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The Ubyssey Feb 14, 1967

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Array ANGRY MOB
...IN SACRAMENTO
Thousands rally to protest   Reagan
By TOM WAYMAN
LONG BEACH, Calif. (UNS) — Governor
Ronald Reagan faced 10,000 angry protestors in
Sacramento this week as California's concern
over higher education continued to grow.
On Saturday 10,000 students, faculty and
citizens representing the state college system
and nine UC campuses
booed and shouted as
the governor put in a
surprise appearance at
a California Federation
of Teachers (AFL-CIO)
sponsored march and
rally at the state capi-
tol.
Reagan had been
scheduled to leave for
Oregon that morning
but told the crowd he
felt he should be present at the capitol if a group of citizens came
to deliver a message to him.
"I believe nothing I can say would create
open minds in some of you. I mean an open mind
on this particular subject," Reagan said in a
short speech punctuated by hecklers and jeers.
At stake is a threatened budget cut, effecting
the nine campus UC stystem and the sprawling
WAYMAN
state college network.
Reagan has suggested tuition fees as a compensatory measure but the issue remains in flux,
as proposals and counter proposals are made by
state officials, educators and students.
Education will be discussed in the state legislature later this month but meantime school
officials say hiring of new professors has been
severely hurt by a threat of a cut back in higher
education spending.
On Thursday, three thousand UC students
organized by the Santa Barbara student government rallied in Sacramento.
Reagan met with representatives of the UC
campuses for a 40-minute, closed door session
after an  appearance  before  Thursday's  crowd.
The press was quick to note that while Thursday's marchers were "quiet, mannerly and conservatively dressed," Saturday's march included
"bearded beatniks", as well as professors in academic gowns.
Ubyssey breaks up
This is the only Ubyssey this week. Reporters,
photogs and editors, like everyone else, will be
skiing or studying during the midterm break
Thursday to Sunday inclusive.
Democratic assembly speaker Jessie Unruh
told Thursday's rally that tuition is a tax of the
worst kind, a tax on education.
Unruh said he didn't know of any democratic
assemblyman who would vote in favor of tuition.
(The decision of tuition, however, will likely
■be made by the UC regents themselves at
least as far as UC is concerned.)
The Reagan-influenced regents last month
fired UC president Clark Kerr, who opposed
tuition, sparking the current educational crisis.
On Saturday, Negro state senator Mervin
Dymally of Los Angeles proposed formation of
a state wide anti-tuition committee.
Representatives of the striking Delano grape
workers, who joined the march, said they were
opposed to tuition, because minorities such as
American-Mexicans are the first to toe affected
by it.
"Tuition is designed to keep the poor and
minorities in their place," said strike leader
Cesar Chavez.
Dr. John Spurling, of San Jose State, announced that the CFT state college council which
he heads is raising a $25,000 fund to buy TV
time to reply to Reagan's proposal.
He threatened that CST might lead its 1,300
state college faculty members on a strike as a
last resort. There are about 9,000 state faculty
members in all.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 48
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14,   1967 <<?»»■-*•4f
224-3916
Veep candidates
push ombudsman
A student ombudsman emerged Monday
as a key issue in Don Munton's campaign
for first vice-president of the AMS.
Munton and candidate Ray Larsen spoke
to less than 50 students at noon in Brock.
Third candidate David Frith has withdrawn from the election.
Asked whether he would have enough
time to be ombudsman Munton said: "My
promise would still hold next year, I will
have the time for the position."
Larsen also advocated an ombudsman
but suggested he be elected in the fall separate from the AMS council.
Larsen's program for next year's council includes an AMS-financed experimental
college to work within the framework of
UBC.
"There are a number of students and
professors who would like to involve themselves in courses outside their specialized
interests — an engineering professor interested in poetry, for example. It would
be an extra curricular voluntary activity."
Larsen advocated a "student task force"
to go into the major communities of B.C.
to raise support among the people and put
pressure on the provincial government.
Munton urged a "strong public information project."
Both were dissatisfied with the present
residence situation.
Additional points of Larsen's program
were: the transfer of the $70,000 the AMS
pays to support UBC sports to better uses
such as symposia, the experimental college
and a government lobby for more grants to
the  universities.
Munton called for the AMS to finance
all faculty anti-calendars, faculty revision
committees (such as in arts this year) and
student representation on the  senate.
The campaign will continue today when
Larsen and Munton meet in Forestry-Geo-
ology 100 at noon.
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson will also
speak in defense of the proposed AMS three
dollar fee increase referendum.
TWO OFFENCES
$150 in traffic fines
— kurt hilger photo
OOPS,  that one   backfired,"  weeps  a   distraught  Cupid.
"You can't win them all, even if today is St. Valentine's
Day."   Lunch   wielding   co-ed   apparently  just  didn't   like
her beau's suggestion  for the day's activities.
UBC faculty council has fined two students a total of $150 for refusing to obey
campus traffic direction signs.
The fines were announced Monday by
the board of governors.
The students, unnamed by council decision, were brought before the last faculty
council meeting. One student who did not
stop when asked by patrolmen was fined
$100 and another who stopped when ordered was fined $50.
Registrar E. A. Parnall, secretary of the
council, which consists of all deans, five
faculty  representatives  and   the   president,
said: "We did not want to embarass the
students or the traffic patrol by releasing
their names."
He refused to say where or when the
incidents occurred.
Parnall said the students were invited
before the council and had a chance to present their side.
The traffic patrol then presented its side.
"A student can appeal to the senate if
he feels the fine is too high. We'd rather do
it ourselves than have outside authorities
come in," he said.
The council meets about once a month. Page 2
TH.      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  14,  1967
Profs urge government
to explain Vietnam stand
By PETER SHAPIRO
UBC's faculty has shown its concern
about the Vietnam war.
A total of 328 of them signed a statement urging clarification of Canadian government opposition to the Vietnam war.
The statement, released Monday to Vancouver news media, calls for "a clear and
official statement
of Canada's support for U Thant's
plea that the United States cease
bomhjng North
Vietnam and de-
escalate the war in
South Vietnam,
both for humanitarian reasons and
in order to promote peace negotiations." SCARFE
Secondly, it demands a ban on the export of arms and military material to all
belligerents in Vietnam. The professors asked the Canadian government "to reveal all
military production contracts related in
any way to the war in Vietnam."
The letter has also been sent to Prime
Minister Pearson, the heads of opposition
parties and external affairs minister Paul
Martin.
Signers include one dean, Neville Scarfe
of education, and several department heads,
including Barnett Savery of philosophy and
Geoffrey Durrant of English.
Anthropology professor Bill Willmott
said the effect of the letter would be a cumulative one if more universities took a
similar stand.
"We wouldn't do it if we thought it
wouldn't have some effect," he said.
The UBC profs took the idea of a faculty
statement from Ontario university teachers'
statements released last month.
The UBC letter is more explicit than
the University of Toronto one, according to
Willmott, because it calls for action on military shipments to the war effort. The Toronto   statement   demanded   Canadian   gov
ernment "consideration" of ending U.S.Canadian arms deals.
(According to the professors' preliminary
letter, signed by 44 UBC professors, Martin
told a Toronto delegation last month that
"Canada supplies $300,000,000 in arms to
the U.S. each year.")
The preliminary letter asking faculty
support for the Vietnam statement was sent
to 1,550 UBC staff members.
Willmott said after a meeting of 60
teachers Thursday the concerned profs set
up a UBC teachers committee on Vietnam.
The committee will act as a sort of faculty "ginger group," according to Willmott.
It intends to have a research committee on
Canadian economic involvement in the Vietnam war.
The group will pass information on the
war to other UBC profs as well as maintaining contracts with professors at other
universities.
Willmott said the original committee
which sent the statement had to pay $15
for the use of the faculty mailing list and
administration mailing services.
About the statement, the preliminary
letter said: "While we do not expect our
statement to have dramatic results, we hope
it will contribute in some way to peace in
Vietnam."
Come to the fair
MONTREAL (UNS) — There are no jobs
at Expo — unless you're willing to skip
finals.
About 6,000 summer workers will be
needed. But Expo officials say workers
must be available for the entire Expo run
— April 28 to Oct. 27.
Officials say other part-time jobs catering to Expo hordes will probably be available in the Montreal area for the summer
only.
Students who think they will be available for the full Expo period can still contact Phil Gautier, Expo 67, Montreal, for
information on remaining jobs.
'But can they cownt?'
TORONTO (CUP) — The average graduate of Canada's engineering schools cannot
read, write or spell, charged the engineering personnel manager of the Canadian General  Electric  Company.
Speaking at an engineering education
seminar here last week, W. F. McMullen
said the spelling mistakes he finds in letters
from engineers, many of them job applicants, are "amazing".
Some letters contain as many as five or
six mistakes. The word "batchelor" is a favorite misspelled word, he said.
He contrasted these engineers to the ar
ticulate men in top management positions
who "can make themselves clearly understood".
Contrary to current misconception, few
engineering graduates are preparing themselves academically for management positions, McMullen said.
He predicted a managerial gap will occur during the next ten years unless engineering schools start producing the men
needed to these positions — or until engineers start preparing themselves.
Slocks Norrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
FLOWERS
10°o   OFF  CORSAGES
Phone 736-7344
!i
THE HAPPY WINNER of a trip for 2 to Mexico in Mardi Gras' annual raffle
draw is Miss A. Griffith (left), of 1976 W. 40th. This ticket was donated
by C.P.A. in aid of this year's charity, the Van. Assoc, for Retarded Children.
Pictured with Miss Griffith is Miss Lorna Watson (Alpha Phi), this year's
Mardi Gras Queen.
Give Undergrad Societies & Clubs A Boost
VOTE YES
For the $3.00 Increase
THE 1967 GRAD CLASS PRESENTS
"A LANDLOCKED BOOZE CRUISE"
at the   JOHANN STRAUSS CABARET
Feb. 15, 1967 Doors Open 8:30 p.m.
(No private booze allowed)
TICKETS $1.50 CPL ALUMNI OFFICE
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
lew frame can do wonders
for the disposition.
Hofa Opting
1701 W. Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft  Mad.  QkJg,
3195 GranvilW
733-9772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
STUDENTS!
Are YOU Carrying
Fare-Paying Passengers?
Do you realize that, if you accept
regular payment from your passengers,
your whole Automobile Insurance will
be invalidated?
The cost of avoiding this is nominal
Consult vour insurance agent
immediately!
Published as a Public Service by:
THE VANCOUVER  INSURANCE
AGENTS' ASSOCIATION Tuesday,   February    14,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
EMPTY   SEATS
don't vote but
students do and
there were more
empty seats
than students in
Brock Lounge
Monday noon as
first vice-president candidates
Ray Larsen and
Don Munton
presented their
platforms. Here
Munton talks
about ombudsmen as Larsen
strokes beard
and meditates.
(See story  p. 1).
COLONIAL  OPPRESSION
...ON RESERVATION
'Gov't out to crush Indian culture'
Canada's 220,000 Indians wage a constant
battle with the federal government to keep their
culture.
Five Indians from across the country told 70
students at an Internationalists' meeting Friday
of the restrictions the Indian Affairs department
has put on the reservation Indian.
One Mohawk said reserve children were strapped if they were caught speaking their native
language at recess or lunch hour when he went to
elementary school ten years ago.
Both the potlatch and the Sun Dance have been
banned since the white man took over, they said.
This is because these events take up too much
time according to white man's standards.
A Sun Dance takes two weeks to prepare for,
two weeks to perform and two weeks to recuperate from.
To the Indian it is a very important religious
event — to the white administrator it is a waste of
time.
The Indians, delegates to the Canadian Union
Fee fight vote set,
council urges yes
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
AMS attempts to lead a fee fight began
again Monday when council moved to hold a
campus-wide referendum on a prospective fee
hike.
Councillors urged a "yes" vote on the March
1 ballot, which seeks student approval for a
three-university joint effort against fee raises.
Text of the referendum is:
"If inadequate provincial operating grants
to British Columbia's universities result in a
tuition increase for 1967-68, do you authorize
and support a co-ordinated program by the
student councils of UBC, the University of
Victoria, and Simon Fraser University to take
steps to ensure withdrawal of that fee increase?"
The -referendum was amended from the
earlier wording authorizing the councils to take
steps ensuring "non-payment" of the increase.
"We don't want it to appear radical or
irresponsible," said second-vice-president-elect
Kim Campbell.
Council also sent a request to the university
senate urging the full membership of three or
more students on the senate, and direct student
representation on any committee struck to con-
TO PAGE 6
SEE: Suite Victory
of Students Indian seminar held at UBC Thursday
to Saturday, said oppression has been the theme
of the Indian-white relationship since it started.
They said the Indians have been exploited like
colonial people.
Mike Mitchell of the St. Regis reserve in
Quebec said he had seen land taken from the
reserve for the St. Lawrence Seaway and freeway
development.
Little compensation had been granted, he said.
Mitchell, a Mohawk, is the future chief of the
Six Nations.
The St. Regis group is beginning to consider
measures to block the seaway if proper compensation is not made for the expropiation of their
lands, he said.
Also at the meeting in Acadia Camp was Gerry
Gamble, a community developer fired last winter
by the Indian Affairs department.
Gamble, who was working on the St. Regis
reserve,  learned  the  Mohawk  language,   dances
and longhouse tradition, thus breaking the Indian
Affairs rules which virtually forbid any meaningful communication between the Indians and the
government workers.
Mitchell said the St. Regis people have asked
Gamble to stay as long as he wishes.
"He has our complete trust. If he had wished
to doublecross us he had his chance long ago."
The delegation, which included Cree and Capi-
lano Indians, said however that white workers
were not needed on reservations.
Indian representatives said more good could
be accomplished by students working in the white
community near reservations educating the whites,
rather than trying to save the Indians. They said
they did not want missionaries.
Already, a militancy is arising among the
young Indians. Tribes across Canada which a few
years ago had no connection, today realize they
have common grounds in that they are fighting a
common enemy.
Board not public'—Mac
By MURRAY McMILLAN
UBC president John Macdonald Monday sent
The Ubyssey the board of governors' refusal to
allow the paper to report board meetings.
The statement read in part:
vThe Ubyssey has compared the university to
a municipality. This is not a valid comparison.
The university is not a legislative body, but an
institution devoted to learning.
"The Board of Governors has vested in it
by the Universities Act
the management and
control of the property,
revenue business and affairs of the university.
"The board wishes to
conduct its business in
an atmosphere conducive to sound decisionmaking. Many of the
items on each agenda
are necessarily of a con-
MACDONALD fidential nature.
"It is easier for the board to consider proposed policies and decisions in an objective and
analytical way when meetings are in camera
rather than in the envoronment of a public meeting."
The statement continued, giving ways in
which the board felt communication is now being
improved,  for  example  student-faculty  advisory
committees and student liaison committees.
Student leaders were disappointed with the
decision.
"Decisions of the board should be made open
as are the deliberations of city councils," said AMS
president Peter Braund. "The AMS is committed
to open board meetings, except where personnel
information is involved.
"The board says it is interested in establishing
lines of communication — open meetings would
only add to this communication.
"At present, decisions are being made where
students don't know what segment of their opinion
is being considered."
AMS first vice-president Charlie Boylan was
opposed to the decision.
'Tor once I agree with the editorial policy of
the Vancouver Province. They state the case
simply — the university is a public institution paid
for by public funds, therefore the decision-making
body of that institution should have open meetings.
"The letter to The Ubyssey from the board
says the board is responsible to the province as a
whole — why then are all its members from the
corporate elite? The people most concerned with
higher education are the students and faculty, and
they should be represented.
"It's not enough to express opinions as such,
we want to share in the process of decision
making." THE II9YSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner  Canadian University  Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
FEBRUARY   14,   1967
Burn, baby, bum
"What we are doing to Vietnam may
become clear if he same percentages
are applied to the American population.
"They mean that one out of every
two American families with four children
would be struck with the tragedy of
having at least one child kilted or
maimed.
"There is a good chance, too, that
the father would be dead as well. At
the very least, he is probably far from
home."
William F. Pepper,
"The Children of Vietnam",
Ramparts, January 1967.
In 1965, the U.S. escalated its Vietnam conflict and
bombed the north, claiming Ho Chi Minh's men were
invading the south to aid the Viet Cong.
Last July, it admitted there were only 400 northern
soldiers in the south in 1965, and in effect confirmed
America as the aggressor illegally intervening in a
wholly civil war.
But for those who remain unconvinced of the Vietnamese horror, sweep away all the political charges and
counter-charges, information and lies, statements and
coups.
Look at this picture. It is of an
eyelidless boy whose chin was
melted into his neck by burning
napalm. Napalm is a jelly-like gaso-
line-polyethelene compound that
sticks to skin and burns white-hot,
searing flame.
Napalm is only part of the
arsenal. Since 1961, it is estimated
one million children have been killed or maimed. That figure is usually cunningly disguised in an aggregate civilian casualty total. Over half
the civilians in Vietnam are less than 16 years old.
That small nation is in turmoil. Its society is pounded
to rubble. In places, the very earth itself — according to
one American pilot — is scorched and burned like a
crater field on  the  moon.
In the name of a kind of freedom which has already
meant 25 years of continuous
war, Canada has remained aloof
from the conflict and refused
to speak for peace.
American forces resumed
bombing North Vietnam on
Monday morning. UBC students
and all Canadian students, in
the name of humanity and
against genocide, can at least
urge their federal government
to speak against America.
More and more voices, including those of UBC students
via a referendum tomorrow, can
yet exert enough pressure to remove the batallions of
foreign troops from that small and bleeding nation. Vote
to ask Canada to speak against the bombing.
DAVID   SLOAM
. . . AND IT IS my case, your honor, that the accused on the fourteenth of February of
this year, did wilfully and unlawfully assault the deceased with intent to cause bodily
harm.
k£TTERS^TB[
Bottoms  up
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Aren't we, in asking for
representation on the board
of governors and senate, putting the horse before the cart?
I think we are. Students, if
desirous of having a say in
university affairs, should
work from the  bottom up.
First, students should follow the example of the sci-
e n c e undergrads, forming
faculty liaison committees,
participating in curriculum
revisions, and learning the
problems   of   the  situation.
With the background gained and with a fund of knowledgeable manpower created,
students should work up to
wider decision-making capacities.
But starting from the top
down is wrong. Who will represent the student body? The
"old guard"? We need more
balanced individuals than the
student "activist."
The nomination, though
bringing forth some worthy
candidates, once again demonstrated that the AMS cannot attract candidates of the
best quality and fabric — rational, far-sighted, diplomatic
candidates.
Who are we to say we know
best and should sit on the top
bodies? On what merit do we
warrant the trust? None at
the present time. We have
much ground to break before
that time arrives.
STEPHEN M. BECKOW
arts 3
Conservative  view
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Now that the first slate
election results are out, I can
say something about political
choice. In the race for AMS
president, Shaun Sullivan
easily won over Bob Cruise.
Sullivan, as leader of the
campus Liberals, will probably follow the same policies
as his Liberal predecessors,
Byron Hender and Peter
Braund.
I don't believe that these
policies can be rationally or
objectively explained.
However, they probably
will focus on presently popular Liberal ideals: against
tuition fees for low-cost housing, student representation in
university government, equal
opportunity, racial equality,
and similar benevolent policies,
Fine. UBC will never
achieve the intra-continental
notoriety of being a 'communist hell-hole' ais the University of California at Berkeley has often been described.
The   university,   then,   will
eMt&r-
remain a middle class institution, always following the
currently popular trends. The
present trend is a socialistic
one, toward the *new left'
which the Liberals espouse,
instead of a conservative
trend evident on many western American campuses. The
university Will continue to
supply British Columbia,
Washington,     Oregon,     and
California with qualified
technicians so urgently needed today, thereby performing
TO PAGE 5
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City       .   ._ Danny Stoffman
News  Al Birnie
Photo      .      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    -    _ Claudia Gwinn
Sports      _     Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus Kris Emmott
Ass't News  Al Donald
Ass't City __    -  __   -    Tom Morris
CUP         Bert Hill
"What is a Ubyssey staffer?"
asked the ontological Wang Ming.
"Wherefore is he why? Whither is
he withering?" Ming was eyed
threateningly by these why staffers: Norman Gidney, Val Zuker
who was puce, Charlotte Haire,
a morguer, David Hastings, Janie
Daidlaw, Peter Shapiro, Val Thom
and headline Boni Lee.
Fotos by Don Kydd, Chris
Blake, Kurt Hilger and Dennis
Gans.
Sportswatohers, coolly dispassionate, were Mike Jessen, Tony
Hodge, Ross Evans and Jim Maddin.
It's $3 hike or starving AMS, says Hoye
Treasurer-elect Dave Hoye here makes his case
for a $3 AMS hike. The Ubyssey acknowledges the
need for the hike.
We suggest you vote for or against it on the
basis of your faith in your new council, and on your
willingness to force that council from outside to
involve the AMS in academic sphere. We vote no.
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Tomorrow students will vote on a referendum
to increase the AMS fee by $3.00 to a total of
$32.0©, a figure which will remain below the
average student activity fee for Canadian universities. More than $21 of the present fee is spent
as non-discretionary grants, primarily for the student union building and for the extra-mural
athletic program, so that all other AMS activities
are financed on less than eight dollars per student.
Up to this year the non-discretionary portion
of the budget has been adequate to deal with
increasing costs and an expanding program because student enrolment has been growing, and
because the interest income that has accrued from
funds allocated to SUB have been ploughed back
into general revenue.
But with the opening of SFU and the expansion of UVic, the rate of growth of the UBC student body has slowed, ad so has the rate of revenue increase. Thus for the last two years AMS
treasurers have run very tight budgets, and ex-
cercised scrupulous cntrol over all expenditures.
In many instances this has resulted in more
effective use of available funds. To the credit of
the committees that organized them, frosh orientation broke even this year, and the homecoming
program made a profit of about $700. Both were
subsidized last year.
But other areas have suffered.
Special events had its budget cut.
No undergraduate society will publish an anti-
calendar this year.
The festival of the contemporary arts celebrated inside campus buildings last week. Some
missed events because brochures were not distributed around the campus, and I think a lot
more people missed the external color, creativity
and enthusiasm with which the festival enlivens
this dreary month. Brochures and displays and
color cost money, and the festival received none.
One hundred thousand people will come to the
TO PAGE 8
SEE: New Expenses Tuesday,   February    14,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
liiiiii^»iill«i
a   valuable   service   for   society.
Under the leadership of
Bob Cruise, UBC could have
attained a unique position
among English-Canadian universities:  a  radical  one.
Whether or not we should
strive for that goal is questionable, but we should at
least achieve the originality
which is so often absent. Mr.
Cruise's basic complaint
about universities is that
they are irrelevant to the
world issues. As I understand
it, he places a large extent of
the blame upon the corporate structure of our society.
This he proposes to change.
This anti-corporationisrn
could perhaps be termed,
lacking a superior term, anarchism, as it would do away
with the economic structures
on which our society is based.
To make university more
relevant, Cruise advocates
expansion - of the academic
functions of the AMS by
bringing i n controversial,
well-known guest lecturers.
To achieve this, he would cut
back the service-station functions, hoping that students
would participate more widely and actively in the relevant arenas.
It is unfortunate that the
outcome of the election was
based on a very minor issue,
a student strike of the university. This issue was blown
out of all proportion by the
campaign.
As a result, the vote choice
became simple; if you want
to strike if the government
does not meet educational
commitments, support Cruise;
if you do not, Sullivan. This
is, of course, a ridiculous way
to elect anyone.
The office of AMS president lasts for one year, and
the strike issue was forwarded by the present indecisive
council to maintain the reputation • of the 'action' executive. Thus the election lacked
a real issue, and students,
without any meaningful alternatives, made the safe
choice.
Issues for the second VP
elections were clear-cut. Kim
Campbell ran on a platform
of action when necessary.
I think that this is rather
vague, but so was the platform. Doug Halverson followed the action platform of
Cruise. What platform did
Maynard Hogg run on? I
didn't come into contact with
him, so I can't say. Halverson
favored a strike if it were
needed. The strike was the
only aspect of the platform
which was discussed, so I can
presume the voting was determined by it, despite the
allegation by Campbell that
she is 'cuddlier'. During
soap-box oratory outside the
library, Campbell accused
Halverson of being a 'me-too'
politician. But I contend that
*he is a 'me-too, maybe' politician, without definite policies.
I hope she does a good job
at  public   relations.
As long as our student politicos are 'me too' and 'maybe'
politicians, and students have
no   meaningful   choice,   stu
dent council will remain an
ineffectual organization, only
adequate to distribute funds
to various student clubs. We
need a student government
which is willing to change
itself. Contradictory as it may
seem, this might toe done by
a conservative council, free
of the impracticalities always put forward by the radical.
Don't conservatives ever
run for office at UBC?
ROBERT  KLEYN
science 2
Why  difference?'
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
In regard to the proposed
referendum for increasing
AMS fees, it seems rather
odd that suddenly an increase
in students' payments is justified.
When it was announced
that tuition fees would be increased the AMS went up in
arms and plans were made
for protest marches and
strikes. However, when a
proposal to increase AMS student activity fees was suggested, suddenly the student
body is urged to vote yes.
Why the difference? The
student body is still paying.
In the case of tuition fees the
money is used for improvement of our education. In the
case of AMS student fees the
money is used to further student activities.
Either way the AMS council seems to be able to pull
itself remarkably through
blunder after blunder.
Why doesn't it plan a protest march to Victoria in support of increased grants to
AMS   student  activitty   fees?
Wm. VANDELFT JR.
arts 1
Home  front  first
Editor, The Ubyssey:
"Words for Internationalists":
Why is it that American
aggressors always invite more
criticism than communist
ones? Why do the people who
protest choose to display sympathy for the burning children in Vietnam, when millions of children enjoy the
slow death of starvation in
India?
Why do the charitable attempts of Mardi Gras criticism from this faction, when
that form of sympathy is so
much more effective than
better words?
Why is it that they are associated with a cause that is
alien to their own personal
lives? Those that protest for
the napalmed Vietnamese and
the million or so dead communists in Indonesia have aspired to the international
level before their own "home
front" has been won.
Albeit that the world situation is of great importance to
the welfare of every nation,
but there are so many problems in our society that affect the welfare of every
person. Such Canadian affairs
as the treatment of Indians
or even the state of our education system could exercise
the most active mind. Why
don't these problems attract
those   who   protest?
MICHAEL H. DAVIDSON
science 2
Come  again?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Since my arrival at this
university some years ago. I
have become increasingly
aware of a group aptly refer-
ed to as the red hoarde.
Their supposed prodigious
powers both mental and physical have suffered greatly in
the ensuing years, mostly as
a result of irresponsible acts
—ruined clothes as a result
of red dye for one. Even their
professed ability to 'hold
forty beer' is no longer valid
(through personal acquaintance). The last virtue to vanish is the epitome of campus
virility.
I have suspected this for
some time but recently they
have seen fit to conform my
suspicions, and those of others, who would care to glance
at the two pairs of red feet
depicted on sidewalks, garbage cans, etc. The position of
the feet as indicated by the
toes indicates that the victim
is either rather abnormal or
the legs are crossed. In either
case it does not say much for
the gentleman's choice or
technique.
ROBERT  BOYLE
arts 4
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FOR GROUP SALES AND THEATRE PARY  INFORMATION CALL RE.  1-6151 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   14,   1967
Suite  victory over city planner
FROM PAGE 3
sider the question.
Council's request points out
the recent action of the University of Alberta at Calgary
and SFA in allowing student
representation on the senate or
equivalent body.
In other business, first vice-
president Charlie Boylan reported on the successful AMS
visit to Vancouver city council last week to protest the
housing  shortage.
"We repeated our stand of
last fall, and numerous other
groups presented similar
briefs," Boylan said.
"City council directed the
city planner to reverse his
earlier refusal to call a one-
year moratorium on the closing of illegal suites in the Point
Grey area.
"What we asked for in the
fall has now been won," he
said.
Council also moved to condemn the stand of the board of
governors on secret meetings.
The board Thursday refused
The Ubyssey permission to report its meetings.
Council urges students to
vote "yes" on the first point
of Wednesday's Vietnam referendum.
The opinion referendum is
worded as follows:
"I believe  the  Canadian  government should—
1) Advocate the U.S. government stop the bombing in
North Vietnam and negotiate
for the withdrawal of U.S. and
allied troops from South Vietnam (yes or no)
2) Continue its present policy
of selling armaments to the
U.S. which are used in Vietnam (yes or no)
3) Pledge total support for
U.S. policy as presently carried
out in Vietnam (yes or no)."
The referendum will be used
as a guide for the society to
inform the Canadian government of UBC students' stand.
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Address- Tuesday,   February   14,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
BEER PARLOR
... EXAMS
Radical method OK'd
By CHARLOTTE  HAIRE
Genetics professor David Suzuki's radical teaching methods are okay with science
dean V. J. Okulitch.
Okulitch said Friday if students do not
object to Suzuki's classes, he sees no reason
to interfere.
"Any method which improves understanding of the subject is desirable and
good," said Okulitch, "even if the
methods are a bit
unorthodox."
Suzuki's methods include all
night exams and
seminars at the
Fraser Arms beer
parlor.
Okulitch said he
was concerned last
year    with     the
OKULITCH
night exams. He said he was afraid students
would be so tired next day they would not
be able to attend classes.
After Okulitch had written to the head
of the zoology department last year the student sent a delegation to him explaining
how much they enjoyed Suzuki's teaching.
Suzuki charged last week UBC's science
faculty was not providing a complete education involving self-awareness and university awareness in the students.
Okulitch said he has been thinking the
same thing.
"It is just a matter of how much time
is available," he said, "It is difficult to
balance a desire for a liberal arts course
with that for advancement and specialization."
The current general course in science
is very liberal, demanding only 36 units of
science. Students may spend the remaining
24 units on whatever else they want, Okulitch said.
He said he knows of no other professors
following Suzuki's teaching methods.
"It takes a special kind of personality
to do this sort of thing and get away with
it," he said.
"Suzuki is both unusual and popular, he
is so enthusiastic for his subject, that he
generates enthusiasm in others."
Unregarded
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Thousands of teenage red
blorgs stampeded through the
streets here Sunday without
the slightest regard for traffic
signs.
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G.S.A. ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
LOWER  LOUNGE  OF THE GRADUATE   STUDENT  CENTRE
THURSDAY,   FEBRUARY  23  at   12:45   P.M.
GSA    ELECTIONS
Nominations for the positions of:
President Special Services Officer
1st   Vice   President Club Night Chairman
2nd   Vice-President Sports  Officer
Treasurer Public   Relations Officer
Secretary Cultural   Officer
Social Officer
open at 9:00 A.M. Thursday, February 16, 1967 and close
at 5:00 P.M. Thursday, February 23, 1967. Nominations
should be addressed to:
THE RETURNING OFFICER
G.S.A.
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
Election of Officers will be held by secret ballot at the
Graduate Student Centre Friday, 24th February, 9:30 A.M.
to 5:00 P.M.
CAREERS IN PHARMACY'
"field   with   a   future"
SPEAKER
FILM
TOUR
FACULTY OF PHARMACY
George Cunningham  Building
COME & SEE WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
THURS., FEB. 23rd, T967
12:30-Rm. 171
Education Committee of the
Pharmaceutical Association of B.C.
410 Dominion Bank Building,
207 West Hastings St., Vancouver 3, B.C.
DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY
Halifax Canada
Graduate Study Awards
The Faculty of Graduate studies of Dalhousie University offers for competition a variety of awards to support graduate study in the Physical
and Life Sciences (including Oceanography and Medicine), and in the
Humanities and Social Sciences. The following is an outline of the major
awards available:
SPECIAL VISITING FELLOWSHIPS
These unusual fellowships in the Humanities and Social Sciences are designed to offer a year of comparative freedom to outstanding students
who need this time either to complete their doctoral theses (for submission
to the universities with which they are now affiliated), or to revise recently accepted Ph.D. theses for publication. VFsiting Fellows are asked
to do only minimal teaching at an advanced level, and to give one or
two public lectures on their researches. The stipends, based on a 12-
month year, are $4,000. for single Fellows and $5,000. for married Fellow's,
with   travel   allowances.
POSTDOCTORAL VISITING FELLOWSHIPS
Open in all fields of study at Dalhousie, these Fellowships are tenable in
the amount of $6,000 for a 12-month year for the purpose of bringing
to the University those scholars who can contribute to advanced studies
at Dalhousie. It should be noted that applications in the natural sciences
are required  before Feb.   1, others by  March   1.
IZAAK WALTON KILLAM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS
The first Killam Scholars, approximately thirty in number, will be chosen
for study leading towards the Master's or doctoral degrees in all fields
during, 1967-68. The Killam Scholarships range from $3,000. to $5,000. in
value and do not require the performance of instructing or demonstrating
duties.
DALHOUSIE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Designed  to  support  students  working  in  all  fields,  Dalhousie  Graduate
Fellowships range up to $3,000. for Master's students, and up to $4,000.
for Ph.D. students.   The awards are based on a 12-month year.
Applications should be made to the Dean of Graduate Studies, Dalhousie
University,   Halifax,   Nova   Scotia.
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN ALL THE WOMEN SUDDENLY SAY
NO?
lySiStrata
DEPARTMENT  OF   THEATRE   STUDENT   PRODUCTION
ARISTOPHANES FARCICAL
SEX STRIKE WITH MUSIC
DANCE AND ET CETERA
ADAPTED AND DIRECTED BY DONALD SOULE WITH
ORIGINAL MUSIC BY JOHN CHAPPELL. DESIGNED BY
DARWIN REID PAYNE. DANCES BY GRACE MacDONALD
FREDERIC  WOOD  THEATRE - FEBRUARY 21-25
Matinee Feb. 23 at 12:30.   Student tickets 75c Everyone else $2.00
Book Early—Only 6 performances. Box office FW Theatre, Rm. 207. Ph. 228-2678 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   14,   1967
-5-2T trSHflH.' THE'LATEST'RE
Jf ~ PORT SHOWS THAT IN '
115 PAST FIVE VEARS THE
BLORGS HAVE LEARNED
__ HAVE TO    „
\DEFEND MVSEL
nttU.
_ BETTER LOCK
MN0O6/fSOr\£.0HE.
GET ME AT
MINUTE.'
JHEV'RS COMING!^ infil-
TRATION'.' FRUNOKINA \t> S£IZ/fl/$)
CONTKQL.'CfiLL MORALMAIM!'
THI5 flAV 6E. IT!)
'0ENERAL J THERE'5"5QME trouble)
- THE BORDER! Xf^TEnT
§   ___
New expenses eat up slowly rising income
From Page 4
campus during dpen house, a superb opportunity
for this public university to encourage the populist
support it requires. The AMS was committed to a
financial contribution of $2,000 for this project.
For budgetary reasons it will in fact contribute
half of that.
Revenues will increase only slightly next year,
and there will be no interest income from SUB,
so that without a student fee increase the AMS
must refuse support to new, less certain endeavors, and struggle to maintain traditional, proven,
but perhaps not always relevant programs. It will
not be seeking, say, to establish a second newspaper but haggling over the merits of two or three
Uibyssey issues per week. Not trying to make
symposia an integral part of every student's university experience, but attempting to make them
pay.
And there are several new and crucial areas
where monies must toe provided.
We spend $78,000 so that about 1,000 students
can participate in inter-university athletic competitions. In a similiar manner we should be will
ing and able to support students who want to
participate in inter-university confrontations on
academic, artistic, political, and theatrical fields.
Should we be considering a "free university"
in conjunction with the new arts program?
Provincial grants to the universities this year
are $12 million short of what was required. It is
worth noting that a $100 increase in fees will
provide less than $3 million to the three universities. We must oppose that increase, and it
will cost money. The AMS had a $17,000 deficit
the year of the Back Mac campaign.
I think we can also expect that the residence
construction program is a low priority capital
item, and may be cut from the administration
ibudget. Vancouver has the second highest suite
occupancy rate in Canada today, and city council
is gradually eliminating apartments in the Point
Grey area.
There can be no doubt that we will face a very
severe housing crisis next fall, and that we are
going to require funds to expand the summer
housing service, and perhaps for emergency measures such as a trailer park.
But these will be short term solutions for long
term problems. Since higher education ha; become exclusively a provincial responsibility the
B.C. assembly of students must become a viable
and effective organization. We must find monies
to establish a secretariat that will research, inform and lobby in Victoria. I think we should
also consider establishing a fund now that will
provide for the type of non-partisan student involvement that made higher education an issue in
the Cariboo toy-election.
Should the referendum fail to get the two-
thirds majority it requires, it will almost certainly
be resubmitted in March. A new and mostly green
council will be looking toward a change in UBC
administration, an academic fee increase, a critical
student housing shortage, and a multiuniversity
community which is becoming increasingly isolated from itself. It should be planning, building and
negotiating from strength, and not be burdened
with the struggle and expense of pushing through
a student fee referendum.
The $3.00 increase is needed and merited now.
Vote for it.
DAVID HOYE
treasurer elect
For the $3.00 A.M.S. Fee Increase
WHY?
Several budgets such as undergraduate societies, special events, scholarship
exchange and academic activities have been cut and severely strained this year.
If there is no increase, drastic cutbacks will occur in the next few years — i.e.,
athletics, publication, Ubyssey, etc.
The A.M.S. is badly strapped for funds to assist such vital activities as HIGHER
EDUCATION, STUDENT HOUSING ACTION and ACADEMIC REFORM.
The A.M.S. fee is one of the lowest in Canada as compared  to the national
average of $44.00.
•  Your Students' Council strongly supports this increase.
VOTE YES
VOTE YES
VOTE YES Tuesday,  February   14,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
150,000 VIEW
Visitors gawk, openly
More than 150,000 visitors will swarm
in, out, and through UBC during Open
House,   1967.
Theme of this year's Open House, which
occurs March 3-4, is "The University and
the Nation".
Open House is designed to acquaint the
people of B.C. with the university, and to
demonstrate our contribution to the community.
A special edition of The Ubyssey with
a press run of over 70,000 will be distributed to visitors. It will contain a program
and map of Open House as well as articles
on UBC's history) plans and needs.
Special Events plans folk dancing, films,
a paint-in, a poetry reading, an original
UBC play, and a happening
There will be approximately 60 faculty
displays
Home ec will run a paper dress making
contest. Aggies will barbecue chicken in the
field house. Architecture plans an "erection" in front of the Lasserre building. First
and second year engineers will help control traffic with the help of a radio communications system.
Chairman Jim Taylor expects 500 girls
will volunteer to staff information booths
and  serve  as  guides.
Clubs will set up booths in the armory.
There will be tours and meeting spots
for high school visitors.
Phrateres will provide babysitting services in Brock.
Open House times Friday March 3 are
from 3 p.m. to 11 pm and Saturday, March
4 from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
The 15-member Open House student
committee, working on a budget of $14,000,
has been planning the event since the summer. Last open house was in 1964, when
120,000 visitors toured the campus.
Persky platform cuts courses
A first year arts student is beginning an
early campaign for arts undergraduate society president.
Stan Persky, describing himself as "practically a moderate", said he is beginning a
grass roots campaign to bring out more
student voters on Feb. 27.
Last year's election for arts president
drew 250 of the 5,000 arts students.
"To bring out the people and get them
talking I am emphasizing local, specific issues," said Persky.
HSs platform includes: advocation of
reading courses and less hours, hiring professors and beginning a free university, accommodating students to keep them out of
rain while waiting to write exams, and discouraging exams in courses where they are
not   really   necessary,   making   obligatory
Leaders protest
drafty conditions
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CUPI) — Seventeen youth leaders, representing left-wing,
right-wing and middle-of-the-road student
groups, recently called for abolition of the
draft and the creation of new programs for
voluntary national service.
They charged that "the present draft
system . . . is incompatible with traditional
American principles of individual freedom
within a democratic society".
The meeting, sponsored by Moderator
magazine, marked the first time such a di-
ferse political group had reached agreement
on a major policy statement.
Although participants signed the statement as individuals, it is expected that most
of the organizations represented will officially accept the position taken.
Introducing the conference statement,
Moderator publisher Sherman B. Chicker-
ing said, "No one in government seems
aware of how widespread and deep runs
the resentment toward the draft among
young people."
language labs more interesting, and publishing an anti-calendar.
Assistant named
Former dressmaker and saleswoman and
more recently principal of York House
school, Mrs. Clare Earle, has been appointed administrative assistant to UBC president John Macdonald.
Mrs. Earle has replaced former executive
assistant Gordon
Selman who is
moving to the job
of director of the
extension department.
She has worked
with students and
the YWCA in California and has
had experience in
dressmaking, sales,
survey shopper,
and executive secretary to an architect.
More   recently   she   lead   York   House
school, a private girts school in Vancouver,
from 1958 to 1964.
SEATTLE PROF
ACIDLY FIRED
SEATTLE (UNS) — A history professor at the University of Washington
has been given his dismissal notices for
involvement with (LSD.
Dr. John Spellman, advocated the
use of the psychedelic and marijuana
under controlled conditions.
Spellman's three year contract with
the university expires in June. The department has refused to reappoint him.
Spellman said he had made no final
decision on what he is going to do.
BEHIND
THAT WAVE
THERE'S
A WINK...
for the sped-1 savings on
perf-Muun-t wm
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: und conditioning treatments.
Marvellous reductions on hairpieces too.
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U.B.C.
PLAYWRIGHTS
Production   for   your   plays
1967 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
One-Act PLAY FESTIVAL
Deadline MARCH 20, 1967
Get Rules & Entry Forms from
Dept. of Creative Writing 171 Buchanan
Dept. of Theatre 207 Frederic Wood
Alumni Association 252 Brock
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM TO BE HELD ON
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 15
This referendum is to be used as guidance for the Students'
Council to inform the Canadian government of student
opinion of the war in Vietnam.
"I believe the Canadian government should:—
1. Advocate the U.S. government stop the bomibing in
North Vietnam and negotiate for the withdrawal of
U.S. and allied troops from South Vietnam.
Yes  No 	
2. Continue its present policy of selling armaments to
the U.S. which are used in Vietnam.
Yes. No	
3. Pledge total support for U.S. policy as presently being
carried out in Vietnam.
Yes  No... 	
"Whereas the A.M.S. Budget is facing serious cutbacks;
Whereas increased funds would significantly assist such activities as undergraduate societies, intramural sports, publications, academic activities and further extend the A.M.S.
programme to additional students;
Whereas increased funds would enable the A.M.S. to participate more fully in the areas of student housing, university reform and higher education promotion;
Whereas the Students' Council strongly supports this increase;
Resolved that the A.M.S. Student Activity Fee be increased
by $3.00 to $32.00 per year
Yes.... No " Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   14,   1967
CROSS-CANADA ROUNDUP
...OF HEALTH, FINANCES
Editor claims 'interference', quits
VICTORIA (CUP) — The editor of the
University of Victoria's student newspaper
the Martlet, resigned after accusing publications director Keith Guelpa of "ineffectiveness in council" and "interference" in
Martlet affairs.
Tim Glover, Martlet editor since September, said Guelpa interfered with The
Martlet "both business-wise and editorially".
He also claimed students' council had shown
personal hostility towards him.
But council president Stephen Bigsby
denied Glover's accusations.
"I don't think any allegations Tim made
are particularly true. Guelpa, in my estimation, has done a competent job in face
of continuing difficulties this year," he said.
"As to council hostility, I'd like to see
instances found .... If people are to find
their way out of difficult situations, they
should be careful of putting blame on other
people rather than their own shoulders."
Students  rule?
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The University of
Manitoba may soon join a growing group of
Canadian universities which have succeeded
in gaining student representation on university governing bodies.
The university faculty council, which
governs U of Ms third largest faculty, has
passed a motion to give students six seats on
the council.
The decision, which received almost unanimous approval from the council, will go
before the board of governors Thursday.
If the board approves the motion, it will
be the first time U of M students have participated in administrative decision making.
Protesting students
claim they'll go nuts
REGINA (CUP) — University of Saskatchewan
students have demonstrated here in an attempt to get
university officials to ease academic pressures.
About 400 students carried placards reading 'We
like our sanity', 'A care today is a cure for tomorrow',
and   'Down with the semester system'.
Student leaders later met with the faculty council
president to request that study time be set aside between completion of lectures and ^beginning of final
exams, and that the faculty council meet with students
to discuss the semester system.
Leeches
get gallons
ofgoubulin
UBC students bled in trickles
and torrents all last week but
they didn't bleed enough.
The final result was 500
pints below the amount expected, reported Jim Whyte,
forestry 2, organizer of this
year's drive.
"The quota was 3,400 pints
but we collected only 2764,"
said Whyte.
Total number of contributors, including blood donors,
serum donors, and those who
reported but were unable to
give was 2924 students.
Foresters bled the most with
73.4 per cent of the faculty
bleeding.
Dentistry came second in the
faculty race with 54 per cent.
A total of 34.9 per cent of
agriculture and 30.7 per cent
of nursing turned out.
Bloodiest residence was St.
Andrews with 68 per cent. A
total of 48.4 per cent of Fort
Camp men and 47 per cent
of the women bled.
"The Red Cross would like
to thank those who helped
organize this year's drive,"
said Whyte.
"UBC is the largest single
contributor in B.C. We are
very disappointed we didn't
make the quota."
For students with blood still
left in their veins a one-day
blitz might be held by the
Red Cross in March.
Male to  head
home ec school
The only male to come to
the UBC school of home
economics will become the
school's head on July 1.
With a master's degree in
animal nutrition and more
than twenty papers to his
credit, Dr. Melivin Lee is
coming to UBC from California.
There he is assistant pro-
lessor of preventive medicine and lecturer in dentistry, specializing in teaching
and research in nutrition
and biochemistry at the University of California Medical
Center in San Francisco.
THIS  IS THE
EXCITEMENT
OF   CANADAIR!
First with the new and daring! First with the tried and
proven! Always a challenge! Stimulating! Rewarding!
Wouldn't you like to be a part of this excitement?
Our interviewer will be on your campus on February 21.
Be sure to investigate your career opportunities with Canadair.
CANADAIR
Limited, P.O. Box 6087, Montreal Tuesday,   February   14,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
Marginalia, missing pages
make library books illegible
DEFACED BOOK
— don kydd photo
. positively illogical
Spanish professor John Mcdonald in an open letter has
condemned defacement of university  library  books.
"It's not just beginning students who do it either, presumably it's the faculty as
well," said McDonald.
"What annoys me is the underlining in ink and the comments written in the margin."
"One student told me he
couldn't read a copy of the
Divine Comedy because of all
the underlining and comments."
McDonald said fine arts
toooks have had photographs
removed from their pages.
Assistant librarian I. F. Bell
said he "deplored" the defacements but there was very little
the library could do about it.
"Outside of exhorting the
students not to do it we'd have
to check each book as it left
the library and again when it
was returned. This would cost
more than it would be worth."
Grads develop resources
UOBC geology graduates have been directly involved in discovering Canadian mineral
deposits worth $6 billion and have made
major contributions to $19 billion more.
These totals were released Thursday in
an 18 month survey of graduates' and their
work completed by the UBC department of
geology.
"In earlier days in Canada many resources were discovered without too much
difficulty by recognizing conspicuous oxidized outcrops or soil seeps, which required
no special training," said W. H. Mathews,
head of UBC's geology department.
"But most of the obvious discoveries
have been made. Deposits now being sought
offer little or no surface indication, and are
much harder to find.
"Consequently, modern exploration is
conducted mainly toy university trained geologists, geophysicists, and geological engineers.
"It is not surprising that graduates trained in these fields at UBC are prominent in
current development of our mining resources," said Mathews.
He also claimed that graduates who were
contributing to mineral discoveries were also
helping to pay for the operation and finance
of Canada.
"The university as a whole can take
pride in the achievements of its graduates,
and can justly claim that though it has not
directly participated in these developments,
it has indirectly contributed most substantially to the wealth of the nation," he said.
"Through taxes and revenues coming
from new mines and oil fields the university's graduates have helped to pay for its
operation."
How much Guv?
A member of UBC's board of governors
will represent UBC on the provincial financial advisory board which alots government  grants to the three  universities.
Allan McGavin will succeed John Liersch
on the iboard which has one representative
from each of the universities.
The chairman of the board, Dean S. N.
Chant, and three other members are appointed by the provincial government.
the
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Announcement
to
UBC STUDENTS
The Northern Miner, the foremost authority
on Canada's Mining industry now extends to
students a special yearly subscription rate.
This weekly mining newspaper published continuously since 1915 has the largest mining
circulation in the world. It is a valuable
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Start reading The Northern Miner each week
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Take advantage of this special student offer.
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        - Year of Graduation Page  12
THE       U  - YSSE Y
Tuesday,  February  14,   1967
Vote Wednesday for first vice:
Larsen
As an alternative to a strike
if tuition fees are raised I
suggest students could (and
legally) withhold, next September, their second term
fees. If the 60 per cent of
students who usually pay
their fees in full withheld this
would put pressure on the
administration and mean four
more months to negotiate
with administration and provincial  government.
Equalization grants for out-
of-town students.
Transfer $70,000 AMS financing of athletics to administration thus eliminating
need for AMS fee raises.
Residence students pay for
Totem and Lower Mall and
will pay for new residence
complex. They should have
say in design and facilities
for buildings they are financing.
Use AMS funds to launch a
free university at UBC.
Student task force to solicit
public support for post-secondary education in B.C.
RAY  LARSEN
Munton
As a candidate for AMS
first vice-president, my platform is:
For: a positive public program if fees are increased.
For: equalization grants for
out-of-town students.
For:   proposing alternatives
to the present high-cost policy
of  self-financed  residences.
For: initiating a residence
survey to provide a basis for
the design of new residences.
For: acting as an ombudsman for any students' problems with the administration.
I believe that these are realistic points; ones on which
action can be taken and results can be obtained next
year.
I would appreciate your
support.
DON MUNTON
REBATE SPRING JOY
If you want more money from your great mother, the
federal government, go to the administration office immediately
and pick-up your income tax receipts.
The IBM tax receipts will be found at the end of an endless
line by the cashier's wicket.
The receipts reduce your taxable income and usually take
students through the last bumming days of spring.
SPECIAL
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A varied  programme of  music for   brass from the  16th
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TODAY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14
12:30 Ed 100
Trumpet — Trombone — Tuba — French Horn
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Tuesday,   February    14,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
RESIDENCES IN RED
Campus co-ops spread
By Canadian University Press
University-sponsored housing projects
are steadily becoming more difficult to finance, more expensive to build and always
difficult to keep out of the red.
Rising labor costs, skyrocketing enrolments and tight-fisted university governors
are blocking the road to residential campuses in Canada.
Many Canadian universities which offer
listing services for off-campus housing are
constantly at odds with gouging landlords
who rent inadequate facilities to reluctant—
and equally broke-students.
But this gloomy picture is being changed
somewhat by the spread of co-operative
housing projects across the country, as more
and more student government and university administrations work together following the lead set by universities like Waterloo and Toronto.
Campus co-operatives are nothing new.
Twenty-nine years ago at the University of
Toronto, Campus Co-operative Residences
Inc. began operations with a rented attic
and a few army cots.
Today, the corporation owns more than
50 dilapidated Victorian houses scattered
around the outskirts of the university
grounds, and is building a $5,750,000, 20-
storey residence building scheduled for completion in June of 1968.
Known as Rochdale College, this triple-
towered structure will house 600 single students, 10 married couples and 50 faculty
members. It is expected Rochdale eventually will become an educational, residential
college.
At Waterloo, in a posh, two-year-old
student co-operative, single accommodation
can be had for $250 per trimester, or close
to $500 for a regular academic year. The
Toronto co-op houses cost students about
$460 for single accommodation, including
board.
One of the big incentives for building
new residence co-operatives is coming from
the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. In 1966, a change in mortgage lending permitted student residences to become
eligible for CMHC money.
The crown corporation now backs 90
per cent of a student residence mortgage,
A phenomenon
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—Two
symmetrical green blorgs last
week came from behind to beat
a team of pink blorgs in the
annual cake decorating and
storm door construction contest here. The defeated team
said its ontology is still intact.
with private lenders furnishing the rest. A
$1.5 millon, 15-storey married students' coop at Dalhousie University scheduled for
completion in September is being built under this legislation, and students there say
their residence dream wouldn't be near
reality  without the CMHC mortgage.
Some campuses are showing signs of
getting into the co-op housing business in a
big way. Here is a partial summary:
University of British Columbia: Last fall,
the AMS anounced plans to hire an architect, borrow between $500,000 and $1 million and build a co-op. At UBC, it was reported last fall there were 1,400 students
Waiting for university - sponsored housing
and an additional 5,500 looking for homes
off-campus.
University of Alberta: In Edmonton,
where university residences are going to
lose an estimated $17,000 this year despite
government grants, and where residence
dwellers will pay $8 a month more this
fall, university provost A. A. Ryan says,
"If students can come up with a scheme for
co-op housing and show it to be financially
feasible, it's all to the good of the university."
Dalhousie SUBs
with $3.7 million
HALIFAX (CUP) — Dalhousie University students have ended a 50-year campaign
for a new students' union building by voting 90 per cent in favor of granting $3.7
million for one.
SUB-financing will result in a $10 boost
in student activity fees. Students have voted
to increase their union fees to $20.
Meanwhile, at University of Manitoba,
a proposed new students' union building expected to cost $5.75 million and result in a
student fee boost.
Planning chairman Richard Good predicts an addition of $10-15 to the existing
$26 union fee. U of M students already pay
$6 of their union fees for the new building,
which is to be financed over the next 20
years.
Come   and   Discuss
"THE NEW
MORALITY"
in "Talk-Back"
at University Hill
United  Church
on University Boulevard
SUNDAY NIGHTS AT 7:30 P.M.
Coffee and Discussion 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Feb. 19th—The New Morality & Sex
Rev. Jim Taylor,
East Burnaby United
Church   Counsellor,
Pres.  of B.C. Conference
Feb. 26th—The   New   Morality   and
The Use of Drugs
Rev. Ted Kropp,
Chaplain, Matsqui Centre
for Drug Addiction
Mar. 5th—The New Morality and
Marriage and Divorce
Dr. Reg Wilson,
Union College of B.C.
Mar. 12th—The   New  Morality  and
Church & Community life
Rev. Ted Nichols,
Exec. Sec.  B.C. Conference
ARTS NEEDS PEOPLE
LIKE YOU!
SIGN UP AS A GUIDE FOR HIGH
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Canada have participated in CHECKMATE'S computer-
dating program. Long-range plans include computerized
dances, inter-municipal and inter-provincial dating for
people visiting other parts of Canada (e.g. Expo!), and
many more. Why not try it?
OPERATION CHECKMATE
Brochures distributed with today's Ubyssey
If you can't find a brochure on campus, complete the coupon below and
send for one todayl
OPERATION CHECKMATE
4601   W.  7th Ave.
Vancouver 8,  B.C.
Please send me your free brochure
NAME ....    -          .-
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For the $3.00 Increase
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12. 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS   —
12:45
• 2:45 p.m.*
WEDNESDAYS —
2:00
7:30
3:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS   —
3:00 ■
7:30
5:00 p.m.
- 9:30 p.m."
SATURDAYS   —
3:00
7:30 -
- 5:00 p.m.**
9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 -
2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
Students .35
Students .50
Adults .60
Adults .75
ADMISSION: Afternoons  —
Evenings      —
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
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encore!   m
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by Aoyjpvn..
laj>-j\-Sfte,       \
_tttwt«»Mi«       . »<
tier ftocvty       ♦»♦
one day otMr
lapiavary friend wag
tmsy makituf a <3liork
hop across campus
TVKett Site espied a
truolo tranGporttng
Copioue, qwaxAfoies, ot
carrot cupcakes.
"but Sitoh. culinary
coivsuTiimaHcms call
for capital.
and capitals kiddies,
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funny we slioixJd
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Surprising, because
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put Xo advertise t*us
way if She weren*h
_ . So Qlie romped over
iiWeiairy,6_uw-wj     ^q -th© Campus Bank,,
S^-SSEfrS-F   ^  whteJi was Hearty,'
velocity eimultsmeous-y. j^k-ll, and gSCCH&red
& few Tfeiuii^p
^Iverefrorri/.
and site, stia luad -time
\o ce&ch, ttie cupcake
vendor and -Mow ilie
lob .before tie was
ovfr of si^Iuh
so wettave-a
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but one problem.
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luave i2t& £ attesfc-
r&itifc- Jx, %cwt\.
_the Ar«wta<£c
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^•■fj>cirsont manager   ^ Page 14
1
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   14,   1967
— derrek webb photo
ROD HOLLOWAY exercises karate; Sam Davidson plays 'gimme my ball back you scab';
Doug Brazier stands and looks on; Rick Hobsoh prepares to leap the frog. The game is
rugby.  The  Birds won  this  game  8-5,  but lost  series   16-14.
UBC rugger men win game-
but California reaps series
The UBC Thunderbirds came out on top in the final game
of the World Cup Rugby Series, but lost the tournament on
total points.
The Birds, playing a stronger game than on Thursday,
were once again ahead until the later stages of the game.
A, try by Doug Brazier and a field goal and convert by
Keith Watson gave the Brids a comfortable eight point lead
in the game. Perhaps too comfortable.
University of California then came on strong to score
five points, winning the series 16-14 on total points.
"The major factor in the game was psychological," said
coach Brian Wightman.
"Oregon was a bigger, faster, and better team than Cal.
Cal had one name in Jim Boyce that psyched us out. We
won this game and proved that we can beat them, and beat
them   handsomely."
Now the World Cup will return to UC for another year—
but only another year. Next year — a prediction — the World
Cup will return to UBC.
Next — the Wallaby game. There are only two days left.
The augmented Bird team lost only 10-3 to B.C. Reps.
Tickets for the Wallaby game are available at the UBC
athletic office in the gym.
RECORD SALE
Hoopsters in finals
The UBC basketball JV's came through with an important
0   93-71 win over YMCA last Thursday.
H The game advanced the JV's into the finals of the junior
«*l   men's B.C. championships against Kerrisdale. The first game of
£  this series will be played Feb. 18 in John Oliver gym at 6:45 p.m.
Top scorers for the JV's in the Thursday game were Sam
Vandermeulen with 25 points, and Rick Inrig with 22.
Basketball losses blamed
on Thunderbird foul plays
By MIKE JESSEN
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds learned on the weekend that a lot of fouls can lead to two losses. -
They played the St. Martin's College Rangers of Olympia
and lost 87-66 on Friday and 93-81 on Saturday.
The story of the exhibition games rests on fouls. The Sirds
committed many and the Rangers made accurate free throws. In
the Saturday night contest the Rangers got 25 of a possible 32
points from the foul line. The Birds managed to get six out of
seven. In that game the Birds scored one more field goal than
their opponents but the free throws made the difference.
"We did not play as well as we could have," said basketball coach Peter Mullins, "although I don't want to take anything
away from the St. Martin's team."
"They hit us on the boards," added Mullins.
The big guns for the Birds in the first game were Neil
Murray with 25 points, and Ian Dixon with 18.
On Saturday IDixon was tops with 16 while Murray had
14. Other scorers in the double figures were Phil Langley with
12 and Dave Rice with ten.
The U of Calgary Dinosaurs pulled to within two points of
UBC in the basketball WCIAA while the Birds journeyed to the
U.S. This makes the series between Calgary and UBC the contest which will decide the conference championships. It will be
played on the Birds' home grounds Feb. 24-25.
Oregon   ousts   Birds
The UBC swim team swam dual meets over the weekend
against two strong American schools, the University of Oregon
and Oregon University, and lost.
Although totally the Birds lost their meets, many individual
performers did their best in preparation for the WCIAA championships.
Best performances over the weekend came from Phil
Winch, who set a UBC record in the 1,000 yard freestyle, taking
30 seconds off the old record; Martin McLaren and Frank Dorchester also donated sterling performances to the cause by
finishing their event, the 200 yard butterfly.
Winch and Jim Maddin were the only winners, with Maddin
being the only double winner, taking the 200 yard backstroke
at U of O and the 1,000 at OSU. Winch won the 200 breaststroke
and placed second in his record breaking 1,000.
As was reported in a morning daily here, the freestyle relay
team won for the first time and team members Winch, Maddin,
Dorchester and team captain Ricardo Manselli are to be congratulated.
The Birds will be swimming this weekend in their last dual
meets of the season when they take on Western Washington
State College here and University of Puget Sound away from
home.
SPEEDY WINGER Stewart
Boyce leads Australia's
famed rugby Wallabies
against UBC at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday at Varsity Stadium.
/---^
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571 GRANVILLE (ot Dunsmuir)
Gymnasts  go  below  U of  Wash.;
greet  Eastern  Wash,  on  weekend
In intercollegiate gymnastics at Memorial gym Saturday,
the University of Washington outpointed UBC 162.1 to 144.7.
Individual honors went to Jay Shaw of WSU, who showed
fine form in amassing 46 points. Close second with 45.40 points
was Bill Mackie of UBC.
The gym squad sweats it out against Eastern Washington
on Saturday, at Memorial gym at 2 p.m.
MU 2-4846
Teams zero in on field
The UBC Thunderbirds and Jokers met last weekend in
what was to be the game of the year.
Nothing was decided. The teams drew 0-0.
It was a game of youth versus experience. The Birds, many
of whom are first and second year students, outran, outhustled,
and outplayed the older and more experienced Jokers, many
of whom are international stars.
Both teams got the ball in the net but the goals were disallowed because of rule infractions.
The Birds are still on top of the league, as they have played
one more game than Jokers.
In other field hockey play, Braves tied 1-1 with Hawks B.
Tomahawks lost 1-0 to Grasshoppers C.
Next weekend marks the climax of the first Indoor Field
Hockey Tournament in Canada, the Birds having reached the
final round.
"It is hoped that this tournament will develop into the
B.C. Indoor Championships and ultimately to the Canadian
Indoor Championships," said coach Eric Broome.
The round-robin tournament goes in the armory 2 p.m. to
5 p.m. Tuesday,   February    14,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   15
UBC races top roster
UBC'S SYNCHRONIZED swim team: l.-r. Trine Henrksen,
Kathy MacDonald, Joley Symons, Annike Schootman.
Georgia Marvin, Pat Huffman and Angela  Raino.
By ROSS EVANS
One of the top international indoor
track meets of 1967 takes place at the PNE
Agrodome Saturday.
Promoted by the Achilles International
Association, the meet combines the Canadian Open Championships with the international class of such names as Ron Clarke
Keino,  Bill  Crothers, and  Harry  Jerome
Also, a large contingent from the U.S.,
including Doris Brown, current world record
holder in the women's half-mile and mile,
will be gunning for Canadian honors.
With a dual purpose, UBC track coach
Lionel Pugh has entered 38 Thunderbird
athletes in the meet. First, he feels that the
top-flight competition will provide "the exposure the team needs before participating
in the Canadian Intercollegiate Championships to be held in March.
Second, the nucleus of the men's team
is comprised of athletes who could capture
some of the events. Chip Barrett, flanker on
the Thunderbird football squad, is rated
highly in the 50 yard dash; Don Scott ranks
third in Canada in either the half or the
mile; Dave Aune was the best Canadian
junior in distances over 600 yards last year;
and Ron Haddad, a half-miler, ran for
Jamaica in the last British Empire Games.
In the field events, Ron Parker holds
the Canadian indoor record in the high jump
at 6'6%". He will get stiff competition from
teammate Sam Vandermeulen, who, as a
member of the JV basketball squad, has developed this skill to the point where he has
unofficially  cleared  6'6%".
The 11 member girls' team does not pose
as formidable a threat as the men's, but it
is easy to underestimate UBC's female capacities. The important thing to remember,
points out coach Pugh, is that the 38 member squad represents the largest UBC has
ever trained, and as such is "indicative of
the progress that has been made in track
and field in B.C."
Thunderettes challenge Canada's
foremost collegiate mermaids
Some of the top collegiate swimmers in
Canada  are  participating in the  Women's
Intercollegiate   Swimming   Championships,
hosted by UBC this weekend.
VOLLEYBALL
Speed swimming events will be held at
Percy Norman Pool Friday with heats from
3-6 p.m. Finals go Saturday, 12-5 p.m.
Synchronized events will be held at Kil-
larney Pool Friday from 1-11 p.m. Winning
routines will be exhibited Saturday.
Individual and team trophies will be
awarded.
The UBC Thunderettes finished second in
the WCIAA volleyball championships held
last weekend in Edmonton. Manitoba took
first place with a 13 win, one loss.
UBC  had  an   11-12  record,  with  close
Wrestlers  crush  cadets
The Thunderbirds wrestled well against
the fit and tough Royal Roads squad from
Victoria and won Saturday's dual meet 21-
10.
Since wrestling has taken the place of
boxing as a compulsory activity at the military college, the cadets are developing a
very strong team.
Every one of the UBC members on the
B.C. team going to the First Canadian Winter Games won his match. Colin MacLeod
and Ken Kerluke won by decisions and
Chris Nemeth by a pin. Other winners for
UBC were Dennis Boulton by pins and Ron
Turner by decision.
While MacLeod, Kerluke and Nemeth
are in Quebec, the other members of the
team will be working hard in preparation
for the WCIAA Championships, being held
Feb. 24-25 in Edmonton.
matches against the eventual winner.
WCIAA curling in Edmonton saw UBC
finish fourth, behind Saskatchewan, Calgary,
and Brandon.
CURLING
UBC's women's field hockey team captured first place in the Vancouver Women's
Field Hockey League over the weekend.
FIELD HOCKEY
Victories over Britannia Tigers and King
Ed Panthers left the team undefeated this
season.
Birds and Bisons
split a second
OTTAWA (CUP) — In an exhibition
double header, en route to Quebec, the UBC
ice hockey Thunderbirds slipped by Manitoba Bisons 7-6 Friday.
But the Bisons retaliated with a 6-4 win
the following day.
HOCKEY: Fri., Alberta 6, Saskatoon 0.
Sat., Saskatchewan 6, Alberta 3.
BASKETBALL: Fri., Calgary 87, Manitoba 45. Sat., Calgary 79, Manitoba 52.
Net  falls  on  Calgary;
national title  sighted
The UBC volleyball Thunderbirds visited
Calgary on the weekend and emerged as
Western Canadian champions.
They won the best of five series by scores
of 17-15, 15-17, 15-13, 4-15, and 15-11. The
Birds will now represent the WCIAA in the
National College Championship to be held
at Calgary March 6-11.
ARTS U.S.
OFFICIAL NOTICE
OF NOMINATIONS
FOR:
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY TREASURER
Nomination forms available in AMS
office. Must be posted in Arts US office
Brock Extension no. 359, by February
20th, 4:00 p.m.
WHEN THE NIGHT BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE   SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the  Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open    every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
LIVE BAND
NO COVER CHARGE
SPECIAL
U.B.C.   STUDENT  DISCOUNT
10%  to  15%  on weekdays
ITALIAN PARADISE
CABARET
1047 Granville       685-9412
Going skiing at Fabulous Tod? Stay at
WHITECROFT SKI LODGE
6 MILES FROM TOD -
FAMILY  STYLE,   HOME-COOKED   MEALS   .   .   .
SPECIAL RATES ON LODGING AND MEALS TO
BUSLOAD   GROUPS
For information write
MRS. F. J. BRADY
Whifecroft Ski Lodge
Heffley Creek, B.C.
Phone Heffley Creek 3-G
INTERNATIONAL
RUGBY
AUSTRALIA'S
WALLABIES
vs
ALSO
UBC
THURSDAY, FEB. 16,
12:30 or U.B.C.
TICKETS: U.B.C. ATHLETIC OFFICE
and HICKS
c
WALLABIES
vs
B.C. REPS
2:30 p.m.. Sat., Feb. 18—Empire Stadium
TICKETS:  HICK'S, HAGEN'S TRAVEL
AND   U.B.C. Page  16
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  14,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Venus verified
EROTICA
Second annual St. Valentine's day reading of erotic
poetry, with Helene Rosenthal, Stephen Scobie and Seymour Mayne, today, noon, Bu.
104.
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Modern Brass Ensemble
performs a varied program, today, noon, Ed. 100. Admission
35 cents.
EAST ASIA SOC
Clive  Ainsley  discusses  the
Red   Guards in   China   today,
noon,   Bu.   102.   Admission   25
cents.
UN CLUB
Meeting,  I. H.,  today, noon.
EL CIRCULO
Discussion   on   Oostendorp's
Espana en Busca de si Misma,
Bu.   penthouse,   today,   8:30.
CONSERVATIVE   CLUB
Davie  Fulton,  today,   12:30,
council    chambers,    discussing
The Party and the Leadership
Convention.
PHYSICS SOC
Discussion on the University
of   Washington   telescope,   tonight, 8 p.m., Hebb theater.
IH
Faculty, students,  and  community friends invited to  tea
at IH, today, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
No charge.
UBYSSEY
Want love, sex, travel,
journalistic instruction? Come
and wok for The Ubyssey. See
us anytime in the basement of
north Brock.
STUDENT VOLUNTEER
SERVICE
Math tutor wanted, 2-3 hours
a week at North Shore Neighbourhood house. Contact Lynn
Morton   922-5846.
VCF
Inform    with    coffee    and
sandwiches,   Wednesday,   5:30,
Mildred Brock.
GIRLS' HOCKEY
Girls   interested   in   playing
ice   hockey   meet   Wednesday,
noon, arena, for first practice.
PRE  LIBRIANSHIP
Mrs.   Vatcher,   children's   librarian  speaks   Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 225.
ACE
Three  Vancouver  principals
discuss   the   new  teacher   and
the  school,   Wednesday, noon,
Ed. 204.
ASIAN STUDIES
Film My Family will be
shown, Wednesday, 3:30, Hebb
Theatre. Film gives insight into traditonal Chinese family
structure.
PSYCH CLUB
Comparison of psych in the
U.S. and Russia, today, 3:30,
Ang. 207. Dr. James Mair discusses Residential Treatment
of Emotionally Disturbed Children, Wednesday, noon, Ang.
207.
NOON CONCERTS
Doug Talney conducts Stravinsky's Cantata for female
chorus, soloists and instrumental ensemble, Wednesday, Bu.
106.
ONTOLOGY
Ron    Polack    discusses   the
seven stages of love, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
CHORAL  SOCIETY
Important    notes     practice,
Wednesday,   6  p.m.   Men, hut
G  14, women, Bu.  104, bring
music.
PRE MED
Post Valentine treat historical film about the heart, Wednesday, noon, Wes. 201.
WAA
UBC hosts western Canadian
swim champions Friday and
Saturday. Speed events at
Percy Norman Pool, synchronized events at Killarney pool.
For information phone 738-
3697.
WUSC
Take a trip with WUS, Meet
nternational students and
WUS scholars. Coffee party,
Mildred Brock, noon, Feb. 21.
Cheaper wings to Expo
planned for 88 trippers
To Expo '67 at less than half the price right after final
exams can be your post-exam trip.
Two UBC students, Denis Conner and Chuck Curteis have
organized an 88-passenger DC-6 charter flight to Expo to leave
May 6 and return May 14.
Their low price of $215 includes the return flight, transportation to and from the airport, a week's pass to Expo, and
accommodation.
All students, faculty, and staff are invited to participate
but the flight contract must be signed by Feb. 20.
Anyone interested can attend an organizational meeting
Wednesday in Buchanan 104 at 12:45 p.m.
NEW     HOURS
BROCK SNACK BAR
STARTING MONDAY, FEB. 20, 1967
Monday through Friday: 8 a.m.-lO p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Suppers available 5-6 p.m.
Hamburgers  and  short   orders   available   all   dayl
WOODWARD   CASH   BUYS   RARE   READERS
A $12,500 gift from Mr. and Mrs. P. A.
Woodward has been used by the Woodward
library to buy rare first editions of medical texts.
The books acquired are by Edward Jen-
ner, pioneer of the smallpox vaccine, and
R. T. H. Lannec, inventor of the stethoscope.
Jenner's book, "An Inquiry into the
Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccine"
was published in 1798.
The first editions appeared in 1819.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST: SINCE CHRISTMAS Black
leather keycase, initialed F.C.L.
Phone Frank, 224-9020.
DIZZY DAME LOST PAIR BLACK
leather gloves Friday and one
wooden earring two weeks ago.
Phone   228-8083.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took economics 313 notes and
psychology 405 textbooks Banou-
ra and Walters and Hoffman
from, the third floor of main library, please call 434-0668. Re-
wiard.
Valentine Greetings
12
MARIE  FROM   PRES   KEN  LONG-
ingly.
GEORGE    I    CROAK     FOR      YOU.
Love,   Rene.
HAY, WILLIE: WITH YOUR
gorgeous blond hair we're a perfect pair. Be my Valentine.
Love,   Max   A.
BITTER B: LUV, KISSES, AND
pears to you and the swingin'
blue   G's   from   Winnie-'-The   Ex.
DEAR MARY: I'M WISHIN' AND
hopin' that you'll be my Valentine — a Starr that's in your
eyes.
TO MY VALENTINE. YOU KNOW
I'm all heart because I'm always
in   ernest!	
BETH GREENWOOD (H. M.)
Happy Bill's birthday (Mrup)
You  know what I  mean?
NEEVA   -   GAYLE
ByflB Moeii BajjeHTHHoft
' JIK.6H   KaK   H   H
ji_o6j_ro Te6fl
— FRANK
HAPPY   VALENTINE   DAY    SUN-
shine   girl.     Gunnysack   RED,
BABY DOLL, ROMAN SENDS HIS
love. 37,000 will be something
yummy   for   tricks.
SHE WILL YOU BE MY VALEN-
tine. Not very original but I
mean   every   word.     Love,   John.
TO    MY   TIGER   —   KISSES   AND
cuddles from your only Valentine.
xxxxx.
TO LAURIE — ONE RED ROSE
and a glass of wine. These are
for   you,   my   Valentine.
TO MY VALENTINE BLINKER,
with more than words can express;  may you always be happy.
DEAR DRAGON BOTTOM: Happy
Valentine. I miss you, Californy
Horny. 	
TO MY BLOND BUNNY ON OUR
second Valentine Day together.
Be  mine   forever.    R.   P.
DEAR JOLLY GREEN GIANT,
Happy Valentine's Day. Dots of
love,   Bulldog.
SHEILA E. THE MOST AND
more.    Love from  her sweetie.
DEAR   AVA:      A   SMILE   IN   THE
sun.     It's   still   true.   Love,   Dave.
TO. BOOTS, FOOIE, ZIZI, MAR-
garet and Dino, a very happy
Valentine's Day to each of you
from   Cream-Puff   and   Thumper.
TO M. L. — FOR LENT, GIVE UP
— Give In, be. my Valentine D. S.
and   Skip.        	
ROCK and POWDER GASSES,
GROUSE, GREASE, THUNMOR-
JARFISCHVIGS.
ISABELLE, ALL MY LOVE ON
St. Valentine's Day and a toast
to the day when your slippers
and mine are under the bed together.     Love.
DAVID ROBINSON, HUT 13,
Kindness and consideration are
enough. Happy, delicious Valentine's to you, from your Rolf
Harris fan, Indian Centre accomplice   and  symposiumite  friend.
DEAR    JOAN:      HAPPY     VALEN-
tine's Day,   Kid.     D.   H.  W.
HAPPY   VALENTINE'S   AND   17TH
Anniversary.    Gum.    Love,    Snarf.
BEAR:   LOVE  AND  STUFF  FROM
your little  Bear.
Q? B L? P? E I? C? T? E? U.
Q? E L? P? E I? C? T? E? U.
Why   not   bring   your   Valentine?
Coming Dances
12A
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
500 GIRLS NEEDED MARCH 3 & 4.
SCIENTIFIC TRANSLATIONS —
Russian, German, Bernard Por-
tier, Dept. of Metallurgy, Phone
228-2676.
HELP SNOOPY WIPE OUT THE
Red Baron. (Enemy of universal
knowledge). Share With World
University   Service   next  week.
Transportation
14
GIRLS WANT RIDE TO KELOW-
na; midterm break. Share expenses.  Ph.  224-9746 Rm. 46<K	
NEED RIDE TO WEST KOOTE-
nay on Feb. 15th or 16th. Please
phone   "Peter"  at 299-9859.	
HELP! HAVE BROKEN LEG,
Need ride from 1699 W. 65th Ave.
near S.W. Marine. Phone AM 6-
9706.
RIDERS WANTED WEST END
via 4th, 10th or 12th, 8:30' classes.
Phone   Bob,   681-3954.	
NEEDED RIDE TO PENTICTON
at midterm for two girls. Phone
Jean,   224-9057   or  Sue,   224-9908.
HELP! NEED CAR-POOL FROM
22nd and Marine, West Van, not
necessarily 8.30's. Phone Sandy,
926-2254.
Wanted
15
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO CHARTER — DC-6. Organized by and for exam shocked
students. Leave Vancouver May
6, return May 14. Price $215;
includes accommodation, Expo
weeks pass. Information meeting
Bu. 104, 12.45 Wednesday, Feb.
15.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sal*
21
1962 TEMPEST. GOOD CONDI-
tion. Selling for my son who
needs money in Europe. Phone
261-8737.
1957       MG      MAGNETE,       NEEDS
work.    See A. C. Donald, Ubyssey
_Office,   days.	
SPORTS   CAR,   1956   M.G.A.     EXC.
motor.     Phone   733-5224.
Automobile Parts
21A
'61 FIAT SPYDER PARTS. NEW
top, clutch, tires trans., body
parts.   CY  9-4874.
Bodywork, Glass
23
Motorcycles
27
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39-A
ATTENTION SKIERS—ARE other
Volkswagens passing yours? You
may need a tune-up ($4.50) now
at Auto Henneken Specialized
Volkswagen Service, Oak and
S.W.    Marine.      Phone   263-8121.
GIRLS: LAST CHANCE FOR
dating me this term. If experienced, see me in Brock. B. Edmonds.
LOST ATO PLEDGE PIN. RE-
quired desperately. Reward offered.       Contact     Ken     Whitehead,
434-4326   (Help!   I_need_it!)	
THE   SEX   LIFE   OF   A   RUSSIAN
. student?    Find  out  at   the  World
University    Service    coffee    party,
Tues.,   Feb.   21,   at noon  in  Mildred
Brock;	
THE   SHADOW   (BILLY   E.)   AND
R.   (Doe)   Bower   apologize   to the
5   lads who we    so    inadvertently
slandered.
PHIL M. — HERE'S TO US IN
Sept. (Don't worry! I'll be faith-
ful).    Love  forever,   'Trish. 	
DEAR JOHN P. HAPPY 21st —
When are you going to be de-
flowered   ■   Love,   Car Pool   (N.V.)
DOG: PLEASE RECONSIDER"
our date. I turn 15 today and
mommy will let me out. T. Bop-
per.
40
Sewing  &  Alterations
GRADUATION GOWNS, SHEATH
dresses, mini-skirts, etc., Alterations, Remodelling. Phone 224-
6471,   near   UBC.
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
FAST, ACCURATE THESES TYP-
ing. Electric typewriter. Fully
exp.   Inger   872-7380.	
STUDENTS— TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.,
low rates. Phone 733-0734 any
time.
TYPING   —   ELECTRIC,    224-6129.
NORTH VANCOUVER — WILL
type thesis in my home. Rates
reasonable.      Phone   988-5420.
GOOD, EXPERIENCED TYPIST,
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
LIFEGUARDS — HEAD GUARD
City of Kamloops refer to placement   office.
EXP. DINING ROOM WAITRESS
wanted for week-ends. Apply to
Abbotsford Hotel, 921 W. Pender.
Apply   hostess    or    phone   MU   1-
4335.
Music
63
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Minimum 5 lessons. 876-1859.
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
Special Classes
65
Instruction Wanted
66
URGENT! TUTOR NEEDED FOR
new chemistry (eleven) course.
Will  pay  well.   Phone  922-4001.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle  Drive-in
at Rear of Store
BANKRUPT!—MUST SELL HI-FI
Trio Stereo, 60 watt amp, Lenco
turntable, Electra speakers, su-
perex phones. Best offer by Sat.
takes. Ask for Bob at 224-5728
after 6 p.m.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED ROOM, LIGHT
cooking in a new quiet home
near gates.     Phone   224-0477.
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE ONLY,
vicinity 10th Avenue and Crown
Street.     MU   4-6736   or   224-0956.
MEN ONLY — ROOM ACCOMMO-
dation near gates; start immediately.   Ph.   224-7623  after  5  p.m.
Room & Board
82
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT.
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 5:00 p.m.
and   7:00 p.m.
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board. Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook.
224-9986.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
Unfurn. Houses 8c Apts.        84
Real Estate
86
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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