UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 13, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128548.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128548.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128548-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128548-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128548-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128548-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128548-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128548-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128548-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128548.ris

Full Text

  // Page 2
MR
EVENTS
THURSDAY'13
BAR
talk
▼ BARTALK#13
6:00 - 7:30 P.M. @ THE GALLERY LOUNGE
The AMS is hosting a panel discussion about UBC's proposed fee increases. Featuring speakers like MLA David Eby, learn about the proposals in an
informal environment. Admission by donation. 19+
THURSDAY s13
UBYSSEY PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
5:30-6:30P.M. ©UBYSSEYOFFICESUB24
The Ubyssey's photo editor is hosting a free workshop in our office. Learn
how to take better photos in a variety of situations, from sports to portraits,
and how to use manual settings so you aren't just pointing and clicking. Free
SATURDAY ' 15
NO P/INTS DANCE
NO PANTS DANCE
9:00 P.M. -1:00 A.M. @ BUCHANAN D-140
200BPM is hosting an all-ages "no pants dance" and pillowfight. The pants-
less dress code is strictly enforced, but acceptable attire ranges from boxer
shorts, to kilts, to skirts, to onesies. Tickets$10, pants check$2
ON
THE
COVER
A tour ofthe new SUB revealed
how far from completion it really
is. Photo - Micki Cowan
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*v
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
OCTOBER13,2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXII
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Matalie Scadden. a Pentland,
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss ey.cs
Design Editor
:opy@ubyssey.cs
Distribution Coordinator
Soren Elsay Olamide Olaniyan,
_awrenceNeal Garcia,Taric
Vira, Kelley Lin, Jenny Tang,
_eoSoh, Mateo Ospina, Li
fpe reira@ubyssey.es
Ad Sales
Business Office: SUB 23
ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
Nick Adams
Lily Cai
Geoff Lister
NouiRiEs604.S22.668l
pri nted i tor@ ubys sey.cs
cai@ubyssey.cs
Zhang, Brock Newman, Koby
Michaels, Jasmine Chenc
a dve rti s i ng @ uby ssey .cs
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Illustrator
Accounts
613S SUB Boulevard
Peter Siemens
Julian Yu
Thea Simpson
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
web@ubyssey.cs
julianyu@ubyssey.cs
a ccou nts@ u byss ey.es
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Twitter: ©ubyssey
JovanaVranic +
Veronika Bondarenko
LEGAL
news@ubyssey.cs
The Ubyssey is the officia
cannot te reproduced without
and clarity. All letters must be
student newspaper of theUniver-
the expressed, written permis
•eceived by 12 neon the day be
Culture Editor
5ity of British Columbia. It is pub-
sion of The Ubyssey Publica
fore intended publication. Let
Jenica Montgomery
iEhecl every Morday and Thurs
tions Society
ters received after this point
culture@ubyssey.cs
day by The U by ssey Publications
The Ubyssey is a rounding
Jill be published in the follow
Scciety. Weaiean autonomous
member of Canadi;
ing issueunlessthereisan ur
Sports* Rec Editor
derrociaticallyrun student crga-
ty Press(CUP)andadherestc
gent time restriction or other
JackHauen
nization.andallstudentsaieen-
CUFsguiding principles
matter deemed relevant by
sports@ubyssey.es
oou raged to participate
_etters to the editor must
the Ubyssey staff.
Editorials are chosen anc
oe under 300 words. Please
t isagreed byall persons
Video Producer
iwitten by theUbysse/staff They
nclude your phone number.
■lacing display or classified ad-
Timothy Hoggan
areth -   ■■    -
ertisirgthatiftheUbysseyPub-
video@ubyssey.cs
staff;--        ■ :■-:-   -v     -
:at ions Society fails to publish
fleet the views of 1 he Ubyssey
vvell as your year and faculty
anadvertisernentorifanerrorin
Photo Editor
Publications Scciety or the Uni
with all submissions. ID will be
the ad cccurs the liability ofthe
Cherihan Hassun
versity of British Columbia. AI
checked when submissions are
JPS wil not tegreater than the
photo® ubyssey.c;
Editorial content appearing ir
drepped effatt heed iter el effice
orice paid for the ad. The UPS
The Ubyssey is the property of
of The Ubyssey otherwise ver-
shall rot te responsible for slight
Opinions + Blog Editor
The U b/ssey Bu b cation sSccety
fication will be done by phone
changes or ty peg ra phica 1 er rors
Stories, opinions, photographs
The Ubyssey reservesthe right
that do not lessen the value or
and artwork contained hereir
to edit submissions for length
the impact of the ad.
:@ubyssey.ca
OUR CAMPUS //
UBC held its annual Remembrance Day ceremony on Tuesday, November 11.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
UBC's Remembrance Day ceremony was solemn and stirring
Austen Erhardt
Opinions & Blog Editor
UBC hosted approximately 1,000
people at its Remembrance Day
ceremony at the War Memorial
Gym on Tuesday.
The ceremony featured speakers
from both UBC and the community, and was attended by an honour
guard from local Canadian Forces
detachments and the RCMP.
University Marshal and music
professor Nancy Hermiston served
as master of ceremonies, and led
the attendees in the singing of
"God Save the Queen," as well as
other songs and hymns.
Tomorrow we may
remove our poppies
and our wreaths, but
let us never remove
our commitment to
those who served
and those who died
in our service. Let
each day of peace and
freedom feed todays
flame honouring their
remembrance."
Joyce Murray
Member of Parliament for
Vancouver Quadra
The sounding ofthe Last Post
served as a mournful yet proud
salute to the fallen, heralding the
beginning ofthe two minutes of
silence. Attendees were brought
to attention by the Reveille that followed, the rousing sound that signalled the start of a new day during
the wars — and for the purposes
ofthe ceremony, signalling new
life and a new world. The silence
brought as many people to tears as
any words that were spoken.
Wreaths were placed by many
UBC, Vancouver and military-related organizations, the announcements ofthe names ofthe
representatives accompanied by a
bagpipes performance.
Member of Parliament Joyce
Murray spoke on behalf ofthe
federal government, highlighting
the sacrifices made by veterans
of Canada's war and the ongoing
unity ofthe country.
We don't have a
blanketing ceremony
in the traditions that
I come from, and I
wish we did because
it was very powerful.
But I've been in many
ceremonies like this,
and I think for many
of us here today, this
is our blanketing
ceremony for people
who put themselves at
risk every day for us."
David Eby
Lawyer and Member ofthe
Legislative Assembly of British
Columbia
"Tomorrow we may remove our
poppies and our wreaths, but let us
never remove our commitment to
those who served and those who
died in our service. Let each day
of peace and freedom feed today's
flame honouring their remembrance," she said.
MLA David Eby referenced
the National Aboriginal Veterans
Day event that he attended last
week, and spoke ofthe traditional
blanketing ceremony that he witnessed, in which aboriginal women
encompass people in blankets to
symbolize their desire to protect
them from harm.
"We don't have a blanketing
ceremony in the traditions that
I come from, and I wish we did
because it was very powerful. But
I've been in many ceremonies like
this, and I think for many of us
here today, this is our blanketing
ceremony for people who put
themselves at risk every day for
us," Eby said.
UBC VP Communications and
Community Partnership, Pascal
Spothelfer, discussed some of
the impact that the wars ofthe
20th century had on UBC and its
students, comparing the deaths
suffered by the university to a
modern equivalent.
"About 20 per cent ofthe
average male population of UBC
through World War I would get
killed.... The amount of sacrifice
this represents is staggering when
we translate these percentages to
the current student population.
Twenty-two thousand students
would go to war, and 4,400 would
not come back. It is very hard
to imagine the impact that the
war would have had on the UBC
community back in 1915 and in the
following years."
Former UBC Nursing lecturer
Linda Quiney highlighted the role
of women in the wars, particularly
in regard to providing nursing care
overseas, and the trials that they
faced in treating the wounds inflicted by this new type of warfare.
The solemnity ofthe event was
punctuated by a vocal performance of World War-era songs, such
as "It's a long way to Tipperary"
and "We'll Meet Again," by four
UBC tenors. Though the lively
music was juxtaposed with the
mournful bagpipes and brass and
the gravity ofthe event, it served
as a reminder that those who we
had gathered to remember had,
too, enjoyed these songs. They
fought for the smiles that the
cheerful music brought to the faces
ofthe children at the ceremony.
AMS President Tanner Bokor
read aloud John McCrae's poem,
"In Flanders Fields," a moving
piece that has become both an
iconic example of Canadian literature, and one ofthe most defining literary works that emerged
from the First World War.
Hermiston closed the ceremony with lines from World
War I poem, "For The Fallen,"
which was followed by the singing of "O Canada."
"They shall not grow old as
we who are left grow old. Age
shall not weary them, nor the
years condemn. At the going
down of the sun and in the
morning, we will remember
them." Xi
CORRECTION: The article "UBC professor hopes to bring more aboriginal language study to UBC"
published in our October 30 issue implied Mark Turin is working to create new partnerships with the
Musqueam community. In fact, his work is actually part of a 17-year partnership between the Musqueam
community and the First Nations Languages Program. The Ubyssey regrets the error. EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
URSDAY, NC
// News
FEES»
Third UBC Town Hall met with dissatisfaction from students
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The third public consultation on
the proposed tuition and residence fee increases took place at
the Norm Theatre on Wednesday,
November 5.
To start, Managing Director of
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services Andrew Parr, Vice Provost and Associate VP Enrolment
and Academic Facilities Angela
Redish and VP Students Louise
Cowin went over a presentation
on the increases that was shown
at the two previous Town Halls,
with added slides that broke
down the ways that the increased
fees will be spent.
Redish said that, along with increasing financial aid options and
on-campus services for students,
a large part ofthe money gained
from the increase in residence fees
will allow the university to expand
its current housing services and
build more residence options in
the upcoming years.
"The proposed plan is to grow an
additional 2,250 beds in the period
from 2017 to 2020," said Redish. "So
if we advance, in two years' time
we'll have 1,500 beds in place. If
we advance, six years from now we
will have a further 2,250 beds that
are planned. So this is what we are
talking about in terms of growth."
After the presentation, students
came up to the microphone to ask
questions and voice their concerns
about the proposed increases.
Several students expressed disappointment about the fact that
the first Town Hall had not been
publicized via broadcast email and
that the second Town Hall was
held on Halloween. Students also
brought up the issues of affordability of living on campus and
attracting a diverse group of students, saying that even if additional residences will get built, their
UBC's third Town Hall meeting was held on Wednesday, November 5.
=HOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBT
prices will still not be accessible
for the majority of students.
One ofthe audience members
also asked whether UBC had considered building in places such as
Pacific Spirit Park or further east
rather than on campus.
Parr said that as UBC does not
need to pay for the land that has
been set aside for the university,
buying land elsewhere to build
more residences is not an option.
"Those capital costs that I
showed don't include the cost of
the land. We own that land," said
Parr. "If we build elsewhere, we
have to buy that land and build
on that and that would actually
increase cost of development and,
I hate to say it, it would increase
the cost of rents too."
Another student from the audience asked whether it was problematic to state that UBC owns its land
when it is claimed as the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory
ofthe Musqueam people. Students
snapped their fingers to express
solidarity with the commenter.
Parr later apologized for his
comment about owning the
land. Cowin also clarified that
the land that UBC stands on has
been set aside for educational
purposes in agreement with the
Musqueam people.
"We are visitors on the unceded land ofthe Musqueam
people and, as such, the university is occupying that land for an
educative vision and purpose and
in agreement at this time with the
Musqueam people," said Cowin.
A student also asked whether
the university had explored all
possible options before choosing to increase tuition. Cowin
confirmed that these increases
were a last resort considering the
difficult financial times and cuts
by the provincial government.
"Budget information went
out yesterday to deans and VPs
requesting that there be cost
containment from the central
unions of $7.5 million just to get
us to close the year in balance,"
said Cowin. "There are very
real pressures that we're feeling
and it's the case that we have
looked left and right and round
the corners and under the rocks
to see if there's ways in which
we could realize these benefits
for students without it being a
direct charge to them, but given
budgetary times, given the province's choices in terms of the way
in which they direct our rules,
this is the reality."
Student consultation on the
proposed increases will remain
open until November 21. Cowin
also said that another Town Hall
on these increases may be held
before then. Xi
NEWS BRIEFS
AMS agrees on strategy to
tackle fee increases
At the last AMS council meeting,
a series of motions were passed
responding to the proposed tuition
and housing fee increases.
Council approved a strategy
document, created working groups
and directed the University and
External Relations Committee
(UNECORN) to create a policy to
advocate to the provincial government for student tenants' rights and
increased post-secondary funding.
$2,700 was also allocated to
be spent on supporting student
protest groups. Council ruled that
the Student Administrative Commission will be working to provide
these groups with meeting spaces
and any necessary materials.
AMS business update
Last AMS Council meeting, a report was presented on the society's
business operations. According to
the report, revenue last year was
higher than expected, likely due to
construction delays in the old and
new SUBs.
Now that construction is underway in both buildings, the AMS expects less traffic to its businesses.
The society expects renovations
in the old SUB to set back their
2014/2015 business revenue, as
many students may stop visiting
the building until the AMS Student Nest businesses open. Xi
RESEARCH»
Mind wandering off in class? Daydreaming is good for you, says UBC psychology professor
UBC neuroscientist Kalina Christoff says that
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
Daydreaming is often perceived as
a waste of time or as a nonproductive experience ofthe lazy mind,
but recent research has shown that
it can actually be good for you.
Kalina Christoff, a cognitive
neuroscientist who has taught at
UBC for 10 years, said that daydreaming or "mind-wandering"
can lead to a more creative and
insightful mind. She was first
intrigued by the idea during her
undergraduate years in Bulgaria,
when she was overseeing an experiment that required partici-
PHOTOCOFTONWITOFFICKR
the mind is more active during "mind-wandering" than problem-solving.
pants to "think aloud" to solve a
problem, and she witnessed how
their thoughts would drift from
one thing to another.
According to Christoff, the brain
is more active during "mind-wandering" than it is when trying to
reason out a complex problem.
"What's interesting is that
during mind-wandering, both the
part ofthe brain involved with
deliberate problem-solving [the
pre-frontal cortex] and the part
that is only triggered during rest,
are activated," said Christoff. "The
only other time this occurs is when
people are thinking creatively."
Christoff said that one ofthe
ways that "mind-wandering" has
been studied so far in psychology
is by giving someone an easy,
mundane task and then waiting
to see how their mind wanders
away from the task. She called
this "task-unrelated thinking."
Although such "mind-wandering" might delay a physical task
from being done, Christoff said
that it can still be linked to some
grander life task such as survival
or fulfilment.
"If you're stuck in a job you
don't like, and you're given the
task of completing an Excel
spreadsheet for example, your
mind might keep wandering and
it has nothing to do with the task
at hand, but it's actually related to
your global task to make yourself
happy," said Christoff.
According to Christoff, what
happens during "mind-wandering" is quite related to what
happens during sleep. During
sleep, the brain organizes our
experiences and memories into
meaningful connections and
helps you arrive at new conclusions and remember things.
During "mind-wandering" you
are not asleep, but your brain still
builds connections that you would
otherwise not make. The random
nature ofthe thoughts allows us
to make revelations and develop
certain insights that we typically
would not if we were thinking in a
more deliberate fashion.
So why does our mind wander? Christoff said that it is an
adaptive tendency, in that it
allows us to be fluid and process
different experiences so that we
are not stagnant. The self-reflective properties help us make
meaning and better understand
both specific tasks and our
lives overall.
"[Mind-wandering] allows us
to map our own space of experiences and get to know our internal environment," she said. "We
are better able to understand
ourselves and the causal nature
of the world because we can see
the bigger picture." Xi NEWS    I   THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014
AMS»
New SUB opening pushed back again until end of Term 2
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The opening ofthe new SUB has
once again been pushed back,
this time until the beginning of
April 2015.
At a Council meeting on November 5, VP Admin Ava Nasiri announced that the AMS will receive
the keys to the new SUB in March,
after which they will begin the
transition and moving process that
is required before the building can
be officially opened for students at
the beginning of April.
This delay is the third that
has taken place since the official
opening date had been slated for
September 2014. After that, the
opening date ofthe new SUB has
been moved to Jan. 5, then to Feb.
23 and now to the end of Term 2.
According to Nasiri, the setbacks
are caused by delays in the construction process, including problems
with the fins, or slatted wood panels, around the performance space
in the centre of the building.
"The fins presented some
challenges in terms of practical
materialization and structure," said
Nasiri in an email. "These challenges in addition to the overall complexity of our very unique building
caused the delays in general."
Nasiri also said that the AMS
had foreseen that construction
would possibly go on for longer than
planned when it announced the
February opening date, but still said
that they would be able to open.
"The opening date has been
realistically set as early April,"
said Nasiri. "We were optimistic
for an earlier date but the major
asterisk that came with the February date was to allow the construction and consulting teams to
sit down for a sufficient amount
of time and revise the schedule to
something realistic."
As the unveiling has been
shifted so close to the end of
term, the details surrounding the
opening celebrations remain up
in the air.
"The programming around
opening and the first day back is
being planned with flexibility as a
priority," said Nasiri.
"We will be sure to have a celebration to commemorate the opening of such an incredible space
for students, but are conscious of
the need for flexibility given the
nature ofthe project." tJ
PHOTO MICKICOWAN/THE UBYSSEY
The AMS Student Nest is slated to open at the beginning of April 2015.
ELECTIONS »
Political science prof Max Cameron talks voter turnout
UBC prof Max Cameron is hoping to see more students cast a ballot in the municipal elections.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Kelley Lin
Senior Staff Writer
As municipal elections approach,
UBC political science professor
Max Cameron hopes to see more
people, including students, take
to the polls.
In 2011, the voter turnout in
Vancouver's municipal elections
was 34.57 per cent, which is significantly lower than 50.55 per
cent in Toronto in 2010.
When asked about the low
voter participation, Cameron,
also director ofthe Centre for the
Study of Democratic Institutions
(CSDI), said it might be because
the city of Vancouver is fairly
stable in terms of governance,
compared to cities such as Toronto and Montreal.
"For the most part, people are
relatively satisfied with our municipal government and I think
we're well served in Vancouver and throughout the Lower
Mainland," he said. "Where
people get frustrated with local
governments is often around very
particular issues that affect them
directly."
At the same time, Cameron
said that incumbent Vision
Vancouver's standing in the local
government is not as stable as
voters may think.
Cameron also said that by not
voting, people lose the chance to
voice their opinions on issues like
local transportation, sustainability and education. Municipal
elections provide the opportunity to learn about each candidate
and what they stand for to make
an informed decision on who
to support.
"Voting is one ofthe minimal
acts of citizenship. It doesn't
require a lot of time, [but] it does
require becoming familiar with
the issues and candidates," said
Cameron. "If you don't vote, you
deny yourself the opportunity to
become schooled in democracy
and to participate in a collective
decision that is going to have an
impact on our lives and the lives
ofthe future generation."
According to Cameron, people
are more likely to vote on issues
that touch them personally, such
as the concentration of high
building complexes downtown
or the placement of homeless
shelters in various Vancouver
neighbourhoods.
The uncertainty and risk
are what mobilize citizens to
practice voting, but without
it, engagement and awareness
are difficult to achieve when
people may not be familiar with
specific campaigns.
"One ofthe ways we build
collective citizenship is through
voter participation and a university does help provide people
with the skills and know-how to
be both effective as citizens and
leaders," he said.
On-campus voting locations
will be open at University Hill
Secondary School and Carey
Hall. Many more voting booths
across the city on November 15
or in advance at several select
locations. Xi
WE ARE
GAME
CHANGERS
WORK YOUR DEGREE
WITH A POSTGRAD
ADVERTISING - MEDIA MANAGEMENT
ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION
EVENT MANAGEMENT
FASHION MANAGEMENTS PROMOTIONS
FINANCIAL PLANNING
GLOBAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
MARKETING MANAGEMENT
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
business.humber.ca/postgrad
HUMBER
The Business School
HALF MARATHON
10KM
November 16 at UBC
MEDAL, RUNVAN TOQUE, ON-COURSE MUSIC & POST-RACE FESTIVITIES THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014    |    NEWS
MUNICIPAL
ELECTIONS
CANDIDATES FOR
DIRECTOR OF ELECTORAL AREA A
The director of Electoral Area A, which includes the UBC and the University Endowment Lands, oversees
the needs ofthe residents of this area and sits on the board with the directors across Metro Vancouver.
Daniel Wood
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
As a debut candidate, UBC Master's student Daniel Wood is the
underdog in the race for director of
Electoral Area A.
Wood has a degree in political
science, and he's currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Asia Pacific
Policy Studies. Wood asserts that
because he's a student, he can best
represent youth and other under-
represented political groups.
Having held positions at Canada
Post and a contracted role as a
researcher for the Vancouver Parks
Board, Wood said throwing his hat
in the ring for the municipal elections was a natural step to take.
"I always participate in the neighbourhood watch and all the community events that go on," he said.
"This is the best way for me to give
back to the community — acting in
the public service realm."
He states on his candidacy
website that his top priority is
strengthening security on campus,
citing "cases of unresolved violence" over the past year.
One of Wood's concerns going
into the elections, noted in public
debates and speeches along with
long-time director Maria Harris, is
that not many voters are aware of
the responsibilities ofthe director.
But Wood said he remains optimistic about the role of students in
Vancouver politics. As part of his
campaign, he has visited university political clubs, fraternities,
Green College and other centres of
student engagement.
He believes that many people
have not been encouraged to speak
about their opinions, and so vows
to be a politician that is more
accessible to citizens. Wood has
made efforts to educate citizens
about their rights and motivate
civic involvement through phone
calls, door-to-door visits and other
grassroots campaigns.
Wood believes "elected officials need to be representative
leaders in the community." He
said that students need to have
their voices heard and that he will
work to ensure their concerns are
acted upon.
"For example, I know that there
is traditionally less participation
in things like civic engagement for
underrepresented groups on campus.... So, as an elected official, I
believe that in that position it's our
duty as leaders ofthe community
to be able to engage these kinds of
groups," he said.
Wood said his student status
means he's very in touch with the
campus community. "I think that
because students believe that it's
time for a change, and they're dissatisfied with a lot ofthe processes and issues going on [around]
campus right now, the time is
right for the students to come out
and have this voice."
As part of his platform, Wood
plans to engage with the student and
UBC neighbourhood communities
over issues of campus safety and
security and the Broadway Skytrain
Line. He also promises to continue
consultations with Campus and
Community Planning over strategic
sustainability initiatives at UBC. tJ
-With files from Mateo Ospina. Xi
Maria Harris
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
Current Electoral Area A Director Maria Harris is going
for a hat trick in the upcoming
municipal elections.
With degrees in economics from
UBC and Oxford, Harris has been
director of Electoral Area A since
2008. If reelected for a third term,
Harris hopes to continue her work
on transportation, sustainability
and youth engagement within the
UBC community.
During her six years as director, Harris affected progress
on the Broadway Skytrain line,
remained vocal about preserving
UBC Farm and gained all succeeding directors of Electoral Area
A a voting voice among the other
metro directors.
"That's huge for us," said Harris
about the gained ability to vote.
"And that reflects the way I work
— one step at a time, actually
doing thigns where I can make a
difference."
As part of her main platform
points for this election, Harris
pledges to continue pushing
for a reduction in car use in the
Vancouver area by lobbying to
make the city's public transit
system more extensive and more
accessible. Harris also promises
to use students' experiences as an
example of how a program such as
the U-Pass can pose huge benefits
to the community.
"My vision on transit is that
we become a transit-dependent
region and not a car-dependent
region," she said. "I think our students get it. Everybody who's had
a U-Pass gets it. People all over
the world are getting it."
Harris adds that her economics background will enable her to
figure out how to bring forth the
necessary funding for public transit in Vancouver.
Sustainability is also a large
part of Harris' platform, as
she plans to focus on effective recycling systems, waste
reduction and preserving
the city's green space in her
goal to make Vancouver more
environmentally responsible.
Among her other objectives,
Harris also intends to increase
youth engagement by holding more
forums and information sessions.
In this way, she wants to help students voice their concerns about
the area and push them forward to
the university through the AMS.
"All of these things are my
pieces ofthe puzzle," said Harris.
"An awful lot of times, especially when it concerns governance
or transportation or a few other
things, I'm connecting students
through the AMS."
Harris vowed to ensure that
the community's concerns are
heard and addressed, but to also
focus on aspects of her platform
where she can make the most
difference instead of making unrealistic promises to gain votes.
"I have always been willing
to help residents with local
issues, whether or not within my
responsibility and I'll continue
to do that if I'm reelected," she
said. "I am not going to make
unrealistic promises in order to
get reelected." Xi II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
, NOVEMBER i:
REMEMBRANCE »
White peace poppies and their controversial history
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNffHE UBYSSEY
White poppies were worn alongside red poppies by students this year.
Jasmine Cheng
StaffWriter
On November 11, Canadians
nation-wide embrace the yearly
tradition of donning a red poppy in
memory of those who had served
our country in the First World
War. As every child is taught in
grade school, the red poppy is an
emblem inspired by Canadian
Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae's
famous poem "In Flanders Fields,"
which beckons people young and
old to remember the sacrifices of
our soldiers in the Great War.
According to the Royal Canadian Legion, the red poppy has
been printed since 1921, with
around 18 million distributed each
year during their Poppy Cam
paigns and nearly $14.5 million
raised last year alone through this
campaign for disadvantaged Canadian veterans and their families.
The blossoming of those vibrant
red flowers that decorate coat
lapels, backpacks, hats and an
assortment of other possessions
in early November has become as
integral to our national identity as
the hoisting ofthe national flag on
Canada Day.
Once in a while, however, you
might spot a white poppy amongst
the sea of red flowers. The white
poppy, more formally known as
a Peace Poppy, was first distributed in 1933 by the Co-operative
Women's Guild in Great Britain.
However the story truly began in
1926 when the pacifist No More
War movement argued that the
red poppies, which had only begun
to be used for fundraising, should
have the message 'No More War'
imprinted in the center instead
of 'Haig Fund', the name of a
charity for veterans started by a
British Field Marshal. The British
Legion continued to print poppies imprinted with 'Haig Fund'
until 1994.
Civilian groups such as the
Co-operative Women's Guild,
many of whom were family
members who had lost their loved
ones to war, grew increasingly
concerned with what they saw as
a growing appetite in the govern
ment for militarization of society
and with these beginnings the
first batch of Peace Poppies were
produced and worn in Britain on
Armstice Day — renamed Remembrance Day after World War II —
in 1933. According to the anti-war
Peace Pledge Union of Britain,
theirs is a "challenge to the continuing drive to war."
Peace Poppies have faced some
struggle and controversy, especially in Canadian media. It has been
frequently mislabeled as a new fad
or a disrespectful symbol worn by
people who don't fully appreciate
or understand the sacrifices made
by previous generations. There
has also been cause for concern
that growing interest in the white
poppy will take money away from
fundraising interests ofthe Royal
Legion.
"[W]e're trying to encourage
Canadians to use November 11
to remember all the victims of
war — civilian and military. And
the victims of all wars, and to
challenge the kinds of beliefs and
values and institutions that make
us accept war as inevitable," said
Teresa Gagne of Vancouver Peace
Poppies, a group that has been
bringing white poppies from the
Peace Pledge Union to Canadians
since 2007. "That's why we distribute the white poppy. And I don't
see any of those things as being
disrespectful to the military."
Gagne says she will be wearing
both red and white poppies, as she
always has.
Supporters ofthe white poppy
say it is more important than ever
that Canadians reflect on the realities ofthe massive and very real
consequences of violence and war,
and recognition ofthe importance
of peacekeeping - especially in
light ofthe October shootings on
Parliament Hill.
This year, students from UBC
will also be distributing peace
poppies on campus for the first
time. Aside from UBC, many other
student groups have been involved
in selling Peace Poppies, including
Langara College and Simon Fraser
University.
"The consequences of war
are so broad; it ties into so many
different interests, whether you're
interested in the environment,
or you're interested in health, or
science, or human rights," said
Gagne, who encourages students
to be curious and open minded,
and also do a little bit of research
to better understand the story
behind Remembrance Day. She
also reminds students that the
white poppy can symbolize different things to different people as
there is no single monolithic white
poppy movement.
"[B]e respectful and listen to
people whose points of views are
different." Xi
THEATRE»
UBC's oldest club to perform their
mainstage production this week
UBC Players Club is the oldest club on campus -they opened their mainstage production
Jessica Roberts-Farina
Contributor
UBC's oldest student club is performing a classic Canadian dark
comedy this week penned by an
award-winning UBC alumn.
The 99-year-old UBC Players Club is producing Morris
Panych's award-winning 7
Stories for the club's mainstage
production ofthe term.
The play centres on a mysterious fellow named the Man who is
standing on the ledge of a building's seventh story and contemplating a jump to his death. The
Man is interrupted by the floor's
colourful residents popping in
and out ofthe windows and it is
their interactions with the Man
that deliver the humour in a play
dealing with serious issues.
"If the audience can laugh,
that means they can take in the
heavier themes easier," said Connor Nechelput, the play's assistant director and an international
relations undergraduate.
Seven actors will be playing 13
different characters in the play.
106 people auditioned for the
roles, including Nick Rinke who
plays the Man.
Rinke auditioned with the role
of Leonard, a paranoid psychiatrist, in mind and was surprised
when he was cast in the role of
the Man.
Rinke is used to playing
physical characters, so the actor
has found standing on an invisible ledge with limited physical movement an exciting new
challenge.
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
7Stories, on Wednesday.
"You feel vulnerable in a way.
I do have physical freedom, but I
can't jump all over the place."
"I've seen Nick [Rinke] do a lot
of comical stuff. And I wanted to
see him as a character who's at
the other end ofthe spectrum.
I know I could have easily cast
him as Leonard, but I wanted to
challenge both of us," said Soo
Min Park, a UBC film production
student and 7 Stories' director.
The audience is given sparse
information about the Man. He's
just a man standing on a ledge of
a seven-story building and he's
lost track of time.
Perhaps one ofthe most
revealing moments in the play
is when the character Lillian
tells the Man that if you're going
to give up your life, give it up
for something. The stories of
the characters delve into these
deeper issues embedded in
dialogues around suicide such as
hope, social isolation and societal
expectations.
"This Man, he thinks too
much. An old acting coach used
to say to me, 'don't think, just do.'
And that's sort of what Lillian
says to the Man. I feel like this
man is really lost. That's a big
part of the play that's hit me,"
said Rinke.
The play has presented other
challenges for the cast and crew,
including designing the set.
Park began working with her set
designer in the summer to figure
out the design ofthe building's
ledge, the play's only set.
The crew was forced to get
creative with their limited
resources. They decided on a set
that looked like a cage to echo
the trapped and confused minds
ofthe play's characters and
setting.
The play opens on November 12 and Rinke is nervous but
ready. "I want people to understand the character ofthe Man."
Nechelput hopes the Man's
self-discoveries will connect
with the audience. "There's
laughs and reality in this play.
All the characters seem weird
and crazy, but they all reflect
real people."
7 Stories is playing at the Dorothy Somerset Studio (6361 University Blvd.) from Nov. 12-16. Shows
at 7:30 p.m., except for Nov. 16 at
2:00 p.m. Tickets are available at
the door or the table in the SUB by
cash or online by debit/credit. $6 for
members, $12 for non-members. Xi
The UBC Film Society is showing
Blue Velvet from November 12-16
at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. excluding
November 14 at 7 p.m., at the
Norm theatre.
This 1986 David Lynch thriller is
about the mysterious happenings
in a small town in North Carolina.
This film has everything from
mystery, drug abuse and an ear
in a field. Intrigued? Head out to
the Norm this week to catch this
thriller.
The Eastside Flea X UBC Market
is back at the SUB this week. From
November 12-13 local retailers and
artisans will be selling their wares
intheSUBmainconcours.
From handmade soaps to
handmadeshirts you'll beable to
find some pieces to add to your
vintage chic wardrobe. If you're
looking to change up your style
the Eatside Flea X UBC Market is
the place to grab some new and
eclectic clothing and accessories .tl THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014    |    CULTURE
WRITING »
Write a novel this month with NaNoWriMo
National Novel Writing month is in f
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Senior Staff Writer
For many, November means a
month of not shaving and increased
cancer awareness. For others, it
means the end of pumpkin spice
latte season and the start of Starbucks' Christmas drinks. But for
another demographic, it means
writing a novel — of at least 50,000
words — in just 30 days.
The project-cum-event is
known as National Novel Writing
Month (NaNoWriMo), which each
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNffHE UBYSSEY
swing, and many take the month to start and finish a 50,000 word novel.
year attracts hundreds of thousands of participants eager to tell
their stories. In 2013, there were
over 300,000 participants.
The reasons people participate
may vary — boredom, curiosity, the
need for a creative outlet — but the
word count, which amounts to at
least 1,600 a day, remains constant. And as anyone who has tried
NaNoWriMo will know, it requires
enormous commitment.
Sonal Champsee, a third-year
creative writing MFA candidate in
the off-residence program at UBC,
has joined NaNoWriMo four times
(including this year) and completed
it twice.
Although Champsee is now
using NaNoWriMo to work on what
will eventually become her masters'
thesis, it started out nearly 10 years
ago, while she was still working
in the tech industry, as a way to
explore her dream of becoming a
writer — even for just a month.
"Originally, I was in computer
science because I thought I would
CLUBS»
BrUBC brewed some bold beers
for the Hops Connect Cup
=HOTO COURTESY DIRK SFOT
UBC's Brewing Club brewed against teams from UVic, KwatlenandSFU.
Alex Lenz
Contributor
Members of BrUBC have a lot to
be smiling about these days. They
always do, considering the fact
that the club is all about brewing
and drinking beer. This weekend
treated the club well, as BrUBC
reigned victorious at the Hops
Connect Cup, an inter-university
brewing competition.
BrUBC members get together
weekly to brew various kinds of
beer, as well as participate in tastings, brewery tours and tournaments. The club has been gaining
momentum, and fast. BrUBC currently has over 200 members, with
membership almost doubling each
year. It's not hard to tell why. The
club aims for an inclusive vibe and
welcomes all who are interested in
learning about the craft of brewing
great beer.
"Whatever people want to do,
we can say, let's figure this out.
And because everybody's learning
together, we use a big collaborative
co-op method. So there's nobody
who has this wealth of knowledge.
We're all learning as a team,"
said Kerry Dyson, one of BrUBC's
Vice Presidents.
Creativity was abundant on
BrUBC's Hops Connect Cup team.
The team won awards for the best
beer in three of five categories
and took home the prize for best
overall brew team. BrUBC winners
included the "White Rider" brew
in the Wheat category; the "Ass,
Gas and Lemongrass" in the India
Pale Ale category and "Bean Me
Up Stouty" in the Stout category.
"We're always taking people's
suggestions. Because we have total
creative control, if you have any
crazy ideas, we can figure it out.
We can try and make that beer,"
said Kerry.
The Hops Connect Cup is
judged by a panel of brew masters,
all of whom are professionally
accredited to judge the quality of
beer. The competition is sponsored
by Hops Connect, a hops distributor; and Deep Cove Brewers and
Distillers, a West-Coast brewery.
This year, the event was held at
the Memorial Recreation Centre
in North Vancouver.
The beer that takes home the
Best Brew Award gets to brew
their winning beer with Deep
Cove, which then gets distributed commercially. UBC's brewing
team competed against teams
from Simon Fraser University,
the University of Victoria and
Kwantlen University.
Cynthia Ni, a member of BrUBC
and a two-time Hops Connect
champion, said that the competition is a great way to meet new
people and interact with the Vancouver brewing community.
"Everyone involved with
brewing is super cool. It's a really
great opportunity to get everyone
together and talking about beer
and doing beer-related stuff. It
breaks everyone's walls down. We
all made beer and we're all here
drinking together," said Ni.
BrUBC prides itself on its ability
to create a fun and open environment that welcomes all, regardless
of brewing experience. Additionally, the club is hoping to change the
way that people typically view the
beer industry.
"I definitely think there's a
problem of, you think beer and you
think guys watching football and
drinking beer. But BrUBC's really
great. We're so inclusive, and for
women as well. Anybody really,"
said Ni.1!!
program by day and then write by
night. That didn't really work out
well.... So I stumbled upon the NaNoWriMo website ... and I thought
to myself: 'well, let me try this. Let's
see if, for a month, I can be a writer.'
I sat down and I signed up and I
started writing every day and it was
amazing. It was like finding myself
again," said Champsee.
First started in 1999, NaNoWriMo — for better or worse — has
become a fixture ofthe creative
writing community. "The world
needs your novel," encourages the
tagline, which seems both bombastic and democratic.
With countless workshops,
events, guide-books, online how-
to's, FAQs and tutorials widely
available, there's no shortage of
tips and tricks to get you through
the daunting task of writing over
50,000 words. But the ultimate advice for Wrimos (the title ascribed
to participants)? Just write.
Understandably, it's an approach to writing that is widely
criticized, as churning out words
regardless of quality can seem like
a pointless exercise; but for many,
the value of NaNoWriMo goes
beyond the quality ofthe work
produced — though it has also
resulted in well-known, published
novels like Erin Morgenstern's
The Night Circus and Sara Gruen's
Water for Elephants.
"The process of NaNoWriMo,
even though it seems a little bit
crazy... the whole philosophy
of just writing crap and getting
lots of words out is also the same
process of writing in general,"
said Champsee, who ultimately
pursued writing because of her
experience with the yearly event.
For others, like Anthony Lyons,
a computer science and Japanese
double-major at UBC, who attempted NaNoWriMo last year
and is trying again this year, the
structured motivational approach
is precisely why it is so useful.
"It really pressures you to get
[words] on paper and just keep
writing," said Lyons, who plans to
write a 'Tokyo pulp' novel in the
vein of Natsuo Kirino, a Japanese
detective fiction author, but sees
the event as a way to improve
his writing more than anything
else. "It's not really about writing
a novel. It's more just about the
exercise."
Reasons, results and reactions
may vary, but ultimately, it's about
writing — a lot, which certainly
takes a fair amount of creativity.
And while it may be easy to fault
the approach, it's hard to argue
with the results. After all, there
are certainly worse ways to spend
a month.
"I had actually written a novel,"
said Champsee of her first NaNoWriMo experience. "I'd always
wanted to write a novel and here
I had one. Whether it was good or
not, I had done that." tJ // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
LETTER »
YU/THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
CONFLICT HAS NO PLACE
ON REMEMBRANCE DAY
Around this time of year, you may
have noticed some people wearing a white poppy on their lapel,
instead of or in addition to the
traditional red flower. Much has
been said about the intentions and
meanings inherent to both poppies, but in reality, there is no decisive answer that fully captures the
objective meaning behind either or
both - because there isn't one.
Remembrance Day has always
been a time to quietly reflect
on the horrors of war and to be
thankful for those who gave their
lives so that we can continue to
enjoy the freedom we have today.
Anything beyond that is individual interpretation, which is to be
expected for an occasion which
can hold so much meaning in different forms, to different people.
That interpretation, however,
should be kept calm and respectful ofthe solemn atmosphere of
November 11.
Everyone is free to wear on
their chest whichever poppy they
choose, but good intentions can
sometimes cross the line into arrogant, lucid discourse on matters
on which, fundamentally, we all
agree. When that happens, not
only is the meaning of Remembrance Day grossly misinterpreted,
but disrespect is shown to the
people who fought and died to give
us the liberty to speak our minds
at all.
DISAPPOINTED ABOUT
DELAYS, BUT NOT
EXACTLY SHOCKED
The opening ofthe new SUB has
been delayed. Surprise, surprise.
We were going to write a long and
wonderfully snarky post about yet
another delay, but felt that such an
announcement really speaks for
itself. At this point, anger has just
been replaced with sad resignation
about the fact that we will not be
moving into our new office before
the end of our editorial term.
That said, we would like to
point out that the AMS is waffling
about when the new SUB will
open by constantly giving us early
opening dates and then pushing
them back. When we took a tour
ofthe new SUB on October 31, it
was quite clear by the abundance
of construction materials and lack
of paint on most ofthe central
structures that the building was
nowhere near finished. This is
also made glaringly obvious to
anyone who walks past the working construction site on the way
to class.
While it is great to hear reassurances that the new SUB is coming
along swimmingly and will be
finished on a specific date, the
disappointment that follows when
such promises are not followed
through always outweighs that
momentary glimmer of hope. Just
give it to us straight because, quite
frankly, we're getting tired of writing article after article about how
the opening date has once again
been pushed back. tJ
Proposed tuition increases are unjustified
ALEX MARX
Letter
Dear Luc Briede-Cooper,
I am writing here to argue you
out of your belief that the international tuition increases proposed
by the university are justified, and I
hope to win your future participation in student protests as well as a
cookie while I am at it. Your justification ofthe increases was based on
two different lines of argument, the
first being the status of education as
a human right and the second being
the necessity ofthe increases for the
continued success ofthe university.
Let's examine each in turn.
I'm afraid to say you have a very
confused notion ofthe nature of
"rights" and ofthe relationship
between law and ethics. In the
debate about the proposed increases, many people have invoked the
idea that education is a human right
and should therefore be as cheap as
possible, if not completely free. You
want to respond to this claim by
telling us that you have been unable
to find any mention of a universal
right to post-secondary education
in Canadian law, and that, therefore, no such thing exists. You seem
to have a very deep respect for
contemporary Canadian law, as if it
was some eternal God-given gift to
humanity containing all the ethical
wisdom that we would ever need.
But, surely, you must be aware
that the current legal system is a
historical and social product, and
that all ofthe rights that are in
the Charter of Rights and other
documents weren't always there.
Imagine a time not long ago when
women did not have the right to
vote, and when racial minorities,
such as people of African and Asian
descent, did not enjoy the full rights
of citizenship.
I doubt you believe that these
campaigns for equal rights were
unjustified simply because they
were not supported by existing law,
and so I am led to conclude that
you don't understand what people
mean when they say that education
is a right. When someone says that
people have a right to education,
they mean that people should
receive an education and that the
political arrangement should make
this a reality. If the law doesn't
include this right then it is flawed
and it should be changed to include
it. People are using the term "right"
prescriptively, rather than descriptively.
I don't have space to fully explain
why education is a good and necessary thing for human fulfillment
and well-being, but here are a few
reasons to get you thinking: what
person and society would not
benefit from the collective intellectual wealth of human civilization in such areas as medicine,
engineering, natural and social
sciences and art? We need to have
knowledge about the world in order
to act effectively and wisely. Just
think about climate change and the
imperative to educate the world on
what it is and how it works in order
to adjust our lifestyles and political
policies accordingly? It's not that
hard to see how an educated and
intelligent world would be a better
world.
How about the argument that
says that the tuition increases are necessary to sustain the
university's high quality? I see no
reason to think that the university would get worse in terms of
infrastructure and academics if it
retained its current tuition levels
or even decreased them by a bit.
I concede that, in the current
political climate, tuition cannot
be decreased significantly if the
university wants to continue to
rank so highly, but neither does
it need to increase international
student tuition by 10 per cent,
rather than the annual three per
cent that it does already. Perhaps
construction would slow down a
little, but so what?
The funds are already there
to improve the university, as the
last decade of construction has
shown, and anyway, providing
a good education to a genuinely
diverse body of students from all
over the world is more important
than giving a smaller group of
richer students expensive aquatic
centres and luxurious residential
towers.
UBC already enjoys a good
reputation, and because it is
situated in one ofthe world's
most livable cities it is hardly in a
desperate position when it comes
to attracting top professors.
In conclusion, the tuition
increases are not necessary for
the continued excellence of our
university, and are therefore
unjustified.
Alex Marx is a fourth-year anthropology major and philosophy
minor. 13
Have your voice heard in the
municipal elections
The Vancouver municipal election is on November 15.
=HOTO VIVIAN WONGffHE UBYSSEY
BAHAREH JOKAR
Letter
According to the most recent
reports from Elections Canada
only 39 per cent of youth voted in
the last federal election. In contrast, 70 per cent of older adults
actually showed up at the polls.
This reality leaves youth severely under-represented across all
levels of government. We can
change that right now!
The 2014 municipal elections
are in full swing across British
Columbia, giving residents of
the province the opportunity
to choose their mayors, directors, councillors and school
board trustees. The results of
this election will impact things
such as public safety, transit and
infrastructure management,
road services, utility services,
parks management, arts and
culture and many other crucial issues across a province of
approximately 4.6 million people.
This is a vital opportunity for the
general public and students to
shape the future of our communities.
During this time, it is imperative for students and other youth
to be engaged in the democratic
process and take advantage ofthe
opportunity to have their voices
reflected in the people who
represent them. The AMS urges
every single Canadian student
18 or older, who has been living
in B.C. for the last six months to
head to the polls and have their
voice heard. Voting is open until
November 15 at multiple voting
stations in different municipalities across the Lower Mainland.
For students who live on
campus (Electoral Area A), the
AMS is hosting a meet and greet
with district director candidates
Daniel Wood and Maria Harris
at the AMS SUB Art Gallery on
Wednesday, November 12 at 6:00
p.m.. There will also be an event
earlier that same day (4:00-5:30)
at the same location, to learn
more about Vancouver School
Board trustee candidates.
Anyone wanting to learn more
about the municipal issues, voter
ID requirements, voting locations
or general information on how to
vote, please visit outreachams.
ca or contact the vice-president
external affairs at vpexternal@
ams.ubc.ca.
Happy voting!
Bahareh Jokar is the AMS
vice-president external affairs. Xi
IAN TURNER
Letter
The first time I interviewed
Shawn Olson in person, I found
him painting his defensive
coordinator's office. To me, that
summarizes Olson's tenure at
UBC: he had to do it all, from
drumming up alumni donations to
save the team from budget cuts, to
recruiting, to being the offensive
coordinator.
So, I found his firing quite
"unfair," as Olson's prodigy Billy
Greene said. Olson had infused
the program with a lot of energy
whereas the previous regime was
much more negative, something
former player and all-star Serge
Kaminsky told me long ago. To be
frank, I found the firing to show
a general lack of understanding
about UBC's football program.
If you want to compete with the
big boys (Laval and Calgary), then
either double the program's funding or get out ofthe sport entirely,
but firing the Jack-of-all-trades
makes no sense.
Ian Turner is a former sports editor of'The Ubyssey. 13
VAPING KICKS ASH!
25% OFF
Starter Kits, E-Juice & Upgrades
Present student ID until Nov 30, 2014
*
ffapor
Erpporiuip
594 Kingsway, Vancouver | 604 336-0550
Mon-Sat 11am-7pm; Sun 12-5pm | vaporemporium.net
m%
Savannah Joe
Proprietor // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
RAIL JAM
It was reported that "major steeze"
was thrown down at the Ski &
Board Club's sixth annual Rail
Jam. Upon investigating we learned that no one from the army was
hurt. Cash prizes and Rockstar
were given out to the contestants
for landing tricks. The event had a
turnout of about 100 people.
Ski & Board Club is coming into
prime season. If you're interested
in getting rides up to the mountain
and meeting fellow shredders.
Visit ubcskiandboard.com for
more details.
PHOTOS PETER SIEMENS AND NICK ADAMS/THE UBYSSEY 10    I   SPORTS   I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13,2014
BASKETBALL»
Homecoming sweep for Thunderbird women
Diana Lee scored 10 points and dished out four assists in UBC's 71-48 victory over Victoria on Saturday night.
Mason Mcintosh
Contributor
The Thunderbirds continued
where they left off from the
preseason with a perfect weekend
of hoops against the University
of Victoria.
With a finish that came right
down to the wire, the T-Birds were
successful on Friday night beating
the Vikes 60-63 and handing
them their first loss of the season
by completing some late fourth
quarter heroics in a sterling team
effort. Harlene Sidhu hit a jumper
that wrapped up the game, Diana
Lee provided a crucial block in the
dying moments and Kris Young led
the team from start to finish with
a remarkable 23 points in the 33
minutes she was on the floor.
With four T-Birds playing 30
or more minutes, this experienced UBC squad looked to have
a quiet Friday night, but had no
intent to slow down their play
come Saturday.
=HOTO SOFYTSAIffHE UBYSSEY
Victoria was seeking blood
in game two ofthe weekend's
double-header, but they were no
match for this dominant T-Bird
squad. Before the opening whistle
blew, UBC looked to be in the
zone. They came out firing and
working hard defensively, holding
UVic to only five points in the
opening quarter. The slaughter didn't end there, UBC were
relentless.
UBC never took their foot
off the gas. The first half ended with UBC on top 31-17. The
14-point lead came mostly from
turnovers, and by the final
buzzer the T-Birds were able
to steal 23 points off numerous
giveaways from the Vikes. The
Thunderbirds kept their heads
down and worked their way to a
71-48 victory.
The women's squad managed
to last the entire game without
appearing fatigued whatsoever.
Starting the second half with an
astounding 19 points, they knew
they had the game in the bag, so
head coach Deb Huband was able
to grant her bench players some
well-deserved minutes.
The entire team was able to do
their part on the court with every
player capitalizing on the opportunities they've been working
towards. Kara Spotton led the way
with 11 points and seven rebounds.
Andrea Stujic, Stepanie Bell and
Cherub Lum put in some phenomenal work in the heavy minutes
they played.
UVic had no counter to the
T-Birds' team play. Confidence
with the ball was a game-
changing factor for the team, as
they were able to come out with
18 points in the paint, running
towards their largest lead ofthe
night (27 points).
The Thunderbirds are looking
to learn from this experience
and bring their A game on next
weekend's road trip against the
University of Alberta.
UBC now heads to Edmonton and
Winnipeg. Their next home game
will be against the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies at the War
Memorial Gym on November 28. Xi
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
COMMITTED COACHES
STEVE PRICE
Swimming
1. What is your coaching philosophy?
Sport can be a great
teacher of life lessons and
skills forfuture success.
Foster the pursuit of
excellence in all that you
do, on and off the court.
Strive for excellence.
Coaching isteaching
... I try to be tough but
fairand providean environment where young
men grow into the best
version of themselves.
I am athlete-centered
and process driven. I'm
trying to develop independent, motivated and
educated women.
Develop young people
in and out ofthe pool to
their maximum potential
— and of course, win!
2. What are some of your hobbies/interests
outside of your sport?
Family, travel and golf.
Nature, the arts, hiking,
photography, sports,
travel, family and
friends.
Coaching doesn't leave
much time for hobbies
...anytimeI don'tspend
on football is spent with
my wife and two kids.
I've got two little dogs
that love the outdoors,
so we go on a lot of hikes
and runs.
like to watch other
sports, travel in the
off-season and spend
time with family and
friends.
3. As a coach, what's your biggest pet peeve?        Poor attitudes and poor
work ethic.
Howan individualcan
so easily lose confidence as a result of
a temporary lack of
performance.
As a coach my pet
peeves are bureaucracy and any loss.
Athletes that waste
talent because they are
lazy. I'll select hard work
ethic overtalent 100 per
centofthetime.
Giving less than your
best everyday.
4. Hypothetically, if you could "poach" an
athlete from another UBC team, who would it
be and why?
ConorMorganfrom
men's basketball ...he
would be quite a threat
to score off corners and
free kicks with his height
and hops!
How about an aggressive athlete over 6'3"!
LukaZaharijevic[from
men's basketball is] 6'8",
260 lbs. I thinkhe would
make a great offensive
tackle and big guys are
always hard to find.
Forl5s, perhaps a
soccer player—they are
fit and have a good foot
on them. Kicking is an
under-developed skill in
Canadian rugby.
Paul Ahn [from] men's
rugby to help "prop" up
ourmen'steam! Paulis
... a great example for
ourteams.
5. What advice do you have for any aspiring
Gain as much expe
Study the game. Be
Stay true to yourself and
Don'ttrytochangea
Bring your passion
coaches out there?
rience as you can in
open minded and willing
surround yourself with
new program all at once,
everyday to yourteam.
avariety of coaching
to learn. There is always
great people.
it takes time! Be patient
Live and love what
environments. Also,
more to learn and ways
and flexible. Never
you're doing because
don't have an ego —
it's
to improve yourgame.
sacrifice your coaching
we have the bestjob in
not about you.
philosophy.
the world! THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
BASKETBALL»
Thunderbird men vanquished by Victoria
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVICffHE UBYSSEY
UBC looked promising at some points, but ultimately continued their unlucky streak versus the Vikes.
Jacob Gershkovic
Staff Writer
The UBC men's basketball team
has not beaten the University of
Victoria Vikes in regular season
play since the 2011/12 season.
Unfortunately, after dropping the
first two games of their regular
season to Victoria this weekend,
the streak continues.
Nerves seemed to have gotten the better of UBC in their
home opener. The atmosphere
inside the War Memorial Gym
was electric, and feeding off of
this energy, the 'Birds looked a
little too excited to begin Friday's game.
After getting off to a jumpy
start on offence, Tonner Jackson
dove out of bounds to save a loose
ball for UBC. The crowd erupted
as Jackson crashed into the
hardwood, and his effort seemed
to ignite the rest ofthe team.
Thanks to some solid post play,
and a couple of three pointers
by veteran Tommy Nixon, UBC
finished the first quarter with a
19-13 lead.
Following an 8-0 run by Victoria that quieted the hometown
crowd, both teams cooled off in
the second quarter. Offensively,
the game lulled. At the half, the
score was tied at 29, with both
teams shooting under 40 per cent
from the field.
Entering the third quarter,
UBC seemed to hold a slight edge
until Victoria's Marcus Tibbs
took over. The third-year point
guard wore down UBC's defence,
finishing with 15 points and four
assists. Supplemented by Victoria's Reiner Theil, who inconspicuously contributed 18 points,
the Vikes climbed to a 55-44 lead
by the end ofthe third quarter.
It was a lead UBC could not
recover from, and game one went
to the Vikes, 68-58.
Jordan Jensyn-Whyte and
Nixon led UBC in scoring with
13 points each. Connor Morgan,
arguably UBC's most dangerous
offensive weapon, looked timid to
start the season. The 6'9 forward
went 4-13 from the field for 11
points.
"It wasn't difficult getting our
guys excited for this game," said
assistant coach Spencer McKay.
"The first home game ofthe
season, the big crowd — unfortunately, I think we channeled our
energy in the wrong direction.
We were impatient on offence,
and didn't get into our sets like
we should have been. Defensively
we allowed them to use the ball
screen too much. We weren't
able to rotate and recover so we
allowed them to recover a lot of
offensive rebounds."
After taking Friday night to
think things over, UBC looked
calm and focused entering Saturday's tilt. Unlike Friday's contest,
both offences came out firing.
Tibbs, the architect ofthe
Vikes' offence, continued dissecting UBC's defence to begin
Saturday's game, catapulting
Victoria to an early 14-6 lead.
Nixon ended UBC's shooting
woes with two early three pointers. The fifth-year veteran was
on fire to start the game, putting
up 11 points in the first quarter.
David Wagner pitched in eight
points, and UBC trailed Victoria
25-23 after one quarter of action.
UBC switched to a zone to start
the second quarter in an attempt
to stifle Victoria's hot three point
shooting. The move was to no
avail. Victoria must have slept in
an excellent hotel, because they
ended the half shooting 50 per
cent from beyond the arc and
56.3 per cent from the field. Chris
McLaughlin dominated a UBC
defence that looked entirely out
of sync. The fifth-year, 6T0 center
for the Vikes put up 18 points in
the half, and UBC entered the
break trailing 48-40.
"McLaughlin really hurt us,"
said Nixon, who led UBC in scoring on Saturday with 23 points.
"We tried to take that away, and
were able to contain him for a bit
to start the second half — but we
can't just have spurts of defensive energy, it's got to be more
consistent."
An invigorated UBC defence
took the floor to start the third
quarter. After a few quick defensive stops, and baskets from
Jackson and Nixon, UBC tied
the game at 48. Tibbs committed
three fouls early and was substituted out, but McLaughlin carried
his team to a 67-63 lead to enter
the fourth quarter.
UBC's Brylle Kamen was a
force down low and kept the
'Birds in it to start the fourth.
Kamen finished the game with
15 points and seven rebounds,
but unfortunately fell into foul
trouble when his team needed
him most.
With Kamen on the bench, McLaughlin continued to hurt UBC
inside. Finishing Saturday night
with a game high 31 points, he
led the Vikes to a 77-70 lead with
four minutes left in the game.
Nixon was able to hit some clutch
free throws down the stretch,
bringing the home team within
four points, but that was as close
as UBC would come.
The final score read 85-79 in
favour of Victoria.
"I think we came out not
being the aggressors, which is
something we're going to have to
change. We have to refocus. You
can't dwell on losses for too long
because games are coming up
quick," said Nixon.
Nixon and his team will look
to rebound next week against
the University of Alberta Golden Bears, a team that ended the
Thunderbirds' season last year
in the first round ofthe Canada
West playoffs.
"There's definitely more
incentive to go in there and win,
considering what happened last
year. But we go into every weekend expecting to win. That's our
goal," said Nixon.
Victoria was perhaps the
toughest opponent UBC could
have faced to open the season.
The Vikes won the Pacific Division last year after finishing with
a 19-3 record. They possessed
the number one ranked defence
in the country, and went deep
into the CIS playoffs. After this
weekend, they're 4-0 to start the
2014/15 year.
The University of Alberta Golden Bears won't be any easier. The
Bears are off to a hot start at 3-1
this season, and looked extremely intimidating in their recent
back-to-back wins against Trinity
Western.
UBC's next home game will be
against the University of Saskatchewan Huskies at War Memorial Gym on November 28. Xi
Rez Night
Nov 19»4-7pm
discounts • free food • music
fun • everyone welcome!
ubc bookstore 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13,2014
The Crowsnest Highway on the way to Manning Park.
1
2
3
4
5
6
'
1
'
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
,.
17
"
13
■
■
"
21
■ 22
23
26
"
*
■ 27
„
29
30
■ 31
32
■
"
34
35
36
■ 37
38
33
40
41
42
■ 43
44
M4S
II
47
50
■ 4S
43
51
1
"
53
54
*
56
"
4
1
3
8
5
6
7
3
6
1
8
4
5
2
7
1
8
4
2
9
6
5
4
7
1
6
3
5
2
9
8
9
2
8
1
7
4
5
3
6
6
5
3
2
9
8
4
7
1
1
3
6
5
4
2
7
8
9
5
8
4
7
6
9
3
1
2
7
9
2
8
1
3
6
4
5
8
6
7
4
2
1
9
5
3
3
4
5
9
8
6
1
2
7
2
1
9
3
5
7
8
6
4
OCT30ANSWERS
0
S
s
A
V
E
L
U
M
c
A
L
1
A
L
A
R
E
N
0
L
A
0
R
A
D
S
U
M
m|"e
R
C
A
M
P
c
A
M
Y
E
S
o Ia
E
E
d I'm
E
N
T
A
L
S
H
A pi
T
A 1   1 J
A
V
A 1
If
A
L pT
L
A
K
E
c P
T
Y
A
R
E
s
T Ih
E
M
E
N l*V
1
A
s
0
D
s Ir
A
T
E
R If
A
L
L
E
A
T If
1
L
A
S l*P
A
N
E
L
A
D
v |"e
N
T
1
T
i |o
U
S |
H'L
E
1
A |   |tl
N
T | 0
L
D
I
S
R
A
E
l Id
E
S
1 In
E
E
c
0
0
T
E
S
C
U
T
C | H
E
0
N
E
T
T
E
s
T
0
R
E
R
A
N
1
R
0
C
S
s
E
N
0
R
E
L
A
M
ACROSS
1-Erased
8- Capable of being evaluated
15-Embodiment
16-High spirits
17-Lacking
18-Situated neartheear
19-Crazy as	
20-Brings up
22- -Aztecan languages
23-Makes lace
24-Middle East rug
25-From the U.S.
26-Hot time in Paris
COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
C0URTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
OCT30ANSWE
27-Keyboard key
48-Skater Boitano
6- Large flightless bird
33-Certain salt
28-Anatomical passages
49-Elector
7- Debris
34- Pertaining to the open seas
29-Remainder
50- First Russian astronaut
8-Mend
35- Montgomery's state
31- Hans Christian Andersen's
52- Plant of the buttercup family
9- Whatyou put on snooze
36-Impure acetic acid
birthplace
54-Conceive
10-Sailors
37- Prolonged unconsciousness
32- Hardens
55-Abilities
11-From Z
38-Unific
33-Citrus coolers
56-Arteries ofthe neck
12-Asphalt
39-Floral ornament
34-Stately dance
37-Animal
57-Appears
13-Tarries
14-Express support
40- Catherine the Great, e.g.
42-Hurt
41- Inventor Howe
DOWN
21- K-6
45-SingerLopez
42- Newsgroup messages
24-Coach Rockne
46-Hermit
43- deguerre
1-Dehydrate
25-Bikini blast
48-Londoner, e.g.
44-Slender
2-Shave
27-Perfect places
49-Meadow mouse
45- Domesticates
3-Understatement
28-Brainstorms
51-"...and seven years
46-Speech issue
4-Community spirit
30- Singer Chris
53- Engine part
47-Actor Vi god a
5-Animated character
31- "Awake and Sing!" playwright

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128548/manifest

Comment

Related Items