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The Ubyssey Nov 1, 1963

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Array THE UBYSSEY
the
engineers
Vol.  XLVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1963
4S
No. 23
Quebec chief
speaks Monday
Quebec's number two cabinet minister, Paul Gerin-
Lajoie, will speak Monday
noon in the auditorium.
Gerin-Lajoie, youth minister and soon to be minister
of education, is the first
speaker in the five-d a y
French Canada Week.
An open panel discussion
on education in Quebec will
be held Monday at 3:30 in
Brock Lounge.
Fee hassle
$4,000
not lost
grads say
Last year's grad class is not
$4,000 short, but plus $4,000.
Wednesday, science undergrad president Chuck Bennie
charged that $4,000 was missing in the grad class accounts.
But Ted Conover, Commerce
IV, brought the grad class
books to The Ubyssey Thursday afternoon.
All money has been accounted for properly, including a
$1,200 grant for the convocation ball, Conover said.
• •    •
The $4,000 is safely on account in the bank and is being carried over as profit for
this year's class to work with.
Conover said Rennie had not
been able to get the complete
records of the class and had
assumed they did not exist.
"I know Rennie wasn't trying to shaft the grad class,"
said Conover.
"He wasn't in possession of
all the facts and made a natural
mistake," he said.
AMS treasurer Chris Hansen
said money spent on the grad
class ball actually shows a
profit of $23.79 out of the
$1,200 budget for the dance.
He said the money was kept
in a separate bank account.
• • •
Hansen said he has a complete record of the funds and
that a check with him would
have shown the supposed deficiencies.
He said he agree with Rennie that the grad class should
have some type of constitution.
"I realize that there can be
no continuity from class to
class, but there should be some
sort of framework for them
to work in," he said.
Conover is running as a candidate for the grad class president this year.
The grad class executive is
chosen by students who will
receive degrees in the spring.
It arranges the graduation program, and arranges the annual
grad gift to the university.
AND STILL
MORE SUB
(See Page 5)
Rowdyism
hurts UBC
\^
in wallet'
BY ROGER McAFEE
A past president of the UBC alumni association says ffhe
university cannot afford the type of publicity that stemmed
from student conduct at the Homecoming game.
Fred   Bolton,   head   of   the j
alumni in 1940, told The Ubys-
DOCTOR APPLIES FIRST-AID at Teacup Game after large,
home-made firecracker, exploded in front of Science II
student Gordon Scheller. Scheller was dazed, but not
injured seriously.
—don hume photo
sey Thursday he was disgusted and annoyed at the
drunken behavior after the
game.
"After seeing that type of
activity, grads are going to
think a second time about giving money to such a place."
Bolton said.
WORST EVER
Bolton   said    he   comes   to
UBC each year for the game.
"But this year was the worst
ever," he said.
"I'm not complaining about
the goal posts being torn down.
It's the drunken stupidity that
interfered with the game
which annoyed me and several
others sitting near me.
"It seems strange to me that
once things got to the point
where students began to disrupt the game and wander
onto the field no one did anything to stop them.
"The   Pinkerton    men    did
nothing and nobody else seemed to care what went on.
POOR SHOW
"If students can't govern
themselves the administration
should take the power away,"
Bolton said.
Bolton also attacked the "14-
year-old mentality who roared
around the track on a go-cart
at half time."
"I've attended football
games, professional, college,
and high school all across the
country and I've never seen
such a juvenile performance."
Bolton said he was going to
write president Macdonald on
the issues and send a copy of
his letter to the athletic department.
JAMES BALDWIN
. . . not a victim
White man
real victim,
says Baldwin
By LORRAINE SHORE
"Some of the Negroes in the
civil rights demonstrations
know they will be dead in five
or six years."
They get heavily abused in
demonstrations and then work
themselves to death in chain
gangs.
The 1,200 students in the
audience were silent and tense
as Negro author James Baldwin described the non-violent
demonstrations  in  the   South.
Baldwin is at UBC to receive
an honorary Doctor of Litera-
(Continued on page 3)
SEE: TOWN AT MERCY
For the sake of science
EUS out-engineered themselves
slugged
on
sat
all
an-
Homemakers
nurses.
Sciencemen    stomped
engineers.
And a bunch of kooks
out in the middle of it
drinking beer.
The occasion  was   the
nual teacup  game Thursday
in the stadium.
The Home Ec Homewreck-
■ers rolled up an impressive
6-0 lead and held it to win the
featured teacup football game.
Sciencemen beat out the
engineers in the half-time
chariot race.
Peter Shepard, Engineering
Undergraduate Society president,   said  he  wasn't   happy
SCIENCE HORSES
—John  tyrell photo
pulling for victory
with the sciencemen's victory.
"We helped them build
their chariot kfter someone
swiped parts of it Wednesday
night," he said.
It was a dark day for the
engineers all around.
They supported the nurses
and the nurses lost. Their
chariot was beaten and they
didn't even place in the beer
drinking contest.
In the boat race at centre
field during half-time the
Aggies bested The Ubyssey in
a close drink-down.
The Ubyssey and the Aggies
(Continued on page 3)
See: INJURY Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  1,   1963
NOTHING UNDER THE SUN looks like this, smiles Bruce Brophy, gazing at $1,500 painting
hanging in Brock link. Painting, titled "Sun," is most recent acquisition of Brock Hall art
fund, supported by student money.
By 19-7 vote
UCC approves
SUB proposals
Undergraduate  Clubs'  Committee has   voted  for  the
Student Union Building.
The clubs voted 19 to seven
Thursday in favor of the
principle of the building.
UBC Radio Society and the
Sports Car club were among
clubs opposing the resolution.
Much of the opposition to
the planned building has come
from club members who objected to some of the facilities
for clubs in the building .
"We have concluded that the
SUB as planned is the best we
can get, and is an honest attempt to please as many people
as possible," said executive
member John Deachman.
"There are still some prob-
"Cards"  barred
TORONTO (CUP) — Card
players, who have been blamed
for clogging the Ryerson Institute of Technology cafeteria,
were banned from the entire
campus last week.
lems with the special interest
clubs like radsoc, but they will
be ironed out satisfactorily,"
he said.
"I'm very glad the SUB has
passed this hurdle," SUB chairman Dean Feltham said after
the decision.
The SUB will be chief topic
of a general meeting Nov. 14,
and will later be submitted to
a campus-wide referendum.
Deachman   said   clubs  must
accept   the   new   building   or
find themselves completely out
of space.
Radsoc is doubled up with
ham radio societly in SUB
plans. Both clubs claim the
proximity will interefere with
broadcasting.
Deachman said the huts behind Brock will be used for as
long as posible, but they will
eventually be torn down to
make room for a parking lot.
eow iwo
Requires undergraduates, graduates and post graduates
in engineering and honours science for summer and
permanent employment.
Interviews with representatives
November 5,6,7 and 8, 1963
Your University Placement Office can provide details
and literature about Cominco and arrange an interview.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND
SMELTING COMPANY
OF CANADA LIMITED
General meeting
is official now
The general meeting is official.
Student council passed a
motion Monday calling a
general meeting on Nov. 14,
"for the purpose of dealing
with the Student Union
Building and other matters
as may arise."
The California Standard Company
Calgary, Alberta
offering careers  in
Petroleum Exploration and
Production
will conduct campus interviews on
November 7, 8, and 8
for
Post Graduates - Graduates
Undergraduates
in
HONORS GEOLOGY
Permanent  and  summer  employment
PHYSICS AND GEOLOGY
Permanent  and summer  employment
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Permanent  and  summer  employment
MINING ENGINEERING
Permanent  and  summer  employment
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Permanent and  summer  employment
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
MAY BE MADE THROUGH
THE UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE Friday,  November  1,   1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
W3   V
VICIOUS FRONT WALL of Home Ec Homewrecker football
machine trundles over the ball at Thursday's teacup
game. None of the Homewreckers play for Frank Gnup,
but they won 6-0 anyway.
Suddenly, he's
got a 3-wheeler
Baldwin describes it
Town at mercy
of billy clubs'
(Continued
ture   degree   at   today's   Fall
Convocation.
"The real victim of this
problem is the poor white who
attacks the Negro and does not
know why," he said.
Baldwin described a southern Alabama voter-registration
drive in which he had participated.
More than 300 Negroes were
lined up all day to register.
Only 20 were allowed to.
State police cars and local
officers blocked communication between the people in the
line-up and other Negroes.
"The town was at the mercy
of a handful of disturbed
people with billy clubs, guns
and night sticks," said Baldwin.
The hopeful voters stood all
day, and could not leave the
line. If they did, they were not
allowed to return. No food or
water could be given to them.
"The sheriff said he wouldn't
have the people molested in
any way; therefore we could
not feed them," said Baldwin.
Two young men who challenged police were savagely
•beaten.
Baldwin dwelled on the
white man as the victim of
his own circumstances.
"If the curtain came down tomorrow, I would not be the
victim — the white people
would be,"  Baldwin said.
"There isn't more than half
Doug Baker, Agriculture
his wheel.
INJURY
(Continued from page 1)
won the   right   to  enter the
final   by   outdrinking   the
Foresters and the  Engineers.
Almost everyone except the
Engineers had a great time.
Almost everyone but Gordon Scheller, Science II, who
was taken to Wesbrook Hospital in a state of shock when
a home-made bomb exploded
in his face. He was released
later.
The whole thing was in
support of the crippled children.
Martin' Ternan, collection
supervisor, said receipts from
the game totalled $860.
Earlier in the day Engineers had stood at strategic
points on the campus collecting funds for the crippled
children. Ternan said they
managed to collect $538.
IV, wants to know who stole
Baker was driving into the
university along Marine Drive
when he felt his car wobble.
He got out and found a
wheel had fallen off.
"While I went to phone for
help someone stole the wheel,"
he said.
Baker says he would like
students who saw anyone removing a wheel from his red
and grey 1956 Meteor Thursday morning to phone the campus detachment of the RCMP.
from page one)
an hour a day that the white
man in the south is not thinking about the Negro. He thinks
about a people who cannot be
intimidated by bombs, dogs or
hoses."
He spoke about "the awful
face of the poor white woman
in the Deep South".
"It is awful the way she tries
to make you see her place
above you. She is just a poor,
lonely woman," he said.
Baldwin also contradicted
the Negro sex myth.
"It is not true I can make
love longer and better than any
man alive," he said.
"I have better things to do."
The author criticized the
U.S. administration's do-nothing attitude.
The Justice Department assures the people it is behind
the Negro voter drive; it supplies money, but refuses to protect the Negroes.
He also spoke of the "great
American myth about the beginning of the country".
"The Indians were supposed
to have just died out; the
Negroes were supposed to be
so happy working in the cotton
fields," he said sarcastically.
"The country still thinks I'm
a -water-melon-eating darkie,"
Baldwin said.
Baldwin placed his hope in
the high-school and college
students.
Police unfence
engineers' float
TORONTO (CUP) — Police
caught 50 University of Toronto engineers demolishing a
fence near the campus last
week.
They arrested four of them.
The engineers wanted material for a float in Toronto's
Homecoming parade.
> Diamond Rings
I Fine Watches
I Custom Jewelry
i Pearls
> Jewelry repairs
Phone
Mel Battensby
of
Oakridge Place
CORNETT'S
OF OAKRIBGE PLACE
3 yrs. Insurance
on Diamond
Rings
Discount
Consideration
for
University
Students
Business Phone 266-2444. Suite 273—5655 Cambie
41st and Cambie — Evening FA 7-2589
FRENCH CANADA   WEEK
November 4-8
presenting
PROMINENT SPEAKERS, SEMINARS, CUL-
TURAL   DISPLAYS,   DRAMA   AND   FOLKSONGS
Sponsored by:
The Canadian Union of Students' Committee of
the Alma Mater Society.
Hugh Pullem
(Dentistry h8) says
I extract more pleasure from life
by keeping my finances in order with
a Personal Chequing Account at..
1 ° TO 3 mtllOM CAMUAK
GpJ
Bank of Montreal
gaiuidtu. 'P&iAt S<nc& fan Student*
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building: MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
a big step on the road to success is an early banking connection
Mike's promise
isn't forgotten
If you've forgotten Prime
Minister Lester B. Pearson's
campaign promise of 10,000
scholarships of $1,000 each,
you're not the only one.
Council thinks he has, too,
Monday AMS second vice-
president Jim Ward moved
that the AMS write to Pearson and remind him of the
scholarships.
My
girlfriend's
girlfriend
told her
and she told me...
and now
I'm telling
you...
try Tampax.
Honestly, it's marvelous.
You feel so clean, so fresh.
So unhampered. So uncluttered
You're ready to go anywhere,
do fun things.
In fact you all but forget
about differences in days of
the month.
Tampax prevents odor,
chafing, embarrassment.
Nothing can show, no one
can know.
Tampax was made for busy
young moderns.
Because it's worn internally,
it's out of sight, out of mind.
It's simply the best way,
that's all.
Now why don't you go tell
someone else about it?
Canadian
T"A AARAV Corporation Lit
I MlYtrHA Barrie, Ontario
Corporation Limited THE UBYSSEY
Nothing Is so useless as a general mcadm.
—Thomas Babington. Lord Macaulay
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the unlTersity
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, OA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242, Lioc.  26. Member Canadian University Press.
Authorized   as   second-class   mail   by   Post   Office   Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies tor general
excellence, news photography, editorial writing
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1963
Give em the tour
We'd like to suggest to the Open House committee
that they make their program realistic this year.
We think there's a very easy way to promote better understanding between the public and the university
community. When the committee is showing 50,000
visitors the campus next term, we hope they will show
them what it's really like.
We trust all visitors will be forced to enter the campus, bumper to bumper, by the most devious route possible. We trust the weatherman can be paid to provide
fog, frosty pavement, and the RCMP can be convinced to
erect several of their sneaky radar traps.
Visitors should have to travel up one-way streets,
and should have to park in the C-lot extension in tihe
middle of a mud puddle. And Sir Ouvry should tow
away every fifth car, just as a matter of principle.
The main events should begin at 8:30 on a Saturday
morning, and visitors who don't make it on time should
not be allowed to enter.
We trust the visitor will not be handed pamphlets and
publicity material, but that they will be expected to stand
in line in the library, fill out their name, address, licence
number, and next-of-kin on a slip for each booklet, and
tihen return the books by 9:30 the same day.
Of course, every second person will be told there
are no booklets available, seeing as there will be only
10,000 programs printed for the 50,000 guests.
Lectures will not take place in Buchanan, but will
be held instead in shacks. All rheumatic old ladies will
be -forced to sit next to the cracks in the walls so as to
absorb the draughts.
Everyone will be served lunch in the auditorium caf.
They will have to pour their own coffee, help themselves
to all the food, eat it crammed up against three strangers, and pay 10 cents more than they're used to paying
for the same thing at a plush downtown coffee-house.'
And that funny little man will come and take their
trays away before they're finished.
Guests will be able to buy souvenir booklets at the
bookstore for a 50 per cent markup, but, as in the library, one in every two people will be told the books
"aren't in yet."
To sign the official guest register, all VIPs will be
expected to wait in line for two hours while the attending professor has lunch.
When guests ask cashiers in Brock for change for the
cigarette machine, they will be told, bluntly, "No!".
Guests will be expected to sit on the library lawn
and the Brock steps, because there will be no lounges
available.
In the evening, after a long, hard day, they will
stumble along the unpaved, unlighted path back to C-lot,
and splash through the puddle to their car (if it hasn't
been towed away).
On their way home, they will be encouraged to
swear, and wish that they'd never come to this goddam
place, anyway.
That way, open house visitors would really understand UBC and the students.
An apology
The Ubyssey on October 24, 1963, in an editorial
under the heading "Stop the Press," stated that the
New Westminster Columbian "likely won't survive
1964" and was "already in the grip of its banker."
This statement was made without full knowledge
of the facts, and, accordingly, The Ubyssey takes this
opportunity to unreservedly withdraw and retract the
said statement.
The Ubyssey wishes to express its regret to the
publishers of the Columbian and to apologize sincerely
to them for any embarrassment and inconvenience
which the statement may have caused.
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■hi
PIP:
Pumpkin problems
By Jack Ornstein
Jack's halloween heresy
I'd like to thank those
who took the time and effort
to reply to my last column
on religion. One person was
even kind enough to warn
me about what might happen
should I marry a believer.
Hmmmmm . . .
Scene I — Brock Hall
Me: You don't really believe in a Great Pumpkin do
you?
• •    •
She: Yes—my family has
always had faith.
Me: Why didn't you tell
me this before we got married?
She: Naturally I assumed
you believed—if only for the
sake of appearance.
Me: I DID believe in Him
as a child but when He
didn't appear year after
year, I began to wonder.
• •    •
She: And what about our
children? Do you want them
to go through life without
the hope of spending enter-
nity in a heavenly Pumpkin
Patch? (Hereafter called just
"p.p.") Do you want them to
be scorned as agnostics or
—p.p. forbid — as atheists?
Me: Well, I . . .
She: I want a divorce im
mediately. And I demand
full custody of the children.
P.p. to Betsy, what's to become of them?
Me: Listen, before you do
anything rash, let's both go
to an earthly pumpkin patch
and WATCH for the Great
Pumpkin. If HE comes, then
I too shall believe.
(Enter Stranger:)
• •    •
Me: My wife and I are
looking for a p.p. Have you
seen one around?
Stranger: I haven't had
a p. for years and haven't
seen a p.p. for even longer.
(He exits).
She: Look, there's one!
Scene II — A p.p. at midnight
Me: Well, I don't see anything!
She: You didn't expect to
SEE him did you?
Me: How else are we to detect his presence?
She: Can't you feel him???
Me:  Humbug!
She: No thanks, they're
bad for my teeth.
Me: Say, I DO feel something!
• •    •
She: You forgot your belt
stupid. Pull up your pants!
. Me: This is ridiculous.
Take the kids and GO.
She: Why you *t %•'"&*
I'll   * ' / &   •""    *   % *    t
Me:   Try   that   eh?   Well,
I'll *   %    * • Ibt  / &    °   "°.
(The end of  a  hapless marriage.)
Epilogue: Well, we got
divorced and I married a
non-believer. Things are going swell except every May
day she looks skyward and I
hear her murmur "Oh Great
Red Missile . . ."
"Jackie O. could see no God,
His wife liked Bishop Sheen,
And so between us both you
see.
They   split  at  Halloween.
EDITOR: Mike Hunter
Editors:
Associate Keith Bradbury
News   Dave Ablett
Managing
City	
Photo 	
George Railton
... Mike Horsey
  Don Hume
Critics    Ron Riter
Sports    Denis Stanley
Asst. City Richard Simeon
Asst. News Tim Padmore
Senior Donna Morris
Senior  Maureen Covell
REPORTERS AND DESK: Tom
Wayman, Lorraine Shore, Graeme
Matheson, Al Birnie, Al Donald John Kelsey, Joan Oodsell,
Carol Ann Baker, Don H'ull, Carol
(Shore's Buddy), Sue Winters-
gill, Mike Atchison, Jim Smith.
SPORTS: Oeorge Reamsbottom,
Roger McAfee, Dan Mullen,
Janet   Currie. Friday,  November  1,   1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
SUB questions
and the answers
Here are some of the questions that have been raised
about the proposed Student Union Building.
The answers are provided by SUB committee chairman
Dean Feltham.
QUESTION
What was the method adopted in choosing the stadium as
a suitable site, and is not the
stadium site a "second best
site?"
ANSWER:
The Union Building must occupy a position not only central to all academic buildings,
but also on the daily path to
and from student parking lots.
The sites that meet these prerequisites must then be sufficiently large enough for future
expansion and must also have
adequate  adjacent  parking.
The site that most adequately
meets these prerequisites is the
old Chemistry Building .As the
Medical Hut site was already
claimed by a ten storey multipurpose academic building, the
nearest site was 700 feet away
at the Stadium.
• •    •
With 40 per cent of the student population passing this
site from their cars every day,
with 60 per cent of the students within four minutes
walking distance of the Union,
and 90 per cent within 6 minutes (survey results show the
students walk on the average
288 feet a minute), with 240,-
000 land space available, and
with a 500-car parking lot adjacent, it is submitted that the
stadium site admirably meets
the essential criteria, but recognizing that if we could tear
down the Chemistry Building
or force out the multi-purpose
classroom block, this site would
be a slightly better site than
the Stadium site.
QUESTION:
Is the Alma Mater Society's
insistence on the traffic flow a
result of an attempt to make
a new Student Union Building
used?
• •    •
ANSWER:
No. The Student Union
Building will be used without
the adjacent bus stop and car
access roads allowing car pool
drivers to pick up and drop off
their fellow students.
Our insistence upon these is
to alleviate present unnecessary hardships. This campus
has no bus terminal with amiable and sociable coffee shops
and lounges but only "wind
blown, makeshift shelters."
This campus has no "front
door" providing a tangible
point of contact for parents,
friends, and visitors to the
campus.
Concerning the student pick
up points ,only a fool would
suggest that these pick up
points will eliminate the problem of students treking out to
the nearest parking lots (south
of Agronomy Road), but with
a four lane road in the front
of and back of the Union Building, it will help the situation,
and I submit, is worth fighting for.
QUESTION:
Will the food services and
lounges in the Union be open
to the students in the evening?
ANSWER:
The Union Building will be
open 7 days a week from 8
a.m. to II p.m. each day. Food
service outlets will be provided
throughout the day with coffee
shop facilities open in the
evenings and weekends.
If written assurance is not
forthcoming on these points, we
recommend that the building
should not be constructed.
The "hub of the University"
cannot grind to a halt at 5 p.m.
as does the present "ivory
tower."
(Editor's note: student council has ordered the Brock
Lounge to remain open 'til 10
p.m. each day, and is negotiating the opening of a coffee
shop on Sundays).
QUESTION:
What area is presently allocated to clubs in the Brock
Hall, and what area will be
allotted in the new Union
Building?
•    •    •
ANSWER:
Clubs presently have 3,000
square feet consisting of 12
rooms in Brock Hall, eight of
which are offices which are too
small for meetings, too large
for individual executive offices, and are generally used
for "dating," coffee, card playing, etc. by a handful of student executives .
Another 4,000 square feet is
provided in the temporary
shacks behind Brock, scheduled
to be torn down any day for
parking lots.
As student government bureaucracy expands, present club
space will diminish, 450 square
feet are already being planned
for another meeting room next
year.
At present, the clubs have
no working area, and are continually fighting for the six
executive meeting rooms in
Brock Hall. Only 12 out of the
60 clubs have a lounge, these
lounges consisting of the club
shacks behind Brock.
The new union will satisfy
the clubs' administrative needs
with a general office consisting of 10 ot 15 desks with
phones and four adjacent bookable offices (1,490 square feet).
The Union will solve the meeting needs with 12 meeting and
seminar rooms (7,582 square
feet).
Their social needs will be
adequately accommodated with
a Ballroom (400 couples) and
a  Party  Room   (130  couples).
Group identity will be facilitated with a Club Lounge
(1,500 square feet). Projects
will be constructed and painted in a workroom area (2,500
square feet).
K   •   •
QUESTION:
Who will control the operation in the building, in particular,  bookings?
ANSWER:
Since the University owns
the land upon which our
building is to be constructed,
by law they will also own the
building.
But, the Union Building will
only be constructed upon an
irrevocable written agreement
that the student body shall
have control over the operation of the building, including
exclusive control over booking policies.
To our frontier
Baldwin barely made it
■James Baldwin almost
didn't make it to UBC because he was too expensive.
Six councillors didn't want
to pay the $750 fee Baldwin
charged for his appearance
here.
•    •    •
"That's pretty expensive
tub-thumping," said AMS second vice-president Byron
Hender.
"This thing leaves a bad
taste in my mouth," said Education president George
Boechler.
•    •    *
But Ken Leitch, AMS coordinator, said Special Events
had to offer more than $700
to Adlai Stevenson when he
came here last spring.
"Let's   face   it,"   said   first
vice-president     Jim     Ward.
"This   university   is   on   the
frontier   to   topnotch   speakers."
Ward said a group called
the Graduate Letters' Society
would put up $200 of Baldwin's, fee.
•    •    •
Council passed the $750
contract by a vote of nine to
six with three abstaining.
Tidy nurse
turned down
by council
Those nurses like everything
clean.
Discomfitted by the usual
pile of waste paper tossed into
the well of student council's
horseshoe shaped table, Nursing president Nancy Symmes
asked Monday night that second vice-president Byron Hender place an open waste basket
in the centre of the well.
She suggested a judgement
be placed on any councillor
who misses the basket.
"I'm not sure," growled
AMS president Malcolm Scott,
"if monkey business comes
before or after new business."
The motion was defeated.
Russians condemned
TORONTO (CUP) — A conference of Ukrainian students
has condemned Russian colonialism in the Ukraine.
UBC Bookstore
Urgently Requires
Twelve Copies
of
BATES "THE BIBLE
DESIGNED TO BE READ AS
LIVING LITERATURE"
Which Is Now Out of Print.
Any student having a copy for sale
is asked to bring it to the book store
as soon as possible.
CAREERS  FOR  MEN
IN
SPECIALTY  STEELMAKING
With The North American Division of a Company That:
•   Has annual sales of over $60,000,000 and  is the  largest  in  the field   in
Canada.
• Has pioneered manufacturing processes for the industry on this continent
. . . hot planetary rolling, continuous casting . . .
• Has a full-scale marketing division  with  six warehouses in  key locations
across Canada.
• Has an international division with representation, or facilities, in most countries of the free world.
• Has  plants in  Welland,  Ontario,  and  Tracy,  Quebec,  employing  approximately 3,000.
AT
ATLAS STEELS LIMITED
A management team from Atlas will visit your campus November 7, 8 and 9
seeking candidates in careers in :
MARKETING AND SALES
MILL AND SERVICE METTALLURGY
PRODUCTION SUPERVISION
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
LIMITED OPENINGS FOR 3rd YEAR SUMMER STUDENTS
See yoor Personnel Services Office or contact At las directly for complete details.   The Salaried
Personnel Manager, Atlas Steels Company Limited, Welland, Ontario. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  1,  1963
*? -       --  -:  :-   s-l-'te
TOP COATS
Hundreds of them ... special 39.95
Pure Wool Smart Fashions
Come in ... and . . .Get Yours Today !
gicharfo &• OarUk  DlenA Wear
786 GRANVILLE STREET
* Vancouver's finest menswear shop * Friday, November  1,   1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Critics' Page
OPERA
TlaAma: iouqh
act to follow
If you missed Norma, you
have a long fast ahead — at
least as far as Grand Opera on
a comparable scale is concerned.
Temporarily at least, the experiment was worth it; VOA
has proven that, IF the opera v
is as well chosen and presented
as Norma, Vancouver's operatic standards can match those
of any comparable centre of
population. Because of the insurmountable obstacle of expense, however, the IF is a big
one. It is no secret that, in
spite of five sold-out houses,
there will be little profit on
this production. The combination of quality in set, costumes,
chorus and leads is more than
Vancouver's opera-going public
will bear. The international
reputation of Joan Sutherland
alone had the power to sell
seats at prices ranging from $3
to $12.50.
• •    •
VOA is faced with a choice
between an artistically unsatisfying but financially successful production of a "name" opera, or a quality performance
of something better suited to
Vancouver at present, but apparently not to its public.
Norma succeeded, with the
added incentive of Miss Sutherland, in compromising between
the two.
What, then, were the ingred- -
ients, in this seldom performed
opera that made it such a success? Certainly they do not include orchestral quality. The
simple but shattering effect of
a small orchestra pit necessitating a tiny string section made
balance impossible. Adding the
enthusiastic but unrestrained
conducting of concert pianist
Boynynge, one had something
less than perfection.
Norma was, from start to
end, a singer's opera; more
specifically, Joan Sutherland's
opera.
• •    •
The all-predominating lyric
line in even the most dramatic
moments could not have been
carried with greater effect than
by her balanced, razor-edged
coloratura. The combination of
a regality that surpassed glamor, and complete musico-dram-
atic control of all the big
scenes in the opera suited
Sutherland perfectly.
Nor could she have found a
better supporter than Marilyn
Home. The breath-taking effectiveness of Home's dark,
full, mezzo-soprano and Sutherland's pristine tone in the duets
Sola furtiva and Miro. o Norma
simply eclipsed the formidable
vocal contributions of John
Alexander and Richard Cross.
It was well that Norma was
not treated as an opera drama-
fique. Marilyn Home was the
only lead to make a significant
dramatic contribution, and
often the near-clumsiness of
her stage movement spoiled
her dramatic effectiveness.
Well-maintained visual balance ever-centred around the
dominating figure of Norma.
Gail   McCance's   all-new sets,
JOAN SUTHERLAND
. . . razor-edged coloratura
particularly effective in the
second act, and Suzanne Mess's
carefully hued costumes reached completion only in the presence of the female lead.
• • •
What have Norma and Joan
Sutherland done for the VOA?
They have given it an unbeatable season opener, but at the
same time have instituted a
basis for comparison with succeeding operas which is neither
fair nor realistic. I do not think
Vancouver was ready for a
production of this scale, and although I enjoyed the experience immensely, I could not
help fearing that a substantial
proportion of Vancouver opera-
goers is not going to accept
anything less in the future.
—dave nordstrom
Critics' Page will accept reviews of books, plays, movies,
art exhibits, and musical performances from any student or
faculty member. Submit reviews to The Ubyssey, north
Brock basement. — ed.
comedy
c&mqh wiih
Tbsrf CowaJid
Metro Theatre, after a shaky
start, seems to be getting itself into shape. A very fine
production of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie
was presented by the West
Vancouver theatre group, unfortunately for a one week run
only, and this is being followed
by a stylish Present Laughter
running until November 2.
Noel Coward's comedy has
enought wit to compensate for
plot inadequacies and our
questioning of basic implausi-
bilities is held in abeyance
while we laugh at the funny
lines.
•    •    •
The difficulty is that the
play at times approaches farce-
but not with any consistency—
so that finally we see it as
neither fish nor fowl but as
Coward's own hybrid drawing
room comedy.
Antony Holland gets most of
the credit. Pace, so vital to
this play, is hardly ever allowed to drag and characters are
on their toes the whole time
engaging in what the trade
calls "verbal duels". At the
end of three acts you've had
enough   but   it  was  entertain
ing while it lasted.
Bob Ross, taking the difficult
lead role, brings it off with
the controlled nonchalance demanded and Betty Tufts as the
ingenue (there's always an ingenue in Coward's plays) is
complete down to the breathless lisp.
Joe Oman in the role of Roland Maule, Coward's idea of
modern playwrights ('scum' he
once called them) gets lots of
laughs mainly by overplaying
grotesquely—exactly what the
part demanded.
If you're looking for an
evening's escape you could do
much worse than Present
Laughter. It's presented by the
Richmond Community Theatre
at the Kitsilano. Curtain at
8:30.
—ken hodkinson
Books
CatUm
continued
(I am indebted ,for my remarks about President Poin-
care, to Leon Trotsky's article
"Novelist and Politician"
which appeared in the October
1935 issue of Atlantic Monthly.)
A friend once pointed out
how Truman used to present a
jaunty, wise-cracking, cartoon
Uncle Sam image and how,
after this same Truman had
dropped the bomb on Hiroshima, "you'd think having
committed one of history's
most odious crimes the man
would appear changed in some
way. But no, there he was on
the newsreel, perky, cracker-
barrel, benevolent — a kind of
White House Will Rogers."
• •    •
I think my friend does Truman an injustice—he supposes
that the president was conscious in some sense and that
he had argued as follows:
"These are only Japs and in
any case they behaved very
badly towards American Boys
at Pearl Harbour." But this is
like attributing conscious
choice and freewill to an
amoeba as it drifts towards its
light source—why should Truman have  appeared changed?
The bourgeois, typically, is
completely unable to grasp
anything that takes place outside his own little universe of
comfort, relativistic morality
and dollar-pragmatism. He is
sunk in an almost impenetrable
sleep — wrapped in a thick
insulating blanket (made of
of neoprene, let us say,) underneath which he leads his
dream-like, solepsistic life
where the Word can mean anything he wants it to mean;
where he can find "reason" for
any action; where there is
nothing, not even an umbilical
cord, to connect him to the outside world. It is this thick blanket that Celine was after—he
wanted to destroy it.
• *    •
France's   equivalent   of   the
modern North American politician was Poincare, who, at
the outbreak of World War I,
was engaged in opening "ia
show of lap-dogs." In choosing
to relate this incident at the
beginning of Journey to the
End of ihe Night, Celine indicates the general direction of
his attack. Poincare was the
purest distillate   of  the  bour
geois — a kind of Arch-Fink—
the apothesis of French bourgeois culture which was, and
probably still is, based on a
cult of lucidity and a religion
of patriotism.
• •    •
Pioncare even speaks in his
memoirs of "these difficult
operations of the mind: selection, classification, co-ordination." Wth the aid of such ponderous rubbish as this he was
able to ignore the inherent rot
of his culture manifested by
the Union-General crash, the
Dreyfus affair, the Stavisky intrigues; he was able, when war
broke out, to speak of a
"Union Sacree" whereby all
Frenchmen would march ideal-
istically together toward* a
"glorious future." The "cleansing sword" routine, in other
words, which is supposed to
dissolve corruption and civil
dissension in warfare as a
detergent dissolves grease.
Celine, however, maintains
an attitude of moral and artistic anti-Poincare-ism. He starts
by attacking the "race".
(To be continued)
—John mills
OWL&
GOAT
The people who missed Hootenanny Under the Dome ought
to weep.
The local performers were
right up to the technical capacity one would expect of billings coinciding with The Rooftop Singers. Most of the material used in the performances
was impure — you know, already done on record — but
criticisms like this don't hold
any more for the simple reason
that virtually everything worth
recording has been recorded.
• •    •
Tom Northcott and Pat Rose
opened with a couple of rousing, well co-ordinated duets.
Their rendition of The Ox-
drivers Song brought down the
house.
Needless to say, Karen
James was in very good form.
In one number originating
from British Guiana she undertook the chancy business of
affecting a native articulation
and pulled it off very well.
Tom Hawkin appealed solidly to the democratic instincts
of the crowd in spite of some
initial nervousness. They sang
We Shall Oveircome along with
him with great conviction and
The Hammer Song was done
well enough to bring Tom
back for the only encore evoked by a local solo performer.
Tom Northcott sang The
Bells of Rhymney. which is always dicey because of the excellent standard set by Pete
Seeger. Tom re-arranged the
tune slightly and his rendition
was the best "original" I've
heard.
• •    •
The Rooftop Singers have
chosen to disregard "authenticity" as one of the criteria of
excellence in folk music. However, given the instrumental
competence of Eric Darling and
Bill Swano and the unique
harmonies and rhythmic interpretations with which the
group informs their material,
there's every reason ot overlook their pragmatic attitude
toward authsnticism. This
group is good enough to sell
anything. —wayne lamb Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  1,  1963
U of W sending
law delegation
The University of Washington is sending a delegation to UBC's International
Moot Court.
Two of the delegates will
meet two UBC law students
to argue a prepared case.
They will argue a case involving a ship collision.
The event will be held
Nov. 8 at 7 in Law South,
and will be preceeded by
dinner at 5:30, and followed
by a dance at 9:00 in the
Brock Lounge.
Card sharps
dealt out
in room deal
The card room is gone.
The card shark's haven, in
Brock's south basement, has
been turned into office space
to relieve overcrowding in
Brock extension.
The card room has become
two large offices with a smaller receptionist's room.
"I would like to see the AMS
committees in the extension
moved to the old card room
during the winter," said Ken
Leitch, co-ordinator of activities, "but anyone could end up
there."
Renovations were made because the card room was dark,
dank, dead space, said Leitch.
Lights and a wall to separate
the room from the men's washroom were installed.
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
ARNOLD'S
PAWNSHOP
986 Granville       MU 5-7517
Ukelele   $ 3.95 up
Banjo   $34.95
Guitars  $10.99 up
Trans. Tape Recorder $18.85
6 Trans. Radio   $10.99
Classic Guitar, from $34.95
Tunable Bongos $14.99
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS |
EVERY SUNDAY AT
St. Timothy
Lutheran Church
Pastor H. Fox, CA 8-8166
11:00 Worship
10:00 Bible Study
Hut L4 — East Mall
the attic
coffee house
Thum to Toes. Inclusive
JUBILATION  SINGERS
added attraction
Claire & Forbes
Hootenanney Sun. 8:30 p.m.
9:30. 10:45 12:18
3607 West Broadway
RE. 8-0410
Campus Canada
ready next week
Campus Canada, the bicultural national student magar-
zine, will be at UBC in time for French-Canada Week.
The   latest   edition  contains
a feature section on biculturalism and the problems of Quebec, including an article by
Quebec resources minister
Rene Levesque outlining
French-Canadian  demands.
It will be on sale next week
in Brock, the bookstore, in
front of the library, and at all
French Canada Week events.
Campus Canada is published
at UBC for the Canadian Union
of Students, formerly NFCUS.
Other articles, written by
students across Canada*are on
higher education, black magic
in   the    Caribbean,    and   the
RCMP campus investigations.
The 64-page magazine costs
35 cents.
UBC distribution manager
Frank Millerd said volunteers
are needed to man sales booths
in classroom buildings. Interested persons can contact Millerd in the Campus Canada or
the CUS office in Brock extension.
Scottish squashed
GLASGOW, Scotland (CUP)
—Two McGill university debaters have scored their fourth
consecutive victory in a debating tour of the United Kingdom.
Arts general meeting
set on SUB question
The Arts Undergraduate Society will hold a general
meeting next Thursday to discuss the proposed Student
Union Building.
Warnett Kennedy, Byron Hender and Cliff Bowering
will answer questions  about the $3.5  million building.
The meeting will start at noon in Buchanan 106.
PAUL KJRBY
731-4747
Campus Representative
for
McCuish
Formal Wear Ltd.
All   New   Garments
Complete Size  Range
Young Men's Made to
Measure  Suits
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 41 st 263-3610
*jc
A special message
TO THOSE
ENGINEERS
WHO WILL
GRADUATE
IN EITHER
1965 OR 1966
HAVE YOU DECIDED in which industry you wish to make your career?
DO YOU KNOW what opportunities are offered by the pulp and paper industry?
DON'T WAIT until you graduate to find out.
Columbia Cellulose Company, Limited offers you a planned programme that
enables you to put theory into practice. This is not just a summer job but an
OPPORTUNITY to learn while you earn. Columbia Cellulose operates two pulp
mills in British Columbia. Our dissolving grade pulp mill at Prince Rupert, produces
acetate viscose and specialty sulphite paper pulp for the manufacture of textiles,
plastics, chemicals and specialty papers. The other, a sulphate (kraft) mill at
Castlegar, is probably the most modern bleached kraft paper pulp mill in the world
today. Equipment such as a Flakt airborne drier, two Kamyr continuous digesters,
a two-stage chlorine dioxide bleaching plant, and other equipment of advanced
design, offers experience to engineering graduates obtainable in few other Canadian
pulp mills.
The Company is a medium-sized producer of forest products employing
about 2,200 persons. Capital investment in all divisions totals some $120 million.
Future progress will depend upon the successful development of a growing
team of people with technical and managerial skills in many fields. The Company
is continually expanding and is in an excellent position to take advantage of new
opportunities as they arise.
FOR INTERVIEWS: Graduating students wishing to discuss employment
will be interviewed on campus by senior company personnel on Nov. 13, 14 & 15th
^
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
t<> -' »^A.*>;**%jfc*j%*.i*^3it»,l»' Friday,  November   1,   1963
By council
Court was backed
out of existence
By TOM WAYMAN
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Council backed out of student court, last year. And now
council wants to revise the court back into existence.
The AMS Constitution's By-
B.C.'s best,
says Calgary
professor
B.C. has the best elementary
education system in Canada,
according to a Calgary professor.
Dr. J. E. Cheal, of the Department of Education at the
University of Alberta, Calgary, said B.C. has fewer
drop-outs and better trained
teachers.
Cheal, speaking at the recent Canadian Union of Students Seminar in Banff, said
B.C. has the highest per-pupil
expenditure of any  province.
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Law 11 states that the court
will be appointed "by majority vote of the last joint
meeting of the incoming and
outgoing Students' Council."
This year the non-existent
court has been called on by
council to deal with two matters: The frosh elections, and
the Homecoming game melee.
So AMS first vice-president
Jim Ward proposed, in the constitutional revisions to be submitted before the Nov. 14 general meeting, that the meeting
be permitted to appoint the
court.
Council decided to change
the wording of the revision to
allow a two-thirds majority in
council to appoint the judges,
instead of the general meeting.
PAUL GERIN-LAJOIE
. . constitutional expert
Petty thieves
hit Vic campus
VICTORIA (CUP) —A rash
of petty thievery has struck
Victoria College.
Books, purses, pens and
money are the main targets.
Essays,   theses   and   manuscripts typed at reasonable
rates. Experienced. 4732 W.
7th Ave. CA 4-7185.
Now on Sale • •
BIRD CALLS
'63
Available   Now   at   the   Following
Locations:
• BOOK STORE: ALL DAY
• COLLEGE SHOP: 11:30-2:30
• IN FRONT OF A.M.S. OFFICE - NOON HOUR
aoooooooooopooeooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
75c CASH SALE
OR PRE-SALE STUB
ecoooooocooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Buy Now — Limited Quantity Ordered
Gerin-Lajoie heads
French week speakers
Paul Gerin-Lajoie, Quebec
minister of youth, will kick off
French-Canada Week Monday
noon in the Auditorium.
He is minister-designate of
Education in the province and
a recognized constitutional expert.
At 3:30 in Brock Gerin-
Lajoie, along with newspaper
publisher Stuart Keats and
Ronald Montcalm, vice-president of the Canadian Union .of
Students, will participate in a
seminar.
Recently Gerin-Lajoie has
been stumping Quebec drumming up support for the controversial Bill 60, which will
give Quebec a department of
education for the first time.
French-Canada Week continues until Friday.
Book thieves
had novel taste
TORONTO (CUP)—Thieves
stole 170 books from a University of Toronto residence
library last week.
Said residence Dean C. S.
Lennox: "They didn't choose
very  well.
"All they took were novels."
Lutheran   Students
ALL   SAINTS    DAY
COMMUNION
Today  at   12:30   p.m.
Sminar Rm. 2202 BU. Ext.
Alma Mater Satiety
OFFICIAL NOTICES
GAMES ROOM SUPERVISOR
Applications for the position of Games Room Supervisor are being accepted by the Brock Management
Committee. Honorarium, approximately $1.25 per hour.
Information from Co-ordinator's Office, Brock Hall,
Applications must be submitted to same by Wed.,
Nov. 6th.
NOTE: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS 12:30,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 NOT OCTOBER 28 AS
PREVIOUSLY ADVERTISED.
BROCK HALL ART COMMITTEE
Information may be obtained from A.M.S. Secretary
Brock Hall.
CAMPUS CANADA
Requires a distribution manager. Information can
be obtained from Frank Millerd, WA 2-5624.
CHAIRMAN CONTINUING
COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION
Information can be obtained from George Boechler,
WA 2-4063.
HIGH SCHOOL CONFERENCE
CHAIRMAN
Information  may be obtained  from  A.M.S.  Secretary, Brock Hall.
Applications and Eligibilty forms for the above positions to be submitted to the A.M.S. Secretary, Box
74, Brock Hall, before 4:00 p.m, Monday, October 28,
1963.
SPECIAL COMMISSIONS
Application forms are available in the A.M.S. office
and must be returned to the A.M.S. office not later
than 5:00 p.m., Friday, November 1st, 1963.
Criteria for selection are: past experience in clubs,
committees, societies, etc., at U.B.C. and other uni-
verisities, incipient or continuing interest in and
concern with student government and finances, A
committee with a broad background is desired, the
commission will be selected by A.M.S. 1st vice-
president and treasurer, subject to ratification by
student council.
A brief elaboration of the issues involved will be
found in Tuesday's (Oct. 29th) Ubyssey. Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  1#  1963
Birds boss
needs win
By DAN
Frank Gnup wonders if he
team.
"We thought we had a better
football team than we've
shown so far," he said.
His UBC Thunderbird scarry a 4 and 3 record into this
Saturday's clash with the University of Alberta at Edmonton. The Golden Bears dumped the Birds 44-33 at UBC two
weeks  ago.
"You know," he rasped, "our
trouble this year has been recurrent mistakes. We haven't
had the gradual, game-to-game
improvement we looked  for."
He complained that players
seemed to make the same mistakes over and over.
"We gave Alberta four easy
touchdowns last time," he said.
This year's team hasn't been
SPORTS
EDITOR: Denis Stanley
Bi5s
on prowl
for Kats
By GEO. REAMSBOTTOM
The Kats are on the prowl
and UBC's Rugby Birds are
their prey.
Saturday at Wolfson field
the Kats attack the T-Birds in
their own nest. At stake is second place in the Miller Cup
Rugby Championship.
Rowing Club and Mleralo-
mas, tied for first place, are
playing each other and a win
for UBC would put them in a
second place tie with the loser
of this contest.
DEFENDING CHAMPIONS
The UBC fifteen are defen-
ing champoins of the Miller
Cup and with seven holdovers
from last year's team, Coach
Albert Laithwaite feels the
Birds have a fine chance of
retaining the Cup.
But he expressed concern
over the amount of injuries
which have plagued his players. In last Saturday's defeat
by the Rowing Club, John
Grange suffered a shoulder
separation and became the
fourth casualty  of the season.
He will miss several games
but Dave Ure, who also has
a shoulder injury, is expected
to be ready for Saturday's
game, providing strength in
the scrum.
Game time is 2:30.
MULLEN
has overestimated his football
able to come up with key
plays, Gnup continued.
"Always last year somebody
was there to make a big tackle
or knock down a pass. This
year we can't get those big individual efforts," he said.
But the Thunderbirds have
not folded their wings yet.
They still have a chance at a
share of the WCIAA championship. If they beat Alberta, the
Birds will move into a tie with
the Bears for the conference
lead.
Worthy of note are last
year's UBC-UA tilts. The first
saw the Bears romp to a 30-0
victory. One week later the T-
Birds recorded a 23-19 upset
over the Edmonton club to
merit a spot as co-champions
of the WCIAA.
And hope springs eternal behind Frank Gnup's cigar. He
believes that the Birds can run
on Alberta; and the Thunderbird passing attack will be
changed to exploit Alberta's
tactic of rushing nine men
against a passer.
"If they keep up the big
rush, we'll go to our short
passes," Gnup explained.
"Alberta has a good, veteran
team," he said on his w a y to
practice. "But there's no reason why we shouldn't be able
to beat them."
As he walked down the hallway outside his office, a T-
Bird player approached him,
limping slightly.
"How's the leg?" Gnup asked him.
"It's fine," said the player.
"I'll be ready. Coach, we gotta
beat those guys by about two
touchdowns."
"Well," began Gnup, "we
ought to be getting a good ball
game pretty soon ..."
Wrestling
loses first
YMCA defeated the UBC
Wrestling Team in their opening meet for the year.
The well-conditioned YMCA
team won six out of eight
matches.
UBC gained points when
Bruce Green pinned YMCA's
Art Casperson; Mike McCon-
nell pulled a draw with Ghur-
mal Thandi, and Cann Chris-
tensen pinned Gurdeu Singh.
UBC also gained five points
when YMCA defaulted in the
130 pound class.
UBC wrestlers Paul Howes,
Bob Peterson, Roland Chapman, Mauri Hjelt, Gunnar
Gansen lost their bouts to the
YMCA team.
3>Jumclv panada, (xJsuJl
November 4th - 8th
On Monday hear the Honourable P. Gerin-Lajoie,
Minister of Youth for Quebec
Keynote Address
Time: 12:30
Place: Auditorium
ROY SHATZKO
... good both ways
Shatzko
Stampeder
camp entry
Roy Shatzko, starting offensive tackle for the Birds,
is in his fourth season under
Frank Gnup, who says, "I
wish we could use him both
ways."
Shatzko, 6-3 and 225, is a
native of Vancouver. He attended King Edward High
School, where he was a
member of three championship football teams.
Roy next joined the Vancouver Blue Bombers.
CALGARY CAMP
From the junior ranks he
entered UBC and has been a
standout performer for the
Thunderbirds.
Roy is in the Faculty of
Pharmacy. His plans include
a career in professional
football. He has a good start
in this direction, as he was
invited to the Calgary Stam-
peders' training camp last
summer.
Students  fined
TORONTO CUP)—Two McGill university students were
fined a total of $45 by student
council for rowdy behavior at
a football game.
COZY COTTAGE
Set in trees. 6077 Holland St.
W. of Dunbar, S. of Marine;
big L.R., 1 lge. & 1 small
bdrm., kitchen & utility rm.,
down, lge. semi-fin. bdrm up
Woodsy country atmosphere.
Call next door or AM 6-8903
right away. $12,500.
ORDER YOUR
MONOGRAMMED
UMBRELLA NOW *
$2.66
regular $5.95
* 10-day delivery
HOME
SERVICE
Allison & Dalhousie
Phone: CA 4-3939
Nats to Manitoba
without two stars
Canada's national hockey team will be without the services of two of their top men when they meet the Flin Flon
Manitoba All Stars this weekend.
Forward Gary Dineen and
goal keeper Ken Broderick will
remain behind to study for
Monday examinations.
Other regulars not making
the trip will be Marshall
Johnston, who is out with a
broken thumb, Don Rogers
and former UBC Thunderbird
Mickey McDowell.
Altenate goal-keeper Rick
Borabelt will make the trip
with the Nationals. In his last
game he allowed only two
goals as the Nationals defeated
the Edmonton Oil Kings 4-2 in
Victoria.
During Homecoming weekend action Dineen racked up
six points, three goals and
three assists in two games
against the Oil Kings.
MARSHALL JOHNSON
. . . broken wrist
BRAND    NEW
04 Volkswagen
FULLY EQUIPPED INCLUDING
Heater, defroster, turn signal, windshield washer, 4-
speed syncro - floor shift transmission, outside rearview
mirror, bucket seats,  tool kit  and  other  accessories.
Full  Price  $1 780
SPECIAL STUDENT PURCHASE PLAN
$59 Down-$59 perMth.
CAMPUS
RBmmA™ Contact
Dave Nelson
On Campus Or
at 298-4131
MU 5-5947 (res.)
HE WILL, ARRANGE
A DEMONSTRATION
OR, ANSWER ANY
QUESTIONS YOU MAY
_____ HAVE!
Dave Nelson
USED VOLKSWAGENS TOO
Dave has a Complete List of
Used Volkswagons and other makes
298-4131
(RES.) MU 5-5947 Friday,  November  1,   1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Running champs
to cross country
UBC's Cross Country team travels to Calgary this weekend to defend their WCIAA Championship.
" Coach Dr. Peter Mullins will
Mail order
swim meet
UBC's women's Swim Team
will be competing in the Annual Canadian Intercollegiate
Telegraphic Swim Meet at
Percy Norman pool this weekend.
Over 20 Canadian colleges
will be competing in their own
cities and the results will be
mailed back to Vancouver
where they will be tabulated
and the winners announced.
Last year's meet saw UBC
walk away with first place
with 50 points more than their
closest competitors, McGill
and Western Ontario.
Members of the UBC team
are Bonnie Bertram, Janie
Wheaton, Penny Jones, Judy
Jennings and Susan Elliott.
SPORT
SHORTS
JAYVEES
The UBC Junior Varsity
dropped a close game to t h e
Seattle Cavaliers 15-14 Sunday
at UBC Stadium. The baby
Birds play their last scheduled
game this Saturday at 2 p.m.
in the Stadium against the
same Cavalier club.
take his field of seven UBC
runners to defend the Dr. P.
S. Warren trophy.
Winning this year could
mean that the team will travel
to Guelph, Ontario Agricultural College, for the Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union
Championship, November 23.
Runners from UBC will be
Rod Constable, Mai McGawn,
John Prior, Jim McKay,
George Murguly, Bob Tapping
and Pat Shipton.
CIAU rules state that five
members of the winning team,
plus the individual winner, if
he is not on the winning team,
will compete in the national
finals.
Sailing team wins
Northwest meet
UBC's sailing team retained
their top spot in the Northwest
by defeating all competitors in
a University of Washington
sponsored racing regatta in
Seattle last week.
Skippers for UBC were
Colin Park, Alex Foley, Barry
Clark and Doug Helmer. Two
members of the Women's Sailing team sailed as crew.
BARB ROBERTSON
... 12 points
Thunderettes
win opener
UBC's Senior Women's
Thunderette basketball team
opened their season with a decisive 54-5 victory over the
Telephone Bells Wednesday
night.
High scorers for the UBC
team were Barb Robertson
with 12 points and Diane Bond
with 11.
The Telephone Bells are new
to the Senior Women's Basketball league.
UBC Thunderettes placed
second to the French Maids
last season.
Flag burned
OTTAWA (CUP)—Carleton
university students burned a
French fleur-de-lis flag and
tore down a goal post at a
football game last week.
fyn'sinnrsTi'irrrerirbirinnnnnr^
OMI^SS miBXKJL^M?
Wi
with h timm apkj
There is vigorous color in the shirtings
employed by the proprietor in his button-down and tab-collared shirts.
Attention is called to banana oxford
cloth, and maroon and white broad
stripings. Both belong in the balanced
shirt wardrobe, along with white.
$5.00 to $8.95
.;
I
THE GAY BLADE
SHOP
FOR YOUNG MEN       J-^i
545  GRANVILLE  STREET      MU   1-9831
Golf match met
on Island swing
A band of intrepid travellers from UBC pressed on, to
defeat  in two golf matches played  over the. weekend in
Victoria.
Playing at the Gorge Vale
club Saturday the team lost
by four points. Ian Muter was
low man with 75 followed by
Jim Stevens with 77.
Bunched together at 80 over
the par 74 course were Graham Zelmer, Wayne Vollmer,
Jim Seed, Don Cannon, John
Kavalec, and Rusty Goepel.
Sunday's match at the Oak
Bay club was lost by three
points but the golf was a better brand despite the howling
gale which played havoc with
shots all day.
Cannon with 74 was low
man followed closely by Milter
at 75, Kavalec with 76, Vollmer 78. Stevens, Seed, Zelmer,
and Goepel finished a t80.
The college boys have two
more  matches left  this  term.
presents
tonight and Saturday
the
Don Thompson
Quartet
featuring
Claire    Lawrence—alto
Terry   Clarke—drums
Bob  Witmer—bass
Don Thompson—piano
Sunday—TOM BAIRD TRIO
GRADUATE    INTERVIEWS
Friday, November 1st and week of November 4th
Socony Mobil Oil of Canada — Nov. 1, 4, and 5
Continuing Employment.   (Permanent)    —   Hons.
Geol.   and   Geol.   Engr.   for   Geol.   Dept.:   Phys.,
Geophys.,   Elect.   Engr.   for   Prod.   Engr.   Dept.;
B.Comm.   (Finance  or   Econ.)   for   Land   Dept.
B.Comm. (any option) for Controller Dept.
Simpsons-Sears — Nov. 4 and 5
Grads., Arts and  Commerce interested  in  retail
merchandising career.
B.C. Tetephone — Nov. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Grads., Electrical Engr.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. — Nov. 5, 6, 7, 8
Grads., Hons. Chemistry and Geol.
C.P.R. (Telecommunications) Nov. 6
Grads., Electrical and Civil Engrs.
Dom Chemical — Nov. 5, 6, 7
Grads., only. Chem. Engrs. Hons. and Post Grads.
Chemistry.
Atlas Steel Ltd. — Nov. 6, 7, 8, 9
Permanent and Summer. For Production — Metallurgy, Mech. and Elect. Engr. and B.Comm. (any
option). For Finance, Admin, and Marketing —
B.Comm. B.A. (Econ.) and Applied Science.
WEEK OF NOVEMBER 4th
California Standard — Nov. 7, 8, and 9
Permanent   and    Summer.    Hons. • Geol.,   Math.,
Physics; Post Grad. Geol. and Geophyisics. Chem.
Civil, Geological and Min. Engr.
3-M Co. (Minnesota) Mining & Manufacturing —
Nov. 7 and 8
Grads., B,A. and B.Comm. for sales training; Grad.
Engineers — Mech., Chem., Elect.
WEEK OF NOVEMBER 12th
Appointment made starting Friady, November 1st
Polymer — Nov. 12 and 13
Requirements not yet known.
Bank of Montreal — Nov. 12, 14, 19, and 21
Grads., B.A., B.Comm. for bank training programme.
(Male).
Arthur D. Little — Nov. 12 and 13
Masters and Ph.D candidates in organic and inorganic Chemistry, Physics, Physical Chemistry and
Engineering.
Columbia Cellulose Ltd. — Nov. 12, 13, 14, 15, and 18
Requirements not yet known.
Colgate Palmolive — Nov. 12 and 13
Grads., Chem. and Mech. Engineering, B.A. and
B.Comm.
East Asiatic Co. — Nov. 13
B.Comm. (forestry) and B.S.F. Major in business.
C.N.R. — Nov. 13, 14, and 15
Grads.; Mech., Elect., Civil Engr., Hons in Econ.,
Math.  General Program  in Econ.   and  Statistics.
B.Comm — Marketing, Transportation, Economics,
Finance.
American Hospital Supply — Nov. 15
Any degree grad. for non-technical management
and sales program. Preferably B.Sc. with Chem.
and Biology background.
Trane — Nov. 15
Requirements not yet known. Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  1,  1963
'tween classes
Here's Watt
-from Oakalla
Deputy-warden Watt from Oakalla Prison will speak to
the regular meeting of the Pre-Social Work Club on public
apathy toward penal institutions.
V *P Tf*
DANCE CLUB
The Black Mask Costume
Ball will take place tonight in
Dance Club lounge, 8:30 p.m.
Admission 50 cents per couple,
25 cents stag.
*r        *r        *fr
NEWMAN  CENTRE
"Hardtime Hussle" Saturday
8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. in Hut G4
across from Brock Extension.
Admission is 2 for 98 cents.
Dress is hardtime.
*r        •*•        *r
BOOSTER CLUB
There will foe a general meeting, Monday noon in Bu. 205.
v     v     v
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Two films: "Le Sabotier du
Val de Liure" (directed by
Jacques Demy) and "La Mer et
les Jours", noon today Bu. 205.
•*•        v        V
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
Lecture and display on the
Physical Plan, and Planning
Education in Ghana: La 205,
Monday 8 p.m. Display continues until Friday, Nov. 9.
V V        •!•
NEW  DEMOCRATS
Propaganda films scheduled
for Monday noon in the Auditorium are postponed until
Tuesday noon. Admission: 25
cents.
V *r       V
RIDING   CLUB
Important meeting and film,
Monday noon in Bu. 204.
v     v     v
INTERMURAL MANAGERS
Meeting in Room 213, Memorial Gym  Monday noon.
•T* •¥• *t*
DESERET CLUB
Deseret Club Institute Meeting, Sunday, 7:30 p.m. at 308
West 41st.
•if* •*• v
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
W. Nicholls (Dept. of Religious Studies) will speak on
"The Origin of the Ministry"
Monday noon, Bu. 104.
•n      *r      •*•
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
First film, the National Film
Board production "Breakdown" noon today, Bu. 100.
•J* ^P Tt*
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting noon today,
Bu. 220, to discuss Victoria
trip and B.C. Student Federation.
^fi «p «J»
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER
MUSIC
Fifty-cent tickets for Amad-
eus Quartet (Queen Elizabeth
Playhouse, 8:30 p.m., Saturday,
Nov. 9) available at AMS office.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Film, "Art of the Sword-
smith," today noon, Bu. 204.
Admission for non-members is
10 cents.
V        •!•        V
PHRATERES
Phrateres all-phi meeting today noon, Bu. 102.
•T* •!• •*•
VCF
The Rev. Cal Chambers of
First Presbyterian Church,
New Westminster, speaks on
"Christianity and Its Implications," today, noon, Bu. 106.
JUDO CLUB
Tournament on Saturday:
preliminaries at 2 p.m., finals
and Black Belt at 7 p.m. It
will be held at Memorial Gym,
student admission is 50 cents.
V v *r
COMMERCE-LAW SOC
Mr. Nichols, BCom, LLB,
will speak Monday in Bu.
2239.
•t* V V
PLAYERS' CLUB
Important general meeting
today noon in Green Room.
Executive elections. All members please attend.
*fr *fr V
BIOLOGY CLUB
Dr. D. Suzuki will speak on
"Chromosome Mechanics and
Man," Bi. 2321, today noon.
Bubble bath
BERKELEY, Calif. (CUP)—
A fountain at the University
of California burst into a billow of pink bubbles last week.
No explanation was given.
FB.OSH  NOTICE:
WtANTED: Frosh to support
intramural sports. 'A.U interested men and womn sign list
in Frosh office, Room 157 of
th basement in Brock Extension.
IOOO'b   of
Dial 730
dollars
free!
given   away
- CKLG — your
information
university
tion for details
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs — Inspections
BA Service Stn.
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
CA 4-7644
YOUR PORTRAIT
1983
A Keen Memory
1963
Exciting
2003 A.D.
Family Treasure
oivth* avwum
4331 W«* 10th Avenue
McAllister
CA 4-5340
S. WAH LEUNG
... at grad centre
Dental head
speaks tonight
Dr. Wah Leung, dean of the
new faculty of dentistry, will
address prospective dentists at
a dinner tonight.
Eight other dentists will attend the dinner at 7:15 p.m. in
the Graduate Student Centre.
All students interested in
dentistry are invited. Admission is free.
Students fare well
on Algeria  journey
Forty Canadian university students will go to Algeria
next summer for $250 each.
Actual cost per student is
$1,000. The UBC administration is payin gthe difference.
The students will be delegates to the World University
Service fifteenth International
Seminar in Algeria.
To be selected you must be
in good health, third year or
above, have a second class
average, and speak fluent
French.
Theme of the seminar will
be Education and Development
in Algeria.
Orientation sessions in Montreal will begin in June.
Delegates will be back for
fall  registration.
Application forms are available in International House,
and must be submitted by Nov.
27.
A selection board meets Nov.
30 to interview applicants.
Seminar to probe
African democracy
Democracy in Africa will
be the theme of the United
Nations Club Fall Seminar.
Keynote speaker will be
Dean Perry of the Faculty
of Commerce. The Seminar,
entitled "Africa: Prospects
for Democracy," will be held
Sunday, Nov. 3, at International House.
SUZTDAY   SBTJTTXiE   SERVICE
Worship   at   Christ,   Dunbar,   &
Redeemer  Lutheran  churches.
Cars   pick  up  and  return
♦Port  Camp  sign:   10:10  ajn.
♦Common Block:  10:17 a.m.
* Acadia east  gate:  10:25
♦Lutheran Student Centre: 1032
4608  W.   10th  Ave
INCORPORATED  2W   MAY   l«TO.
Canjia at Ciamih 0>a« 0*»y *-S:M  FfMaf 9-*       FkoM   MU 1 Mil
S?>,
I went completely, utterly mad
in the new collegienne shop!
What a way to go! It starts as soon as you set foot in The Bay's
newest third floor shop. As you whirl from flamboyant sweaters to
gorgeous fur fakes, from sportsy suedes to sophisticated date
dresses, you feel this heavenly madness coming on. You'll want
one of everything from jewellery to a knit coat, from knee socks to
turtle neck shells. Give in to it soon . . . prices are so reasonable
for college or career budgets, in the just-opened Collegienne Shop.

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