES •  HUSH PUPPIES
• LOAFERS •   DESERT BOOTS
•   BATES FLOATERS
By KEITH FRASER
Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the
Eunuchs is presently wrestling with itself at the
Frederic Wood Studio. In this play Malcolm
Scrawdyke (Jace Vanderveen) casually defines
paranoia with textbook accuracy, and we are
made aware that what he and His Struggle suffer from are delusions of grandeur.
David Halliwell, the author, has established
an obvious antithesis between romance and
reality. Malcolm leads his friends into a romantic
microcosm by raising himself leader of a splinter
movement whose principle task is to discredit
Philip Allard an art teacher at Tech. The opium
for this group of four becomes the destruction of
society through mime. This party assumes overtones of historical fanaticism slapped against the
epic backdrop of winter. The memibers plot and
the kidnap of Allard, who will be
forced to destroy this painting, under
their threat of blackmail. Although
they are artists themselves, these
mime the robbery of a painting and
people will apparently tolerate this destruction
of art for the sake of the party. Fortunately,
Malcolm cannot bring himself to leading his followers into the world, of reality, and they leave
him finally alone to resolve the question of his
future.
Motive for the action is ostensibly thin.
Malcolm schemes revenge because he has been
expelled from school. Of course he is paranoid
and this explains the premise of his action. What
we discern about his followers is an inability to
resist some mesmerizing talent of Malcolm. Each
is an individual within himself, but falls victim
to the archetype dictator. The mimes they enact
theater
are enjoyable and well done; the persecution of
one of their members is cogently staged. But
eventually we ask, is the basis for their actions
really explained ? For the answer we must rely
upon the playwright, who never takes us outside
the microcosm he establishes. In short, we trust
him to tell us that these characters are victims
of a reality we are never shdwn.
But dare we trust him ? I think not, for the
central character, from whom his friends derive
some motive, is weakly created. The idea that
what Malcolm opposes is what he represents is
made too obvious, to the detriment of our believing the characters who would too blandly
follow him .
Malcolm's inner struggle is poorly written,
and consequently poorly acted. Again, his predicament is made too apparent and it
becomes laughable. "Why am I so inhibited?" he asks himself. It seems
the play both asks the question and
argues it, while the audience is left to
determine whether the argument is even valid.
In the denouement the protagonist stoops to
playing for laughs as he finds no satisfactory
way of killing himself.
The tragedy of Malcolm is his inability to
realize that within the restriction of reality lies
the freedom he craves.
The play is what one character calls his own
novel — "a metaphysical strip show" — leaving
no subtlety to our imagination.
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Friday, October 20, 1967 ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
: YE S EXAM
I Lonven
■ KERRISDALE   41 at at YEW
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BHKH SCHTBTS
mi siuhi wm
Thinking of returning to the U.K. ? You'll get good
straight talk about scientific opportunities from the
team of I CI scientists visiting your campus shortly.
They'll tell you about jobs available now, where they
are, how much they pay, what the housing situation
is. If you've only just arrived," you can still talk prospects with them.
ICI's recruiting team
will visit your campus on OCT. 25, 26
Contact them through    Mr. J. C. Craik
Office of Student Services
CHOOSE A
DIAMOND WITH CONFIDENCE
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Special 10% Discount to all
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Our representative will visit the campus
,   6th, 7th, 8th and 9th November
to interview graduating and post-graduate
students in the following disciplines:
Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Mathematics
Ph.D.'s in Physical Chemistry
and Chemical Engineering
for regular employment.
Kindly contact your Placement Office for information
on position openings and to make an appointment.
Students of other disciplines are invited to forward
applications to us for consideration.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Mechanical & Chemical
Engineering (Class of 1969 only)
~i
DU PONT OF CANADA LIMITED
Employee Relations Department
P.O. Box 660
Montreal, P.Q.
ideology
Student syndicalism:
The Canadian Union of Students at its
September congress took a few tentative steps
in the direction of student syndicalism or student unionism as it is sometimes called. Daniel
LaTouche currently studying political science at
UBC, critically exams the possibilities of syndicalism in English Canada. LaTouche a vice president of the Quebec student union, UGEQ at its
inception was prior to that editor of the newspaper of the University of Montreal.
By DANIEL LaTOUCHE
English  Canadian   student   politicians  have
just discovered (or think they have) a new political toy: student syndicalism.
These two words have become the magic
expression, the key to the future, the only ideology possible in a world where ideologies are
reported to be dead. If all goes well (that is if
it doesn't disappear first), the Canadian Union of
Students should soon become the first English-
speaking student union in the world to accept
student syndicalism as its official dogma. And this, 27
years after the French and 12
years after the Quebec students made that move. But as
a former CUS president once
put it: "It doesn't matter how
long it takes us, as long as we
get there some day."
Here    are    a    few    useful
notions about the whole  con-
La Toucho        cePt  of  syndicalism:   even   if
you  don't become  a  syndicalist   yourself  it is
always useful to  know what  people  are  supposed to be talking about.
The History of Student Syndicalism
Such a nice concept could have only originated in France, more precisely in post 1945
France.
After five years of German occupation, after
the involvement -of thousands of students in the
military resistance, after the clandestine setting-
up of hundreds of student associations devoted
to the struggle of the French nation against the
oppressor, the moment had come for a change
in the basis for student action and student organization in the country. After six years of war,
French students had realized that the only way
to prevent future catastrophies was to take over
or at least play an active role in the setting of
the future.
At the same time they didn't want a come
back to the world of the thirties, with its arch
conservative social order: they hadn't fought or
died to rebuild such a world all over again.
From that moment the idea of student syndicalism was born. It was to receive its official
credentials with the publication a few years
later of the basic- document, the only one in
fact, of student syndicalism: the charta of Grenoble (La charte de Grenoble). Ten years later
in 1958 when student syndicalism made its first
entry at the University of Montreal this charta
was, and still is, considered to be the Magna
Carta of the ideology. It is important for anyone planning to be called a syndicalist to have
a good knowledge of this document, unfortunately it has never been translated in English.
The Quebec Case
In the traditional Catholic province of Quebec
it is Mauriee Duplessis who was the real father
of this "prise de conscience" of the student class.
The general apathy toward the social good that
reflects itself in the last years of the Duplessis
rule had also its tragic consequences for education. Our primary and secondary school systems,
the best in the world we were told then, succeeded effectively in forming human sub-products
easily integrated at the lower echelons of our
colonial economic structure.
At the university level the lack of government
funds prevented students from reaching the university and also prevented the universities (the
French speaking ones, since McGill had enough
money from private sources and didn't think, at
that time, of complaining) from developing normally.
1958 marks the turning point. Bypassing the
university administration's interdictions, the
Quebec students went on a general strike. For
months after the strike three students sat permanently at the door of the premier's office requesting a meeting. The movement had been launched.
Incoherent, contradictory and weak during
the first years, it will finally reach its final consecration with the founding of the "Union General
des Etudiants du Quebec" in October 1964.
The Ideology of Student Syndicalism
One usually gets disappointed once he has
discovered the basis of this, apparently complex
and mysterious ideology. At the start there is one
definition and one axiom from which everything
else is drawn.
definition: a student is a young intellectual
worker.
axiom: There is no such thing as a student
problem, there are only student aspects of socio-
national problems.
From both this definition and the axiom the
rights and obligations of the student association
are drawn. As an example we will present the
charta adopted 'by the University of Montreal
students. Even though each student group in
Quebec possesses its own charta there is no great
differences among these, since they are all off
springs of the Charta of Grenoble.
The Student
The student has all the rights and assumes all
the obligations of a free and young citizen, who
by his intellectual work within the university
community, is an apprentice in a profession
with which he will in the future serve society.
Rights of Students
As a free citizen: The student is entirely
responsible for his own actions, he is the first
judge of his needs and interests. He must be
given total freedom of thought, expression and
action. This liberty must be complete. Consequently the University in respecting him must
not interfere with the affairs of the student
and must not consider itself responsible for the
actions of one of its students. No sanction or
pressure must be undertaken by the university
or the student body against an action or attitude
of a student, especially when he is expressing
himself (within the boundaries of the law) on
questions of politics, morality, thought or religion. Except to protect itself against judicial
measures, the student body must not exercise
any control oh the actions of its members, including those who have the courage to express
their opinions through the student newspaper.
As a Young Adult: The student has a strict
right to a future and a right to living conditions
that will allow him to take over, to conserve and
to develop the social heritage of his society. He
has a right to influence social institutions and to
contribute to their evolution. Youth must think
over all cultural values and every social structure. He has a right to a dialogue with those in
power since it is the contemporary youth who
will inherit today's achievements. Youth must be
prepared to judge what is being Ibuilt for tomorrow since it will have to live under it .
An an Intellectual: The student has a right to
material conditions that allow a decent life of
the mind. He has a right to bring society to give a
primordial attention to cultural life. These last
Continued pf 7
Friday, October 20, 1967 Continued from pf 6
two rights are the basis of all student demands
on society: abolition of fees, student salary, cultural and sport centres, fellowships, libraries.
As an Apprentice: The student must be presented with an adequate education. His intellectual work must be considered as the exercise of a
social, useful and indispensable function. For this
the student has a right to a university free of
constant financial problems and to a well-paid
faculty doing research with all the necessary
facilities in a milieau respectful of academic liberty. The student has a right in the education
received, in the selection of faculty and in the
working instruments. The student must not be
forced during the academic year to work extra-
academically. During the summer such work
must be in his discipline.
As a Member of the University Community:
The student has a right to see that this community play a social role of guidance and innovation.
He has a right to see that those who have received a university education live up to it. The
university being a community of students and
professors, many problems that arise in the community would easily find solutions if students
could participate in the management of the university. The relations beween the alumni and the
university is of special concern to students for
they will be judged by society. This forces the
problem of the professional corporations in their
function and roles.
As a Citizen: The student must enjoy the
rights and privileges of any citizen; he has the
right to participate in the public life, in the task
of defending democracy, in the responsibility of
improving society. Not only has the student a
right of being listened to. Society must be willing
to respect his own rights, interests and obligations.
The Obligations of the Student
As a free citizen: The student must respect
and defend liberty in all its forms and in every
circumstance. He must be honest and subordinate
his own interests to those of society.
As a Young Adult: The student has a respon-'
sibility toward other young people. He must work
to assure a constant renewal of his ideas and to
prepare better conditions for those following
him. Tomorrow he will take over in society;
today he must prepare himself for this responsibility.
As an intellectual: The student must participate fully with sincerity and honesty, in the
intellectual life of his university community. He
has the obligation to search for truth and to make
known the results of his findings.
As an Apprentice: The student has the obligations to enlarge his horizons in his own discipline.
He must integrate his studies with future needs
of society. Study must be his principal activity,
but he must not engage in this, activity solely for
his personal profit, but the entire social community must benefit from his work.
As a Member of the University Community:
The student must be prepared to respect the
autonomy of the university and its academic freedom. He is responsible for the good administration of the university. As an integral part of this
community, he has the obligation to participate
in its evolution and progress.
As a Citizen: The student must play an active
role, individually and collectively, in the social
and politic life of the nation.
The Rights of the Student Association
Since by this time the reader is probably overcome by  the numerous rights and obligations,
We will only mention briefly the rights and
obligations of the student association. It will become very clear that the AMS is exactly the
contrary of all this.
The student association is the organization set
up by students to represent them, promote their
interests and defend their rights. It must be their
sole official voice.
The student association has a right to strike
when the fundamental rights of the university or
of its members are in danger. It has the right
to have its autonomy respected by the university
or the government.
The Obligations of the Student Association
The association must be democratic so as to
ensure an efficient representation of its members.
It must assure the freedom of expression of
everyone. The association must work for the
improvement of its members' situation as long as
this is compatible with the good of all society.
The association is a "solidaire" of other youth
movements. The association must play an active
role in the social and political life.
JS
Since frats are out, how are the business
connections through syndicalism ?
What does a Syndicalist Student do?
All the activities of the Student Union can be
considered under three dimensions, those which
perform services:
1. for the student
2. for the university community
3. for the society (or nation)
The services for the student includes the
traditional cultural activities, sports, conferences,
debates, etc. All these services must be free of
charge in every single case: it would be illogical
for the association to demand the abolition of
university fees and itself create an equivalent
discrimination in asking financial contributions
to participate in activities.
But there is more than those traditional services: the student union must also work to end
discrimination and privileges on the campus:
this means the end of all fraternities and sororities, the existence of these organizations is
contrary to the basic principle of student syndicalism.
The student association must have a personnel office, an office for financial help (for
students in urgent and desperate need of financial assistance) and a legal advice office.
But it is obvious there are two other categories of service that are the more important for
student syndicalism. They encompass a number
of committees and activities: a liaison committee
with other trade unions and political and education committees responsible for preparing the
political and educational demands of the union.
Conclusion:
Student syndicalism is a very complex and
serious ideology. It is the concretization of a new
conception of what the student is. At UBC the
predominant conception of the student is the
corporate one; you are interested in having the
best time possible while you are on campus.
University life is not the real life, an example
of this could be taken from the geographic location of your campus; outside the city, isolated.
Some may think that student syndicalism is
the refuge of anarchists and minority groups or
that student syndicalism is an anti-bureaucratic
type of movement. It is not. This is the folklore
image of the movement. Student sydicalism needs
a powerful bureacracy to achieve its goals. We
have no place for the sentamentalism of pseudo
revolutionaires. In Quebec we have a nation to
build. We do not have any time to lose in secret
meetings, expulsions, splinter groups. We have
more urgent tasks to do.
the new mythology?
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
JAPANESE
NOH THEATRE
Lecture Demonstration by Major Mulholland
THURSDAY, OCT. 19   —   12:30 P.M.
FRIDAY,        OCT. 20   —   12:30 P.M.
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"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
Friday, October .0, 1967 /iolence breeds
own destruction
By GABOR MATE
A society which practises
violence against foreign
peoples must inevitably turn
that violence against its own
people. The rulers of America
have found that to oppress the
Vietnamese people they must
employ naked oppression
against citizens of their own
country.
Los Angeles this summer
was the scene of a peaceful
anti-Johnson demonstration —
peaceful until riot-helmeted
police attacked the demonstrators. This past week has
seen the repetition of aggressive police action against protesters of Johnson's murderous policies in Vietnam, and
worse is expected as the week
of Vietnam protest reaches its
culmination. Many Americans
are learning that blood is the
price of expressing open opposition to their criminal
leaders. Whatever its justification, the purpose of the violence is clear: people must be
intimidated into submission.
Discontent and dissent are too
wide-spread in American society to be allowed unharassed
expression.
The effects of violence in
Vietnam are clearly that more
and more Vietnamese are joining the ranks of the patriots
'WHATj. NHRPN6 WITH IMS -0«AM CoONTl^ArJfflDW/*
who have taken up the struggle against American imperialism. As the Buddhist monk
who spoke at UBC this Monday
said, each new act of violence
by the Americans in Vietnam
causes greater support for the
National Liberation Front.
The same was the lesson of
Castro's guerrilla struggle
against Batista. In retaliating
against the guerrillas by using
violence against the people,
the Batista forces ensured the
continuous and spontaneous
growth of the liberation movement.
The American leaders are
mistaken if they believe they
can escape these lessons of
history. As the struggle of the
American Negro shows, violence breeds its own destruction. Each new act of police
brutality in the black ghettos
creates new revolutionaries
for the Black Power movement. The Negroes have not
reacted to the brutalities of
the fascistic state troopers by
softening their voices of discontent — they have reacted
by buying guns.
But the aggressor never
learns, he merely tightens the
pf Sight
noose tighter around his own
nek. A former UBC student,
an eyewitness to the Los
Angeles demonstration, said
that the chief effect of the
police action was that many
former pacifists became convinced of the justification of
violence in self-defense. The
lesson is two-fold: one, that
the violence of the Vietnamese
people is quite justified and
is to be supported so long as
the aggressor remains in their
country, and two, that the
police violence in the U.S. itself must soon meet with defensive violence on the part
of the people. The results were
already evident this week, for
in several places the demonstrators offered determined resistance to the police.
According to all reports,
America is becoming an armed
camp. The sale of weapons of
all kinds has increased greatly in the past few months, and
people are preparing themselves for violence. The words
of Malcolm X, uttered after
the assassination of President
Kennedy, have never been
more appropriate: the chickens
are coming home to roost.
Vietnam protest Saturday
[
By ARNOLD SABA
All this week, across the
country, people of all ages
and social positions have been
demonstrating — against the
war, against the draft, against
such companies as Dow Chemical, who makes napalm.
These people do not want
their country to become a
monster of suppression and intolerance, as it already has
started to, using its tremendous might against one tiny
nation.
Yet, they are running a
race. As violence by their
country's rulers increases
abroad, so it increases at
home.
The U.S. Army is considering using paratroops against
its own people, who will try
to express their disapproval
of their government's actions
this Saturday in Washington,
D.C.
At the Uhiversity of Wisconsin and at Oakland, police
have been breaking up demonstrations with anti-riot techniques, injuring hundreds and
arresting even more. sCali-
fornia's  governor   Reagan
threatens to move in national
guard troops this Saturday.
Clearly, it is not the actual
demonstrations that authority
is objecting to. It is the feeling of so many sensible citi
zens that their government is
wrong.
It is a race to see who will
eventually win the spirit of
America. As the policy gets
worse, more people turn
away. But will the real authoritarianism take over before
the nation's policy can be
effectively influenced?
Don't kid yourself. Authoritarianism is just around the
corner in the States. In word
and deed, Americans are trained and made to think a certain way. And squashed when
they don't.
Of course this affects North
America as a whole, and that
includes us, too.
There is still time — and it
may not last long.. Express
your disapproval of the North
American killer ethos this
Saturday, by marching to the
courthouse. Country Joe MacDonald, from San Francisco,
is leading.
You'll be joining millions
of protesters across the continent. Help make the dissenters a majority.
A rally wil Ibe held at noon.
NOON RALLY IN FRONT OF LIBRARY TODAY
PETER
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Friday, October 20, 1967 Friday, October 20, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
rwr
INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY
Vietniks demonstrate
OTTAWA (CUP) — This week-end promises
to yield the biggest show of international solidarity against the Vietnam war in that war's
short history.
October 21, officially declared by anti-war
groups around the world as International Day
of Protest Against the War in Vietnam, will see
maches in Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, and
other Canadian centres; in every major city in
Europe; in Australia; and in Japan, where organizers expect 3 million people to join in the
protest.
But the main target will be the pentagon in
Washington, D.C.
The U.S. mobilization to end the war in Vietnam is expecting up to 100,000 protestors—stu-
Acadia drops CUS;
opinion is 3 to 1
WOLFVILLE, N. S. (CUP) — Acadia
University has dropped out of the Canadian
Union of Students.
Students voted more than 3 to 1 against
continuing membership in the union in a
referendum Monday. Just over 54 per cent
of the students voted.
The referendum followed a council resolution three weeks earlier advocating immediate withdrawal.
In a dining hall speech at noon Monday
student council president Bob Levy said,
"I feel that we have gained little in our
association with CUS over the years and the
fact that many of you ask what it is, is
more than eloquent testimony to its irrelevance."
CUS president-elect Peter Warrian, who
travelled to Acadia Oct. 14 for the vote,
said, "One of the reasons the vote may
have gone the way it did is people simply
did not have information or familiarity
with CUS."
He said the council had made up its
mind on CUS and seemed to be looking for
a ratification of that decision.
Of a total enrollment of 1,682 students,
905 cast ballots in the referendum. Of
these, 287 voted for CUS, 618 against.
Acadia is the first CUS member to
withdraw since the London congress last
month.
Last Friday University of Windsor students voted 576 - 552 in favor of the union.
The University of British Columbia will
hold a similar referendum Nov. 1.
,#3»W
V  ^avauwa^^v^
Ryerson bucks law,
pill
TORONTO (UNS) — Birth control information has been supplied to students at Ryerson
Polyechnic Institute for the last 11 years, Dr.
Donald Barr, head of the school's health clinic,
said Wednesday night.
Barr said he is aware that his action in
supplying such information is contrary to the
criminal code.
"It is illegal," he told the Ryerson students'
administration council.
He said that as part of the clinic's service
prescriptions for birth control pills or contraceptive devices have been supplied to at least
24 unmarried girl students in the last year.
This part of the clinic's service is not publicized, Barr said, for fear that parents might
exert pressure on politicians to have the service
discontinued.
At the University of Toronto, the students'
administrative council has been supplying a description of the various kinds of contraceptive
methods available to anyone who asks for it..
The information sheets urges the students to see
their doctors for more detailed information and
advice.
dents, mothers, pacifists, intellectuals, veterans—
to coverge on Washington Saturday morning.
The program calls for two marches — from
the Lincoln Memorial and from the Washington
Monument — to end at a rally in front of the
pentagon.
Unlike previous rallies, the demonstration in
Washington will attempt to disrupt the operation
of the government.
Object of the sit-in, according to Dave Del-
linger, national chairman of the mobilizatior
committee, is to sit down inside the pentagon
and stop it from working. He says they are not
likely to shut down the pentagon but at minimum the pentagon workers will have to step
over their bodies to get in.
The committee statement issued in August
said, "We will fill the hallways and block the
entrances. Thousands of people will disrupt the
center of the American war machine. In the
name of humanity we will call the warmakers
to task."
When asked if such a demonstration might
spark violence, Dellinger replied: "Nobody can
predict exactly what will happen on that day.
A lot depends on the government."
Canadian participation will be overshadowed
by the flood of Americans, but the committee
views this international representation as being
important to the spirit of the mobilization.
The largest Canadian demonstration will
center around Queen's Park in Toronto late
Saturday afternoon.
The Ontario mobilization committee expects
3,000 people from all over the province to congregate in the park to prepare for a march downtown to Toronto's city hall.
But the march has run into stiff resistance.
Metro police chief James Mackey has invoked a
police by-law originally intended to regulate
parades, to curb the demonstration.
The marchers plan to take to the sidewalks.
Other Ontario demonstrations will be held in
Sarnia, Welland, St. Katherines, London, Hamilton, Peterborough, Oshawa, and Ottawa.
Obstructors   ousted
NEW YORK (UNS) — Seven City College
students were suspended here after demonstrations which halted construction of temporary
prefabricated classrooms and offices at the colleges.
The students, most of whom were sitting in
the branches of a tree at the time, were suspended by the dean of students after they refused to allow workmen to cut and fell a tree.
The dean, Dr. Willard Blaesser, warned the
students they might be suspended for up to two
years and they might be expelled from the
college if they did not leave the campus immediately.
The students stayed to lead a four-hour foray
against dump trucks, bulldozers, power saws,
and workmen.
The students' actions were mainly a reaction
to destroying the campus by cutting down trees,
and constructing buildings—derisively called
huts by most students — according to Ira Liebo-
witz, one of the leaders of the demonstration.
A special student-faculty discipline committee will meet next week to try the students.
According to Dr. Buell Gallagher, college
president, possible measures to complete the
work on schedule might include closing the
campus to all but workmen, or to simply let
the process of law enforcement take over.
More than 100 students were sitting in front
of bulldozers, climbing trees, and filling in
ditches in an effort to stop all work.
Underlying the students' objections was the
complaint that they had not been adequately
consulted.
Plans for the location of the buildings had
been approved by a student advisory committee,
created last year after several hundred students
blocked the paving of the campus lawn. Demonstrators, however, claimed the committee was
unrepresentative.
FRIDAY'S PLACE
9 p.m.-l a.m. Coffeehouse entertainment and discussion
MAN-APART. Squamish Indian Leader. Music by THE
SINGING FORE.
SUNDAY FESTIVAL
One service at the Centre at 10:30,a.m. Dr. Arndt Hal-
vorson, Speaker. Luthern Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. 99c
cost dinner following. 3 p.m. REFORMATION RALLY at
Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
MONDAY NOON -
Halvorson speaks on
BU. 104
'SECULAR CHRISTIANITY".
WESNESDAY AT 8 P.M.
at   the   Centre.   Halvorson   again   on:   "THE NEW?
MORALITY?" Contemporary Service at 9:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd.
Near the Village
STARTS OCT. 25th, 8:00 P.M.
In the splendor of 70 mm.
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SCHEDULE OF RESERVED SEAT PERFORMANCES AND PRICES
ORCH. BAL LOG-
EVES. 8:00   PM.   -   $2.50 $2.50 $3.00
MATS.  2:00  P.M.   -   $2.00 $2.00 $2.50
MATINEES WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
Mail self-addressed, stamped envelope with your cheaue or money
orderpayable to the  Strand  Theatre, 600 West Georgia St., Vancouver  I
2, B.C. Out of town cheques must include bank exchange.
NAME
ADDRESS
No. of Seats
At?
Mat. rj Eve. rj
Date Requested
Alt. Date
STRAND Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 20, 1967
Money, money, money,
who's to get the money?
' «^$ ?°    V * '    ^. ™"^s.S'*^?   ' '«£ *   ^
,-*\sX' "
,*?< ."SAr^^*-v*""* "•v'*
^x&?y®miwm*'-zy%f''y-ti°y: v* .^■•wre
The Carter Royal Commission report on taxation will be
discussed Saturday in the Buchanan building.
Commerce professor Donald
Fields, a former research supervisor of the commission; eco
nomics professor Robert Clark
and Patrick Thorsteinsson,
Vancouver lawyer and tax expert, will discuss the subject at
the open meeting of the Vancouver Institute at 8:15 p.m.
Rhodes awards deadlined
Get your applications in early to avoid the     ship and interest in outdoor sports, according
rush. to J. L. Stewart, Canadian secretary for the
The next B.C.. Rhodes scholar will receive     scholarships.
a stipend of $3,300 a year.
But the scholar, besides being an intellectual superman, must possess qualities of leader-
Applications must be sent by Oct. 25 to
Michael Brown, secretary, Rhodes Scholarship
selection committee for B.C., 602 Hastings St.
'  **W1I,^VA
» '
TW^w.^ ■■
rONLY
TWO WEEKS
TO THE
INTERNATIONAL I
FAIR
November 3 and 4
St. Anselm's W.A. Annual
THRIFT   SALE
Saturday, Oct. 21st
12 noon to 3 p.m.
at
UNIVERSITY  HILL UNITED
CHURCH
5375 University Blvd.
VOLKSWAGEN
DRIVERS.....
I
iAST YEAR OUR FACTORY-TRAINED EXPERTS REPAIRED MANY OF
YOUR CARS ...
Naturally wo wffl quote cm «qr
repair   service   because   of   oar
guaranteed low prices.
AU   WORK   GUARANTEE)
Only At
AUTO-HENNEKEN
■-■'■ - Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
"General Foods
offers you more than
just Tang"
His job keeps him on top of the world. On top of
world commodity prices, world markets, and any
international developments. He dlso has a firm
grasp on the economics of production and marketing and how they might be affected by market
fluctuations.
Who is he? One of General Foods' Financial Services Analysts. Like all of his colleagues, he is well-
equipped to meet the GF challenge: to develop a
needed product and sell it at a profit.
He finds great satisfaction in his work, because
his opinion counts. Marketing management works
closely with him, and relies on his sound financial
advice to provide a basis upon which they can make
wise marketing decisions. And these decisions can
involve anything from the launch of a new instant
food to a complete change of marketing strategy
for a well-known brand such as Maxwell House
Coffee.
Does this sound like the kind of career to satisfy
your ambition; to test your abilities to their limits?
If so, you may be one of those exceptional people
who can respond to the kind of stimulating, mind-stretching challenge we offer.
So why not take up the challenge,—
and choose...
A career with a future from General Foods
Interesting opportunities await you in our Finance,
Marketing and Operations areas. A General Foods recruiting
team will visit your university on:
OCT.  30,  31  -  NOV. 1, 2
See your placement office. Friday, October 20, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
the
_gau
. switches to campus-at-night with
lights-on fashions for Homecoming Week
from the Bay Crickets' Corner (formerly
Collegienne Shop) . .
Flirt your way through Fraternity Row in the bewitching
turned-on party looks, now at the Bay. Illuminate the scene
in a gleam of lame, a glow of velvet, a flash of black . . .
interpreted with sophisticated young flair ... in date-time
stunners planned to add romance and drama to your night
life.
Preview the scene...
Be in the Bay Crickets' Corner (formerly
Collegienne Shop), third floor, Saturday,
Oct. 21, at 1 p.m. to see the fresh new
party fashions modelled by the U.B.C.
Homecoming Queen candidates.
Cocktail dress with the shock of matching bloomers peeking below the
hem. Gold or silver printed mylar. Modelled by Jackie Elgaard,
Miss  law. $30
.■*v*_W;«_K
%■'•: ■,-"■".
_ ■
■■_.-
A shimmer  of  silver  lame   and   jewelled  buttons  light  up   the   classic
shirt dress for evening. Modelled by Cindy Jinks, Miss Commerce. $35
Take the plunge in flash black, a fluid crepe designed for after-dark
glamour. Modelled by Denise Sexton, Miss Home Economics. $55
INCORPORATED 2"° MAY 1670 Ptjge 18
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, October 20, 1967
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Conor Cruise O'Brien
Seminar on "NEO-COLONIALISM"
Sunday, October 22, 1:00-5:00 p.m.
International House
Students 75c Faculty $1.00
Tickets at AMS, AAC, tor at the door.
-.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
ST.  ANSELM'S  ANGLICAN
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
10:00 a.m. Matins
Speaker: Dr. Eric Webb
SAINT WITHOUT GOO
7:30, p.m.—Zorba the Greek
at St. Anselm's
HAROLD MacKAY JIM McK.BBON
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
11:00 a.m; "Do You Know
What Love Is"
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Homecoming
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SATURDAY, OCT. 28th
2:00 P.M. Thunderbird Stadium
2,500 FREE covered seats
are available,  on first  come  first serve   basis,  to  U.B.C.
Students, on presentation of A.M.S. Card.
Tickets must be picked up between
Monday, Oct. 23rd and Friday, Oct. 27th
at
A.M.S. Office or Memorial Gym
'   You may purchase additional general admission tickets
for 50c each.
500 RESERVED SEATS WILL BE SOLD AT THE GAME FOR
$1.50 EACH.
Your A.M.S. Cards must be shown when the free student
ticket is presented at the Stadium Pass Gate.
Wrestlers need bodies
By JIM MADDIN
The UBC Thunderbird wrestling team has a
little problem.
The Birds need more bodies.
Wrestling coach Paul Nemeth explained the
problem as he proudly showed off his team's
new facilities in the Thunderbird Stadium wrestling room.
The problem: with their new facilities the
team has more room and they would like people
interested in wrestling to come and share it with
them.
More to the point, the reason is the team
needs bodies to practise with, or on, big or small,
beginner or expert, and any weight class.
The new facilities are excellent but Nemeth
pointed out some minor problems during the
press tour.
There are no mats to protect the walls from
people running into them, there are no facilities
for changing and it is a long way from campus.
This does not discourage the wrestlers though
because tljere is a full set of circuit equipment
set up, including climbing ropes, chinning and
dipping bars and lots of stairs.
Now half of the available space is covered
with floor mats and more mats are expected.
For those interested, the coach says workouts
take about three hours from campus and back,
and run from 4:45 p.m. every day except Friday
with a Saturday morning one starting at 9:30.
To qualify for.the wrestling team you must
attend three workout a week but, as Nemeth
says, anyone who knows or wants to learn about
wrestling is welcome.
The team's first competition will be in the
War Memorial Gym on Nov. 4 when they meet
a team from the Canadian Armed Forces Academy at Royal Roads.
The big meet for wrestling fans (Olympic not
TV wrestling!) will be on Nov. 25 when the
Birds sponsor the UBC Invitational Wrestling
Championships, again at War Memorial Gym.
Their last competition before the Christmas
quizzes will be against the University of Alberta
Golden Bears here on Dec. 2.
For more information about wrestling for
fun or the Birds, contact Paul Nemeth at War
Memorial Gym during the day or at the Thunderbird Stadium after 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Thursday.
'    SSiAifc
"BUT THAT'S MY LEG, not yours," protests Jim Sunderland, of the Thunderbird wrestling team.
His opponent, Wayne Cave (top) appears all arms in the match. Team works out five days a
week in the new stadium wrestling room.
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Friday, October 20, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
COULD  TAKE . . .
. . . FIRST PLACE
Birds battle Columbus
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds will play
Columbus on Sunday and for the second time in
two weeks have a chance to move into first
place in league standings — if they win.
On Oct. 14 the Birds were faced with the
same situation but they lost 3-2 to Burnaby
Villa.
"We lost but we learned quite a few things,"
said coach Joe Johnson after Thursday's
practice.
He said he'll change the team's style of
operation and some of the personnel to combat
Columbus' tough foiir-two-four type of play.
"Columbus has always had a strong forward
line," said Johnson. "Two of their best are
Peter Simpson, who played in the National
Professional Soccer League in the United States
and Sergio Zenatta, a left wing who played on
Canada's national team."
Columbus has played only one game this
season, a 3-1 victory over Victoria. The Birds
have also beaten Victoria for a 1-1 record.
"If we want to stay in contention for the
league championship, we'll have to share the
game with Columbus; we can't afford to lose,"
added Johnson.
The soccer coach said he'd like to come out
of the next five games with a minimum of seven
points.
In practice sessions this week Johnson has
been stressing the mistakes the Birds made in
the Villa game.
"We took too long to take a shot on goal,"
said.  Johnson.   "I have  the boys practise  this
type of thing but only a game situation will
tell if they have learned."
Sunday's contest at Callister Park, beginning
at 2 p.m., will be that game.
The only other university soccer team, the
Tomahawks, also plays Sunday against the Bur-
dette Beavers starting at 11 a.m. at Kinsmen
Park.
Road rallyists ready;
Totem Rally Sunday
The UBC Sports Car Club takes to the roads
on Sunday.
The event is the club's annual Totem Rally
which starts in front of Eaton's at Brentwood,
with the first car leaving at 8 a.m.
The rally will be a straight forward time
distance event. This type of rally is good for both
novice and expert rallyists.
Rallymasters Art Monk and Stu Somerville
promise moderate speeds and good roads all the
way, with the emphasis being on the fun.
The rally will run for 200 miles, approximately, all in the Fraser Valley and will take
nine hours of driving and will require a Dominion Map Company Fraser Valley Map.
It will finish at the Brentwood Bowling Lanes
with the first car reaching there at around 5 p.m.
Entry fees are $3 per car and an extra $1
per three-car team.
Want to join the Luftwaffe?
By JOHN TWIGG
"We demand air-supremacy
over SFU," said Larry DeFehr,
organizer of the newest campus club, "the UBC Luftwaffe"
or sky-divers.
With this thought in mind,
the sky-diving cluib started
planning its future.
There are 20 signed members, as well as sponsors Larry
DeFehr and Fritz Bowers of
chemistry and engineering respectively, and jumping instructor Bill Hardman of Abbots-
ford.
Intensive training and first
jumps are on Saturday, Oct. 21,
at Albbotsford.
The club is open to all people
on campus, including professors. Interested people should
contact Larry DeFehr, in chem
107, or phone him at 228-3225.
The cost is nominal, considering the thrills (?) involved.
A $32 fee includes the necessary half-year membership in
the Parachute Club of Canada
and training {five hours of intensive ground training, all
equipment rental, and "half a
plane ride to 2,800 feet in a
Cessna 180.")
Further jumps are $6 each,
all inclusive.
There will be additional club
dues of about $5, depending on
whether or not an AMS grant
and affiliation can be obtained.
A meeting will be held on
Oct. 26 at 12:30, in chem 126,
to elect an executive and sign
up new members.
Future activities for the club
include the first inter-collegiate
sky-diving meet in this area.
There are clubs at Simon
Fraser University, University
of Victoria and the University
of Edmonton.
As DeFehr gays, "We'll clobber SFU, in the air."
In spite of what you may
think, sky-diving is a relatively
safe sport.
"The most dangerous part of
sky-diving is driving to the airport," said DeFehr.
In free-fall, a jumper's speed
rarely exceeds 180 mph vertically and 120 mph horizontally,
or about 240 mph, at 45 degrees
to the ground.
Despite the speeds, the landing impact is reduced to that
of an eight foot jump by the
28-foot parachute.
Each chutist is required to
take extensive precautionary
measures, especially carrying
the 22-foot reserve chute. All
jumpers must also undergo an
extensive medical test before
taking their initial jump.
All adventurous Thunderbirds are urged to join "the
Luftwaffe", Thursday, Oct. 26
in chem 136, and fly to fame!
MAKING A PERFECT landing in the middle of the circle is
Bill Hardman, instructor for the new UBC sky-diving club.
New members are welcome to come to a meeting on Oct.
26, in chem. 126.
Braves ready* for ice
The UBC ice hockey Braves
will play their first league
game on Monday, Oct. 23, at
the Thunderbird arena.
The Braves will skate onto
the ice against a team from
Ladner. Game time is 7:30 p.m.
Coached by Andrew Bako-
george, the Braves have one
win under their belts, a 13-2
exhibition over the Comox
Totems.
JA YVEES FOOTBALL BOUNCES
TOWARD BRANDON WIN
Maybe, just maybe, the UBC Junior Varsity football
team will win a game this Saturday against Brandon
College.
"You know," said Nestor Korchinsky, Jayvee football
coach, "it would be nice to beat the only Canadian team
we meet this year.
"For the first time this year, our offense has jelled,"
Korchinsky said. "Two guys walked into practice this week
and turn out to be real great quarterbacks. And with our
offense getting better all the time, what more can you ask
for?
"A lot of key personnel on our defense are hurt and
it may make a difference. You know, they've got the usual
injuries, knees, backs, arms, nerves, but they're determined," added the Jayvee coach.
Korchinsky said that he plans to mix up the plays a
bit to throw Brandon off. He's also introduced a new set
of plays because of the addition of quarterbacks and
receivers.
"They work the middle pretty good, so we'll put lots
of pressure on their quarterback. That should work quite
well."
Game time is 2 p.m., Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium. Admission is free to UBC students.
A
Weekend £ptrt6
Want to take out a little revenge on SFU?
Then go see the UBC cross country team take part in the
B.C. Senior Championships on Saturday at Stanley Park.
Among those participating in the meet will be University
of Calgary, Vancouver Olympic Club, UBC, and our friends
from the hill, the Clansmen runners.
The Birds, who have won the B.C. Junior Championship
the last two years, now have one of their strongest teams in
many a season.
Track and field coach Lionel Pugh stil lthinks VOC is the
strongest entry in the Wi   mile race.
"But," he says, "you never know what surprises our team
has in store."
•        •        •
The  Junior  Varsity  Thunderette  field  hockey team   left
yesterday by plane for Saskatoon where they will compete in
the WCIAA tournament.
"They are much the same team as last year; they look very
promising," said spokesman Judy Males.
The Varsity team will travel to Portland on Nov. 18 for
the Pacific North West tournament. They will be competing
against American and Canadian teams.
The girls are holders of the 1st Division trophy for Vancouver.
From the look of past performances, both our teams promise
another big year in field hockey.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
GLASSES from 9.95 Complete
CONTACT LENSES one price only$69.50
Includes any color, insurance for one year,
lifetime prescription change, all fittings.
LONDON V DRUGS
f
Ltmlttd
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Vancouver
677 Granville '
Opp. THE BAY
6814174
DOWNTOWN
LA 141751
657 Columbia
Opp.  Army  A Navy Page 20
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday; October 20, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES . . .
. . . MAKE  US  TIRED
Squamish Indian discusses Man Apart
LSM
Friday's Place: Man Apart,
by Sam Lewis of the Squamish
Indian Band. Discussion, films,
coffee, music beginning at 9
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre. Admission 25 cents.
Dr. Arndt of St. Paul, Minnesota, discusses secular Christianity, Monday, noon, Bu.
104.
SCM
Showing of Zorba The
Greek, Sunday, 7:30 p.m., St.
Anselms Anglican Church.
AMS FIRST VP
Academic reform: all persons interested in discussing
this and related topics, meeting in first vp's office (across
from south Brock caf), Monday, noon.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Totem rally, Sunday, beginning at 7 a.m. from Brentwood Shopping Centre.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Talent night tonight at St.
Mark's college, dance follows.
Activity starts at 8 p.m.
WOODROW WILSON
NOMINEES
Henry Ross, national representative, will speak to fellow-
shop nominees in faculty club
salons B and C, Monday, 3.30
p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
McGill lecturer Charles
Taylor discusses the Quebec-
French question, today, noon,
Brock lounge.
SZO
Israeli dancing Sunday, 7:30
to 9:30 p.m., Hillel house, behind Brock.
SUS
Campus placement officer
discusses grad employment,
Tuesday, noon, chem. 250.
VOC
New members must do one
work hike or one mountaineering school lecture by Oct.
23. Old members must do one
work hike by Oct. 23. All
qualification activities must
be done by Nov. 20.
AQUA SOC
Two-day club dive Nov.
11-12. Sign up in club room.
Start saving for it.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Club coffee party noon today in Mildred Brock lounge.
Gordon Fairweather, MP will
speak.
MUSSOC
Annual fall banquet fa-
Brock, 6:30 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 21. Prize for best costume.
Please sign list in clubroom.
VCF
Student panel discussion, Is
Faith a Recipe, today, noon,
Ang. 110.
Esnilia?
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Producers of raw materials
used in the manufacture of esnilia have gone on strike at
farms surrounding this island
capital. They are demanding a
39.529 per cent pay decrease
for their products because they
claim esnilia is detrimental to
puce blorgs' health.
HAVE FUN
J
BE IN FASHION TOO
WITH
Glenayr
J
£*?
0§*s
Walk into fashion in this exciting new machine-washable
English Botany full-fashioned
raglan shoulder pullover . . .
with dome fastenings at neck
front, roll collar, new Continental band and cuffs.
To complete the pretty picture,
team it with this pure wool
worsted skirt, woven from
superfine English Botany. It is
fully-lined, dry-cleanable. and
dyed-to-perfectly-match
all bright new Kitten sweater
colours.
S645/690
PURE VW6IN WOOL
Look for the
Woolmark on the label
Without this label   £ 'fSSiC %|   >t is not a genuine KITTEN
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Meeting   today,   noon,    IH.
Membership cards available.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Hootenanny-social tonight
lower lounge.
SAILING CLUB
Remember   to   sign   up  for
sailing lessons in hut B-3.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty 8c Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
P''one  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
GIGANTIC POST GAME SOUL, SPEC-
tacular featuring 2 Great Bands
only $1.50. Rosalind Keene & The
Apollos plus Billy Dixon & The
Accents. Armoury, Friday, 9:00 p.m.
DANCE TO THE BETTER HALF
Friday, Oct. 20 at the Hallmark
Hall.  $1.50 per person.
COME TO TOTEM PARK DANCE
Sat., Oct. 21, 9:00-12:30. The
Shockers.   Admission 76c.
IS COUNTRY JOE BETTER THAN
the Yellow Ducks? Kitsilano Theatre,.  Fri.  No Dance  Saturday.	
HOOTENANNY - SOCIAL, TONIGHT
at I.H. Lower Lounge, 8:30 p.m.
Bring your guitar.	
COUNTRY   JOE
PAPA   BEARS   MEDICINE   SHOW
PAINTED SHIP
Dance   this   weekend   at   the   Retinal
Circus  from   9   p.m.    til   2   a.m.
Greetings
12
SPECIAL SUPPER MEETING FOR
e. 11 interested in International
House and its programmes, Supper .50c or .25c with meal pass. 5:30
p.m.,   Tues.,   Oct.   24  at I.H.
Lost & Found
 13
LOST SET OF VW KEYS BE-
tween Buchanan and Fort Camp.
I'll buy finder a beer if he calls
874-9823.
LOST     OCT.     5th     INTRODUCTORY
mycology by Alexopoulos. Leave
in W. 109 or phone Shirley 876-
1850.  Reward.
WALLET LOST ON CAMPUS, OCT.
13th. Personal papers urgently required. Reward. 277-7655 after 6:00
p.m.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my Black Briefcase from Library
Wed., Oct. 18. 3-4 p.m. Please return at least notes and books to
Publications   Office.   Reward.
LOST ONE PAIR OF GIRLS BLACK
Glasses in B-Lot Oct. 18. If found
please call Linda at 985-3501 after
6  p.m.   PLEASE.	
FOUND SPANISH 200 NOTE BOOK
Bu. 3201 Friday 13th. Claim at
Publications  Office.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'53 CHEV. BELLE-AIR, TWO-DOOR.
Radio, well chromed. Good Condi-
tion.    Asking   $275.    Phone   688-3203.
MUST SELL 1957 FOUR DOOR
automatic Ford. Good radio and
tires. $250.00 or best offer. Phone
733-9774.
1958 MORRIS MINOR, EXCELLENT
condition, $300. Sally, 684-5437 after
6  p.m.	
MGA 1600. FANTASTIC CONDITION.
Can be seen at Z.B.T. House. Rick,
224-9660.
'59 RAMBLER AMERICAN 2-DOOR
Sedan. Good brakes, tires, heater,
engine. '63 Rambler, (31,000) miles.
Best offer, Phone in evenings, RE
3-5627.
1960 DAUPHINE. BEST OFFER
takes.   Phone   Bob,   879-2341   eves.
1956 ZEPHYR SIX CYL. PREFECT
mechanical order with radio. Best
offer. Phone 261-2904 after 5:30 p.m.
HUNTER-SKIER SPECIAL VW VAN
Insulated,   propane   heater,   224-3190.
'61 VOLVO 544S — GOOD ENGINE,
new tires and battery, 35 mpg, $950
or best offer.   922-6568.
Automobile Parts
23
4—14" CHROME REVERSE RIMS.
Chev./Pontiac. 4 knockoffs, 261-
6153.   $80.   No   exchange   needed.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles   -   Cars
Generators   -  Utility Units
New  and Used
SPORT CARS
N        Motors        T
O S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Typing
40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates   TR  4-9253
TYPIST TO TYPE MAILING LIST.
Give rates based on 2000 addresses.
U.B.C. Film Soc., Box 38, Brock
Hall.
TYPING  SERVICE
Mrs.   Gail   Symons  —  224-6436
3885 W.  12th Ave.
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone  228-8384  or 224-C129.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
SPECIAL   CLASSES
of  people   will  come   to   see  Country
Joe at  the Retinal Circus  this weekend.    People    who    groove    to    good
things.
Tutoring
64
Maths.  Tutors, 4th year or graduates,
GRADES  7  to  13
736-6923 —  4:30   -  7:30  P.M.
LEARN TO BE FREE!
Country Joe digs to release people
from their Social Hang-Ups. Freak
out with Country Joe, Papa Bear and
Painted Ship Oct. 20 and 21 at the
Retinal Circus, 1024 Davie from 9 p.m.
to 2 a.m. 18 and over please. Be
there early.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLINQ
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4674 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block  from   gate*.
SUZUKI 80S TOP CONDITION.
Leaving town, must sell. $190. Helmet included. See it o ncampus Call:
Carol 228-3320 aftefnoons, mornings,
weekends   684-3724.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDERS FROM NORTH BURNABY
wanted for 8:30's — phone Russ,
299-0721.
WANTED: CAR POOL FROM WEST
Van. will drive one day a week,
922-2304.
25TH AND  CAMBIE
Ride    needed    —    Classes    9:30-3:30
Mon. - Fri. Phone TR 6-9592 Renia or
leave   message.
Special Notices
    15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUB-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966.
GSA WILL HOLD ITS GENERAL
meeting for fall on Thursday, October 26, 1967, at 12:45 p.m., in the
Lower Lounge of the Graduate Student Centre. Plans- for Centre expansion and consequent fee increase
will he discussed, 	
SKITS, SINGING, BANJO — PICKIN'
Guitar Playin'. It's all at Talent
Night, Friday 20 Newman Centre,
8:00 p.m. Fyee Coffee. Dance after.
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.	
FROM "BLOW UP" & THE KER-
rlisdale Arena The Yardbirds return   Nov.   10   for another   White
Rabbit   Multi    Media Dance-Concert,
etc.
VAN. MOST FANTASTIC NEW
Sound! Mother Tuckers Yellow
Duck. Fri., Oct. 20. Kits Theatre,
8:30-1:00.
1964   HONDA   CB   160.   VERY   GOOD
condition. $325 or best offer. Phone
224-9953   and  ask   for   Alan.
ItONDA 90-SPORT ONLY3800 MILES.
Excellent condition, helmet. Phone
Rob,   224-9769. ■
1965 HONDA 90 IMMACULATE CON-
dition,   5000   miles. "Offers.   266-5002.
Miscellaneous
32
WHOLESALE PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235 West  Broadway,  TeL
732-6811.
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 W. Broadway. Ph.
733-4516. 	
PHILIPS CONTINENTAL 150 (EL
3302) Tape Recorder, $75.00. Phone
926-3304.
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
6671  anytime.
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
ARE YOU GETTING ANY? COME
to the Witches Brew at the Hallmark Hall Oct. 20. The Better Half
.   .  .   .   .   .   $1.50  per  person.
CAT BALLOU RIDES INTO THE
Aud. on Oct. 26. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30.  Adm.   50c.   	
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also   complete   repair   service   for  all
makes and models.
McIVER Appliances  Ltd.
3215 W Broadway—738-7181
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
GOLF CLUBS 1964 WILSON STAFF
2-9 Irons Ex. cond. $175. Phone Ross
266-6503.   After   6.
OLYMPIA PORTABLE TYPEWRI-
ter, manual, small type, zippered
carrying case, like new. $55. 874-
4096 evenings.
DOUBLE-BED & DINETTE TABLE
with four chairs, rug. 224-9666.
Erie:   Try anytime.
CAMPING EQUIPMENT, SKIS,
portable stereo and radio. Phone
224-3190. 	
SANKYO 8mm. ZOOM CAMERA, $45.
3%" reflector telescope, like new,
$50.   Evenings,   261-6153.
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR RENT, FOR MALE
students, near Alma St. Phone
738-4792,   ask for  Mrs.  Wang.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR 2 GIRLS
near campus. Private facilities. $35
ea. CA 4-6389.
WANTED: 3rd YEAR FEMALE
student needs room close to campus. Phone: 224-9982, (Room 226),
Susan.
ROOM   FOR   2   MEN,   POINT   GREY
single beds. Study facilities, break-
fast.   Call   733-0632   evenings.	
ROOM  FOR  YOU
and 999 others at Retinal Circus, 1024
Davie.   For   the   groovy.   Dance   with
San   Francisco's   Country   Joe.,    Oct.
20   - 21. 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Room 8c Board
82
SCANDINAVIAN STUDENTS WIL-
ling to work for International Fall
Fair.   Call  224-9766,   Rm.   18  or 120.
SORRY NO ADVANCE TICKETS
for Country Joe, Papa Bear and
Painted Ship. So be early at the
Retinal Circus, 1024 Davie. Oct. 20-
21.  $2.50,
DON'T  WEAR  A TUX
to   the   Retinal  Circus   this   weekend.
Country    Joe,    Bless    him    heart,    is
just plain folks!
Travel Opportunities
16
A LITTLE BIT OF FRISCO! IN
Vancouver. Retinal Circus presents
Country Joe, Papa Bear and Painted
Ship, Oct. 20 and 21 from 9 p.m.
til 2 a.m. Be early!
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
URGENTLY   NEED   COPY   "DURK-
heim's Suicide" Get cash for weekend beer. Phone Gerry RE 8-6897.
FANTASTIC BLACK MASK BASH
Sat., Oct. 21, 8:00, 25c/person.
Dance Club Lounge, Brock Extension.  Wear a costume Thlngeey.
TGIF — YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB IS
still at it Friday afternoons, 4:00-
8:00 p.m. Cecil Green Park. Come if
you   dare!!	
IT WILL BE A SCANDAL IF YOU
Don't see Country Joe, Papa Bear
and Painted Ship this weekend at
the Retinal Circus, 1024 Davie.
Dance starts at 9:00.  Be early!
Typewriter Repairs
39
ANDERSON  TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING MACHINES
NEW    AND    RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free Estimates        Reasonable Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185  West   Broadway 879-7815
Across from Zephyr Motors
Service Centre
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRA-
ternity is now inviting inquiries for
accommodation in their new $165,-
000 36-man house on Agronomy
Road. The house will be officially
opened Jan. 1, 1968, but room and
possibly board will be offered in
early November. The house will feature the best living facilities at
UBC for residence rates. For further information and opening dates
please write: H. Harrison, No. 6,
3851 West 4th Ave.
NEAR UBC. TWO MALE STUDENTS
to share very large nice room.
Good   meals,   table   tennis.   738-2306.
Furn. Houses fe Apts.
88
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE FLAT
with young couple. $60 per month.
681-2679,   West   End.        	
GIRL 21-25 TO SHARE FURN. APT.
with two of same. 41st and Vine.
Call  263-9217.	
WARM CLEAN 3 ROOM SEMI-
furnished house-keeping suite, 1284
W.   6th.   738-3925,   $78.00 mo.	
1st YEAR FEMALE STUDENT
wants girls to share suite on 1st
and   Dunbar.   Phone   733-0519.

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