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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1974

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Array Evicted students
"It was a mass trial — we were
the scapegoat."
That was the comment Monday
of a former resident of Gage
towers who was evicted with four
others Saturday after guests at
their party threw beer bottles over
their balcony.
Dan Hicks, commerce 5, said an
appeal of the eviction to the Gage
liaison committee resulted in a
highly irregular "trial" after
which the appeal was rejected.
Hicks said he has now found a
temporary place to live but is still
angry at the treatment residence
officials gave him.
He said he is now considering
further legal action.
The beer bottles were thrown out
of the window at a party Sept. 13 in
Hicks' quadrant on the ninth floor
of the east tower.
Hicks' complaints got a sym
pathetic hearing from at least one
liaison committee member. Gerald
Algaier said the most the residents
deserved was a few months
probation.
And Algaier charged Gage area
co-ordinator Derek Parry, who
acted as "prosecutor" at trie appeal, was "out to get" the
residents.
Complicating the issue is a
controversy over whether the
Landlord and Tenant^c)Jarjplu*i-folzl $Zt£act exempts buildings such
the    university's    resideTrrcesr^as residences which are funded by
jjPMiff
UBC   housing   director   Leslie
Rohringer,  who could  not be
reached for comment Monday, has
insisted that the act does not cover
. residences.
The act currently provides for
eviction only after a proper 30-day
notice to vacate had been given
and refused.
Alma Mater Society internal
affairs officer Joan Mitchell said
the society's lawyers say
residences are covered by the act.
She refused to divulge further
details of the lawyers' report but
said she will ask council Wednesday to retain the society's
lawyers to help the evicted
students if they decide to take
further action.
the Central Mortgage and Housing
Corporation from the rent increase
provisions of the act but does not
stipulate any other exemptions for
CHMC buildings.
The exemption is designed to
allow rents for low income housing
projects to be tied to the wages of
residents.
Chronicling events leading to the
eviction and appeal, Hicks said he
was the only one actually to witness a bottle thrown over the edge
and the culprit promised him it
would not happen again.
A housing official came to the
quadrant to warn the residents that
bottles  were  being  thrown  but
Hicks said the official talked to
See page 5: EVICTION
Council
named
soon
kini mcdonald photo
THREE LITTLE PENISES stand in a line poking curiously out of  -	
their hideaway in display of contemporary ceramic sculpture at UBC       door   knockers  were  sculpted  by former  UBC fine artist Terese
art gallery (see Hot Flashes page 6). Titled Jack in the Box, potential        Svoboda, now of New York.
Indian life short, violent
Indian infant mortality rate is
three times that of whites.
Indians' average lifespan is 44
years compared to 72 for white
B.C. residents.
And death by violence accounts
for three times as many Indian
deaths as white deaths.
These statistics are part of a
comparative study done among
B.C. Indians and whites by commerce prof William Stanbury.
And Stanbury gave a paper on
the results during a symposium on
Canadian and American relations
held in Bellingham, Wash, over the
weekend.
Stanbury said the paper is a
summary of the last chapter of his
book, Success and Failure: Indians
in Urban Society, to be published in
1975 by UBC Press.
The study dealt mainly with B.C.
status indians living off reserves.
Criticism of the federal Indian
affairs department is implicit in
the information given in the paper.
Stanbury said assistance with
housing was cited by urban Indians
as their most pressing need, but
"the federal off-reserve housing
program has only made a slight
dent in the problem."
"And Indians feel that Indian
affairs could play a greater role in
helping them get jobs," Stanbury
said. "Jobs provided the single
most important reason for living
off the reserve."
Stanbury said younger Indians
suggested the Indian affairs
department provide counselling
for Indians thinking of leaving the
reserve.
He said 55 per cent of the Indians
interviewed who had moved to an
urban centre received help when
they first arrived from relatives,
friends and social workers or
clergymen.
"Indian affairs was not mentioned as a source of assistance,"
he said.
Stanbury said his study revealed
a decline over the last two decades
in the preference for marriage,
and a corresponding rise in
illegitimate Indian births.
"Cause and effect are difficult to
discern here, but sections of the
Indian Act provide that a status
Indian woman who marries a non-
Indian loses her status," he said.
"This represents a substantial disincentive to such marriages.
"If she simply lives with a man,
however, their children are defined
as status Indians.
"In our sample, over two-thirds
of the common-law relationships
that we could identify as such
consisted of a status Indian woman
living with a non-Indian or with a
non-status Indian."
Large Indian families compound
housing problems, Stanbury said.
An average of 5.4 people live in
an  Indian  household,   compared
with 3.1 as the household average
for the total B.C. population, he
said.
"Infant mortality among B.C.
Indians in the early 1970's is one-
third of the rate it was in the late
1930's, but it was still three times
the rate for non-Indians in 1971 and
1972," Stanbury said, adding that
the median age of death of B.C.
Indians is 44 compared with about
72 for all B.C. residents.
"Between 1961 and 1970, death by
accidents and violence, often involving alcohol, accounted for 28.9
per cent of all Indian deaths in the
province — almost three times the
proportion for the total
population," he said.
But Stanbury said success
among the B.C. urban Indian
population is evident in their rising
levels of education and their increased representation in white-
collar occupations.
VICTORIA (Staff) - B.C.
education minister Eileen Dailly
said Monday the cabinet will
consider names of prospective B.C.
universities council members
within "a couple of weeks."
She spoke with The Ubyssey
after meeting with council
chairman William Armstrong here
to iron out details of the new
organization.
Dailly said she and Armstrong
discussed the "whole working
ordering" of the council.
The council, set up under the new
universities act passed by the
legislature last spring, will
coordinate university development
in B.C. and act as an intermediary
between the provincial government and the three public
universities.
Armstrong will quit his current
job as UBC administration deputy
president in a few weeks to take
over operation of the 10-member
council.
He said in Vancouver Monday
he talked with Dailly and other
education department officials
mainly about "establishing the
budgets for the operation." "I
really wanted to get more information on government
mechanisms for the leasing of
space," he said.
He said he didn't discuss the
names of the 10 council members
yet to be appointed from outside
the universities saying "it really
depends more on the caucus and
the cabinet than it does on me."
But Armstrong said he is
responsible for deciding who will
help him administer the council's
Vancouver headquarters.
He said earlier his office will
have a research director, three
research assistants, administrative assistants and
stenographers.
Student charged with murder
A 19-year-old UBC science
student will appear in Matsqui
provincial court Wednesday
charged with murdering a 24-year-
old woman hitchhiker.
Michael Milko, science 3», was
arrested in his Place Vanier
residence room last Wednesday
and charged in connection with the
death of Lynda Marlene Dueck of
Sooke on Vancouver Island.
The dead woman's body was
found last Tuesday on the side, of
the 401 freeway near Abbotsford by
a man searching for beer bottles.
RCMP are awaiting results of an
autopsy performed last week to
determine the exact cause of death
and establish if the woman was
sexually assaulted.
Staff-Sgt. Fred Bodnaruk, head
of the RCMP's special sex-murder
squad, has been notified about the
murder and is being constantly
briefed on the situation.
Bodnaruk, of the North Vancouver detachment, has been investigating the sex-murders of a
number of B.C. woman dating back
to 1969.
Cpl. CM. Bergman of the Abbotsford RCMP told The Ubyssey
Monday the victim was picked up
hitchhiking on the labor day
weekend near Hope where she had
been visiting her father.
Bergman said no one reported
the woman as missing although she
had relatives living throughout the
Fraser Valley.
After the body was found
Tuesday morning, Bergman said,
an RCMP investigation determined that the woman had been
picked up by two men, one of whom
was later dropped off in Abbotsford.
Bergman said that while the
cause of death is still not known,
the body was not beaten or
mutilated in a manner similar to
the victims of other recent B.C. sex
slayings.
Milko is to appear in court
Wednesday for a bail application.
He is currently being held in
Oakalla. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24,  1974
'Explicit' Carleton book banned
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton
university's administration
orientation handbook is selling for
$20 to $30 these days, but that's
only because nobody can have one.
The Carleton administration
seized its own Survival handbook
last week because in its opinion it
was in bad taste.
University president Michael
Oliver said "there were photos in it
that were not suitable for a
university publication."
Sources   here   said   the   book
reputedly contains "a couple of
pictures showing explicit sexual
acts."
In addition, the book apparently
lists the university's womens
center as a "gay" organization.
Dean of students Norm Fenn
said the handbook will probably
never be released because it might
"unintentionally do harm to the
community outside the university."
Earlier reports speculated the
book was withheld because it was
critical of the local administration
and uncomplimentary of some
local business.
One Ottawa radio station's
programming was called "inane"
in the booklet.
A former owner of the radio
station is currently patron of a
university campaign to raise $5
million.
Bob Nixon, handbook editor for
the last four years, expressed his
disappointment by resigning his
position as assistant to the dean of
student services.
Nixon said the administration
wasn't able to seize all the books.
"One mail bag got out," he said.
A flourishing black market on
campus has resulted, as students
scramble to see what is so exciting
about the banned book.
Survival provides basic information to new students on more
than 200 topics, including accommodation, academic and
administrative problems, entertainment and where to find birth
control and abortion information.
It serves the same purpose as the
UBC   administration's   Lifesaver.
S.U.B.
12:30 P.M. SEPT. 27th
FREE
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a CBC production
roots
NATURAL FOOTWEAR-
766 Robson Street
If You Dig Stereo, READ THIS!
This year as a special offering to U.B.C. enrolled students only, we are going to GIVE AWAY
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what he or she desires for $500.00.
DROP DOWN AND GET INVOLVED
JAN'S STEREO WEST
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0
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"ASK THE CHAPLAIN"
One of the most interesting and colorful persons
on campus is Bernice Gerard, U.B.C. chaplain and
moderator of two open-line radio broadcasts. Each
Sunday on CJOR Bernice enters into a verbal
exchange with listeners at 9:05-10:30 a.m. on
"ENCOUNTER" and at 11:10 p.m.-1:30 a.m. on-
"SUNDAY LINE." Both programs deal with topics of
current interest and often of a controversial nature.
Guests on the program have included Dr. Muriel
Upritchard, head of the U.B.C. Faculty of Nursing;
Dr. Philip Ney, psychiatrist and author; Willa Dorsey,
internationally known singer and many others. In
addition to the foregoing programs, Bernice also has a
broadcast entitled "ASK THE CHAPLAIN," Monday
to Saturday on station KARI at 12:00 p.m.
A graduate of U.B.C. with an M.A. in English,
Bernice has worked with the campus chaplaincy since
1962. Her interests in students resulted in the
formation of a student club, now known as the
Charismatic Christian Fellowship. Working on campus
with Bernice is Geraldine Fordyce, who received her
Master's degree from the U.B.C. School of Social
Work in 1973. Both are available for . student
counselling and can be contacted by phoning
266-9275.
The Charismatic Christian Fellowship,
incorporated as an AMS club in 1973, offers an
opportunity for students tQ share faith and
fellowship. Weekly meetings are held in the Lutheran
Campus Centre, 5885 University Blvd., presently on
Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m. in the Conference Room and
at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday evenings beginning the end
of September.
Those interested in meeting Bernice Gerard and
learning more about the Charismatic Christian
Fellowship are invited to a "GET-ACQUAINTED
DINNER" in the Lutheran Campus Centre at 5:30
p.m., Thursday, September 26. Confirmation of
attendance can be made by phoning 263-8219 by
September 25.
o= n o Q □==
CJOR'S BERNICE GERARD
Coming events for Thursday evenings will include
speaker, Kathy Storrie, M.A., Assoc. Professor in the
Dept. of Sociology at the University of
Saskatchewan, who is an ardent and articulate
advocate of women's lib; Gary Thomson, musician
and singer; and other interesting guests.
Further information can be obtained by phoning
263-8219.-
Also today hear the Regeneration Sound at noon
on the mall in front of S.U.B. featuring Dave>
Johnston and nine musicians and singers from
Toronto.
n n -a -□ a	 Tuesday, September 24,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Gov'ts ignore UEL potential'
By DOUG RUSHTON
Provincial and municipal
governments are making parkland
out of "urban deserts" while
ignoring the potential use of the
University Endowment Lands as
parkland, a UEL citizens' committee spokesman said Monday.
Bowie Keefer cited current
development of former industrial
property along False Creek and the
recent $10 million acquisition by
the Greater Vancouver Regional
District of property at the mouth of
the Capilano River.
"They're putting grass where
there used to be blacktop," said
Keefer, spokesman for the endowment lands regional park
committee.
He said he doesn't object to the
creation of more parkland, merely
the ignorance of the 1,760-acre
endowment lands as potential
parkland.
"People are becoming more and
more conscious of nature and here
you have nature right at hand," he
said.
"You can step onto the endowment lands and you could be
hundreds of miles away from the
city."
Instead of considering use of the
endowment lands for parkland, the
provincial government is currently
conducting feasibility studies of
the land for housing use, an attitude he said he doesn't find
surprising considering the housing
crisis.
But despite the "genuine concern" of the NDP government,
Keefer said it is "looking for an
easy way out of the housing
problem."
"The endowment lands are
suited to any use they can think
of," Keefer said. "But they're
forgetting the future."
Keefer suggested that the
government is considering use of
the endowment lands for housing
because there is little bureaucratic
hassle involved in doing so.
"Here's l,700acres and they (the
government) don't have to ask
anybody to use it," he said. Since
the land is already owned by the
government, municipal permits
and other red tape can be avoided,
he said.
"The government is looking to
make a bold new experiment in
housing without considering other
bold  new  experiments  —  for
example a park," he said.
Keefer said the provincial
government currently has four
groups studying possible uses for
the endowment lands — three
architectural groups thinking up
housing designs and one looking
into the possibility of creating an
industrial park.
"There is no group looking at the
implications of using the endowment lands as a park," he said.
"We had better consider how we
can best use the park while we
have the potential".
Keefer claimed the issue has
been prejudged by cabinet
ministers plagued with a housing
crisis that seems unsolveable.
"The municipalities can't think
of good schemes because they're
starved for tax funds," he said.
"Builders tend to build high priced
glossy developments that yield a
high return.
"Most of these politicians who
are talking about this have
carefully avoided taking a walk in
the endowment lands because they
don't want to have their prejudices
upset," he said.
"It's a complex problem, not
easily solved. But it is not to be
solved by making a housing
development on the endowment
lands."
And it really wouldn't be much of
a solution anyway, Keefer said.
The greater Vancouver area is
faced with a current annual
population increase of 30,000 per
year. That is the limit that could be
accommodated on the lands using
medium density housing such as
condominiums, he said.
After that? "If we must accept a
higher population, and I'm not sure
we must, it's better to live in high
density around a park than low or
medium density all over it,"
Keefer said.
As possible solutions, Keefer
suggested "decentralization" of
the province by encouraging
secondary industry to locate out of
the Lower Mainland. He also
suggested the establishment of
satellite cities away from large
population centres.
Fourteen months ago, B.C.
Housing Minister Lome Nicolson
said a statement on the use of the
endowment lands was "imminent."
But since then, Keefer said, the
committee hasn't heard from
Victoria. "Wehave no clear idea of
what the government has in mind.
"I'm not even sure if it has a mind.
"If they can do it, they'll sneak
in. But I think we're at the point of
scaring them off."
Text tax toxic,
AMS polls pols
—marise savaria photo
I'M BUSHED so leaf me alone says unidentified student rooting around in a studious vein. A down-to-earth
person, perhaps one day she'll twig to the root problems of growth and branch out.
SUB service cufback seen
ByPATMcKITRICK
The SUB management committee will cut back student services if the board of governors does
not improve the building's
maintenance situation, says Ron
Dumont, acting Alma Mater
Society coordinator.
"One caretaker has quit his job
rather than work in SUB" Dumont
said of the cleaning staff's low
morale.
Dumont said a combination of
vandalism and poor working hours
make the job of cleaning SUB
extremely difficult.
"The short term action of the
committee may be to shut the
building down at midnight rather
than 1 a.m." said Dumont, who
is chairman of the SUB
management committee.
The board of governors is
ultimately responsible for the
maintenance of SUB.
This year the cleaning staff has
been cut from 28 to 18 because of
the switchover from a private
cleaning service which maintained
SUB last year to physical plant
employees.
The current workers make
higher wages than the private
service, but must work with a
smaller staff.
Dumont said that since most of
the SUB functions stretch on until
late at night, the caretakers have
little time to do their jobs properly.
The cost of paper products for
SUB has risen from $70,000 to
$139,000 this year, mainly due to
people stealing toilet paper,
breaking fixtures and throwing
paper towels around, he said.
The board of governors has to be
approached through channels,
Dumont said. "It will probably be a
month before they do anything."
However,  student council will
probably send a letter to the board
of governors protesting the
situation after Wednesday's
meeting, he said.
It is unfair to the committee and
to the students that maintenance
should be the overriding concern in
SUB functions, he said.
An Alma Mater Society officer
will next month launch a letter
campaign to all B.C. MP's urging
their support for tax deductions on
school textbooks "as a plumber
has deductions on tools."
The move, by AMS internal
affairs officer Joan Mitchell,
comes after she surveyed college
book stores during the summer on
the enrolment of the university
served and the stores' gross
business.
She also used figures from the
National Union of Students
showing an average annual expenditure on books of $125 per
student.
Mitchell says her eventual goal
is to contact federal finance
minister John Turner who could
enter student textbook deductions
as part of the budget for either this
year or next.
A $125 deduction for the approximately half million students
in Canada, would total $6,000,000, a
sum Mitchell calls "peanuts" in
the projected $22 billion national
budget.
Such a deduction would be a
"real feather in the government's
cap,'-' as, with an average $3,000
yearly income, some students are
"real welfare cases," she said.
Current student deductions total
$2,700, composed of $1,700 standard
exemption, $500 for basic tuition,
$50 per month as a rental rebate,
and $100 in medical expenses.
Mitchell met with Quadra MP
Bill Clarke on possible government
and public reaction. She said
Clarke suggested the public would
likely believe that students, having
brought their poverty upon
themselves by enrolling at college,
could reap the benefits of a degree
upon graduation.
Government officials could ask
whether the deduction would be a
flat sum, or based on the information of receipts, Clarke says.
If the latter, a tremendous administrative problem would arise,
Clarke told Mitchell. It would be
difficult to identify the receipt as
being from the college book store.
Arts One
Pit classes
Rape victims — speak out!
vetoed
BySUEVOHANKA
If you're raped, tell somebody.
And if you're raped at UBC, tell
the RCMP detachment in the
village.
"That's what we're here for,"
Const. S. F. Leach said Monday.
"If a rape isn't reported there's no
chance of locating the rapist, and
he may go on to rape other
women," he said.
Leach, a plain clothes investigator, said three rapes have
been reported at UBC since
January compared to four
reported cases last year. Leach
said he investigates the majority of
rapes and other sexual offenses
that are reported.
"But you can't go by the number
of rapes reported as many others
are not reported," Leach said. He
estimated that perhaps only 10 per
cent of all rapes are reported, "and
that might be a high estimate."
Because of the few reported rape
cases, health services isn't aware
that rapes may be a problem on
campus.
"We just don't seem to see these
people," a nursing supervisor said
Monday.
She said she could recall only two
rape cases dealt with at health
services since October 1972.
However, Jeanette Auger of the
women's office said rape is
definitely a problem on campus.
"Last year five women came
into the office who had been raped
and just wanted to talk to someone
about it," she said "Four of them
had not gone anywhere else to
report the rape."
Auger and other women from the
office studied the available
facilities for UBC rape victims
from May to August. Their work
was part of a feasibility study for a
campus rape crisis centre.
Auger said that little is available
because there are no meaningful
figures indicating a need for rape
facilities.
"Nobody listens if you haven't
got figures," she said. "And
women are not going to give you
their names, or often even report
the rape, because of the social
stigma attached and the attitude
that 'everybody secretly wants to
be raped'."
"Women would be more willing
to assist in having guys convicted if
rapists were given psychiatric
care instead of prison sentences,"
she said.
Auger said the Vancouver
women's health collective is trying
to set up a clinic on campus which
would serve rape victims and also
provide sex education for both men
and women.
But not one seemed to have
many ideas for preventing rapes.
"Don't hitchhike," said Leach.
"The majority of rapes we've dealt
with stem from hitchhiking."
An Arts One instructor's request
to use the Pit drinking area for a
student discussion group has been
vetoed by the SUB management
committee because of maintenance considerations, committee
chairman Ron Dumont said
Monday.
If the Pit is being used from 10:30
a.m. to noon Thursday as
proposed, this would cut out 30 per
cent of the staff's cleaning time,
said SUB building proctor Ed
Trewin.
Arts One instructor Richard
Holmes said the Pit was ideal for
discussion purposes because of its
architectural design.
Holmes was representing the
Arts One and Education faculties
at the committee meeting Friday.
The motion passed at the committee meeting said the request
should be approved only on condition that no maintenance
problems would arise.
Dumont said that because of the
problems that arose he would ask
student council not to approve the
motion. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1974
Legality questioned
In an action of doubtful legality
but doubtless stupidity, four
students have been evicted from
Gage towers.
It's the latest in a long series of
violations of the Landlord and
Tenant Act under housing director
Les Rohringer's nonchalant policy
that the act doesn't apply to student
residences.
This exemption was in fact
originally set up to allow
CMHC-funded low-cost housing
developments to be exempt from
rent stipulations so rents could float
with residents' salaries.
It can be argued that the act
doesn't exempt CMHC
developments, like residences, from
any other provision.
So Rohringer's policy is based on
a false premise.
Perhaps that's the reason he
won't conduct anything more than a
kangaroo-court style inquiry into
alleged misdeeds to deal with
evictions.
Any other court might overturn
the policies that have allowed him to
terrorize students into submission
with threats of immediate eviction.
It would in fact threaten the basis
of residence policy in general —
which is that students are not
responsible human beings and cannot
be  trusted to act in a reasonable
manner, so they have to face a whip.
That policy has been modified in
recent years so deadlines have been
eased and co-ed housing has been
instituted (almost) in Gage.
But the paternalism remains in
the presence of dons and rules which
restrict student movement in a way
that would be considered intolerable
in off-campus housing.
Of course it's part of the old
"keep 'em in their place" mentality
which sees students processed
through the university to emerge as
well-disciplined employees.
But that's a concept that should
be challenged, even in its
manifestation in student residence
regulations.
The students evicted from Gage
have an opportunity to do this
through court procedures
establishing that residences do come
under Landlord and Tenant Act
provisions.
And they probably have a case
for it in both the means in and
reasons for eviction.
Now people who throw beer
bottles out of windows are assholes.
But it has never been
satisfactorily proven in a proper
court that those evicted did in fact
throw the bottles, or stood by and
let others throw them.
If it can be proven then they
should have been given a warning. If
they continued they should have
been given the one-month eviction
notice specified under the act.
But they at least should have
been given a chance to prove
themselves innocent or guilty of the
misdeed before the eviction was
thrown at them.
Rohringer's fear of losing his
power base shouldn't have stood in
the way of their getting a fair
hearing.
So the students should definitely
appeal their eviction in court. That
way they might get their rooms back
and establish a precedent necessary
to other students.
Letters
Record
rip-off
The Kelly Sound Centre on West
Broadway should be accorded the
Annual Bullshit Crust for excellence in advertisement
misrepresentation and deceit.
What the shylocks really meant
by their "30 per cent off all marked
prices on records" was 30 per cent
off the suggested retail price, or 30
per cent off 130 per cent of the
marked price — which, depending
upon buyer shrewdness, meant in
some cases savings of more than a
nickel an LP, and in others not a
farthing!
Which all means that they really
forgot that decimal in front of the
30 per cent.
Furthermore, the explanation on
the money box at 2714 is a perfect
parody of Hegelian metaphysics
(well, not "perfect," because there
were one or two who actually came
to understand Hegel). If you want
to know how much a record is, ask
the manager, or better yet, look at
the price tag — it hasn't changed
much.
Dave Jones
Grad. Studies
Dodgers
May I protest against the "draft
dodger" stigmatization of
American youths who refused to
participate in the war in Vietnam.
These boys should be respected for
being too conscientious and
courageous to collaborate in that
national rape. They are patriots in
humanity's slow, march toward
world citizenship and brotherhood.
I am an American, temporarily
in Canada, and during my 78 years,
have come to accept Benjamin
Franklin's affirmation that "God
governs the affairs of men", and to
respect God's mandate to use our
talents in building "the good life".
Our pagan American government
is using our talents and power in
world-wide      American      im
perialism. Those young men who
rejected the pressure of the
gangster American industrial-
military-political complex to
engage in international
criminality, should be commended
for so doing.
American entry into the Vietnamese war was never declared
constitutionally, hence it was an
illegal war. The criminal conspiracy between big money and big
military, dominating our political
government, inveigled us into that
war through the side-door of
technical-advisory assistance,
followed by shooting "defensively", then into open, illegal
warfare. The Gulf of Tonkin incident, never authenticated, was
then used to "justify" an unconstitutional "black check" to
then President Lyndon Johnson,
but that war was never legalized.
Adolph Hitler lost the Second
World War on the battlefields but
"Hitlerism" triumphed through
it's adoption by the American
industrial-military-political
powers in a conspiracy of international domination. Hitler may
lie ". . . a-mouldering in his grave
but his soul goes marching on",
since the Second World War, in the
overthrow of governments which
were out of favor with that unholy
trinity, the i-m-p complex.
The CIA was one of the subversive organizations which did
this dirty work. Known cases of
governmental assassination were
Iran, Guatamala, Brazil,
Dominican Republic, and others.
In the case of the Bay of Pigs
fiasco, in Cuba, it was common
knowledge that the CIA, financed
and directed by the Pentagon, was
directly in charge of financing, and
managing the invasion but
American personnel did not take
part in landing.
In most of these assassinations,
native military juntas did the
hatchet work, financed and
directed by American subversive
organizations. In some such
governmental overthrows, such as
Greece and Chile and some other
South American convulsions, the
extent of American participation is
still in doubt, I believe.
Back about 1930, Senator Huey
Long of Louisiana, was
assassinated. He was know as the
most pro-fascistic politician in
American affairs, in his time.
Shortly before his death, Senator
Huey Long prophesied that "When
(or "if") the United States goes
fascistic, it will do so in a
movement against fascism". If we
substitute "communism" for
"fascism" in Senator Long's
prophesy, the U.S. career since the
Second World War validates
Long's prophesy. The United
States is trending strongly toward
de facto fascism, though, of course,
it will not be called fascism.
Our war-resistors are in the front
line for peace and democracy.
Let's respect and honor them for
that.
Francis Scott Coyle
Boring
After reading your warning
about a certain drug prescribed on
campus, I decided to reveal the
results of tests I recently carried
out on a much more widely
prescribed deppressant, namely
The Ubyssey. The tests involved
the use of one mouse named
Albert.
In the first experiment Albert
was placed in a cage containing 50
unopened Ubysseys,
carefully laid out so as to expose
only the front page. When first put
in the cage, Albert's facial expression immediately turned to
one of boredom. This quickly
disappeared when the Ubysseys
were turned simultaneously to
pages two and three by a cleverly
directed blast of hot air.
Albert was observed to lie on his
back and utter high pitched
squeaks whilst clutching his belly.
This was very unusual as the pages
contained no humor whatsoever.
His squeaking was interrupted
when another blast of air turned
the pages and exposed 50
editorials. The effect was
astounding, Albert started
coughing and choking and some
vommiting was also noticed. Not
wishing to prolong his agony the
pages were again turned exposing
the sports section.
Albert's nausea ended quickly
but he was obviously upset in some
way. His nose was twitching and he
appeared to be searching for fresh
air.
He would also look up at me and
point with one paw to beneath his
armpit. I wondered if any intelligence was being shown by
these actions, but after reading the
pages I was assured that there was
not. Upon closing The Ubyssey,
Albert uttered what can only be
described as a sigh of relief. With
the apparent success of this first
experiment I decided to pursue my
work further.
The next experiment involved
pulping one copy of The Ubyssey
and injecting it into Albert. This
was done every day for one whole
month, whereupon he was taken to
a veterinarian friend who per--
formed a thorough physical on
him. The vet's conclusions were as
•follows; a) The mouse weighed
four pounds, two ounces and had
been dead for over twenty eight
days, b) The Ubyssey had contributed to his death, c) Albert was
a serious fire hazard, d) Recycling
should be considered.
From all the above results one
can only conclude that The
Ubyssey's effects are greater than
that of a mild sedative, and that in
the future they should be under
prescription.
A. C. Birch
science 4
i TMiisnstv
SEPTEMBER 24,1974
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university yeaf by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Lesley Krueger
It was really Gary Coull who threw the beer bottles, Mr. Rohringer,
honest. Me and Boyd McConnell saw him and Ralph Maurer totter up to
Doug Rushton and say "Let's throw Lesley Krueger over the balcony." But
Krueger ran off, headlong into Reed Clarke actually, so they decided to
throw Alan Doree over. He was all for It, since he needed hours for his
pilot's license, but then Berton Woodward horned in, saying he wanted to
do it in the nude with Kini McDonald shooting the pix. But too many
people were already sick enough as it was, without that, so they decided to
chuck Pemme Muir Gearlover using Cedric Tetzel as a cushion. When he
objected Marise Savaria volunteered but then Muir ran off chasing an
almighty dollar. This left Greg Osadchuk and Mark Buckshon, but they
were discarded into a nearby trashcan when it was discovered one of them
was Jewish. Then Linda Hossie saved the day. Leading in Jake van der
Kamp by the ear over the limp but lifeless body of Pat McKitrick, she
delivered him to the capable but soft hands of Sue Vohanka who, with a
swift kick, sent him soaring into the breeze. And Gary had to throw the
bottles, Mr. Rohringer, to Christen van der Kamp the Flying Dutchman.
Honest. Tuesday, September 24, 1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Alma Mater Society budget
Notes
This budget is based on 20,000 full fee paying members and
1,400 part-time fee paying members taking an average of three
units. These notes contain an explanation for each item in the
expenditures column of the budget.
student union building debt
This is the $15 portion of the AMS fee to be used to repay the
capital cost of the building.
undergraduate.society fees
This    is    the    amount    collected    on   the    behalf   of   the
undergraduate societies by the AMS as shown in the revenue
section,
graduation class fee
This is the $7 fee levy collected on behalf of the graduating
class.
SUB management fund
Constitution allocation of 50 cents per member to purchase
equipment    at    the   discretion    of   the   SUB    management
committee,
accident benefit fund
Constitutional  allocation of 10 cents per member to a fund
from which council may cover injuries to students not covered
by their medical insurance.
SUB art fund
Constitutional allocation of $1,500 for the purchase of
Canadian contemporary art.
national union of students
This represents the 30 cents per member fee levy of the NUS
approved at the 1972/73 general meeting.
registration photographs
The cost of placing photographs on AMS-Library cards.
athletic fee
This is the $5 extramural athletic fee established by
referendum and controlled by the university administration.
constitutional margin
The Constitutional calls for a 50 per cent operating margin to
be included in the budget as a safeguard. The 5 per cent is
based on the operating portion of the AMS.
undergraduate society grants
Basis of allocation to be $300 basic, 30 cents for each student
up to 1,000 students, and 15 cents for each student thereafter.
ubyssey (schedule b-1)
_, The allocation will allow The Ubyssey to publish 3 times per
week until the budget is spent. This amount included 100 per
cent of the publications administration expense (schedule B-2)
which supplies the support services, such as accounts receivable
and advertising sales, that are necessary for the operation of
the campus newspaper.
intramurals
This allocation allows all students to participate in many
organized sports, through teams formed in clubs and
undergraduate societies.
students' council (schedule D)
This is the budget on which the students' council operates
Itself. Included in this amount is a portion of general
administration expense (Schedule C) which supports the
council and its direct programmes and activities. Some services
which the council uses are auditors, solicitors, printing and
general bookkeeping.
conference grants
This is a special fund administerecTby the finance committee to
aid subsidiary organizations in sending a maximum of two
representatives to conferences, which will be beneficial to their
membership and/or to the AMS as a whole. Written reports are
to be submitted by the delegates for future reference of the
society's members.
speakers' committee
This allocation is to cover publicity, travel and honoraria costs
of speakers invited to speak on topics of general interest to
students. Because of limited funds the committee should avoid
large money allotments to securing individual speakers, and
instead in co-operation with the education committee
concentrate on inviting locally available speakers, those in
Vancouver already or those willing to travel at their own
expense. v
education committee
This allocation is to cover costs in having a committee, of
council and interested students, hold hearings with members of
all undergraduate societies about special topics in education
today such as the Universities Act and student financing. The
committee will actively solicit the opinions of all students and
publish a summary report to be criticized by students before
forwarding the report to the provincial government and the
board of governors.
special projects
This allocation is administered by the finance committee to aid
clubs and AMS designated Special Projects, i.e. Speakeasy,
Women's Office, with the cost of special projects. This fund
was established in the Code when clubs were no longer given
direct operational grants by council. This fund is
non-accumulative. This fund was increased this year with the
knowledge that it is International Women's Year and additional
funds will be sought to run some kind of special program.
elections
This is the amount necessary to print ballots and publish the
necessary notices as well as maintain elections equipment.
external affairs
This allocation is to cover the operating costs of the external
affairs  office,   which  includes  long distance telephone calls,
Summa
REVENUE:
try
A.M.S. Fees (based on 20,000 full time student population)
—Regular (20,000x$34)
680,000.00
—Extension
10,000.00
—Non-Credit
50.00
Undergraduate Society Fees
15,000.00
Graduation Class Fee
20,000.00
Investment Income
30,000.00
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
75,000.00
Total
830,050.00
EXPENDITURES:
Student Union Building Debt (20,000x$15) 300,000.00
Undergraduate Society Fees
15,000.00
,          Graduation Class Fees
20,000.00
S.U.B. Management Fund (20.000x.50) 10.000.0C
Accident Benefit Fund (20,000x.10)
2,000.00
S.U.B. Art Fund (Constitutional
1,500.00
National Union of Students
(Constitutional) (20,000x.30)
6,000.00
Registration Photographs
4,000.00
Athletic Fee (20,000x$5)
100,000.00
Aquatic Centre Trust Fund
(20,000x$5)
100,000.00
Constitutional Margin 5%
24,500.00
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Loan (See Revenue)
75,000.00
Total
685,000.00
Amount Available for Discretionary Uses:
172,050.00
DISCRETIONARY ALLOTMENTS:
Undergraduate Society Grants
10,725.00
Ubyssey — 3 issues
36,662.00
Intramurals
12,000.00
Conference Grants
3,800.00
Speakers Committee
1,500.00
Education Committee
700.00
Special Projects
3,313.00
Elections
1,500.00
External Affairs
Treasurer Operating
1,600.00
Co-lntramurals
1,000.00
C.I.T.R. Support
2,000.00
Mamooks
Arts*. Crafts
AMS Art Gallery Programme C'ttee
 )
*
500.00
Housing
3,000.00
Careers '74
300.00
Speakers Grant Fund
1,400.00
Orientation
2,500.00
Total
82,500.00
'
SUMMARY
Discretionary Allotments)
82,500.00
Schedule B—Ubyssey         )
Schedule C—Administration
73,450.00
Schedule D—Students' Council
14,700.00
Total Expenditure
170,650.00
Funds Available Based on
20,000 Enrollment
172,050.00
Surplus
1,400.00
* Money not used that was
allocated last year.
The Ubyssey is required by the
Alma Mater Society
constitution to print its budget each
year.
stationery and supplies, and the cost of sending delegates to
BCASU and NUS conferences.
undergraduate society support
This allocation represents that portion of general
administration which is used to support clubs (Schedule C).
club support
This allocation represents that portion of general
administration which is used to support clubs (schedule C).
co-intramurals
This is a new programme to supplement intramurals. It will
allow members of both sexes to participate in a limited number
of sports together.
c.i.t.r. support
This allocation is to help defray operating costs and to replace
worn out equipment.
AMS art gallery programme committee
This allocation is to allow for the showing of the Brock Hall art
collection in the SUB art gallery. The allocation will also allow
the presentation of other art exhibits throughout the academic
year. The main expenses of the programme are supervision and
publicity.
Pemme Muir Cunliffe,
AMS Acting Treasurer
Eviction not based on act
From page 1
only one  person.   He  said  that
person did not pass on the word.
Hicks said the first indication he
had that there was trouble in the
offing came when house advisor
Chuck Fenton asked the quad
residents to come down to his suite.
He told them there that they might
be evicted if they didn't produce
the culprits.
Hicks said the culprits refused to
identify themselves to Fenton.
The following Tuesday Hicks
said he and the five other members
of his quadrant received eviction
notices signed by Rohringer
requiring them to be out of the
quadrant within 48 hours.
Ali six appealed to the Gage
liaison committee but their appeal
was rejected after what Hicks said
was a highly irregular "trial."
He said all six were tried as one.
When the committee went in
camera to discuss the issue Parry,
acting as prosecutor, remained
while the six were told to leave the
room.
Parry is not on the liaison
committee.
Hicks said he tried to forestall
trouble by ending the party when
he first heard of complaints and by
asking the culprits to identify
themselves.
But he said his efforts were not
enough to satisfy the committee,
which voted six to three against the
members of the quadrant.
Only one member was allowed to
remain. He told the committee he
was in Blaine the night of the
party.
Algaier said the most he
would have done is put the six
residents on probation for a few
months.
"I thought these guys did all they
could, but Parry was really out to
get them," he said.
Algaier admitted he did not know
if the committee's decision was
based on any point of law.
Parry told The Ubyssey Wednesday he was trying to act only as
an investigator, not as a
prosecutor.
"If I was acting as a prosecutor I
was acting incorrectly," he said.
Parry admitted the eviction was
not based on any provisions of the
Landlord and Tenant Act.
He said he acted under
Rohringer's direction and said
Rohringer, not he, was responsible
for any violations of the act.
"I am not in a position to state a
legal case, he said. "I personally
don't feel the need to rest on the
Landlord and Tenant Act. I require
my personal authority from the
director of housing."
Parry, who personally served
the eviction notices, defended his
action on the grounds that
throwing beer bottles out of windows is "potentially lethal
behaviour."
He refused to discuss the
authority for his actions other that
to say he is responsible only to
Rohringer.
Schedules
SCHEDULE C
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BUDGET
Salaries & Benefits
80,000.00
Transportation & Communication
2,000.00
S. & S. (General & Print Shop)
11,000.00
Professional Services
8,000.00
Part-Time & Overtime Salaries
1,000.00
Sundry
500.00
Staff Relations
500.00
Staff Development
2,000.00
Total
105,000.00
Revenue from Selling Stationery & Supplies
10,000.00
SUB Revenue
21,550.00
Total Administration Charge to be Allocated                 ** 73,450.00
** This is a suspense account to isolate administration expenses to
be charged to the following areas on the following basis. These
percentages are based on the amount of work processed by this
department on behalf of the other departments or
programmes.
Students' Council —25 percent
Publications — 5 per cent
Student Union Building — 20 per cent
Undergraduate Societies — 25 per cent
Clubs — 20 per cent
Activities — 5 per cent
Sub-Total
SUB Revenue
Print Shop Revenue
Total
26,250.00
5,250.00
21,000.00
26,250.00
21,000.00
5,250.00
105,000.00
21,550.00
10,000.00
73,450.00
SCHEDULE D
STUDENTS' COUNCIL
Executive Salaries
5,200.00
Stationery & Supplies
2,500.00
Transportation & Communication
3,000.00
Information
3,000.00
Honorariums
1,000.00
Total
14,700.00
25 per cent of General Admin. Budget
26.250.00
Total Charges
40,950.00
SCHEDULE B
UBYSSEY BUDGET
Budget
Budget
Revenue:
1973/74
1974/75
Advertising Display
50,000
62,595
Classified
2,000
3,000
Subscriptions
400
500
Total
52,400
66,095
Expense:
Printing
54.2O0
65,682
Photography
500
600
Mailing
800
1,150
Honorarium
1,000
1,000
Telephone & Telex
1,550
1,700
Stationery & Supplies
550
600
Staff Meals
450
450
C.U.P.
1,950
2,000
Misc. Salaries —Copy Runner
575
650
Distribution
1,675
2,000
Sundry
250
250
Total Operating Expense
63,500
76,082
Administration
21,540
21,025
Youthstream Commissions
3,350
5,550
Promotion
100
100
5% General Admin. Charges
5,250
Total Expense
88,490
108,007
Less 5% General Admin. Charges
5,250
Total Expense
102,757
Subsidy:
36,090
36,662
PUBLICATIONS BUDGET
B udget
Budget
1973/74
1974/75
Expense:
Salaries
17,000
18,500
Stationery & Supplies
400
450
Postage
250
275
Telephone & Telex
450
500
Car Allowance & Sundry
1,050
1,300
Total
19,150
21,025
100 per cent to be charged to The Ubyssey.
INTRAMURALS
Objective
To provide administrative and technical support for an
integrated program of intramural athletics for men and women on
as wide a basis as possible in types of activities offered and in
numbers of individuals participating.
Summary of Request — 1974/75
Women
Referee & Operating
Rentals
Equipment
Publicity
Total
Men
Referee & Operating
Rentals
Equipment
Publicity
Administration
Special Events
Sub Total
Less Revenue
Total $10,653
Co-tntramurals
Operating
Rentals
Total $1,875
Total
Women
Men
Co-lntramurais
Sub Total
Less Revenue
Total
TOTAL REQUEST FOR 1974/75:
AMOUNT OF REQUEST GIVEN
$1,660
1,590
180
850
$4,280
$3,615
6,885
383
1,070
500
500
12,923
2,300
$925
950
$4,280
12,953
1,875
19,108
2,300
$16,808
$16,808
$13,000 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24,  1974
Ski meeting
The Pacific Ski Club's first
meeting, mentioned in Hot
Flashes Friday, will take place
Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Mount
Pleasant Lawn Bowling clubhouse
at Robson Park, St. George and
Kingsway. Friday's flash
inadvertantly dropped the date.
The club, which plans group
skiing trips as well as social events,
will show ski films and serve beer.
Lounge wants
kinky sf vff
The lounge wants to scrounge.
Organizers of the SUB drinking
lounge, known so far as the
Alternate Facility (alternative to
The Pit), need large graphics or
Hot flashes
photographs as decorations for
the new watering hole in SUB
101.
Organizers warn there is no
guarantee the submissions can be
returned in their original
condition.
Call Joan Mitchell, Alma Mater
Society internal affairs officer, at
228-5466.
Art show
Contemporary ceramic
sculpture by leading artists from
B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and
Manitoba is currently on display
in the UBC art gallery in the main
library basement.
Well-known B.C. artists
included in the exhibition are
Gathie Falk, Tam Irving and Sally
Michener.
'Tween classes
TODAY
SHITO-RYU KARATE
Practice   cancelled.    Practice   with
grand master at Dojo 7 p.m.
CKANKAR
Introductory   lecture,   noon,   SUB
213.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr.  F.   R. C. Johnstone speaks on
tissue    complications    of    injuries,
noon at IRC 1.
HSA
General   meeting, noon,  Bu. 2225.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
David       Johnstone       and       the
Regeneration    sound,    noon,   SUB
mall.
UBC KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General    meeting   and   convention
delegation election, noon, SUB 211.
UBC LIBERALS
General meeting and convention dele
gation election.
UBC MY JONG AND KUNG FU CLUB
Registration   and   first   practice,   5
p.m., SUB party room.
GERMAN CLUB
Oral   German  practice,  7  p.m.,   IH
406.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
H.S. CHOI LEE FAT KUNG FU CLUB
Annual demonstration of weapons,
technique     etc.      5      p.m.     SUB
ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE
STUDENT FEDERATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, voting on
constitution amendments and
sign-up for lessons, noon, SUB
207-209.
ONTOLOGY
Special presentation by Rick Dunn
on the inner game of life, noon,
Bu. 216.
CUE
Talk by Colin Cole, on How to
move from hatha yoga to
meditation, noon, Mildred Brock
Lounge.
PACIFIC SKI CLUB
Organizational meetings and film, 7
p.m., Mt. Pleasant lawn bowling
clubhouse at Robson Park, St.
George and Kingsway.
REHAB-MED
Orientation meeting, 7 p.m., hut
B2.
CHRISTIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist, noon, Lutheran Campus
Centre.
PSYCH CLUB
Organizational    meeting,   first   and
second     year    students    especially
welcome, noon, Angus 24.
GERMAN CLUB
Films, noon, IH 406.
Pool deal OK
The aquatic centre management contract has received
preliminary approval from the
board of governors' table officers.
The table officers — a rotating
group of board members -responsible for screening proposals
seeking board approval — last
week recommended acceptance of
the proposal, pending lawyers'
approval.
Pool co-ordinator Doug Aldridge said Monday this means
board acceptance of the proposal
"is pretty near automatic now."
The board will consider the
proposal at its Oct. 8 meeting.
AMS council approved it last
Wednesday.
The management contract calls
for parity student representation
on the central administration
committee. Students and the
board will each appoint two
members and will each also
choose one community representative.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Browns • Blues
• Greys • Burgundy
• Tux-Tails • Velvets
• Double Knits • White
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
ASSOCIATED STORES
Men's Room Westwood Mall 941-2541
4639 Kingsway 435-1160
2174 West 41st Ave. 261-2750
1046 Austin, Coquitlam 937-3516
1420 Lonsdale, N. Van. 988-7620
3048 Edgemount Blvd., N.V. 987-5121
1586 Marine, W. Van. 936-1813
1527 Lonsdale, N. Van. 985-4312
Fraser's Surrey Place 588-7323
Werners Lougheed Mall 936-7222
Friesens Guildford Centre 581-8722
Kennedy McDonald, Park Royal 922-6421
Fraser's Park Royal North 926-1916
* 10% discount to U.B.C. students
SUB FILMSOC presents
SEPT. 26-29
Thurs. 7:00
Fri.
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Sun.
»»BRAVO 'CABARET'-A DAZZLING
ENTERTAINMENT!^
—Rex RMd
75c SUB Theatre. Please show AMS card.
Starting this week, a twelve-part serial:
Space Soldier Conquers the Universe.
Friday and Saturday at 7:00 p.m. show only.
STUDENT MONTHS
SEPT. - OCT.
AT
>^jm$,
FREE ADMISSION WITH STUDENT GARD MON.-THURS.
2 BANDS — 2 ROOMS ON FRI. and SAT.
THIS WEEK SEPT. 23-28
APPLEJACK
Vancouver's best rock group
NEXT WEEK SEPT. 30-OCT. 5
HANDLEY PAGE
Back to Vancouver after
Eastern tour.
OPEN MON.-SAT. UNTIL 2 a.r»V
6649 Kingsway at Sperling Ave.     435-9343
Can Yon Repair Your Own Car?,
Then Why Not Repair It At Our Shop?
We rent   fully equipped bays at $3.00 per hour.
Hoists $1.00 extra per hr.
& includes all diagnostic & repair tools.
COMPLETE STOCK OF ALL REPLACEMENT PARTS
"DISCOUNT PRICES"
We are located at Boundary Rd. &
Marine Drive      3862 Scott Street
OPEN EVERY DAY   9 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT
For more information   CALL 438-3301       t?
KELLY'S STEREO MART
Last Thursdays (September 19th) ad in The
Ubyssey confused a few of our student customers.
We meant to say that all UBC students could buy
records from us for 30% off the full price, if they
presented a UBC AMS card. Many records
ALREADY were discounted in price, and a UBC
student would get either 30% off the original list
price, or the sale price — whichever is LOWER.
Unfortunately, several students felt that they
should get 30% off the already discounted price,
which is NOT at all what we meant to say. We
apologize for the inconvenience and the
misunderstandings that this may have caused.
Remember, if you want to buy records at a good
price, you can still come in this week and save
30%. (Off the original list price).
Thanks. Kelly's Stereo Marts, 2714 W. Broadway.
WS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 dey $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
"CAN YOU DIG ITT" Bundolo's- coming
back. Friday, Sept 27 at 12:30 in
SUB Theatre. It's Free!
IN CONCERT. Paul Hann — Thurs.,
26th, 8:00 p.m. Joani Taylor & Ron
Small, Fri. and Sat. 8:30 p.m. Arts
Club Theatre.
DOES ANYONE really laugh at Bun-
dolo Shows? Come and find out this
Friday, Sept. 27 at 12:30 in SUB
Theatre. It's Free!
10 —For Sale — Commercial
TEXAS  INSTRUMENTS
CALCULATORS
Price Reduction
SR-11 Now 1114.95
TI-2550   Now   SS4.9S
(with memory)
TI-2500 $5».»5 — SR-10 $»4.»5
Available immediately from
MARV NIDER
In   Pharmacy  Lounge,
Cunningham Bldg.
Dally 12:30-1:30 er call 325-41*1
for information
LIMITED QUANTITY of Texas instruments, SR-50, available on or before
Oct. 4, call Marv 325-4161.
11 — For Sale — Private
CRAI6 auto, cassette player, $35. assorted tapes, $2.50 tach. Phone Paul
224-9700 after 6 pm.
•41 WHITE RAMBLER 2 dr., auto.,
good cond. $600. 261-6187.
LADY'S SMALL blue ski jacket. Bug
6x9.  Rug 9x14.  736-1066.
ATLAS WINTER TIRES, 13 inch rim,
brand new, $10 each. 263-8794.
'73 HONDA 175. Must seU. Helmets, etc.
Beautiful running. Best offer. 733-
8322 between 6 & 7 p m.
IMS VIVA plus extra tires. Engine in
A-l cond. New clutch and brakes.
263-8794.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
NEED ROOMMATE — Female graduate
to share furnished one bedroom
suite, modern, good locaUon. $107.50.
228-9557.
25 — Instruction
PIANO LESSONS by grad of Juilliard
School of Music. AU grade levels
welcome.   731-0601.
30 — Jobs
STUDENT—2 hours per day, 3 days
per week—clerical work.
Apply   Ubyssey   Advertising   Office,
Room 241 S.U.B.
35 — Lost
LOST—Eye-glasses, Thurs., Sept. 19,
between Cunningham and B-Lot. Need
desperately.  Phone Diane, 584-8404.
40 — Messages
KUNG FU demonstration. Time: 5 p.m.
Tues., Sept. 24 Place: SUB Ballroom.
UBC Choi Lee Fat Club. Everyone
welcome.
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
TYPING in my home, North Shore. Call
985-2814.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat Accurate work. Reasonable rates, 263-
5317.
90 - Wanted
CASH    FOR   paperback   books.   I   will
pick  up.   CaU  937-0214,  7  a.m.   to 10
WANTED —- Educational student to
tutor grade 9 math for Lord Bing
student Two afternoons a week in
our home, close to UBC, Mrs. Mac-
Lean, 224-7574.
99 — Miscellaneous Tuesday, September 24,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
But Golden Bears unperturbed
Smith and Smith smear Seattle
Believe it or not the Thunderbirds football team won their
third game in a row Saturday.
Unfortunately it was only an
exhibition win as they beat the
Seattle Cavaliers 21-12 at Thun.-
derbird Stadium. It was the 'Birds'
third straight exhibition victory in
two year,s.
UBC quarterback Dan Smith hit
Digby Leigh with a touchdown pass
covering 66 yards and Marshall
MacLeod scored the other 'Bird
major on a four-yard running play.
Jim Hill converted both while
Gary Metz kicked two field goals
and Ron Cullen a single point on a
punt.
The 'Birds shut out Royal
Military College 30-0 and Seattle 8-
Oin exhibition games last year, but
Scoring touch eludes 'Birds
are 0-2 in league play this season
with 63-0 and 19-14 losses to the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies and the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs, respectively.
When asked if the exhibition win
helped improve the 'Birds morale,
coach Frank Smith, said: "Yeah."
When asked if a victory in
exhibition play meant anything to
the team, he said: "Yeah."
When asked if the win would
boost the 'Birds confidence for
their next league game with the
first place University of Alberta
Golden Bears, sporting a 3-0
record, Sept. 28, he said: "Yeah."
Marcus Bailey and Ted Metcalfe
scored Seattle's touchdowns
Saturday.
By CEDRIC TETZEL
The Thunderbird soccer forwards forgot something Sunday.
How to score.
They lost 1-0 to the Eldorado
Glens at Capilano Stadium
although they outshot the opposition by a wide margin in the
second half.
Lenny Brown scored the winner
15 minutes into the first half on a
brilliant pass from Mike Templeton.
The 'Birds were unable to come
back though they pinned the Eldos
in their own zone for much of the
second half.
The 'Birds pressed hard but
could only come away with near
misses by John Nelson, Ken Legge
and others.
As the second half wore on, with
the 'Birds missing the net in every
possible manner, UBC panicked
and lost any chance of equalizing.
If coach Joe Johnson hopes to
win the 'Birds next game, against
the New Westminster Blues,
Wednesday, he has to do something
about his goal shy forwards.
The game will be played at 7:30
p.m. in Capilano Stadium.
The 'Birds leave Friday for two
games each in Denver and
Colorado Springs before taking on
the Air Force Academy Oct. 4.
Johnson hopes the trip helps
settle the team and expects a
better performance when they
return.
Runners on track
UBC's cross country track team
literally ran away from its competition in the first meet of the
season Saturday.
John Wheeler and Chris White
finished 1-2 in the men's 8,800-
metre event at the University of
Victoria  meet,  leading  a   UBC_
onslaught that saw the Thunderbirds take four of the top five
places and six of the top nine
Sheila Currie, the only UBC
woman to attend the meet, finished
second to Esquimau's Sharon
Young in the woman's 3,000-metre
event.
CONTRACT MILE
Men's, Women's Co-Intramural
JOHN OWEN TRACK
Thursday, Sept. 26, 12:30
"Predict your time-—you win!"
BICYCLE & HOCKEY
CENTRES
New and Used Skates and Bicycles. Complete selection of
brand name Hockey Equipment, Bicycles and Accessories.
Expert Repairs, Trades Welcome.
Student and Team Discounts.
'FREE SKATE SHARPENING"
4385 W. TENTH
228-8732
620 E. BROADWAY
874-8611
Forestry Undergraduate Society Presents
UNDERCUT '74
with
HANK and the HOBOS
Saturday, September 28
8:30 P.M.
S.U.B. CAFETERIA
Full Facilities     Dress: Hard Times     $4.00 Couple
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM FORESTERS OR F.U.S. OFFICE
WORKSHOP—IN PSYCHO-MTEGRAM TECHNIQUES
12 successive Tuesdays 7:30-10:30 p.m. starting Oct. 1.
PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES DRAWN FROM
The Receptive Ways (Karma)
—deep relaxation yogas
—meditation yogas
—Interpersonal meditations
—yoglc breathing
—hatha yoga
—grounding or standing
meditations
The Active Ways (Tantra)
—meditation in motion
—awareness through movement
—rhythmics
—chanting
—theatrics
—iazz
—ego reductive encounter
—bio-energetics
—scream and other primal
means to work out
Either call Lynn Sereda at 731-0773 or
show up Tues., Oct 1 at Gestalt Studios
139 Water St. In Gastown. 4th floor.
A Unique Volunteer
The Family & Children's Service needs volunteers to:
Tutor children, work in group homes, and give
one-to-one support to troubled youngsters. Four hours
each week, expenses reimbursed.
Call: Volunteer Dept., 733-8111
1675 W. 10th Ave.
VANCOUVER SCHOOL BOARD
Wants to receive your opinions and ideas as to what students are learning or
should be teaming about
ENGLISH
in our elementary and secondary schools.
The School Board has a Task Force to obtain an answer to this
question:
Is the present Reading and Writing program preparing
students for today's world?
The Task Force invites anyone with opinions and ideas to jot them down and send them to the
Task Force at the School Board.
Write what you consider to be the good, the bad, the strengths, the weaknesses of the reading
and writing program. Offer suggestions. Ask questions.
You may be a parent, a student, a business person, a union member, a teacher, or any interested
person or group. Your opinions and ideas are we'come.
You may want to speak to the Task Force. Write for an appointment.
Please send your letters or submissions as soon as possible and by October 31st to:
THE TASK FORCE ON ENGLISH
Vancouver School Board
1595 West 10th Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C., V6J1Z8 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24,  1974
U.B.C. STUDENTS
MUST
SHOW
U.B.C.
A.M.S.
CARD!
ORIGINAL
LIST PRICE
ON ALL
RECORDS
SPECIAL OFFER AT
ONE LOCATION ONLY...
KELLY'S STEREO MARTS
2714 W. BROADWAY
ALSO SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT ON STEREO COMPONENTS!

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