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The Ubyssey Jan 18, 1966

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Array THS UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 37
VANCOUVER, B.C.,  TUESDAY,  JANUARY   18,   1966
CA 4-3916
—norm  betts  photo
COFFEE BREAK comes for city motorcycle cops every morning as they pause with car patrol unit (out of picture) at
Tenth Avenue cafe, taking respite from harrassing university kids on Sixteenth Avenue speedway.
NEXT TO SUB
New building
set for housing
By   STUART   GRAY
A new student residence may be built near the  proposed Student Union Building.
SUB   chairman,   Roger   Mc
Afee, reporting to student
council Monday night on the
progress of the building plans
said the area in the vicinity of
the stadium has been set aside
for a residence.
He said he noticed a planned
road to the residence while
discussing plans for the university area with university officials.
McAfee said he did not know
the size of the residence.
"It will go on the place
where UBC's traffic director
Sir Ouvry's army now has its
headquarters," he told council.
In his report, McAfee termed
"satisfactory" the present development of SUB.
But, McAfee said, "I personally would like to see things
progressing more rapidly."
However, the complexities
arising from having to deal
with several university departments and the nature of
the project make this impossible, he added.
The report placed the floor
area of SUB as it now stands
at the preferred area originally
planned, approximately 164,-
000 square feet.
Estimates of the cost per
square foot were $24, which,
the report said, should rise to
$27 jper square foot by the time
construction gets under way.
Total cost of the building is
-expected to be $4,500,000, with
the AMS contributing $3,340,-
000, and the university making
up the difference in food services.
McAfee said the current
SUB financial situation is favorable.
Its funds now include approximately $420,000 on account with another $225,000
due in September, bringing the
eventual total cost close to
$650,000.
Expected revenue from
SUB's commercial spaces were
estimated in the report to yield
$35,000 per year in rental.
McAfee also said in the report the original financing
period of the building, set at
fifteen years, may change.
The report estimated construction on the project will
begin later this year, and
should be finished for the 1967-
68 academic term.
UBC land money
'not big revenue'
Loffmark says commercial
building   to take time'
By  DANNY  STOFFMAN
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
The endowment lands will never be an important source
of revenue for UBC, says trade and commerce minister
Ralph Loffmark.
"TJie big profits are in major
commercial developments,"
Loffmark told The Ubyssey
Monday.
He said Stanford University
in California makes little profit from its suburban endowment lands.
"But the University of Washington makes a killing from
its property in downtown
Seattle."
Loffmark said profits from
a proposed government skyscraper in downtown Vancouver would be turned over to
B.C. universities.
The project, however, has
been shelved indefinitely.
Loffmark said the office
building would be administered by a government-established five^man commission.
The same commission is
charged with developing the
endowment lands.
Vancouver city council has
opposed the development on
grounds it will compete with
private developers in offering
rental space.
Council claimed the project
would kill plans for developing Block 42 at Georgia and
Granville in downtown Vancouver.
Loffmark said Mayor Rathie
and Liberal MLA Pat McGeer
"fought me in the 1963 election on the proposal they were
for higher education.
"But I have not seen either
of them come forward and say
this downtown property should
be developed for the universities," he said.  "In fact it has
been the other way around."
The minister said he agrees
with UBC president John Macdonald's proposal that private
industries be encouraged to
develop research centres on
the endowment lands.
"But it will take time," he
said.
RALPH LOFFMARK
. . . big money
TO INVESTIGATION
AMS opens CUP
policing policies
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
AMS council formed a committee Monday night to look
into a  Canadian  University Press proposal for a policing
system to handle newspaper-student council conflicts.
Ubyssey editor-in-chief Tom
Wayman presented council
with a brief drawn up at the
twenty-eighth CUP conference
in Calgary at Christmas.
The brief suggested that
when an editorial conflict
arose between an editor and
his student council or an outside pressure group, a committee should be formed of the
CUP national president or his
appointee, an editor of member student paper in the same
region as the paper being investigated and a member of
the professional press.
The brief also suggested the
findings of the committee be
considered binding on all parties.
However, law president
Peter Hyndman told council
the   brief   should   not   be  ac
cepted and passed as a motion
in its present form.
He moved council recognize
its eventual responsibility for
The Ubyssey and that it accept
the idea of an investigation
committee, but not in the form
Wayman presented.
He said he did not like the
idea of the committee findings
being binding if council did
not have representation.
AMS president Byron Hender said even if council wanted
to give up its final responsibility for The Ubyssey it could
not legally do so.
Council decided to postpone
further discussion on the CUP
brief until a committee of
Hyndman and Ubyssey Associate Editor George Reamsbottom meet and prepare a more
acceptable plan.
CYNANIDE BESIDE  BODY
Chem prof found dead
A UBC professor was found
dead in a downtown hotel room
Saturday.
Dead is Dr. Harry M. Daggett, 43, associate professor of
chemistry since 1949.
Police said a bottle of cyanide
and a note were found beside
the body.
Daggett booked into the Austin Hotel, 1221 Granville,
Thursday, police said.
A coroner's office spokesman
said Monday the results of an
autopsy carried out on the
body are not yet known.
HARRY DAGGETT
. administrative load
Police are investigating the
possibility of suicide.
Daggett ,a bachelor, came to
UBC in 1949 after graduating
with a Ph.D. from Brown University, Rhode Island.
Dr. C. A. McDowell, chemistry department head said
Daggett had been suffering
from ill health for some time.
He described Daggett as an
excellent teacher and well-
liked in the department.
"Lately he has had to take on
a great deal of administrative
work in the department," said
McDowell. Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January   18,   1966
BIRDS ON SEATTLE LIST
Falcons avenge '65 loss
By  KEN  ATKINSON
Seattle Pacific Falcons added UBC's Thunderbirds to their
casualty list over the weekend.
Falcons, who have not lost
a home game since early in
the 1963-64 season, avenged
last year's upset losses to the
T-Birds at Vancouver, by
sweeping both games of their
basketball series in the American city.
In Friday's 78-69 victory.
Howard Heppner, Falcon's six-
foot, five inch center, single-
handedly  stopped   a   Thunder
bird  comeback  by  scoring  35
points.
UBC trailed by 19 points
with eight minutes left in the
first half starting a run at the
strong Seattle squad.
UBC narrowed the gap to 71-
67 with four minutes left in the
game.
However, a successful stall
by the Falcons combined with
charging fouls against the
'Birds Bob Barazzuol and Steve
Spencer  ended  UBC's   hopes.
Forwards Barazzuol and
John Olsen finished the game
RUGBY NUTS  TANGLE
UBC squads win
3 weekend games
By  DOUG MOSER
Victoria College sent two
BCIT provided one each, and
The Birds repeated their'
1965 performance over North
Shore with a fine 15-0 victory
after a scoreless first half.
Bill Gray scored two tries
and Dave Murphy scored the
other. Dean McKinnon converted two of the tries and Doug
Patterson  the  third.
Victoria gave a magnificent
display of three-quarter play,
but its forwards were unable
to match the Braves' set and
the UBC squad ran out a comfortable 9-3 win.
Victoria seconds were no
match for the speedy UBC Totems, but never gave up trying.
Fly half Terry Tingling was
conspicuous on a team  which
slick teams, North Shore and
UBC fielded three teams,
appeared   to   have   no   weaknesses.
Dave Hughes scored two
tries.
Ian Anderson, Ron Kinkaid,
Ron Samol, Ross Mclnntash
and Tingling scored one each.
Anderson converted two
tries in  the 25-3 victory.
Victoria's Tomahawks produced their finest rugby of the
season  to  defeat BCIT  11-0.
Terry Cook and Tom. Richards were outstanding in a
team that showed signs of
jelling into a fine squad.
Jim Harrison scored one try
after a brilliant movement, and
Doug Stavely was on the spot
twice to finish off good forward plays.
Carl Fisher converted the
first try.
by bagging 10 points apiece.
However, on Saturday it was
a different story.
The fine play of UBC guard
Ian Dixon kept the 'Birds neck
and neck through the first
quarter but then the Seattle
five steadily pulled away for
an 84-64 victory.
Falcons had a 20 point lead
by three-quarter time and in
the final 10 minutes of play,
UBC's bench led by rookie
center Jack Turpin held the
American squad even.
A 17 point effort by Barazzuol topped the Thunderbirds'
attack.
Dave Smith and Heppner hit
for 20 and 18 points respectively for the Falcons.
Puce too
PANGO-PANGO — CUP) —
Hordes of green hairy  blorgs
again  descended.   There  were
puce   ones   too,   sources   said.
Dale Bartlett
on Canadian Tour for
JEUNESSES    MUSICALES
Playing  Ravel, Chopin,  Liszt
12:30 AUDITORIUM      TODAY       35c
A   SPECIAL   EVENT
Huron's fag ©ii an& <fe
OFFERS
SUMMER
TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
to
UNDERGRADUATES
IN THE FIELDS OF
PRODUCING AND PROCESSING
OPERATIONS AND ENGINEERING
All engineering disciplines,
3rd yr. & 2nd yr. complete
Interviewing   representative  —  W.  G.  Bender
PIPE LINE OPERATIONS All engineering diicipline.,
ENGINEERING   AND  CONSTRUCTION 3rd yr. & 2nd yr. complete
Interviewing representative — T. D. Doyle, P. Eng.
COMPANY LITERATURE CONTAINING INFORMATION PERTINENT
TO GENERAL COMPANY ACTIVITIES AND PROFESSIONAL CAREER
FUNCTIONS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE CAMPUS PLACEMENT
OFFICE.
Interviews will be held on:
January 26, 26, 27, 28
Appointments  for   interviews   may   be   arranged   through   the
Placement office.
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
commences Jan.  20
for  10 days only
The HOWE SOUND
BARBER SHOP
QUARTET
Graduating Students
Interested In
A Financial Career
should have an interview with
The Royal Trust
representative on campus
January 26th & 27th
Appointments made at Student Services Office
The Royal Trust
COMPANY
Canada's   Leading   Trust   Company
VANCOUVER, B.C.
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Kings Tuesday,  January   18,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  3
FIVE  YEAR PLAN
— by powell hargraves
FEMININE DOUBT enters Monday noon contest as science women defeat nurses to raise
$25.00 for UNAN. 'Hockey game', punctuated by female outcries, was won by science
women, 2-0.
Vic board 'impressed'
but fines stand—-Taylor
The Victoria College board
of governors confirmed its
stand on the fee fight at an
informal confrontation Thursday.
Registrar Ronald Jeffels told
students the administration
would levy the $10 late fee fine
on fees not paid by Jan. 15.
Fifteen hundred students are
withholding $5'6 of their second-term fees until Jan. 27 in
protest  against the  fee hike.
"Nothing I can say will make
the $56 increase attractive,"
Victoria president Malcolm
Taylor told the meeting billed
as a  "speakeasy".
"The board of governors has
taken your campaign seriously.
It was an intellectually-conceived program and we are impressed."
He said the board is in complete sympathy with students'
complaints of rising fees but is
faced with the "great problem"
of financing.
Taylor stressed that provincial grants have exceeded student fees as a means of financing the university.
In the last three years provincial grants to Victoria have
risen 126 per cent while student fees have increased only
33 per cent, he said.
"The important thing now
is what the federal government
will do as a result of the Bladen commission," he said.
"Our hope is for a $5 per
capita grant) next year."
Paul Williamson, Victoria
AMS president explained why
the campaign is to be carried
on until Jan. 27, the opening
date of the provincial legislature.
"If we pay on the seventeenth then the issue is merely
one of a fee deadline."
The object, Williamson said,
is to place the fee issue squarely in the hands of the provincial government so it doesn't
go on 'merely waiting for the
federal government to raise
the (per capita) grant to $6.
"We have shown how strongly we feel .... and the desire
that there be no direct pressure during the provincial debate."
Victoria student Gordon Pollard disagreed with Williamson.
Parliament looks
at student aid
The Liberal government may begin parliamentary
session this week with a program of increased federal aid
to universities.
In an article in The Vancouver Sun Saturday, correspondent Peter Newman predicted
that the government will follow recommendations of the
Bladen Report and implement
increased bursaries, scholarships and capital grants students and universities.
Newman said proposals being drafted would:
Give $4.16 million to students in the form of scholarships and bursaries:
Give $730 million to universities and colleges in the form
of a rising scale of per capita
grants;
And allocate large sums for
federally sponsored research
at universities.
"By sponsoring the education bills, the Pearson government will be making an ostentatious contribution toward the
improvement of Canadian society," Newman said in the Sun
article.
He said he is forming an ad
hoc committee that will continue to withhold fees.
"The committee is designed
to unite students wishing to
withhold fees until a no-increase guarantee is received
from the provincial government", he said.
AMS  wheeler
escapes  rap
AMS second vice-president
Peter Braund almost hit the
wrong stretch Friday afternoon.
Braund and friend Derry
Nelson were driving past the
Bank of Nova Scotia at
Twenty-third and Oak when
police stopped the car and
held them for 10 minutes in
connection with a bank robbery that had happened
minutes before.
The questioning was made
difficult by the fact that
Braund could not undo his
seat belt, but he managed to
convince the police he was
not involved.
Medics cry more
research war
in
By CHRIS BROCKHURST
Government grants to medical  research must be  in
creased by over 500 per cent within the next five years.
This   prediction
came in a-
report submitted Jan. 10 to finance Minister Mitchell Sharp
and health minister Allen Mac-
Eachen by a group representing
medical research and education.
The group headed by Canadian businessman C. L. Gundy,
included Dr. J. F. McCreary,
Association of Medical Colleges
president and Dean of the UBC
Faculty of Medicine, several
hundred researchers, scientists,
educators, and representatives
Irorn volunteer health organizations.
In a letter to Prime Minister
Lester Pearson, Gundy said
"The report considers it urgent to establish a favorable
medical research environment
in Canada."
The report suggests creation
of a Health Services Research
Council out of the already existing Medical Research Council which "has not had sufficient funds with which to support adequately their already
continuing programes."
Government aid will have to
increase from the present $14.1
million for 1965-66 to an estimated $80 million in 1969-70.
The report states, "Requests
to the government for aid in
the construction of research facilities in universities and hospitals have gone unanswered
until recently.
"The expansion carried out
has been piecemeal, falling
short of a co-ordinated program  Of the  type   required."
It will be necessary to double
the size of existing university
medical schools by 1970 and
to create at least two entirely
new schools, said the report.
"The key consideration is the
creation of conditions which
will encourage teacher-scientists to remain in Canada, and
which will encourage Cana-
d i a n teacher-scientists and
graduates now in the United
States to return to work in
Canadian universities and hospitals.
The report concluded, "It is
imperative that a research environment be established which
will induce leading teacher-scientists to stay in Canada, and
which will attract back to
Canada those who have gone
elsewhere for lack of opportunity in their own country."
INDOOR
FOREIGN    STOCK    CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday, Jan. 22
Saturday, Feb. 5
— A Cross between a demolition
derby and a stock car race.
— Back by popular demand. Ask
anyone who saw our fantastic Nov.
show.
P.N.E.
AGRODOME
Time Trials 7:30 Races 8:30
Adults $2.00   Student $1.25
Child   under   12   FREE   with   Adult
Fun With Horses
in the 400 ft. LIVESTOCK Bldg. on the P.N.E.
Grounds, daily till 10 p.m. — Music too. — Horseback Riding, Western
and English and the unique opportunity of having Riding lessons for
Beginners and Intermediate.
All friends of Horses should come to the Indoor Riding in the Livestock
Bldg. - P.N.E.
Telephone 255-6045
PARADISE VALLEY HORSE RANCH
FRATERNITY
SPRING
RUSH
Sign up at A.M.S. Office
Jan. 17th through Jan. 28th mwnsif
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, JANUARY,   18,   1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects ot Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
Moral by Farr
It'll be a sad day in February when Murray Innes
Farr backpedals into the sunrise heading for the brighter
lights of New York.
The roly-poly Special Events Chairman has certainly proved himself one of the most able AMS types
around since he took office last March.
And now, as of next month, he has resigned to take
up a too-good-to-pass-up offer managing a modem dance
troupe, which he once brought to campus.
Special Events, you may remember, is that dark-
horse committee which in the past couple of years has
swung into the limelight with a vengeance.
With a minimal budget, Special Events has been able
to present an fascinating program of speakers and stunts
ranging from U.S. Nazi George Lincoln Rockwell to
Bruce Spencer of the Society for Indecency to Naked
Animals.
With everything from film-lectures to classical concerts — plus co-sponsorship of the fantastically successful annual spring Festival of the Contemporary Arts.
Special Events now offers students one of the major
benefits — after The Ubyssey — they get for their AMS
fees.
And it's people like Farr and his predeccesor Chris
Wooten — plus the bright and energetic crew working
with them — who have built Special Events into the
effective organization it is.
It's nice to think Farr has received a more tangible
reward for his services to the campus than the usual
"job-well-done" the AMS can offer.
But it certainly wasn't in hopes of a lucrative position in the New York theatrical world that Farr sweated
to bring such successes as the recent Jefferson Airplane
group.
Nope, Farr worked 'cause he got a kick out of seeing
one branch of the AMS really serving the students. He
got a great deal of satisfaction from the job, of course,
and — like there really is a good fairy — he got his
reward.
With the AMS elections looming up, there must be
a moral around here somewhere.
EDITOR:  Tom  Wayman
News       Ron   Riter
Associate   George  Reamsbottom
City  Al    Donald
Photo           Norm   Betts
Sports        Ed  Clark
Ass't  News         Dan   Mullen
       Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't  City      Danny   Stoffman
Page    Friday       John    Kelsey
Managing            Ian   Cameron
Features        Mike    Bolton
CUP       Don    Hull
Your city editor realizes you all
have classes or something, b"ut
where was everyone after 2:30?
Matthew Tirady took pictures of the
battle involving Pat Hrushov.y,
Ann Bishop, Dick Taylor, Val
Zuker, Sue Gransby, Andras Hoj-
vat. Howie White, Kim Richards,
Anne Slipper, Chris Brockhurst, and
Jinrilyn Hill. Stu Gray was up al
the council meeting with Doug
Halverson   and   Carol-Anne  Baker.
"Geez,  the  only  note  I  gave  the  teller   was to ask her for her phone  number.''
IN  THE EAR
BY IAN  CAMERON
'Airplane' a real smash
Last weekend, in a small,
dingy, smoke-filled, ill-lit hall,
a new religion came to Vancouver.
The high priests at the these
initial rites
were six
young people
who call themselves the Jefferson Airplane, and
three even
younger men
who pass un- cameron
der the collective cognomen of
The Northcott Trio.
The scene outdid the most
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Moralman  appeals  for  issues
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In the course of my daily
pose as Joe Typical Average,
I frequently witness students
on the verge of committing
great errors in their moral
judgment.
Because as Moralman it is
my duty to help these students, I render my services
whenever they are needed.
However, due to my inaccessibility, not everyone of
the 16,000 UBC students is
benefitting from my wisdom.
So to rectify this matter, I
now respectfully ask the UBC
student body to write me care
of this great and righteous
college paper, submitting their
moral problems to me.
Each, week I shall choose
the most critical problem and
solve it in my comic strip.
MORALMAN
•      •      •
SWEET YOUNG THING
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Proof that the engineers are
effeminate:
The night of the Engineers
Smoker, a sweet young engineer (underage) borrowed my
ID.
It was accepted without any
questions   at   the   door.   The
checkers  only  comment was
we need more of those.
Is this not proof that masculinity is a handicap to engineers?
MISS M. R.
Arts IV
DONT KNOCK SEX
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Regarding John Kelsey's
argument Women, I Hate
(Wedding) 'em.
I say this: don't knock an
institution you haven't tried
and if you have, you should
have waited until you grew
up.
INDIGNANT WIFE
bacchanalian orgies of the
long-gone tout not forgotten
Black Masses of the dark ages.
The parishoners writhed in
convulsive spasms to the erotic pulsation of 5,000 tortur-
edecibles being forced
through spaces that were obviously never made to accommodate them.
The only thing that the mob
seemed to have was gall, and
as in Caesar's day, gall is
divided into three parts.
The first of these parts was
the "in crowd." They used to
be called beats, and they still
display some of the characteristics of that group.
The hair is longer, the
beards fewer, and the clothes
are more affected (and ten
times as expensive) tout the
unwashed aura lingers on.
The second group was the
observers. They were the
people who came to look and
to marvel, or, in some cases,
because they like the music
and were willing to put up
with a lot in order to hear it.
The third segment was the
hangers-on; the people who
have neither the talent or the
courage to be really different, but are willing to prostitute themselves to whatever
idol happens to be set up for
public view at the present.
The hardest task was telling
the men from the girls from
the others. The rules I arrived
at finally was that the ones
with the bright clothes are
male.
Leather suits, bell-bottom
pants ( velvet for the real "in"
types), Donovan caps, boots
(western dress, preferably),
and bright bright bright shirts
were de rigeur.
One exhibitionist came in a
shirt and tie.
The girls wore anything,
except for one young thing
(and I use the word advisedly)
who wore nothing at all to
speak of. (Come to think of it,
no one wore anything to speak
of, but I am.)
One young lady turned up
in a semi-formal. Probably
came with the fink wearing
the tie. There were only 20
odd pairs of white stockings,
which says something about
the kind of people who wear
those things.
The music itself was wild.
The Jefferson Airplane, from
Frisco, are a great, great
group. They have two guitars,
bass, drums, lead male singer
and a female vocalist.
The dancing was something
else. It combines the thrust
and counterplay of flamenco
with the motions of a sailor's
hornpipe gone berserk.
The pace grew too much for
one frail young thing, wearing white lace and tights, who
had to be helped off. He was
all right next night, though.
One fellow got a real laugh
by coming dressed as a cop.
The laughter stopped when it
'turned out he was a cop. BLACK PLAGUE
NO. LAST, VOL. 4
PLAGUE HOLE, B.S., JANUARY,  18, 1966
SOUSEM GOES TO THE PLAGUE
Trophy wrong righted
Moralman flies
to SUS rescue
MORALMAN PRESENTS  SOUS'EM  TROPHY  to the editors of Black Plague, Hotrod and
Ken.   He  kindly   posed   for  this   picture while on his way to Science Spring Symposium.
BLUE, BLUE
PROFS
Students appraise courses
By DEVIN TRUSSEL
"Review" Editor
The Black and Blue Review
was launched last March to
communicate student appraisal of UBC science courses
and professors to both faculty
and students.
• •     •
It is an attempt to involve
students in evaluating and improving the quality of instruction.
Prior to the Review, student knowledge of courses and
professors came through the
notorious grapevine while the
faculty obtained comment
from only a small, biased minority.
• •      •
The Review strives for an
overall synopsis of student
opinion gleaned from questionaires, and tries to form a
value judgement of each
course and professor.
Questions are raised from
time to time concerning the
value  of student opinion.
Who is better qualified to
rate courses and professors,
the student or the alumnus?
A detailed survey on this
question was conducted by H.
H. Remmers and A. T. Dru-
ker at Perdue University.
They found no significent
difference between ratings by
students and alumni on the
same professors.
They also found student
ratings were relatively unaffected factors such as sex,
year, grades, and the judges
difficulty of the course.
• •      •
Two interesting sidelights:
the better students academically, contrary to popular belief, tended to rate course and
professor critically while poor
students rated more generously; students, particularly in
upper years, were extremely
intolerant entertaining professors who were poor instructors.
• •      •
The Black and Blue results
paralleled these observations,
supporting the objectivity in
the summation of each individual's personal viewpoint.
Without this objectivity, the
Review is worthless.
President Macdonald has
said:
"Universities tend to appoint o nthe basis of international reputation rather than
local performance. Thus teach-
nig tends to be down-graded . .
"It must be obvious to
everyone that more emphasis on teaching will be needed
as shortages of teachers for
the universities become more
severe .  .  .
"Most important, however,
is to restore the status of
teaching.
"This does not mean less
concern for research. It does
mean a renewal recognition
that teaching and research are
synergetic and that a balance
is in the best interests of
both."
•      •      •
Students of this university
share the cost of their education.
Therefore, they should have
the privelege of taking a responsible stand toward improving the university educational  system.
The Black and Blue Review
is an expression of this attitude.
MORALMAN has righted
Recently it came to the at-
of our renowned upholder of
right and justice on campus
that a great wrong had been
perpetrated.
The Southam Trophy was
awarded to the right university, but the wrong paper!
Moralman heard our cries
and flew to the rescue.
On Monday night, in full
view of the AMS council he appeared to defend the rights of
the unrecognized greatest.
The trophy was snatched
from the grasp of the undeserving and carried to the safety
and loving care of your editors.
The poor trophy was on the
verge of death, badly broken
and in a state of complete, dis-
pare.
Only kind, loving care, a
number of nuts and bolts, and
volumes of solder could save
it.
The great men of science responded to the call and soon all
facilities acutely tuned, they
performed the necessary operation to restore the health of the
trophy.
We have saved the Southam
Trophy from the scrap heap,
and will continue to watch
over it through the many,
many years we hope it will
stay at UBC.
Yes, we have decided to let
The Ubyssey keep on representing us at the CUP Conferences.
a wrong
003
It's the great Crystal Ball, a
dance no true Scienceman or
woman should miss.
The Crystal Ball is designed
as a splendid semi - formal
dance, at which you are expected to have a fabulous time.
This is the third annual Crystal Ball and, as usual, it will
be held in the Crystal Room of
the Villa Motor Hotel.
There are 24 crystal chandeliers hanging from the ceiling
which represent $48,000 worth
of glass. Need we tell you more
about the decor?
The music will be in same
class as the surroundings. The
Organization will supply music
with a real beat to make your
dancing enjoyment exceptional.
The half time show will be of
the same high quality.
In keeping with the adult
atmosphere, refreshments will
be available, not at 90 cents to
$1.10, but at only 40 cents.
A repeat of last year's highly
successful affair only requires
your participation. Tickets are
at the office, but we cannot
promise how long they will
last. Good luck.
IAN CLARK
. . . spectroscopic Rhodes
Scienceman
takes Rhode
to England
Last year, B.C.'s Rhodes
Scholar was Alan Sprey,
Maths, and Physics Honors
student.
This year another science-
man, Ian Clark, was selected
for this scholarship, awarded
annually to the top candidate
in each province.
Clark is a graduating student in combined honors Chemistry and  Physics.
The subject of his thesis is
photo - electron spectroscopy,
and he hopes to continue in
this or another field of physical chemistry during his three
year course towards the Ph.D.
degree at Oxford.
HEY, SANTA
PLEASE?
The five year temporary
buildings currently occupied
by Forestry, Geology, Mathematics and Agriculture have
served well through these last
forty years.
Forestry and Agriculture
are getting a new complex,
so the Mathematics Department can expand into the old
Agriculture building and
Geology can use more of its
building.
The joy in these two departments upon receipt of
more temporary space would
only be surpassed by their
joy in receiving the working
plans of a new building or
two.
Would everyone please
drop a note to Santa! Page 2
THE      BLACK      PLAGUE
Tuesday,  January   18,   1966
THE BLACK PLAGUE
WINNER OF THE SOUS' EM TROPHY
MEMBER, CANADIAN WINE PRESS.
Editors in Chief: K. D. Lloyd, Dave Manders.
Typists: Milt Stanley, Rich Ford.
Many thanks to Ron Riter and The Ubyssey staff
for the assistance that has made The Ubyssey really
Canada's greatest.
The opinions expressed are not necessarily those
of any members of the Faculty of Science unless otherwise stated.
Thoughts...
Today's society with its heavy stress on specialization for every member, has forced a form of intellectual "inbreeding" within various groups. As scientifically
oriented people, we tend to be introverts in our dealings
with society as a whole.
The stress for ever greater specialization has made
this problem of inter-group relations even more acute,
because the member of different specialized groups has
rapidly increased in recent years with the evolution of
many new fields in science. Hence the scientist has been
forced to narrow his field of awareness in an attempt
to achieve understanding of at least one part of the whole
subject.
This constant reduction of the perceptual field has
led to the stereo-type scientist of today who spends his
entire life investigating some topics which is very obscure to the general public and often to many of his
associates.
We must avoid this danger of becoming highly specialized mechanical units and constantly strive for an
identity as a thinking, feeling human being.
The coffee party is only a beginning. We need
many more of them and other similar social gatherings
for the benefit of both the faculty members and the
students.
We believe the choice of Dr. Macdonald as Honorary
Scienceman at this time is extremely apt. We are giving
him our highest award because he is the model of the
multi-faceted person who is a truly great scientist. His
contribution of over sixty scientific papers in the field
of microbiology is ample proof of his abilities as a research scientist, and his contributions to higher education in British Columbia are well known.
He also led the drive to form the Department of
Microbiology at UBC and is presently involved in the
promotion of two events which are of major importance
not only to UBC as a whole, but also to every individual
student attending this institution.
These are the implementation of the Bladen Commission Report and the establishment of pure research
centres on the Endowment lands by private industry.
Today, for his contribution to the science of Microbiology, higher education, and the Faculty of Science
at UBC, we will make Dr. John B. Macdonald an Honorary Scienceman and then, as fellow sciencemen, we
will support his policies in the future.
We feel he is a "real human being" in the true
sense of the words, and is working toward the improvement of Science, the University, and as a natural consequence, people.
Williams message
It is generally agreed among life scientists that
the dinosaurs became extinct because they were unable
to adapt to changing conditions.
Here on campus we have our own dinosaur, which,
like its predecessors is headed for extinction because it
is unable to adapt itself to a changing campus.
A similar parallel may soon be applied to the
Science Undergraduate Society, unless we learn to
change and adapt. At present we are a decentralized
faculty which, in itself is not bad, but unless there is more
interest shown in binding ourselves into a more cohesive
and active group we will soon lose sight of our objectives.
This week is Science Week on campus and I feel
that the program that will be presented this week is
admittedly ambitious, yet it is a big step in the right
direction. This week can be a great one for Science
provided that you, the average student, give your support to the events of Science Week.
DAVE WILLIAMS
M™ sii
have YouR
Southam Trophy
YOU havebeerpad Boys AND
\jIKLo bragging about your record
fifth   Win   Of   The Southam Trophy .
// you quit your irresponsible
Sloshing AND place i_ of H^^E '
in a g£a<
\G   INSIDE
BYHOH HENDER
0FF,«   You Will Be Given   S# .     .
** back
npmmdai
The jp.r.f pf (;<.-.,....-«-
Moralman's ransom message
DEAN'S MESSAGE
Chin up, men
By V.  J.  OKULITCH
Your executive has asked
me to write a few words for
this faculty edition of the
Black Plague.
First, I would like to give
some encouragement to those
who did not do so well at the
Christmas Examinations. You
should realize that Christmas
Examinations are not final.
If you do well in the Spring,
no Instructor in his right
mind would penalize you for
a low Christmas mark.
Christmas examinations are
intended largely to force students to review their pre-
Christmas work, and to make
it possible for them to measure themselves against the
achievements of their fellows
and the University requirements.
If, in light of this, you find
it necessary to change your
work habits and you come to
the realization that our standards are high, a great deal has
been accomplished. You probably realize by now that the
University is not the place
for those who want to lead a
pleasant social life, or who
felt that the acquisition of
knowledge is for the
"squares".
The slackers and the disinterested will soon find out, as
they are forced to seek unskilled jobs, that life is highly
competitive, and interesting
jobs are not there for the asking.
Secondly, I would like to
tell you of some of the developments in the Faculty of Science. A new single introductory course for all Life Sciences will take the place of
the old Biology 105, Botany
105, and Zoology 105 next
Fall.
A serious start in the teaching of Astronomy will also be
made next Fall with the coming  of Dr.   Ovenden, a  very
DEAN OKULITCH
. . . encouragement
prominent Astronomer, who
will be our first Professor of
Astronomy. In this connect-
tion, the Federal Government
is now planning to have the
Headquarters of the Queen
Elizabeth Observatory located on our campus.
The new Department of Microbiology — an enlarged and
strengthened version of the
old Bacteriology and Immunology, will start functioning
next fall.
Your Faculty has also considered and recommended to
the Senate many changes in
almost all Science departments. This is part of the annual review of courses and
programmes in the attempt to
improve our teaching and to
keep abreast of the never-
ending progress of science.
Before registering next Fall,
make sure that you have examined the new Calendar
thoroughly, and understood
what some of those changes
may mean in the planning of
your own university programme. .
Faculty
relations
excellent'
By DR. G. H. N. TOWERS
In answer to the question
"Are you in favor of better
student faculty relations" let
me put it this way: I believe
that excellent relations now
exist between faculty and
third and fourth year students. These relations are
better at the graduate level
where faculty and student
are even more in "tune", so
to speak.
If, in student-faculty relations a serious problem exists
on this campus, it concerns
the first and second years of
a student's university life.
• •      •
In many of our introductory courses the student to
faculty ratio is too high for
the establishment of satisfactory contact. It is a problem
in economics.
Conditions could 'be improved by increasing the
number of competent faculty
concerned with these classes
and by dividing the classes
into smaller teaching units.
I believe also that the relatively weak rapport between students and faculty
at this level is, in part, a
consequence of the student's
attitude. Many of these undergraduates - have only a
rather vague idea as to why
they are in university at all.
It takes a little time for
some of them to get their
mental machinery humming
and when they do it is often
in response to the signal
"Examination."
• •      •
Many   of   those   young
people are extremely intelligent and I would like to
think that they belonged in
a university. How can we
help them?
I am sure that professors
in every department at UBC
are available to them for
individual consultation. The
good student often demands
and  gets   this  attention.
But many are reluctant to
meet the professor. They
have met him in lecture and
it is clear that he is a rather
unreasonable person. He expects one to remember, to
think and to work, and to be
enthusiastic over facts and
concepts that don't quite fit
into everyday thinking.
• •      •
What is to be gained from
attempting to establish any
sort of relationship with such
an individual? Will it help
to discover that he is at least
part human?
Less formal relationships
outside of lectures is advocated quite frequently. We
should certainly have more
common rooms and coffee
houses. .There is a dearth of
these on the campus right
now.
Informal exchange of ideas
in the coffee house may enrich both students and faculty life but will the first and
second year student take advantage of it?
The faculty is here to lead
young people to think. The
student must decide whether
he wants this or not. Tuesday,  January   18,   1966
THE      BLACK      PLAGUE
Page 3
SECOND  LARGEST FACULTY
...MOVING  WITH  TIMES
Science Departments outlined by heads
These articles were produced by the heads of the
various departments in your
faculty. We would like to
thank these men for donating their valuable lime in
the interests of their students.
We hope you, the students,
appreciate Ijhis effort and
find these articles as interesting as we did.
BOTANY
By DR. G. H. N. TOWERS
Head, Botany Dept.
The Botany Department is
housed in the Biological
Sciences Building as well as
in sundry huts on the campus.
It is bursting at the seams.
It consists of 18 faculty
members who carry on undergraduate and graduate assistance of about 40 graduate students and an excellent technical staff.
Collectively, the members of
the Department are concerned
with knowledge of all the
fundamental aspects of plant
life.
We are especially concerned
with attempting to explain
how plants live, grow, reproduce and evolve in terms of
mathematics, physics and
chemistry.
Research projects in the Department (there may be as
many as 100 of these) range
from studies of the flora and
of the ecology of the vegeta-
tional zones of the province
and of the Arctic to studies of
the distribution and growth of
the giant kelps or seaweeds
of the Pacific Northwest.
•      •      •
A number of us are engaged
in problems dealing with
photosynthesis, metabolism and
the genetics of plants.
It is really impossible to do
more in a brief space than to
point out that there is a rich
variety of Botanical studies
being conducted at UBC.
We have a well-balanced
modern program in botany for
the undergraduate. There are
many outstanding botanists in
the Department and each has
a  strong  interest  in teaching.
Canada, an agricultural
country, needs capable botanists and our Department is
anxious to train them.
We encourage all students in
the University to learn something about the world of plants
before their formal period of
training is over.
Even in this era of great
scientific achievement it is still
a basic fact that all other forms
of life on this planet depend
on the ability of plants to live
successfully.
CHEMISTRY
By  DR.  C.  A.  McDOWELL
Head,  Chemistry  Dept.
Currently we are witnessing
one of the most exciting and
rapidly developing periods in
the whole history of Chemistry.
Recent developments in
theory, the impact of computers, and the increased application of newly developed instruments have greatly increas
ed the opportunities for dramatic new fundamental advances
in Chemistry.
Many of the applications of
these new techniques such as
Infrared, Raman, and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry,
Mass Spectrometry, Chromatography, Chemical Applications of he Massbauer Effect,
etc., are completely transforming our whole approach to the
subject.
In many parts of the scientific world, Chemistry is now
being regarded as a much more
embracing subject which
would more properly be called
Molecular Science.
This tendency will be encouraged, and in the near future, well developed and com-
prehensive departments of
Chemistry such as we have in
this University will be more
correctly called, Departments
of Molecular Science.
•      •      •
Many of the older techniques are being completely
replaced by ones which have
been, until quite recently,
only used in graduate work.
These changes will undoubtedly make Chemistry an even
more interesting and stimulating subject which will continue
to attact more and more high
calibre students.
These new developments
continue the pattern which
has meant that the division
between senior undergraduate
work and graduate work: will
become more and more diffused.
The tendency for most Honours Graduates in Chemistry
to continue at the Ph.D. level
will, undoubtedly, be increased.
"Likewise, it is evident that
as the field becomes known as
Molecular Science, more and
more students will take "combined" degrees such as Chemistry and Physics, Chemistry and
Mathematics, Chemistry and
Biology, and Chemistry and
Metallurgy.
GEOLOGY
By DR. W. H. MATHEWS
Head,  Geology  Dept.
The Department of Geology,
currently consisting of 14 active faculty members, 22 graduate students and 38 in the
graduating class, constitutes a
remarkably close-knit group
in spite of their variety of
interests: lines of communication between staff and students
are open, which is as it should
be.
Some of the topics currently
or recently under investigation
by students in Geology reflect
the wide range of fields this
Department is involved with—
isotope dating of ancient granites, structure and behaviour
of glacial ice, use of fossil
spores and pollens to interpret
rocks of the Lower Fraser Valley, Minerology of one of the
major molybdenum mines—to
mention only a few—and our
undergraduates and graduates
spend fully half of their summers in geological exploration.
Our graduating classes of the
last few years have been bigger than those of any other
North American University.
As our graduating students
are in great demand at all the
top U.S. graduate schools, we
are forced to conclude that
their quality must be good.
Of those graduates who do
complete their Ph.D. work in
the U.S. nearly all return to
Canada, whereas those who
get their Ph.D. here tend to
remain  in Canada.
On balance we are importing geologists and, judging by
the way our B.Sc. and B.A.Sc.
students are being snapped up
by industry, the excess of demand over supply is here to
stay for a long time.
GEOPHYSICS
By DR. J. A. JACOBS
Head, Geophysics Dept.
Since 1964, we have had in
geophysics two honors programs, one in combination
with physics which prepares a
student for graduate studies in
either geophysics or physics,
and one in combination with
geology which is intended to
prepare students for graduate
studies in either geophysics or
geology.
We have only one program
which leads to a majors degree in geophysics, and we believe that this will be most
successful in preparing geo-
physicists for work in the exploration  field.
Programs analogous to the
honors and to the general program have existed for some
time in Canada at many universities, but as far as we are
aware, this is the first time a
program equivalent to our
majors degree has been offered
in geophysics.
•      •      •
We have at present 37 students taking senior courses in
geophysical e x p 1 o r a t i o n of
whom 12 are taking the more
methematical  version.
Of these students eight are
classified as majors students in
sciences or else in an engineering physics type of program.
The remainder are various
engineering and science students who are taking this subject as an option.
In graduate studies there are
18 students undertaking research in the fields of geomagnetism and aeronomy, mass
spectrometry, isotope geophysics, heat flow, seismology and
techonophysics.
To date, 20 M.Sc.'s and 16
Ph.D.'s have been granted in
the Department of Geophysics.
MATHEMATICS
By DR. BENJAMIN MOYLS
Head,  Math.  Dept.
I am very pleased to see the
enthusiasm which is apparent
in the Science Undergraduate
Society this year and I think
that the coffee parties which
are planned for students and
faculty are an excellent idea.
We do have a number of
very large classes in mathematics and it is often difficult
for the student to get to know
any  of his  professors.
I hope that such gatherings
will help in this respect.
The Mathematics Club has
been reactivated this year
under the   spirited   leadership
of Bill Wedge, president; John
Dindal, vice-president; Bruce
Montador, secretary; and Len
Horvath.
In the latter part of the fall
term the club held a coffee
party, to which it invited staff
members.
This event was similar to the
planned coffee party, and was
termed a great success.
Early in December some 26
students competed in the annual P u t m a n Competition,
sponsored by the Mathematical
Association of America.
Three students writing these
examinations are selected by
the Department of Mathematics to represent UBC as a
team.
There are prizes for the best
teams and considerable prestige is attached to placing in
the first 10 universities.
Science students might be
interested in knowing the
whereabouts of their last year's
Honorary Scienceman.
Dr. Nathan Divinsky is in
London at Queen Mary College, working with some English algebraists. He promises
to return to UBC next year.
MICROBIOLOGY
By DR. J. J. CAMPBELL
Head,  Microbiology Dept.
Micro biology encompasses
the study of fungi, bacteria,
and viruses and it is usual,
even for an undergraduate to
have at least a modest knowledge of all these groups.
There are a number of ways
in which to investigate micro-
organimisms and use is made
of the knowledge and techniques of cytology, biochemistry, biophysics, immunology
and genetics.
As a result, a student of
microbiology must have a
broad background in science.
Because microrganisms exhibit a tremendous variety of
synethtic and degradative activities and because we can
exert accurate control over
their environment, they offer
the research worker almost
limitless possibilities for investigation.
The greatest opportunities
for students in this field exist
for those with ability and interest to continue on to graduate work.
PHYSICS
By DR. G. M. VOLKOFF
Head, Physics Dept.
The Physics Department at
UBC offers Honors and Major
programs in Physics for the
B.Sc. and the Engineering
Physics program for the
B.A.Sc. degree.
About 25 students graduate
each year in the Honors program, 60 in the Majors, and
10 in the Engineering Physics
program.
In 1965-66 there are over 70
graduate students in Ph.D. and
over 50 in the M.Sc. program.
The majority of these are
Canadians from UBC and other
parts of Canada, but there are
also representatives from a
great many other countries.
Each year there are many
more applicants than there are
vacancies in our graduate programs.
Graduate" programs and facilities for research are available in Nuclear Physics, Plasma Physics, Spectroscopy,
Theoretical Physics, Solid
State Physics, Low Temperature Physics, Neuclear Magnetic Resonance, Physical Elec-
t r o n i c s , Radio Astronomy,
Oceanography, Biophysics, and
Radiology.
Since the first Ph.D. degree
was granted in 1950, there
have been 115 Ph.D. degrees
awarded.
In 1965-66 there are 39
N.R.C. and six other major
scholarships of value from
$2,500 to $3,200 per annum
being held by graduate students in the Physics Department and the rest of the graduate students are supported by
a combination of teaching and
research assistantships of value
up to $2,750 per annum.
ZOOLOGY
By DR. W. S. HOAR
Head,   Zoology  Dept.
The Zoology Department is
a focal point for the study of
animals — their diversity in
form and function, their evolution through past ages, their
development as individuals,
their relationships to one another and to the physical
world where they dwell, their
behaviour and their significance to man.
A teaching faculty of about
30 professors and instructors
with 55 assistants (graduate
students) offer instruction on
these many facets of animal
biology to some 2,000 different undergraduate students.
At the graduate level, the
work is closely integrated with
the Institutes of Fisheries and
Oceanography; approximately
120 graduate students are doing research on zoological
problems in these combined
areas.
Our laboratories are equipped for varied types of experimental work; facilities include
an experimental aquarium and
a  vivarium for live animals.
•      •      •
The teaching museums are
extensive and several field stations provide an opportunity
to study animals under natural
conditions.
At present the Department
has outgrown its quarters in
the Biological Sciences building and spills over into a large
portion of the temporary white
buildings to the immediate
south.
The Zoology Department is
also fully committed to the
new program in General Biology which is strongly based on
the physical sciences and emphasizes the Molecular and
Cellular aspects of Biology.
Students graduating with a
major or honors degree frequently gain ready acceptance
to graduate schools here or
elsewhere, or embark on
careers of teaching or research.
Completion of the Masters
or Doctors degree leads to interesting work in pure or applied biological research or to
college or university teaching. Page 4
THE     BLACK     PLAGUE
Tuesday, January  18,  1966
.■jvm-1 ij1*"-."».»■.• .■ »t, ■.' tjt'
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VENTRAL    MALL
THIS IS THE EXTENSIVE addition planned for the bio-sciences building. Plan view shows
the result, which will be larger than cell blocks and associated buildings of Totem
Park.  The  picture  is view 2  on  the  diagram.
NEW DEPARTMENT
Microbiology coming
The Fall term will see the
beginning of a new department in the Faculty — Microbiology.
This department was reorganized from the former department of Bacteriology and
Immunology and the microbiological aspects of the Department of Dairying in an
attempt to provide a more organized body for the teaching
of all Microbiology, on the
campus.
As far as the Science student is concerned, the department will offer B.Sc. degrees,
the M.Sc. degree, and is per
mitted to give the Ph.D. degree.
The prerequisite for all
courses in the department will
be the new Biology 101.
This is the youngest of the
departments of Science, with
great opportunities for the
student working towards a
research position.
Also in the Fall, the teaching of Astronomy in the department of Geophysics will
be established. Dr. Michael W.
Ovenden of The University of
Glasgow, will become the
head   of   the   teaching   pro
gramme and a full professor
of Astronomy.
The grinding of the 150
inch mirror for the telescope
of the Queen Elizabeth Observatory on Mt. Kobau will
be done on the UBC Campus,
under the supervision of government astronomers.
There are also other professional astronomers on the staff
of this University. Dr. W. L.
H. Shuter, a specialist on radio astronomy, is on the staff
of the department of Physics;
and Dr. G. F. Roach has been
appointed to the Mathematics
department staff.
Science activities
very big this week
Tuesday, Jan. 18
12:30—Student-Faculty Coffee Party  — Brock Lounge.
Guest of Honour: Dr. John B. Macdonald.
All Science students are welcome to attend this function and
drink all the free coffee they want. This is probably
the only opportunity you'll get to meet Dr. Macdonald,
Dean Okulitch, some of the members of the Board of
Governors, the Administration, and most of the faculty
members of each department. Dr. Macdonald will be
made our Honorary Scienceman at this event, so be
sure not to miss what promises to be a great effort.
7:00—Spring Term Symposium for the men.
Another excellent evening of demonstrations of exotic harmonic motion augmented by visual aids. Tea will be
served as usual. Sorry, no tickets left.
Wednesday, Jan. 19
Noon: S.O.S. Meeting — Giant Stunt — Shoe Polish Raffle.
All Sciencemen welcome.
Thursday, Jan. 20
Noon—Gigantic Pep Meet — Hebb Theatre.
• Tom Northcott Trio       • Pretty Girls
• Famous  actors in SCENES definitely not FROM
SHAKESPEARE      • and much more
Friday, Jan. 21
Noon: Interfaculty stunt.
Night: General Meeting — Fraser Arms.
Saturday, Jan. 29
8:30—Annual Crystal Ball — Villa Motor Inn.
Drinks 40c. $3.50 couple. Door Prizes.
Now — an excuse not to join the Greeks, on Saturday night
anyway. Dress is semi-formal. Science is the only
faculty with enough class to hold a dance of this calibre, so come out and have a real iball.
SUS wants 'maybe building
to hold science library
There are vague plans for the construction of a multistory office block on the present site of the Home Economics
building.
Could we suggest the first floor be used to house some
study space or lounge, and a science library containing
special books on chemistry and physics?
We realize the impossibilities of providing adequate
library space in the present Chemistry and Physics buildings, but the new building can easily be adapted to provide
facilities for study after 10 p.m. with a minimal amount of
staff.
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-auiSua    ub   5(Bajq    noX   op   a\ojj
aauissviD Tuesday, January  18,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
CREDO INTERVIEWS
KHOURY AND  TREIL
Camus-screaming alone at a silent god
Dr. Claude Treil has been
professor of French at UBC
since 1955.
After graduating fiom the
Sorbonne, Treil obtained his
M.A. and Ph.D. from Laval
University. Both theses were
about the works of Albert
Camus.
In 1956, Treil started a
correspondence with Camus
that lasted until the latter's
untimely death in I960.
He talks with Credo's
Jack Khoury.
Credo: What is Camus' philosophy?
Txeil: I would say that
from the beginning —
we have to go to his sources
to be faithful to him—Camus
is a pagan. He worships nature. He worships his body.
You could say the only god
that Camus ever had is a god
who was silence. A god who
was a void.
But there was another side
of his personality beside his
attraction for emptiness. This
was his attraction for something pragmatic, something
positive, palpable, which was
his love of nature; and when
I say nature, I mean the
climate of Algeria, where he
was born, and joy in his
body.
Credo: So this is what
makes him not an existentialist—his love of nature?
Treil: That's right. I would
say there it may be something
that surprises many people:
if you compare Sartre and
Camus, Sartre has disgust for
his body, and for anything
that is physical and sexual,
whereas for Camus there's
a great natural, spontaneous
love for anything concerned
with his body.
Credo: Then a disbelief in
God is all Camus and Sartre
had in common?
Treil: Yes, you could say
this is their one common
point. They considered that
there was no God and that
death was definite. There was
nothing   afterwards.
—  Mme.   Camus   photo
CAMUS
. . . silent god
Credo: And also that man
had no destiny — his responsibility was to himself?
Treil: Yes, but to himself
and the others, because you
can only find yourself
through others. You only see
yourself as others see you.
The others are your mirror.
But there again, you see,
Sartre thinks there is nothing
after death and is convinced
of it. Whereas Camus never
wanted to say he was convinced.
He always made sure he
was saying, "This is what I
can tell from my present
knowledge of life," but he
never said, "This is definite."
And this is why so many
Christians thought this was a
door left open for a possibility of Christian faith.
Credo: What about absurdity?
Treil: Thisis the one word
that made Camus famous. In
The Myth of Sisyphus, his
only philosophical essay, he
describes his discovery of the
absurdity of life.
You could say that to him
absurdity is the lack of meaning because man, like Sisyphus, has to push this rock
up the mountain, and when
he thinks he's achieved his
goal, it falls down and he has
to start all over again.
So it is this vicious circle
in which he's caught, and because there's no way of getting out of it, his life doesn't
make sense. It is absurd.
Credo: Is this absurdity in
common with the existentialist idea?
Treil: No, because this is
not the same absurdity. With
Camus, the word comes up
many times; but with Sartre,
the word that has the same
sound is obscene, with an idea
of frustration behind it.
You see, the attitude of
Sartre is much more unhealthy, in the sense that
Sartre is a man obsessed with
the word flesh, while Camus
was living with it happily.
Credo: What about his
Catholic background?
Treil: Camus was born a
Catholic because he was
christened and did his first
Holy Communion. But he
didn't do it because he wanted
to. It was his grandmother, a
very strict, religious person
who forced him.
It's an interesting detail
that Camus went through the
gestures of religious belief to
please somebody he didn't
like — his grandmother. It
affected   his   thinking.
Credo: Not many people
today are truly religious.
They simply perform the motions. Would you say Camus
CREDO
TREIL
. .. campus scholar
is like many people in this respect?
Treil: I would say Camus
differs from most people because he was honest. Once he
realized that his motions
meant nothing, he stopped
doing them. Whereas now so
many people know they mean
nothing but they keep doing
Ihem.
They're afraid of toeing
labelled as pagans or atheists.
Credo: Some try hard to
believe, but their doubts are
so great, or they have so
little faith, that they cannot.
Did Camus want to believe?
Treil: Camus, in his Notebooks, wrote that the one
thing he had to hide was his
doubt. He did doubt, and he
rebelled against the idea that
if he couldn't believe in God,
therefore death was definite.
He couldn't accept it, but that
doesn't mean he found God.
In many of his books, there
is a real scream towards God.
In The Fall, for example, the
main character is in the image of John the Baptist, a
man who wants to preach in
the desert but nobody answers him.
Camus has said God is
silent. God exists to him but
doesn't show his existence.
This is why I think Camus
appeals to so many people
nowadays — especially in
North America — because
many people share this feeling of being in a world where
everybody is in contact
through fast communication,
but the contrast is great when
you feel your solitude.
Camus appeals to many because we are living in a period where people are in exile,
although they are all together
more than ever.
Credo: Would you say that
Camus was ahead of today's
death-of-God theologians, who
admit the god we have known
is dead, and a new concept
should be developed?
Treil: Camus lived in a
period of emergency, and he
wrote The Plague at the beginning of the last war. So
he had no time to discuss
whether God existed or not.
He had immediately to find
ways of enabling people to
live together under the same
hardships.
The question of whether
or not God existed was to
him almost as a luxury, that
he could postpone to later
when he could afford the time
for it.
He couldn't dream, you see.
He couldn't afford that luxury.
So, in that sense, he was
ahead of these people because
he wasn't discussing the question of whether God is dead
or alive; he was discussing
the question of how we can
live without God.
"Highly
English"
BULKY  KNIT
TURTLE  NECK
SWEATERS
(Heaviest   in   the   world)
BAD BOYS  EXCLUSIVE
Bad Boy Ragge Shoppe
315  SEYMOUR
LARRY KENT'S
a
Uncensored'
BITTER ASH
Two Days Only
Monday, January 17th
Wednesday, January 19th
lABC tftidibJutwL -12.30 (iwdil)
Admission
$1.00
THOSE ATTENDING MUST
PRESENT THEIR AMS CARDS Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January   18,   1966
CREDO
SKI SALE
Ski Boots, Sweaters
After-Ski Boots
Boys' and Girls' Ski Sets
Boys' and Girls' Stretch.e
Ski Slacks
Skates
Car-top
Carriers
POP   PRAYER
AW HELL GOD
NORTH
WESTERN SPORTING GOODS™
10th and Alma       (Open 'til 9 Fridays)        CA 4-5040
Week of Prayer
tor
Christian Unity
at U.B.C
Noon Hour Meetings & College Services
Tuesday, Jan. 18, 72:30 p.m., Buchanan 104
Panel Discussion on the Ecumenical Movement.
Student Moderator Eileen O'Donnell
Father Maloney, Father Brian Cooper,
The Reverend Bernice Gerrard, Dean J. Richardson
Students and Faculty are invited to attend Chapel
Service, Saint Andrews College 6:15 p.m.
Wed,. Jan. 19, 12:30 p.m., Buchanan 104
Report on the Second Vatican Council
Bishop Remy DeRoe of Victoria
Students and Faculty are invited to attend A Bible
Service at Mt. Mark's College Lounge 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 20, 12:30 p.m., Buchanan 102
The Growth of Unity Within the Lutheran Church
Pastor L. Reyelts, Good Shepherds Lutheran
Church
Students and Faculty are invited to attend Evening
Vespers at the Lutheran Student Centre 4608 West
10th Avenue, 10 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 21, 12:30 p.m., Buchanan 104
The  Union Proposals   between   The   Anglican   and
United Church of Canada.
The Rev. Robert Henderson,
Archdeacon Watney.
Students   and   Faculty   are   invited  to  attend   The
Chapel Service at Union College 6:15 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 24, 12:30 p.m., Buchanan 104-
The Jewish   Community in the World and Jewish
Christian Relations.
Rabbi Solomon.
Students   and   Faculty  are   invited   to   attend   The
Evensong Service at Anglican Theological  College,
4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 25, 12:30 p.m., Buchanan 104
Interconfessional Renewal of Baptismal Vows
University Denominational Chaplains
Prof. Chas. Anderson
UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS COUNCIL
Stomping along with Jesus
By  STUART  GRAY
"Somebody forgot to push
the right button, Jesus, so
all hell broke loose ..."
"Please cool everyone off,
Lord,  including me.
"It's morning, Jesus. I've
got to move fast — get into
the bathroom, wash up, grab
a bite to eat, and run some
more . . . are you running
with me, Jesus?"
That's pop prayer, prayers
in colloquial english, prayers
designed to replace the standard archaic circumlocution
and middle-ages metaphor
which is meaningless to most
Christians.
The idea belongs to Episcopalian Rev. Malcolm Boyd,
of Detroit, who two months
ago published Are You Run-
-__-_-f<lF
The   modern  way  to see  is with
Contact Lenses
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALYERTl
MU 3-1816 70S Birks Bldg.
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026  Granville
commences  Jan.  20
for  10 days only
The HOWE SOUND
BARBER SHOP
QUARTET
ning With Me, Jesus, and
who hasn't stopped running
from fame yet.
Boyd was ordained in 1955,
before that he was a successful radio-tv producer, and a
former president of the Television Producer's Association
of Hollywood.
Credo interviewed six
clergymen of Anglican, Baptist, Catholic, Lutheran,
Presbyterian, and United
Churches.
The Rev. G. D. Kelly, of
St. Mary's Anglican Church,
Vancouver, supported pop
prayer but also said formal
prayer can be just as valid.
• •      •
"The basic relationship of
any prayer is the establishment of a relationship by us
with  God.
"If it helps me to establish
a relationship with God by
using colloquial phrases, then
I'm all for it.
"However, I don't think
formalized prayer: is archaic.
"Although a lot of our
formal prayer is couched in
the Elizabethan age, if prayer
can withstand hundreds of
thousands! of sayings by genuine people, I think its merit
is very obvious."
• •      •
Rev. Arthur J. Hadley,
West Point Grey Baptist
Church, said his Church's
services are composed almost
entirely of what he termed
spontaneous prayer.
"This is the case in most
Baptist churches," he said,
"Even though some formal
prayers  are  retained."
Hadley said prayers such
as the Lord's Prayer still retain a great amount of value,
"But prayer isn't valid just
because it's repeated," he
said.
Father T. J. Hahrahan,
C.S.B. of St. Mark's College
UBC's History department,
said he regarded the term
"pop prayer" as stupid, because it suggests a fad, like
pop art.
"But in private prayer,"
he said, "there has always
been a tendency to colloqui-
alize, and thus the idea of
pop prayer is not new."
Father Hahrahan said he
was in complete agreement
with pop prayer, because it
establishes a more personal
relationship with God.
Rev. J. H. Ulmer, Kitsilano
Lutheran Church, said he
thought pop prayer was fine
as personal prayer, but "I'm
not sure it would fit in with
group worship."
"I do feel the prayers we
use in our churches sometimes hamper our congregations.
"Prayer itself is much misunderstood," he said.
"But many prayers have
a deeper meaning than the
directly personal, and sometimes classical forms are the
best means to express this
meaning."
•      •      •
Rev. H. L. McKay, University Hill United Church, said
the idea of pop prayer sounded terrific.
"But the real weakness in
this type of prayer is that it
may lead to thoughtlessness.
"Prayer is opening up our
side of a communication link
to God — we must communicate with a personal being."
The last minister interviewed, Dr. John A. Ross,
dean of St. Andrew's College
and pastor of St. Andrew's
church, agreed with collo-
qualization.
"I did it a year ago," he
said.
"As soon as I was free of
the thee's and thou's my
prayers became almost poetic.
Dr. Ross said his congregation has almost doubled since
he  instituted  "free prayer".
"I may be starting a
trend," he said.
THE GREATEST
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Made in the 40's
Discovered in '65!
ALL 15 EPISODES COMPLETE!
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Starts THURSDAY
DOMINION
GRANVILLE — MU   5-
S65   G
-      --■- — MU   5-6725
3 SHOWS DAILY - 11:00, 3:00, 8:00
SUNDAY    at   2:30,    7:00    only
vr^a-p Tuesday, January  18,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
the eicl-vcniuiisx of
KMUUfAK"
Izj $AEA,*»«»-?^-«rP <W- k\[f&
TO GAS, OR NjoT TO GAS ?THAT 15 THE QUESTION! 'RATSi' says OUR STAR.
WHEM A COUNTRV HAS NO LEGITIMATE GOWRMFNT, UHO 15 THE FATHER OF THE OWrRY.?"
-a moral rio/d/e. Answer ne.*/- week-
Christian unity...
Arnold Toynbee, summing up 1965 and giving his
evaluation for 1966, said during the coming year the
widening gap between the white man's lot and the non-
white man's will be so enormous that violent outbreaks
will erupt in many places.
Several newly-formed African states and most Asian
countries seem to back up this theory, as daily news reports
announce more overseas revolutions, demonstrations and
riots.
At the same time, after last year's Ecumenical Council's achievements, 1966 gives theologians great hopes for
a unified Church, and optimism for the future.
This week, in fact, is Christian unity week at UBC.
However, it seems that with all this talk of Christian
unity and making the Church relevant to the modern world,
there should be evidence of some effects on our government.
By comparing government policy trends with Church
aspirations, one cannot help but feel disappointed.
Student Committee on Cuban Affairs
PRESENTS
3 FILMS FROM CUBA
- CYCLONE, 1963
- CUBAN TRAVEL FILM - 1964
- MAY DAY - HAVANA - 1965
THURSDAY NOON ANGUS 110 25c
CREDO
Bad Boy
"Choker"
—Dress    shirts with
the   highest collar  in
the  world
.  . . Mauve, Pink, Black
Bad Boy Ragge Shoppe
315   SEYMOUR
CHECK   THE   OTHER   "BAD   BOYS"
AD   IN   TODAY'S   UBYSSEY,   IT'S
EVEN  WORSE.
BAY
SYLVIA
Carroll    Baker,    George    Maharis
PLUS
THE  L SHAPED  ROOM
Leslie   Caron,   Tom   Bell
(Restricted)
STUDENTS   15c
DELTA
JAN.  21   & 22
THE BIG GAMBLE
Stephen Boyd, Juliette Greco
PLUS
FIVE WEEKS IN A BALLOON
Red   Buttons,   B.  Ede,   Fabian
Is Religion Relevant Today?
Hear a lecture answering this question and others
The Dynamic Theology
of
Scientific Christianity
by
HOWARD H. IRWIN
THURSDAY JANUARY 20 NOON BUCHANAN 100
Sponsored by The Christian Science Organization
CUSO
film on a CUSO doctor in Nigeria.
film   following   Beverley  Bie  (a   UBC  graduate   now
teaching in Ghana) through orientation last August.
to be shown in Buchanan 203 at 12:30 on Thursday,
21st January.
S
(pMAanhu
Otto Preminger's
Saint Joan
with
Jean Seberg
Thursday, January 20th
AUDITORIUM
12:30 — 3:30 — 6:00 — 8:30
50c
ZELLER'S
RETAILERS    TO    THRIFTY    CANADIANS
Offw a Secure Future, and
Fatf VnHwtim for tfowy
Men in ^ti/Mm^emenf
Here is a career opportunity where your initiative
and personal talents will be appreciated and rewarded. You will receive on-the-job training
designed to prepare you for rapid advancement.
Promotion is from within the company, and is
based on individual performance.
If you are graduating in the faculty of Commerce,
Arts or Science.
If you possess leadership ability and self-confidence.
If you possess imagination, ambition, and an
interest in people.
If you are able and willing to accept periodic
expense-paid transfers.
Consider a career with Zeller's Limited, a growing
Canadian Retail Company with over 100 stores in
more than 70 cities. Success in the Training Programme leads to Store Management or to other
executive positions.
Starting salary will be commensurate with your
qualifications and experience. Employee benefits
include, Pension Plan, Group Life and Health
Insurance, Profit Sharing, and Summer and Winter
Vacations.
Visit the Placement Office to learn more about
the career opportunities with Zeller's, and to
arrange an interview with a company representative who will be on campus on: Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January  18,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Partying profs meet
Student-professor c o f f fe e
party noon Brock—all science
students welcome.
HELLENIC CULTURAL SOC
Dr. Malcolm McGregor
speaks on travelling in Greece
tonight 8:30 in Upper Lounge
I.H.
JAZZ SOC
General meeting noon Bu.
216. All members and interested persons.
JR. AGRICULTURE
Dr> J. C. Berry speaks on
India Thursday noon, Ag. 100.
PRE-MED
Dr. Fenwick speaks on Computers in Medicine, Wes. 201,
noon Wednesday.
PRE-DENTISTRY
Meeting with film at noon,
Bu. 204.
FINE ARTS
Dr. M. L. H. Mackenzie will
speak in Lass. 104.
NEWMAN CLUB
Dr. Chitty will speak tonight
at 7:30 at St. Mark's.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Noon hour rally Thursday at
south end of C-lot. City and
campus maps required.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Pianist Dale Bartlett today
in Aud. 35 cents.
FILM SOC
Otto Preminger's Saint Joan
Thursday at 12:30, 3:30 and
6:00, in Aud. 50 cents.
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Bill Bahan Wednesday noon
in Bu. 221.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
noon, Bu. 214. Topis is Who
owns the Armouries.
MARDI GRAS
Mardi Gras presents Mexican Culture films, Bu. 106
noon today.
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
•
DON'T
BELIEVE
RUMORS
The Vancouver School Board
does hire many teachers
directly from university
SO
when  you   are
applying for an
elementary or secondary
teaching  position,
remember to   apply  to  the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West 10»h Avenue
For an interview
call RE 1-1131
MARDI GRAS
Mardi Gras presents a Mexican Fiesta — South Brock, 2-4
p.m. Wednesday.
MARDI GRAS
Mardi Gras Charity Ball
January 28 and 29. Tickets on
sale in AMS office.
CLASSIFIED
Rales: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST SILVER KILLER WHALE
Pendant mid-December. Phone
Linda   Jack,   266-5925. 	
LOST: ONE iiL.UK SHOE. WALK-
ing on one is difficult. If found
phone Donna, AM 6-0902, Great
sentimental value.
TOUND — ICE SKATES, ON ROOF
of my car in Thunderbird Arena
parking lot, before Christmas.
Phone 731-7018 or N. Boston at
228-2262.
LOST ONE SILVER CUFF-LINK
vicinity Buchanan Pool, Thurs.
Finder   please   phone   Bill   261-6793.
FOUND: SILVER BRACLET LS
field house, Friday 14th. Anply
publications, Ubyssey,  Brock Hall.
FOUND —- ROOM. 104 HENRY AN-
gus Bldg., Lady's glasses, Wed-
nesday night, apply Janitor's office
Henry Angus  Bldg.
LOST: FOUR KEYS ON CHAIN
with small green stone, probably
in Chem. building or Brock. Please
contact Hill, Rm. 562, Haida House,
Totem Park. Call CA 4-9818 or "CA
4-M33   after   6:30.
LOST DURING NOVEMBER IN Oil
near Buchanan, black and silver
Parker pen with initials M.A.T.. on
cap,   AM   1-0585   eves.   Reward.
FOUND — SEVERAL KEYS IN
Key Case, apply AMS office, Brock
Hall.
LOST: PAIR CONVERSE RUN-
ners, Memorial Gym, Sat. 15.
Phone  RE   3-8765.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSIJR-
ance   rates?   If   you   are   over   20
and have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
SURPRISE! LOCKERS ARE NOW
available in Buchanan Bldg. Anply
at   Bu.   182.
YES IT'S TRUE! LOCKERS ARE
now available in Buchanan Bldg.
Apply at  Bu.  182.
Transportation
14
CARPOOL NEEDS A MEMBER
whoi can also drive vicinity Ta-'or
Way, etc., West Van. Phone Pam
WA   2-5062.
actors, beautiful girls, noted poet:
E. Koster. All for 25c. 12:30 Thursday,   January  20.   Hebb   Theatre.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, |20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
TYPING OF TERM PAPERS, ES-
says, Thesis and Letters. Reasonable  rates.   CR  8-9480.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,   263-4530.
FAST   ACCURATE   TYPING   THE-
sis,   Essays,  Etc.,   on  new  IBM  Executive typewriter. Phone 263-4023.
TYPING   OF    ALL   KINDS.    FAST,
accurate,   reasonable.   RE   1-7496.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age' or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West  Van.
PS:    New   outlet   now   open   close
to   U.B.C.
BREAKFAST DISHES AND TIDY-
ing for Wheelchair Housewife. 2
hours daily or 3 days a week between 9:00 a.m. and 2 p.m. o minutes walk from UBC gates. $1.00
an  hour.  CA 4-7574.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR UBC CO-
ed in exchange for baby sitting,
located on campus. Details to be
negotiated.   Phone  CA  4-3522.
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
TWO DRIVERS NEEDED FOR
carpool in Shaughnessy area phone
Steve  RE   8-7323.
RIDE WANTED FROM 41st A.ND
Oak for 8:30 classes morning only.
Plume Dennis 261-7102.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30 MON. TO
Fri. from Knight St. & 43rd. Phone
325-9650.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's M.W,
T, F, vie. Kingsway and Patterson, S. Burnaby. Phone Marg HE
3-0384.
URGENT — RIDE TO AND FROM
UBC for 2. Monday-Friday; 8:30
lectures, Marine and Fraser, phone
Don   327-5719.
ENGLISH SPEAKING STUDENT
requires ride, riders or carpool
from Lynn Valley area 8:30-5:30,
987-9718.
TWO    NEED    RIDES    FOR    8:30's
from   West   End.   Ph.   681-7761.
DRIVERS     WANTED    FOR    NEW
Westminster carpool  (Sapperton
area)   Phone  LA  1-2765  or   LA   2-
1366.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
52 NASH. GOOD RUNNING ORDER.
Pulmanized, Radio, a rare bargain
at  $75.   Call  CA   4-7401.	
1961 VW DELUXE. RADIO, Excellent condition, must sell 683-0040
evenings.
1960 RAPIER ABARTH PIPES 8S
HP. 4 spd. Sport, gd. cond. $800.
RE   6-0606.
54 STUDEBAKER STATION WA-
gon, new engine, original owner.
Ask  for  Patricia  AM   1-1584.
HEARSE   FOR   SALE   OR   TRADE
for details  AM 6-2602 after 6  p.m.
Accessories & Repairs
22
WANTED: TR 3 BODY PARffS,
phone 224-0467 evenings ask for
Dave.
Scandals
39
EXTRAVAGANZA:   SCIENCE   PEP
Meet!     Tom     Northcott,     famous
GUITAR—SPECIALIZED INSTRUC-
tion by experts in every type of
Guitar and Banjo* playing at "The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone   CA  8-8412.
Special Classes
65
THE KNACK — IF YOU CAN'T
charm 'em with looks — try words,
an 8 week $8.00 evening course, in
EFFECTIVE SPEAKING starts
next week (Wednesdays), Alma
YMCA,  CA 4-3282^	
THE KNACK — THE ART OF
electrifying MAKE-UP doesn't iust
happen. Learn under professional
instruction, 8 evening lessons, $8,00.
Call YMCA, CA 4-3282. Starts next
week.   (Thursdays).
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
...    USED   FURNITURE   MART" ....
Where You  Shop at Auction  Prices
5207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store)
Rooms
81
STUDENT (MALE), FURNISHED
single room, kitchen privileges, one
sharing frig., washroom, and .entrance. 1 block from shops and
buses. Non-smoker. Phone RE 3-
8778.
WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO
share house with three others
(graduate preferred) 733-2138 after
6:30   p.m.,   Tues.   18.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD. AVAILABLE
Prefer male student. Private entrance, Vicinity of 10th and Alma.
Phone   224-3390.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   FOR   QUIET
male student, 4595 West 6th,  Phone
224-4860.
Furn. Homes 8c Apts.
83
DESIRE FEMALE STUDENT .TO
share furnished suite in Soiith
Granville area. Please call 733-
2869   evenings.	
FELLOW TO SHARE 3 BEDRM.
Apt. with two others. $40 mth.
Waterloo  and   2nd.   736-4852  aft^ 7.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE
apartment on W. 2nd soon as
possible   phone   738-7726.
CUSO
— fill unmanned posts overseas in "Peace Corps." work
— lists of job requests available and letters from volun
teers in the field available at International House.
— application forms can be obtained from International
House.
— selection interviews scheduled from 24th January to
18th February.
ELDORADO
MINING AND REFINING LIMITED
Permanent employment opportunities for:
Mining Engineers, Metallurgical Engineers, Chemical
Engineers, Geological Engineers, Geologists.
Summer employment opportunities for:
Mining Engineers, Metallurgical Engineers, Chemical
Engineers, Geological Engineers, Geologists, Mechanical Engineers, Electrical Engineers, Civil Engineers.
Interviews Wednesday, January 19th
PLACEMENT SERVICE
SKI STOP!
for all your Ski Equipment
EATON'S Ski Chalet
Downtown MU  5-7112
Brentwood  CY  9-5511
Park Royal 922-3325
New  Westminster  526-6766

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