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The Ubyssey Nov 17, 2011

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^1 • J 21 Page 2111.17.2011
What's on
This week, may we suggest...
This Hour has Six Ideas: 6pm @ Buchanan A
Six profs each have ten minutes to present an idea that changed their
world, covering subjects from music to economics. An evening of enlightenment and intellect, with the additional bonus of watching a prof try to
express a complete thought in under 10 minutes. Oh. and it's free!
DJS»
CiTR's Annual DJ Competition
8pm @ the Pit Pub
CiTR is hosting its annual DJ
competition with eight up and
coming DJs competing for the
top spot. $5 in advance. $8 at the
door (tomatoes not included).
20SUN
'LECTURE »
Cute Cats and the Arab Spring:
7pm @ the Chan Centre
The second annual Vancouver
Human Rights Lecture examines
human rights and internet activism. And with the promise of cute
cats, who can say no?
Sports! @ Home
Name your sport and UBC has
you covered this Saturday night.
Men's volleyball, basketball and
hockey along with women's volleyball and basketball all play on
home turf. Check them out and
cheer on your Thunderbirds (just
don't expect any football). You'll
have to learn the name of an athlete other than Billy Greene.
FUNDRAISING »
Night of 1,000 Dinners
The International Relations
Students Association (IRSA) is
raising awareness of the devastating effect of land mines going
kaboom in war torn third world
countries by hosting a fancy-
shmancy three course dinner.
That's solidarity, if I've ever heard
it.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
November 17 2011, Volume XCIII, Issue XX
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
onnteditor@ubyssey.ca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writers
Taylor Loren &
Will Johnson   1
tloren@ubysseyca
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@ubysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
ijoel@u bysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
BUSINESS
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
business@ubysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@ubysseyca
STAFF
Andrew Hood, Bryce Warnes.
Catherine Guan, David Elop,
Jon Chiang Josh Curran, Will
McDonald, Tara Martellaro,
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria,
Deter Wojnar, Tanner Bokor,
Dominic Lai, Mark-Andre
Gessaroli, Natalya Kautz, Kai
Jacobson, RJ Reid
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertising
@ubyssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is afounding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300wr :   -'^~-~.^ - dudeyour
phone number, student number anc
signature (notfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the I IPS will not be greater
than the pr'^e paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>3
JOSH CURRAN^HE UBYSSEY
Ethan Wong stands outside the Chinese Varsity Club office in the basement of the SUB. The CVC has more than 1200 members.
Ethan Wong: CVC's fearless leader
JoelBarde
Contributor
Ethan Wong is a busy guy. He's
a full-time history student; he's
helping to develop and promote
the emerging field of Chinese
Canadian studies; and he's president of UBC's largest club, the
Chinese Varsity Club (CVC).
Though he admitted his extracurricular responsibilities can be
onerous, Wong said he would not
have it any other way. He loves
what he does.
"The more you put in," said
Wong, "the more you get out."
And he should know. The
Vancouver College graduate
entered UBC in 2006, hopingto
have a rich and exciting university experience. Yet his first year
of Arts One, a demanding liberal
arts program, left him wanting
more. He dreaded the 40 minute
commute to and from his South
Vancouver home and didn't meet
as many new friends as he would
have liked. Goingto school was a
chore, not the fun experience he
had anticipated.
At the suggestion of a friend,
Wongjoined the CVC in his
second year. Wong said the club
filled a void, giving him a sense of
community and fun activities to
take part in.
Wong said he likes to think
ofthe CVC as UBC's version of
Cheers. The club, which caters to
off campus students, is located
in the basement ofthe SUB and
provides a refuge for students to
hang out with friends. The CVC
also organizes dances and events.
Some members are currently playing Gotcha, a take on MAD magazine's comic strip Spy vs. Spy. The
objective is to kill (shoot a water
gun at) CVC-provided targets. The
winner is the last person standing with the most kills under their
belt.
Wong laughed as he recounted a story of how three CVC
members traveled all the way
to Playland to ambush another
player. He said games like Gotcha
help bridge the gap between the
on and off campus UBC experience, giving commuters a chance
to participate in fun activities
that are traditionally reserved for
students who live on campus.
"What you remember from
university isn't necessarily the
academics, it's the experiences,"
said Wong.
"Everyone comes to university
wantingto have an extraordinary
experience. That's what we try to
provide."
Wong said he wants to be a high
school teacher. He has coached
high school basketball, worked as
a teacher's assistant at an elementary school, and wants to bring a
Chinese-Canadian "flare" to the
classroom. Chinese-Canadian history, he said, is under-represented
in Canadian high schools.
"Students are exposed to a lot of
First Nations and Indian history—
and that is so important," added
Wong. "But it's just kind of neglected that [Chinese-Canadians]
had a huge role as well."
Wong is currently working on a
research project that aims to raise
the profile of Chinese-Canadian
history. Chinese Stories is a new
web-based project dedicated to
archiving and sharing Chinese-
Canadian history with the wider
public.
Wong said that between the research project, his academics and
his CVC commitments, he has little time to relax. There are a lot of
late nights, and it can be stressful.
That said, he seems to genuinely
relish every minute of it.
His advice to his fellow UBC
students: "Join a club. Get involved." 13
CORRECTION
>>1
In the article titled "AMS
too broke to pay for UBC
Ombudsperson Office for
Students" in the November
14,2011 issue of The Ubyssey,
we misidentified the AMS
President as Justin McElroy.
The AMS President is, in fact,
Jeremy McElroy. Not Justin
McElroy. Justin McElroy is,
in fact, the Coordinating
Editor of this newspaper. He
is also the cousin of Jeremy
McElroy. Justin has no role
in editing or writing stories
concerning the AMS. If any
readers seeing this error
believed he overthrew the
AMS in a bloodless coup rife
with Shakespearean drama,
we apologize. That did not
happen. We regret the error.
Club event?
Early exam?
Studying late?
Stay on campus!
Commuter
Student
HOStel   RESIDENCE
I   a        WWW* EM-H
housing i|
t BOOK ONLINE
STUDENT HOUSING AND HOSPITALITY SERVICES News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
11.17.20111 3
STUDENTLOANS»
Student loan amendments helps applicants bypass signing guarantor
Micki Cowan
News Editor
Two amendments have been made
to the BC student loan program
that look to take the pressure off
underage applicants or those facing
financial hardship.
The changes were made to comply with federal rules, since the federal and provincial loan programs
were amalgamated earlier this year.
The first amendment allows
underage students to get a loan
without a signing guarantor. The
second amendment eliminated
non-sufficient fund fees, which
are usually applied if your account
is overdrawn when paying back
your student loans. AMS President
Jeremy McElroy said the program
still has a lot of shortcomings.
"It's great that [students] can now
apply for funding independently at
the age of 18, and I'm glad they're no
longer penalizing students for being
in situations of financial need," said
McElroy. "But there is still a lot of
work to do with the program and
we've got all kinds of ideas for that."
McElroy said the AMS is lobbying
to also change the expectation that
parents should be paying for students' university fees and tuition.
"We're asking for reduction and
ultimate elimination of expected
parental contribution," he said.
Another issue the AMS is attempting to tackle is how liquid
assets are evaluated. "Right now if
a student owns a car that is worth
more than $5000, they are expected
to sell that car or have $5000
removed from how much they're
eligible for student loans," McElroy
said.
"Those of our students who commute in from Abbotsford, Mission
and Chilliwack, they either have to
sell their car, go to school somewhere completely different or not go
to school at all."
Brittany Manson, a third-year international relations student on student loans, welcomes the changes.
"I know when I first tried to
apply, it was kind of difficult...especially ifyou don't get a lot of support
from your parents," said Manson.
"You should be able to get the funding you need to go to university, so I
think it's awesome."
"They told me I couldn't use BC
student loans anymore because
my parents don't live in BC, even
though I do and I had been living
here for three years, so it was a bit
of a hassle for me," she added. "But
it sounds like they're addressingthe
issue, though, so that's good." tH
RESIDENCE »
Totem residents without hot water
LiamScanlon
Contributor
Maintenance problems have
plagued residents ofthe new Totem
Park buildings since they opened
in early September, with plumbing
and electrical issues, broken elevators and continued construction.
But the most pressing issue for students of hsm'lsssm' and q'slsxsn
has been the hot water supply.
Kaitlin Hazzard, the residence
life manager for Totem Park,
said that the inconsistent supply
of hot water has been a constant
challenge.
"We are not confident that a
complete solution has been found,
and until such time as one is
achieved, this will continue to be a
daily priority for us," she said.
Hazzard said Student Housing
and Hospitality Services (SHHS)
has been working daily with
the building's developers, UBC
Properties Trust, and the contractors to try solve the problem.
While residents were also promised appliances like flat screen
TVs in their lounges, it's the lack of
basic services they say they've been
cheated out of.
"We signed a housing contract...
we should get the certain amenities that we pay for, and they're not
holding up their side ofthe contract," said q'slsxsn resident Nadine
Clark.
"I often run to Kwak [Kwakiutl
House] to take my showers. It's never been hot here the way it is there."
In an email to residents sent
November 7, Hazzard explained
that the control system has been
shutting down the hot water system for both buildings, leaving
limited supplies of lukewarm water
followed by cold water.
News briefs
UBC to set up offices in New
Delhi and Bangalore, India
UBC is establishing two new satellite
offices in New Delhi and Bangalore,
India to explore possible partnerships with universities and institutions in the area.
The New Delhi office will be operated in partnership with the University
of Toronto, while the Bangalore office
will be led by the Sauder School of
Business. Sauder will be announcing
memorandums of understanding
with two Indian business schools. IIM-
Bangalore and IIT-Madras.
These partnerships are expected
to increase student exchange, research partnerships and collaborative
program development.
TANNER BOKOOTHE UBYSSEY
Residents of the new Totem Park buildings have been dealing wtih continued construction, plumbing, electrical and hot water issues
System shut-offs have been
difficult to track, which has lead
to lags in maintenance. Students
were asked to immediately report
changes in water temperature to
the front desk.
"We are aware ofthe significant number of problems experienced with the showers in your
buildings," Hazzard wrote, "and
acknowledge the inconvenience
caused bythe cold water and nonfunctioning showers.
"This is definitely not the experience we want for you and we
will continue to work with the
buildings'contractor to increase
the level of hot water available and
First Canadian polymer plastic
bill released at UBC
The Bank of Canada is circulating a
new $100 bill made of a plastic polymer, the first Canadian polymer note.
The bill, which celebrates
Canada's contribution to the field
of medicine, was launched at an
event held at the UBC Life Sciences
Institute on Monday.
The $50 bill will be the second
polymer note to be circulated in
Canada, set for release in March of
2012. with the $10. $20. and $5 bills
being unveiled by 2013.
In contrast to the paper currency
currently used in Canada, polymer
bills are more resistant to tearing
and more difficult to counterfeit.
improve the repair response time."
Residents of hsm'lsssm' and
q'8l8X9n paid $5040 for their connected single room—$508 more
than other Totem residents, who
pay only $4532 for the eight-month
contract. Some residents are now
calling for reimbursement.
SHHS is currently reviewing the
compensation they can provide to
hsm'lsssm' and q'slsxsn residents.
"A final amount will be identified
once the problems have been permanently resolved, as the length of
this disruption is an important consideration in determining the level
of compensation," said Hazzard.
q'slsxsn resident Sal Fuda said
UBC-O workers reach deal on
two-year contract
A new agreement has been ratified
by support service workers at UBC
Okanagan.
The workers, who are members
of the BC Government Service
Employees' Union, have reached a
deal for a two-year contract which
finance minister Kevin Falcon
said "recognizes the current fisca
situation."
UBC Okanagan service support
workers are comprised of over 300
employees from various branches of
the university. The deal was reached
under the provincial government's
net zero cost mandate for collective
bargaining.
that what compounds the inconveniences was that she wasn't given a
choice to live in the new residence
buildings.
But Hazzard explained that the
residence guarantee for new students is based on availability in both
Totem Park and Place Vanier, and
not everyone is able to have their
first choice.
Kelly Gerlings, a first-year Arts
student living in hsm'lsssm', said
that the problems with her house
are ultimately bearable.
"[It's] such a great place that a
couple hiccups are worth the money
we pay for it." tH
UBC study shows war impact on
elephant populations
A new UBC study suggests that humans have had a greater detrimenta
impact on African elephant populations than environmental factors.
The study was led by UBC researcher Rene Beyers. His findings
suggest that poaching and armed
conflict, such as the war in the
Democratic Republic of Congo, "had
a large impact on elephant populations, including those in parks and
reserves."
According to the study, there are
an estimated 6000 elephants left in
the wild in eastern Congo, down from
approximately 22.000 before the civil
HEALTH»
Rapid HIV testing
clinics continue
on campus
Spencer Toffoli
Contributor
Rapid HIV testing clinics on campus are making it possible for students to find outtlieir status in just
60 seconds, dramatically quicker
than the 1-2 day wait usually required for HIV test results.
The rapid HIV testing clinics
are part ofthe Seek and Prevent
for Optimal Treatment HIV/AIDS
Project, a joint initiative from
UBC Student Health Service and
Vancouver Coastal Health. It's
meant to encourage sexually active
students to be tested annually for
HIV.
Accordingto Dr Patricia
Mirwaldt, Student Health Services
director, 55-60 per cent of undergraduate students have been sexually active, and of those, most have
had 1-2 partners. Yet only an estimated 30-34 per cent of students
have ever had an HIV test.
The test involves a finger prick
for blood, which results in a "negative" or "maybe positive" result
within 60 seconds.
Sexually active heterosexual
women are the campaign's targeted
demographic, since a growing
number of HIV diagnoses have
been among heterosexual women,
who aren't typically considered "at
risk."
Mirwaldt emphasized the importance of knowing and managing
your HIV status.
"About a third of people who
have HIV don't know they have it.
And that's the group that's actually
spreading it."
So far 34 students have found out
their status via the rapid HIV testing clinics.
The Know Your Status campaign
has already hosted one on campus
rapid HIV testing clinic on October
27, and two more are scheduled
in the upcoming months, on
November 17 and December 1.13
For more information visit blogs.
ubc.ca/knowyourstatus/ or contact
Student Health Services. 41 News I ii.i7.2oii
Electoral Area A hopefuls face off in debate
All five candidates touch on transportation, governance and land use issues at UBC
Colin Chia
Contributor
On November 10, candidates hoping to be elected Electoral Area A
Director gathered for the all candidates meeting, touching on transit,
land use and governance issues. The
five candidates, Colin Desjarlais,
Mischa Makortoff, Scott Andrews,
Alexandria Mitchell and incumbent
Maria Harris, answered questions
in an attempt to secure their seat in
this coming Saturday's election.
Transit
In regards to public transportation, candidates Colin Desjarlais
and Scott Andrews pushed for
rapid transit to UBC, while Mischa
Makortoff said that an increase in
the number of buses and light rail
would be an adquate solution.
Alexandria Mitchell stressed
that more transit to campus
was neccessary and pointed to a
Mayors' Council statement that the
Broadway corridor was not a priority. "This is a problem," she said.
Incumbent director Maria Harris
also said she wants expanded transit, but said the province should be
pressured for more funding.
Harris emphasized her experience and ability to influence the
other board directors.
Land use
Audience members requested that
candidates discuss the proposed
housing development plans at UBC,
Candidates from left to right Alexandria Mitchell, Colin Desjarlais, Mischa Makortoff, Scott Andrews and Maria Harris
specifically the plans for increased
density in the Wesbrook Village
area in south campus.
"I enjoyed hearing the candidates, and I was gratified by the fact
that there are young people who
are willing to do this," said Stephen
Drance, who has lived in the community for over 60 years, but is
disappointed that there is not more
debate over land use at UBC.
"UBC has a very clear understanding of where it has to go and
wants to go with the lands that
are under its jurisdiction, and they
have benefited enormously from
the density of Hampton Place and
what's been developed [on south
campus]. That's in their own self-
interest..Whether this is the ideal
way of developing this community
and this fabulous land is a very different issue but I don't see that ever
being debated," he said.
Richard Alexander expressed
anxiety over plans by Campus and
Community Planning to dramatically increase housing density,
which were presented at a recent
open house.
"We understand that it's going
to happen. But the extent of it is
a surprise," he said. "They didn't
provide a very good explanation for that, either historically or
currently."
Governance
Candidates Desjarlais and Andrews
were concerned bythe governance
situation, with Andrews saying that
governance reform was fundamental. "Everything else is a symptom of
that issue," Andrews said.
Ben Seghers, a resident ofthe area
for the last seven years, said many
new residents are beginning to get
-ILE PHOTOS^HE UBYSSEY
a grip on the unusual governance
structure at UBC.
"I think for a lot of people, they're
goingto be educated to some extent," said Seghers. "Unless there's
some big uprising from the grassroots it's probably not goingto
change anytime soon."
Seghers also sees the debate over
density and development leading to
a split in how residents of different
parts ofthe UBC lands will approach the election. The issues vary
along with the density, he said.
"It's a very strange part ofthe
world, Point Grey." tH
Media Democracy Day is here
"It's know the media, be the media, and change the media," says organizer
Caroline Chingcuanco
Contributor
The Remembrance Day weekend was
abuzz with events on media literacy
and democratization as part ofthe
annual Media Democracy Day.
Gala Milne, head coordinator of
the event, said the focus was media
awareness. "Our motto falls under
three arms. It's know the media, be
the media and change the media,"
she said.
"All of these fall under creating
media awareness for people. We're
all consumers of so many forms of
media daily."
The annual three-day event was
free to the public and attended by local newspapers such as The Georgia
Straight and The Tyee and non-profits including OpenMedia.ca. It began
with a screening of War Made Easy
at Pacific Cinematheque, a film that
explores militarism, media and war.
Panel discussions at the Vancouver
Public Library discussed changes to
the media landscape, includingjour-
nalism models, the Occupy movement, civic engagement and examining ShitHarperDid and Slutwalk.
The final day featured workshops
on DIY radio basics and using social
media for online campaigns.
"[The workshops] are a chance for
people to get hands-on experience
and discover ways to challenge mainstream media's dominant voice,"
Milne explained.
Professors from the UBC School
ofjournalism spoke at the panels,
including Peter Klein, David Beers,
Candis Callison and Duncan McCue.
"This is an important event in
Vancouver," said Peter Klein, acting
tfr
Registration: mediademocracydays2011.eventbrite.com
mddworkshops.eventbrite.com
director ofthe UBC Graduate School
ofjournalism.
"Media and democracy are inextricably linked, and to have a multi-
day event discussing these issues
doesn't happen very often."
Klein spoke at a panel about the
crises and opportunities injournal-
ism. "I think that journalism has
gotten much better. Journalism has
actually gotten much richer," he
commented.
"On the other hand, as I mentioned in my talk, your audience has
gotten much smaller...so for one news
organization, whether it be corporate
or independent or whatever, to be
able to invest in the amount of money
and time that's needed to do difficult
journalism well, I think that's become a real challenge."
Julie Jenkins, a UBC political
science undergraduate who also
works for The Tyee, attended the
conference.
"The great thing [about] Media
Democracy Days...is it really addresses the role of information. And how
COURTESY OF VANCOVUER MEDIA DEMOCRACY
information, free-flowing information and conversation is really vital
to a healthy democracy."
Milne also stressed the importance of being an active consumer.
"We live in very mediated environments, from advertising, to
the constant flow of information
through our social networking
sites," said Milne.
"It's important for us to know
what we are consuming, and to have
ways to critically break it down and
understand it," she said. 13
Workshops
►>1
The Future of Journalism:
Crisis & Opportunity
Resistance and Renewal:
Unions and Public Opinion in the
'Crisis Economy'
Indigenous Choices,
Indigenous Voices:
Aboriginal Uses of Media
ShitHarperDid, Slutwalk &
LeadNow:
New Directions in Civic
Engagement
The New Frontier is Interactive:
Advancing Progressive
Storytelling and Journalism with
Multi-Platform and Social Media
Tools
Media Policies for a
Democratic Future:
A Multi-Party Panel
Lost in Translation?:
Challenges of Inclusivity in
Diverse Media
Mapping Media Democracy in
Vancouver:
A Launchpad for Action
Mediated Violence
DIY Radio Basics ii.i7.2oii I Features 15
Gregor Robertson and his
Vision Vancouver party
members on council have
managed to weather a
number of political storms
duringtheir three-year
term. In 2009, the city asked
the province for unlimited borrowing power
to complete the disastrous Olympic Village
development. Then Robertson caught flak
from downtown business owners after installing a number of controversial bike lanes. On
top of that, his political opponents have spent
the past few months trying to tar him with
the Stanley Cup Riots and Occupy Vancouver.
Still, his campaign seems to be resonating with
voters, who are drawn to his Greenest City
Plan and small business policies. The Ubyssey
reached the mayor by phone on Monday.
Q: How do you see the role of a city
government?
A: To make sure the city is safe and enable people to live in the most livable city in the world.
The city role is limited, as 92 per cent of tax
revenue goes to provincial and federal governments, and also through the provincial legislation that restricts the power city hall has. So
we're focused on land use, public safety, libraries, parks and recreation.
Q: The Occupy movement is quickly
becoming the defining issue in this
election. Is there anything you would
have done differently in your handling of
the tent city?
A: No, my approach has been to achieve a
peaceful resolution to the encampment and
to enable the protest to continue, because it is
a global movement. But this is more challenging, with my political opponent taking a more
militant stand against protest and grandstanding politically to try to score points.
That's added some instability to everything
and repeatedly flared up media and made it
more difficult to make progress in resolv-
ingthe tent camp issue. Occupy is certainly
a short-term challenge that we're grappling
with, and I'm just focused on ensuring that
that happens without conflict and violence.
Q: The NPA plans to raise two million
dollars for this election. Last time
around, Vision spent around $L6 million.
Is this kind of campaign spending
undemocratic?
A: We've pushed hard for changes to ban corporate and union donations and cap the contributions in civic elections, but the BC government has refused to make those changes. The
rules stand, but we're hopeful that we get
changes in the years ahead, and this is the last
election with big donation involved, but that's
the history of Vancouver: very expensive elections per capita that don't reflect well on the
political arena.
Q: Both you and Councillor Anton said
in a debate on homelessness that street
homelessness would be eliminated at the
end of your respective governments. Do
you stand by this?
A: [Under Vision] we've seen an 82 per cent
drop in street homelessness, so I'm confident we're goingto achieve that goal by 2015.
The bigger objective to solve homelessness
will take us to 2020 at least. Our ten-year affordable housing plan is focused on solving
overall homelessness in a decade, and that's a
much bigger plan to tackle, so it's not feasible
by 2015. We need to make sure that no one's
stuck outside ASAP, but it'll take more years
to fill out the housing to solve homelessness
overall.
The Ubyssey spoke with Robertson in October
about his government's relation with UBC.
"We've had a constructive relationship with
UBC. The city and UBC didn't actually communicate that much in the past, and we've
had a really concerted effort to reconnect
and look at opportunities we can explore together....On the land use and zoning and governance side, those are longer-term questions
and we're not in any hurry to amalgamate or
do anything drastic like that. We're on the
side of having stronger partnerships." tH
DAVID MARINOATHE UBYSSEY
Robertson and Vision swept the council race in 2008, but Anton and a revitalized NPA hope to take back city hall
Jonny Wakefield
Managing Editor, Print
THE STRUGGLE
FOR CITY HALL
THETOP CANDIDATES FOR MAYOR HAVE VERY DIFFERENT PLANS IN
MIND FORTHE CITY. GREGOR ROBERTSON AND A VISION COUNCIL AIM
TO CONTINUE WITH THEIR GREENEST CITY PLAN OF BIKE LANES AND
SUSTAINABLE INVESTMENT. NON-PARTISAN ASSOCIATION CHALLENGER
SUZANNE ANTON HAS ATTACKED VISION FOR GREEN WASHING, FAILING
TO LEAD ON ISSUES LIKE OCCUPY AND PURSUING AN ACTIVIST AGENDA.
MEANWHILE, RENTS CLIMB, TRANSIT SLOWS AND HOMELESSNESS
REMAINS.
WHO WILL VANCOUVER CHOOSE?
For the full interviews, including video, visit ubyssey.ca.
The Non-Partisan Association
(NPA) was handed a defeat
in 2008 unlike many in its
74-year history. The venerable "party that says it isn't
a party" lost all but one of
ten council seats to Vision
Vancouver and the Coalition of Progressive
Electors (COPE), decisively breaking its firm
grip on city hall.
Suzanne Anton, the sole NPA councillor,
has now emerged at the head of a reinvigo-
rated party. This time around, the NPA plans
to break spending records and has recruited
the help of Campaign Research Inc., the firm
behind Rob Ford's victory in Toronto. Anton
has attacked Mayor Gregor Robertson for his
transportation priorities, his handling ofthe
Stanley Cup Riots and Occupy Vancouver,
and some of his green policies like allowing
chicken coops within city limits. The Ubyssey
sat down with Anton at a coffee shop near her
Kerrisdale home.
Q: How do you see the role of city
government?
A: City government has actually a limited role
in providing all the services that cities do. We
do streets, we do street lighting, we do parks
and we do land use. The biggest thing we do is
land use.
Q: If you had been mayor during the
Occupy protest, how would you have
handled things differently?
A: I would not have let the first tent get set
up. The protest is fine but the tents are not.
Experience shows that exactly what has happened always happens in these tent cities.
They start off with a fairly benevolent purpose,
people have good motives, but they deteriorate. And this one has deteriorated completely,
culminating on the weekend with the death of
this girl, Ashlie Gough, a 23-year-old girl. The
same age as my son...Gregor ditherfed] on this
[by] not taking decisive action at the front end
and telling people, 'Oh, you can stay forever.'
Q: Your campaign plans to raise two
million dollars in this election, a new
record in Canada. What do you think this
will do to public perceptions of the NPA
and politics more generally?
A: Well, I would think Vision Vancouver is
hopingto raise about the same. I think in the
last election we raised pretty much the same
amounts and I think it was some where in the
vicinity of one and a half million, two million. We each raised about 1.6 last time, so I
would think [Vision] is trying to raise the same
amount this time. So I don't see a lot of difference between the two major parties.
Q: Some people at UBC and on the Metro
Vancouver Board have argued that, as
the second largest transit destination
in the Lower Mainland, the university
should have a seat on the TransLink
Mayor's Council. Do you agree with this
proposal?
A: No. I would like UBC to be a part of
Vancouver. UBC is unincorporated right now.
I think Vancouver would be enriched by having UBC as part of Vancouver. People already
think UBC is part of Vancouver. I would like to
be lobbying for UBC on these kinds of issues.
As mayor of Vancouver, I can speak out on a
lot of these important issues, but I would like
to be able to speak out for UBC on the transportation issue. UBC needs to decide what
its governance is goingto be. I grew up in the
country; unincorporated meant a few houses
up a mountain. Unincorporated does not mean
a major settlement out on Point Grey.
Q: You and the mayor have said that
homelessness would be eliminated
by 2015 under your respective
governments. Do you truly believe this?
A: Well, the question was about street homelessness, and yes, I do believe we can get
people indoors. But [homeless] people come
to Vancouver, and we can't control how many
more people come here. So if we're looking at
the street population we have now, can we help
them move indoors? Absolutely. 13 61 Feature 111.17.2011
THE PARTIES
AND THE CANDIDATES
npa
THE CITY
CHOOSES
VANCOUVER IS A CITY WITH
NO SHORTAGE OF PROBLEMS:
ASTRONOMICAL RENT, A LARGE
HOMELESS POPULATIONS
CLOGGED TRANSIT SYSTEM AND
ASTRUGGLING ENTERTAINMENT
SECTOR.
ON NOVEMBER 19, VANCOUVERITES HAVE THEIR CHANCE TO
CHOOSE WHO RUNS THIS CITY.
MORE FROM THE MAYORAL CANDIDATES ON THE ISSUES
NSV
Other candidates
ONTHECOSTOFHOUSING
GR: We're focused on a ten-year plan to build
38.000 affordable housing units that will alleviate the crunch for people on lower incomes.
We're also pushing for a more creative housing supply, like laneway homes, row housing, mixed use projects around the city and
more density at transit stations throughout
Vancouver.
SA: I think you have to take detached houses
out of that eguation. because we cannot
make detached houses more affordable.
The supply of them is getting smaller every
year, not bigger. What we can do is create
affordability through other forms of housing:
allowing townhouses to be built and allowing
condominiums to be built and allowing renta
housing to be built.
ON THE NPA'S PROPOSED
STREETCAR
GR: In a nutshell, the NPA platform has $390
million in new capital spending and another
$10 million in operating spending-and no
explanation as to where this money comes
from. They say they're going to cap property
taxes. If you combine the capital and operating costs, it's a five per cent tax increase,
which they said they would not do. So who's
going to pay for this? And how?
SA: The current team at City Hall doesn't
believe in public/private partnerships. I do. I
will find private funding and I will find federa
funding through their P3 fund. And don't
forget that the city has already spent a lot of
money on the project. We've already built part
of the line and the city has purchased all of
the line. The NPA is the party of "yes we can."
Vision is the party of "no. no. don't do that!"
ON VISION'S DOWNTOWN BIKE
LANES
SA: The downtown bike lanes went in as a
trial, but they're not treated as a trial. And the
consultation on them was weak. Now I'm a
cyclist, and we have a lot of bike lanes around
the city. And the NPA put in 400 kilometres of
bike lanes. It's the downtown bike lanes that
really caused this sort of conflict and caused
problems in the bike lane program. So I support putting in facilities that work.
CANDIDATES HOPE
TO BREATHE LIFE
INTO NO FUN'
CITY
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
A year after a documentary dubbed Vancouver
the 'No Fun' city, have things gotten better for
artists seeking cheap studio and performance
space?
"It's not that it's no fun here, you can make
your own fun here. It's just that it's not easy. I
mean, that's just a fact," said Melissa James,
co-director of No Fun City.
The 2010 documentary depicted the difficulty for artists to create affordable studio
and performance spaces, given the demand for
land in the city. Accordingto Vision city council candidate Heather Deal, spaces had existed
as part of a system of passive negligence,
where old, run-down buildings were used as
arts spaces when they were really zoned as offices but were allowed to persist.
"Unfortunately, because ofthe price of those
buildings is so high, the owners of those buildings are wanting to flip them and turn them
into something that's more profitable," Deal
said. "We can't allow that system of passive
negligence, we can't rely on that to serve our
artists anymore."
The issue has manifested itself when spaces
that open under the radar find themselves
trapped by bylaws. The Little Mountain
Gallery, on 23rd and Main, had been reported
by neighbours for noise violations, at which
point itwas discovered they were zoned as
retail, rather than a performance space, accordingto Deal.
Deal, who is an incumbent councillor, said
that if an organization knows they don't comply with bylaws, the city currently will agree
to hold off on enforcing them as long as the
organization works with them to function legally, which Little Mountain has been doing.
"We've been working on loosening those to
the point where we're still making sure people
are safe, but we're not being over-restrictive,"
she said. This is functioning as a pilot program
to identify necessary changes to bylaws and
accordingto Deal, a finished report will reach
council in the beginning of the newyear.
Accordingto NPA councillor George
Affleck, artist spaces need to be planned in
new development. "When you develop it, think
about creating spaces that are affordable for
artists," he said, noting that artists don't always require more than a few hundred square
feet. "[It] doesn't have to be a retail space, [it]
can be a little bit of studio space inside the
building."
The NPA plan for dealing with affordability
is creating a new endowment fund, funded by
a percentage of fees paid by developers to the
city. "I understand the arts world, through
how challenging it is," said Affleck, a director
for the Vancouver Children's Festival.
"The biggest challenges artists have and
those groups have
is steady cash flow,
steady funding,
steady predictable funding." The
NPA also hopes
to fill the fund
through encouraging donation from
people who have
received estate
inheritances.
The fund could
be used to loan
money to groups
that haven't yet received grants, accordingto Affleck.
"Beyond that, as
ndianajoel/the ubyssey    far as arts spaces,
it could go to that
as well," he said. "The endowment fund, depending on the size, could be used for all sorts
of things, even arms-length organizations that
could be used for facility space."
Since the release of No Fun City, James said
consultations brought up a lot ofthe issues and
progress has slowly been made. "There was
an epiphany it seemed like, from city council,"
said James. "It's slow, and when you have such
a huge process...and you want to start changing all those laws, it doesn't happen overnight.
"That's why I'm kind of scared that if we
lose some of these people in the election, it's
goingto all start over at zero," she said. "All the
projects that were already set in place, all the
licensing, the conditional licensingthat they've
been granting people, who knows what happens to it, right?"
But accordingto James, both parties are
still reliant on donation money from the developers, which prevents change. "Because ofthe
infrastructure and how it's set up, how they
donate, and how it keeps the money in the city,
the livability and affordability crisis is not going to go away," she said.
"I think the term 'No Fun' city definitely
still applies." 13 ii.i7.2oii I Feature
COPE platform aims for affordability
ISEEALOTOFYOUNG
PEOPLE MOVING OUT
OFTHE CITY BECAUSE
THEY CAN'T AFFORD
TO LIVE [HERE].
RJ AQUINO, COPE COUNCIL CANDIDATE
Kalyeena Makortoff
News Editor
The Coalition of Progressive Electors
(COPE) is trying to increase its presence on
Vancouver's city council after the 2011 election. After winning two spots last year, they're
planningto secure seats for all three of their
council candidates in Saturday's election.
COPE's platform for this election, explained
council candidate RJ Aquino, revolves around
affordable housing and accessible transit. "It
all ties into the affordability in the city," he
said.
The left-leaning party has an agreement
with Vision Vancouver to only run sufficient
candidates for the seats open on the parks
board, school board and city council. Instead
of splitting the left vote, Vision Vancouver is
running seven council candidates while COPE
fills in the final three.
"More often than not, our priorities overlap
and we'd rather work with them than against
them," said Aquino.
However, COPE's policy on campaign donations and their platform for election finance
reform is one thing that sets the parties apart.
"One ofthe main differences between
COPE and Vision is that COPE does not
take any big donations from developers or
KALYEENA MAKORTOFFATHE UBYSSEY
RJ Aquino and COPE hope to make housing affordable, possibly through quotas placed on new developments
corporations," Aquino said. The majority of
COPE's funding comes from unions and labour organizations.
"We are advocating for limits to the amount
of spend ing that is done in municipal elections," said Aquino. "That just creates a more
level playing field, creating greater availability
of opportunity for anybody else who might
be willing to run. It's somethingthat our
membership is proud of..we don't want to be
beholden to any special interests."
Aquino said that COPE also wants to emphasize the importance of arts in the city and
make sure that large corporations don't overshadow local entrepreneurs.
"Small businesses really promote the character ofthe community and are a stronger
economic stimulator for the local economy,"
he said.
"We're not saying that big business needs to
go, but we're saying that small business needs
to co-exist with large corporations and that's
why we're proposing a tiered tax system."
While Aquino said that COPE isn't targeting a specific demographic in its campaign,
"The platform we have, we feel, will speak
directly to young people. It's just a matter of
making sure that people understand that our
platform does affect their lives and that's why
they need to get involved.
"Affordable housing is so crucial," Aquino
explained. "I see a lot of young people moving out ofthe city because they can't afford
to live in the city, even though they may get
good jobs, be finishing school or even going
to school. It's hard to find a good place to live
that's relatively affordable for a lot of people."
One proposed solution is inclusionary zoning. In any buildings over 6 stories high, 20
per cent ofthe units would be reserved for
affordable housing.
"The development is goingto continue
but we need to make sure that with this new
development, affordable housing is in place,"
Aquino said.
"We need to make sure that developers
are developing for the people in the city and
not for themselves. We need to make sure
that we hold developers accountable for the
service that they're providing, which is building homes, and you're building homes for
everybody."
While COPE may not be holding the majority of seats on city council anytime soon,
Aquino stressed that there's something more
important to focus on.
"Our main concern is to make sure that
we're able to retain a strong progressive presence in city hall and that we're able to find
partners to work with and...get things done."
STEP 1: DETERMINE IFYOU'RE
ELIGIBLE
Must live in the city of Vancouver, be a
Canadian citizen and lived in BC for at least
the last six months. UBC residents cannot
vote in the mayoral or council races, but can
vote for school and parks boards. However,
UBC residents can vote in the Electoral
Area A and School Board races. For more
information on the candidates, please see
pages4and 10.
STEP 2: FIND OUT WHERE TO
VOTE
The City of Vancouver has polling locations listed on its website (http://vancouver.
ca/c tyclerk/elec tions/20 llelec ti on/where.
htm/1)
STEP3: PROVIDE ID ATTHE
POLLING STATION
Unless you've previously registered to vote
from the place you currently live, you must
provide two pieces of valid ID
REMEMBER TO VOTE ON
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19!
INDEPENDENT
CANDIDATES
TRY TO MAKE
A SPLASH IN
BIG MONEY
ELECTIONS
PEOPLE LIKE ME CAN'T
BUYRADIOTIMEORTV
SPOTS OR SPEND THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS IN
SIGNAGE.
TED COPELAND, INDEPENDENT COUNCIL
CANDIDATE
Mike Dickson
StaffWriter
As the Vancouver municipal election draws
closer, political parties like Vision Vancouver
and the Non-Partisan Association are busy
posting signs, rolling out banners and buying
radio time. They are sparing no expense in
convincing people that their candidates are
the best choices for mayor or city council.
Such campaigning requires some loose
purse strings and a thick wallet. But for the
independent candidates running in this election, many of those campaigning tactics are
luxuries they cannot afford.
"The chances of [an independent] getting
elected are pretty low, mostly because it's
so hard for independents to spend the kind
of money that parties can," said Michael
Dharni, a human kinetics student at UBC
who is vying to become a city councillor.
Under the previous ward system, neighbourhoods were combined accordingto
population to form an electoral district.
Independents had a realistic chance of winning in these districts because the scope of
their electorate was much smaller.
But the current at-large system encourages the formation of political parties because the task of reaching all of Vancouver's
1.5 million residents is overwhelming, both
financially and otherwise.
"People like me can't buy radio time or
TV spots or spend thousands of dollars in
signage," said Ted Copeland, an independent
running for city council for the first time.
"Being an independent, the only way I
could have an impact policy-wise would be
to have the support of one of the two major
parties."
Copeland is referring to the NPA and
Vision Vancouver, who, along with the
Coalition of Progressive Electors (COPE),
dominate Vancouver's political landscape.
COURT ESYTHE CANDIDATES
Michael Dharni and Sandy Garrosino are independent
candidates running for council. Dharni is a UBC Human
Kinetics student, and Garrosino made her name as
co-founder of the anti-casino Vancouver Not Vegas
movement.
This leaves little room for the independent
underdogs to make their voices heard—only
one independent councillor has been elected
in 25 years
One option for independents is to secure
an endorsement by one ofthe parties. As
prospective city councillor Sandy Garrosino
explains, endorsements mean more exposure, and when your electoral area holds 1.5
million people, exposure is everything.
"Having the endorsement from the NSV
really expands the base of people that will
suddenly look more closely at my position,"
said Garrosino, co-founder ofthe Vancouver
Not Vegas movement.
"It's also a no-strings-attached commitment, so my status as an independent isn't
jeopardized."
Meanwhile, party candidates have several
strings attached to their platform, and those
strings operate as double-edged swords when
it comes to municipal party politics.
On one hand, parties enable voters to determine where a candidate stands based on their
affiliation and make a decision based on that
information.
"Parties simplify the voters' task by simplifying broad electoral themes," said Sean
Bickerton, an NPA candidate who was also
involved with the Vancouver Not Vegas
movement.
"They enable voters to make broader
choices and to choose individuals within
them. They also provide a sense of continuity
and responsibility, in that there's a sense of
being able to hold an entire grouping of people
accountable."
But on the other hand, parties can prove
divisive and crowd the space for independent
thinking. They can also restrict party members in their ability to truly and honestly voice
their beliefs.
"Party politics tend to heighten or create an
atmosphere of conflict and division, both in
office and the public realm," Garrosino said.
Her sentiments are echoed by Copeland.
"COPE is supposed to be a political party, but
they're like the kid who only gets to play in
the football game if he brings the ball."
"We have the most partisan municipal
politics in Canada," said UBC political science professor Fred Cutler.
"Independent candidates are usually people who want to get their message out there.
They have almost no chance of winning unless they have a high-profile background in
politics, sports [or] business." 13 » Sports»
11.17.20111 9
JOSH CURRANATHE UBYSSEY
The UBC men's basketball team began their season with two victories. The women's team split their weekend series. Both teams are entering the season with championship aspirations
Thunderbirds basketball season preview
Men's basketball
Last season, UBC was only 11
seconds away from playing in the
national championship.
With the clock winding down,
Trinity Western's Kyle Coston
drained a three pointer to propel
Trinity into the lead and ultimately
end UBC's hope of playing for their
first national title since 1973.
With the 2011-12 season just
beginning, UBC has a long way to
go if they hope to match the success
they had last year, let alone capture
a CIS title.
Veteran stars Josh Whyte, Alex
Murphy and Brent Malish are gone.
Yet for the 'Birds, replacing those
stars is not an issue; the team has
five players in their last year of eligibility. What UBC must overcome is
that the rest of their roster is young
and relatively inexperienced.
On the 14-man squad, UBC will
dress 6 rookies and have 8 players
who played zero minutes for the
blue and gold last season.
"In years gone by, we have been
pretty talented in terms of depth,"
said UBC head coach Kevin Hanson.
"One ofthe problems over the last
couple of years was that we weren't
recruiting in that area because we
thought we were goingto be going
to the NCAA and we didn't want to
have kids in the program that were
goingto have to end their careers
early or lose eligibility because of
that."
Despite the infusion of youth,
there is an expectation for UBC
to succeed this season. The 'Birds
finished 22-4 in conference play last
season and in the past four years
UBC is an astounding 118-13. The
program has flourished under coach
Hanson, with back-to-back CIS title
appearances in 2009 and 2010, and
a perfect 20-0 regular season record
in 2006.
"Every year the expectation is to
try to win the Canada West, to get
to the national championship and to
try to win nationals," said fifth-year
guard Nathan Yu.
Yu, along with seniors Doug
Plumb, Balraj Baines, Kamar Burke
and Graham Bath, will form the
nucleus of UBC's roster, and their
experience at the CIS level will be
paramount in UBC's bid to finally
capture a gold medal.
In particular, Yu is a player
Hanson expects to lead the 'Birds
this season.
"Everybody knows it's [Yu's]
team and he has to produce for us in
order for us to be successful," said
Hanson. "I think as a fifth-year guy
you strive to have it as your team
and I think that pressure turns into
a very positive thing.
"You want that as an athlete, you
want to be the guy, and he is going to have to perform well for us,
without a doubt, in order for us to be
successful."
Though not a full-time starter last
season, Yu was an integral part of
the 'Birds offence, providing a spark
from the bench with his deadly
three-point shooting. His skill on
the court got him noticed by Team
Canada scouts, and this summer
he represented his country at the
Universiade Games and the Pan Am
Games.
Yu said he and his fellow veteran
teammates are prepared to step into
a leadership role for the team's rookies. Despite the challenge of having
a team with less depth than past
years, he believes the 'Birds are up
for the challenge of goingtoe-to-toe
with the best in the Canada West.
There are four rookies—guards
Nakai Luyken and Malcolm
Williams, and forwards Mike
Lewandowski and David Wagner—
that Hanson expects big things from
this season.
They have received valuable
minutes in the preseason and when
the fatigue of tne season kicks in,
Hanson hopes those minutes will
pay dividends, allowingthe'Birds to
rely on their depth rather than having the burden exclusively rest on
the shoulders ofthe veterans.
"Those guys are goingto be very
valuable to us and they are the future of our program," Hanson said.
UBC has started their season
2-0 and will be looking for revenge
against the Coston-led Trinity
Western Spartans Thursday night
at 8pm and Saturday night at 7pm at
War Memorial Gym. 13
—Drake Fenton
CHARLESTOATHE UBYSSEY
Women's Basketball
If there is a winning formula for
basketball, then the UBC women's
team has shown they have it, albeit
with two key ingredients missing.
Head coach Deb Huband believes
that a lack of toughness and consistency prevented them from achieving success last season.
"I think first and foremost, after
last season we had a chance to look
at ourselves in the mirror and isolate a few things we wanted to improve on in the offseason, and one
thing was overall team toughness,"
said Huband.
After dropping the Canada West
quarterfinals to the Alberta Pandas
last year, the T-Birds kept busy
during the off season by working on offensive execution as well
as strength and conditioning to
increase both mental and physical
strength.
While grueling runs on Wreck
Beach and hikes up the Grouse
Grind are sure-fire ways to increase
tenacity and toughness, the ability
to perform with these attributes
consistently is an entirely different
matter.
"The last year or two we've
maybe under-performed a little bit
and haven't been able to get over the
hump when the playoffs hit, as far
as getting consistent performances
from the people we rely on," said
Huband.
"We have two fifth-year players
who we're really going to look to, to
lead us on the floor."
Those two players are forwards
Zara Huntley and Alex Vieweg, both
of whom have received MVP and
All-Star recognition.
Huband says the team will look to
Vieweg for leadership, tough defensive play and point scoring.
Huntley's strengths are scoring
points in the paint and dominating
on the glass.
It takes a team to win games,
however, and a deep talent pool is
necessary to be a contender with
the high level of competition in the
Canada West.
Huntley believes solid repeat
performances will be determined
bythe depth of this year's roster. "In
tne past we haven't been consistent enough to make it as far as we
wanted to, but we have more talent,
we're really good this year. I think
we can do it," she said.
Some ofthe new recruits have
already begun to make waves in the
preseason.
"Cassandra Knievel is a rookie
guard from Nanaimo who has been
getting decent minutes and is a real
sniper from the three-point line
and a solid defensive player," said
Huband. "The rookies are working
hard and I think they're all going
to be solid for us as their careers go
on."
With only one loss in the preseason and a tournament sweep, the
'Birds have shown they are a championship calibre team.
Whether or not they can hold
onto this game-winning formula
throughout the season will determine if they are a contender or a
pretender.
UBC has started their season 1-1
(see sidebar for recap) and will host
the Trinity Western Spartans at
War Memorial Gym this Thursday
at 6pm and Saturday at 5pm. 13
Teams kick off
regular season
CJPentland
Contributor
Women's Basketball
The 'Birds had an up and down
weekend. They completely annihilated Brandon University 88-21 on
Friday night, but then lost to the No.
1 ranked University of Regina 77-66
on Saturday.
Friday's game could have been a
practice with how dominant UBC
was. Brandon only scored one point
in the entire first quarter.
Sophomore shooting guard Kris
Young led the 'Birds in scoring with
18 points. Zara Huntley and Alex and
Erica Vieweg all had double digit
scoring performances.
On Saturday, UBC had to refocus
against a much tougher opponent.
In the first half the 'Birds looked
capable of downingthe nation's top
ranked team, forcing Regina to commit 15 turnovers. UBC exited the half
leading 39-35.
Regina came out flying in the second half, however, outscoring UBC
20-10 in the third quarter.
"They turned it up a notch and
really came at us in the second half,
particularly in transition, and we had
a few breakdowns that gave them the
momentum," said UBC head coach
Deb Huband.
Regina would hold on for the
win, but UBC showed an incredible
resilience in their comeback bid.
Point guard Kristen Hughes put the
team on her back, scoring 16 straight
points to help the 'Birds get within
6 points.
Huntley and Hughes shared the
team lead in points with 16.
Men's Basketball
Last weekend the men's team (2-0)
got off on the right foot to start the
regular season. They opened the
season Friday night with a strong 91-
55 win over Brandon University (1-3)
at War Memorial Gym. On Saturday,
they soundly defeated the University
of Regina (0-3) 100-71.
The wins left head coach Kevin
Hanson happy with how his team
opened up the regular season. "I
tnought this was the first weekend
that we played two good basketball
games," said Hanson.
UBC forced an overmatched
Regina team into 29 turnovers on
the Saturday and led them in every
statistical category. They built up
a comfortable 30-13 after the first
quarter and never looked back.
Fifth-year point guard Nathan Yu
stole the show with an impressive 34
point and 8 assist effort, controlling
the offence and leading a potent fast
break.
Freshman Malcolm Williams
nailed 5 three-pointers on Saturday,
while second-year Tommy Nixon
also chipped in 19 points. 13
CHARLES TOATHE UBYSSEY Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
11.17.20111 IQ
DAVID MARINO/THE UBYSSEY
Forget hot water; you could put Totem residents in a shack and it still beats a Surrey basement suite
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Take time to consider your
Electoral Area A vote
This Saturday, from 8am-8pm,
there will a ballot open in the
SUB for people wishing to vote
in the election for the director of
Electoral Area A. If you've lived in
BC for six months and have lived
on campus for at least 30 days, you
can vote.
Obviously, we urge you to do so.
Yes, you'd be hard pressed to find
an election where we wouldn't
say "vote," but the person elected
director of Electoral Area A is the
only person on campus who can
claim to represent all students
and residents in a democratic way.
Furthermore, if UBC or the provincial government begin to move on
creating a long-term governance
structure for this campus, the
director will hold a great deal of
symbolic importance. And even if
the status quo prevails, the director
still has a great deal to do on the
Metro Vancouver board.
We would hope that students
could elect a strong, experienced,
enthusiastic candidate who would
fight for the interests of students
and advocate for governance reform. Unfortunately, that candidate
does not exist in this election.
It certainly isn't Colin Desjarlais,
who has done little campaigning for the position, and has little
experience that will aid him should
he be elected. Mischa Makortoff is
very earnest and very committed
to learning the skills required by
the position, but we wonder about
his lack of experience and ability to
take a hard stance on an issue when
it matters.
Maria Harris, who has held the
position for the last three years, is
running for re-election. She has the
experience and contacts to perform
in the position. However, students
should know that in the last three
years, UBC's democratic accountability has decreased, the debate
between Metro Vancouver and the
UBC community on rapid transit has gone nowhere, and much
of Harris's strength and expertise aid people in the University
Endowment Lands, rather than
students.
That's understandable; the UEL
is what Harris knows and where
her base of support lies. But students should be aware there are
other people who will represent
student interests more effectively.
There are two candidates—one
a current student and one a recent
graduate—who we have no doubt
will have students fully in their
mind if elected. But Alexandria
Mitchell and Scott Andrews have
their flaws as well.
Andrews has does a good job
campaigning on campus and has
the strongest commitment to tackling the governance conundrum
on campus, both of which are to be
commended. We do worry about
his lack of political experience,
though, as an effective director
needs to have a firm hand on issues
from the outset.
Meanwhile, Mitchell is an incredibly involved student, very
ambitious and already politically
active. All of these things are to be
commended, but they also make us
wonder if she would have the time
and dedication needed for the position for the entire three years.
That said, there are no perfect
candidates in any election. The
position will be filled regardless
of whether you vote this Saturday.
But in an election where less than
1000 people are projected to cast a
ballot, your vote will matter a great
deal. Choose wisely.
Davis Cup coming to UBC is the
exception to the rule
The Davis Cup is the biggest tennis tournament in men's team play.
Over 100 countries enter teams
into competition. And it's coming
to UBC.
Or at least one round of it, anyway. Canada plays France in the
first round in mid-February The
matches will take place in the
Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports
Centre, marking the first time a
tennis event has been held there. It
is also the first time a sports event
of any significance has been held
there since the Olympics, aside
from regular CIS hockey games
which have embarrassingly low
attendance.
And that serves as a reminder
that the arena is currently a giant
white elephant on campus, a beautiful new sports venue that is very
costly to operate and sits empty
almost all year. UBC Athletics had
planned to hold concerts there
until that plan was scuttled bythe
RCMP and campus residents, and
there aren't many big sports games
that come through the city and are
suitable for the arena.
We know Athletics is trying to
find a solution to get more use out
ofthe Doug Mitchell Centre, and
we wish them luck in that endeavour. It's a real shame that such a
nice venue, built at little cost to the
university, is so under-used.
Hope for the worst traffic light
in the world
Though we aren't very happy with
the return of cars to University
Boulevard (the strip of road outside
Mahony & Sons), we have to admit
that there is one real benefit that
will come out of this: the worst
traffic light in the world should see
a slight improvement.
You must know the traffic light
we're talking about. It's the one
right by Shoppers Drug Mart. And
if you've ever tried to cross it on
foot, you know what hell is.
We can't count the number of
times we've stood there for ages
waitingto cross, noticingthat every
direction incomprehensibly has a
red light. Turning arrows will stay
on forever, thus barring pedestrians, despite the fact that the only
traffic coming out ofthe current
University Boulevard is a bus every
five minutes.
The light pattern just makes no
bloody sense and nobody with the
power to change it seems to care,
which leaves us screaming at the
sky every time we try to cross.
With the return of semi-regular
traffic to the Boulevard, some kind
of order should return to that intersection. 13
Keystone XL victory
is a hopeful sign
Perspectives
» Gordon Katie
Being an environmentalist isn't easy.
When we survey this changing
planet, we experience sweltering
temperatures, suffer turbulent seas
and witness melting ice caps. The
processes we've begun are unprecedented; the Earth we've become
accustomed to has already been
fundamentally altered in irreversible ways.
When we review the leading
scientific literature, we notice how
little time we have—how dire our
situation has become—and we
struggle to hope in the face of this
mounting despair.
When we open our newspapers
we see, despite all our efforts, that
we're pouring more carbon dioxide
into the atmosphere than ever before, that temperatures are reaching
new peaks, that storms and wildfires are ravaging our communities
and that climate change is causing
drought, famine, disease and untold
misery for the most innocent and
vulnerable.
When we turn to our political
elite, we're met with unsatisfying
accords, vacuous plans, pledges,
press conferences and decrees.
After decades of fruitlessly pleading for real leadership, we've come
to realize, in the words ofthe great
American philosopher John Dewey,
that "politics is the shadow cast on
society by big business." That business is oil, coal and natural gas.
Climate change is the defining
issue of our time. And yet, thus far,
our response has been nothing but
an abject failure.
Being an environmentalist isn't
easy.
However, I've never been more
proud to be one, I've never had more
hope, and I've never been more
confident in our ability to author a
greater, greener future.
The reason for my optimism is
last week's victory by Bill McKibben
and thousands of other activists (including prominent Canadians, like
Naomi Klein and Maude Barlow) in
forcing President Barack Obama to
suspend the Keystone XL pipeline
for an independent review, which
most analysts think will kill the
project. Keystone XL was slated to
transport dirty tar sands oil through
a 3456 kilometre pipe from Alberta,
through the Midwest, and down to
Texas. NASA's chief climatologist
James Hansen said this would effectively mean "game over" for our
climate.
Everything seemed a-go;
TransCanada had already moved
a million dollars of pipe across the
border, and they even began to seize
land by eminent domain. But, in the
words of Bill McKibben, this "done
deal came spectacularly undone."
Their victory teaches us an amazing lesson in how to best push for
political change: people power.
Day after day, these brave activists
encircled the White House. One
day there were 12,000 shoulder-to-
shoulder; another day 1254 of them
were arrested in a massive act of
civil disobedience.
UBC needs to learn from this
moment. We are world-renowned
for our sustainable operations and
innovative research in the field,
but we could do more to politically
mobilize our students and faculty.
We must be both academics and
activists; it is our duty to make efforts to understand the science, and
the politics. The science is clear; it
informs our urgency and forecasts
our future. The politics are messier,
but our experiences have shown us
that the solution lies not in waiting
for our leaders to act, but in forcing
their hand.
It's particularly important we
learn this lesson now, because the
next climate battle is likely to be
in our backyard. Canada's finance minister, Jim Flaherty, told
Bloomberg that this "may mean that
we move quickly to ensure that we
can export our oil to Asia through
British Columbia."
Our odds still look bleak, but one
thing is certain: we have a stronger
and more focused movement than
ever before, and I would like you to
be a part of it. tH
Letters
Re: Time to turn the page on
campus planning, Nov. 14
Dear Mr McElroy,
While I respect your right to
express opinions on the university's plans and governance, I take
objection to your singling out Nancy
Knight, our Associate Vice President
of Planning, in your opinion piece of
November 14.
Ms Knight is part of my team. She
does not make decisions in isolation,
nor does she set the university's
directions and policies. Ultimately,
the university's Board of Governors
makes the final decision on all of
our plans.
Take exception with the decisions themselves, with the rationale
underpinning them or with their
consequences ifyou will. But please
leave personalities out of it.
—Pierre Ouillet is UBC's Vice
President Finance, Resources and
Operations Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
11.17.20111 11
STUDENTBODY»
Reclaiming the lost art of masturbation
Happy
Healthy
Homy
RaevenGeist-
Deschamps
Before I start my ramble, a few
preliminaries.
Masturbation has no known
physical or mental risks: everyone
from HealthLine to Wikipedia says
so. Boys tend to do it less than they
say, while girls do it more than they
say. In fact, a quick solo roundabout
has been credited to decrease depression and improve self-worth.
Ifyou are spending more than
half your time in private exploration, you may want to speak with
someone, but other than that, masturbation is a safe space to explore
your orgasm and yourself. It also
isn't goingto disappear anytime
soon, so you should probablyjoin
the bandwagon and get your jerk on.
A few months ago I had a shocking realization: besides a brief stint
with a sex toy which then succumbed to drunk escapades and
pranking unhappy neighbours, I
had been masturbating in pretty
much the same way for nearly a
decade.
What's worse, I figured sex was
an adequate replacement for my
lack of curiosity in exploring ways
to pleasure myself. And there are a
few problems with this. Ifyou're not
curious enough to spend the time
alone on the craft of discovering
whatyour unique anatomy needs,
how are you supposed to develop a
fulfilling sex life?
Sex toys can be the way to go if
you're comfortable goingto a sex
shop or ordering them online. The
most important thing you should
keep in mind when looking for sex
toys is avoiding phthalates AT ALL
COSTS. Phthalates are toxic chemicals used to increase the durability and flexibility of plastics, and
they will seriously mess with your
reproduction.
All toys marked as novelties are a
big no-no, because the label is used
as a way to circumvent safety standards placed on sex toys. It allows
the companies to make 'em cheap
and dirty, not exactly what you want
in and around your genitals.
Silicone is still the best quality, but note that top grade silicone
is opaque, not see-through, and if
you're goingto use ajelly vibrator
or dildo, it should be covered with
a condom because some of that
GEOFF LISTEmHE UBYSSEY
A lot of students masturbate-and so should you
porous material can hold anything
from scents to dye. And there are
a number of male options, like the
Tenga egg and the fleshlight. The
former is cheaper, but less durable,
but the latter comes with add ons
that allow you to plug it into your
computer and synchronize it with
your favourite porn!
While masturbation aids can help
to up your pleasure, they're not for
everybody. What's more important
is learning what your body needs.
As a starting point, I'd recommend
examining your breathing and, for
once, take your time and try to kill
the story in your mind's eye if it's
drawingyou away from the immediacy of sensingyour own body.
As much as every doctor, public
health policy activist, teacher and
grandma might pummel you to have
a balanced lifestyle, why aren't we
recommending frequent masturbation the same way we're supposed to
run around for at least 20 minutes a
day to stay healthy?
Seriously. The National Health
Service in England made this—the
running, not the other thing—a public health announcement in 2009.
I can still dream that Harper will
take time away from cutting our
budget on environmental spending and relocate funds to Private
Pleasure Policies.
I'm not promoting public masturbation; I don't think the Knoll is a
great venue for a solo rumble in the
hay, and the Rose Garden should be
left to the elderly, tourists and graduating students. I'm not necessarily talking about peeling a daikon,
shaping it and disappearing into the
woodshed for agricultural elation.
I'm just saying, the power is inyour
hands! And palms. And fingers. Use
it wisely. 13
Don't Forget to Submit Your ^
Health & Dental Claims from Last Year
DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING CLAIMS FROM LAST YEAR (for students covered in 2010-2011)
All health and/or dental claims incurred on or before August 31, 2011 (for the 2010-2011 policy year) must be
received by the insurance company (Sun Life) by November 29, 2011.
In order to ensure that your claims are transferred by the deadline, they must be dropped off at the
Health & Dental Plan Office (SUB Lower Level, Room 61) no later than Thursday, November 24,2011.
If you're mailing claims directly to the insurance company, please leave adequate time for delivery. The address for
Sun Life is recorded on the back of all claim forms.
Claims received after the deadline will not be reimbursed.
Claim forms are available at www.ihaveaplan.ca or call the Member Services Centre at 1 877 795-4421 from
9 am to 5 pm on weekdays.
Have a smart phone
with a QR code
reader? Scan the box
to be directed your
Plan's website.
ams
GRADUATE
STUM-!NT SOCIETY
UBC•VANCOUVER
HOOD
ihaveaplan.ca 121 Games 1117.2011
Crossword
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Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com. Used with permission.
1- Fast fliers
5- Bedouin
9- Orgs.
14- the crack of dawn
15-Bundle
16- Religion founded in Iran
17- Able was ...
18- Pulitzer winner James
19- Build
20- Vessel with two masts
22- Currency unit in Nigeria
23- Doo-wop syllable
24- Arabian Sea vessel
25- "The dog ate my homework," e.g.
29- Ancient tongue
32- Extend into subdivisions
34- Annoy
39- Extended family unit
40- Ages
42- The Time Machine race
43- Native
45- Banner
47- Beat by a hair
49- Confusion
50- Evaluate
54- Egg head?
56- European wheat
57- Calcium carbonate rock
63- Low point
64- Dies
65- Make for it
66- Clear the board
67- Chieftain, usually in Africa
68- Gentlewoman
69- Continue a subscription
70- Lacking
71- Zeno's home
Down
1- Diamonds, e.g.
2- Gush
3- Edible corm
4- Flower part
5- Disconcert
6- Disheveled
7- "Hard I" (sailor's yell)
8- Ale, e.g.
9- Eastern Algonquian
language
10- It's a wrap
11- Arab chief
12- Mother-of-pearl
13- Lute of India
21- Yeah, right!
24- Curt
25- Flatfoot's lack
26- Composer Schifrin
27- Muslim elder and prayer-
leader
28- Common hop
30- Janeiro
31- Directional ending
33- Fenced areas
35- New Age musician John
36- Inter	
37- Fast-food option
38- Half of zwei
41- Hosp. readout
44- Lie scattered over
46- Sgts., e.g.
48- Realm
50- Lou Grant star
51-Surplus
52- Four-door
53- Beethoven dedicatee
55- Swerves
57- Falsehoods
58- The Joy of Cooking author
Rombauer
59- Account
60- Like some history
61- Unclothed
62- "Only Time" singer
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Do you feel
strongly about our
games page?
Contact our Managing Editor, Print with complaints or suggestions
Jonny Wakefield I printeditor@ubyssey.ca
It works in theory,
but will it work
in the real world?
At U of T's School of Public Policy, we'll help you find out.
U of T's School of Public Policy and Governance puts research and practice in the
same classroom. From climate change to human rights, today's challenges require both a
firm rooting in powerful ideas and a motivation for real-world action. Through its Masters
program in Public Policy (MPP), U of T is tapping into Canada's most productive research
faculty to shape the next generation of policy leaders.
School of Public Policy & Governance
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
www.publicpolicy.utoronto.ca

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