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The Ubyssey Sep 16, 1976

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Array Fee increases unavoidable
By CHRIS GAINOR
It is almost certain that UBC
tuition fees will rise next year.
Although administration
president Doug Kenny is making
guarded statements about the
subject of tuition, it is clear that
tuition fee increases are
unavoidable.
In an interview Wednesday,
Kenny refused to answer yes or no
when questioned about tuition fee
increases, but said he has been
asked by the board of governors to
"examine" current tuition fees.
The board will have to make the
decision on any changes in fees.
Such a decision will not come
until   next   spring,   when   the
provincial government brings
down its budget, Kenny said.
"Philosophically, I believe
tuition should be as low as possible.
I will do everything I can to keep
things low," said Kenny.
"It's a poor idea to raise tuition,
but it is also a poor idea to lower
the quality of education," he added.
In a letter to students and faculty
released Wednesday, Kenny said:
"As you all know, the economic
climate is cold too. An effective
decrease in public funding of the
university has brought us some
severe problems.
"Most faculties have had to
make cutbacks. At the same time,
there is rising pressure from some
quarters to increase tuition fees.
"So far, UBC has been able to
resist the national trend in this
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 2     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1976
228-2301
direction — UBC students
presently receive the cheapest
good university education in
Canada.
"Since I personally believe in the
lowest possible tuition fees for
students, I hope we can resist the
mounting pressure for a large
increase."
The implication is clear — tuition
will rise and the question now is:
how much?
The final answer, as Kenny said,
will not be provided until the next
provincial budget comes down,
likely in March.
The Social Credit government's
first budget gave B.C.'s three
See page 2: UVic
— matt king photo
NOVEL POSE is struck by unidentified recumbent object on greensward outside SUB Wednesday, taking in vitamin D while supply lasts.
Gung-ho spirit shown by student will dissolve in November rains, if past
experience is anything to go by.
Rag requires runner
The Ubyssey needs a copy runner.
A copy runner, for those who don't know, is the only paid member of the
staff.
A copy runner earns $18 every week while the paper is publishing.
And the duties are simple. All a copy runner needs is a car to make six
half-hour trips each week from UBC to College Printers, located at 12th
and Maple.
If you're interested, come to The Ubyssey office at SUB 241K at noon
today.
We'd like to see anyone who's interested in writing for the paper, too,
especially sports writers. For more details, check the editorial page
inside.
Winegard report flayed
by Kenny at senate
By CHRIS GAINOR
The Winegard commission on
post secondary education in B.C.'s
non-metropolitan areas came
under sharp attack Wednesday
from UBC administration
president Doug Kenny, who said
the commission "grossly underestimated" the cost of its
recommendations.
The commission, headed by
former Guelph university
president William Winegard, said
in a report released Friday that a
fourth public university should be
established in four campuses in the
interior. The report states the new
institution should operate as part
of Simon Fraser University until
1990.
Kenny, addressing a meeting of
the university senate, said the
Winegard report did not take into
consideration the role of the
education faculty in the interior,
especially the faculty's program in
which native Indians are being
trained to become teachers.
"Dr. Winegard does not take that
SRA says no election
for student senators
By MARCUS GEE
 T:he  Student   Representative
Assembly has decided students
won't get a chance to vote for two
of the student senators who will
represent students on UBC's chief
academic decision making body.
The SRA voted Sept. 8 to appoint
two students to replace Brian
Higgins and David MacKinnon,
who were elected to senate last
year but resigned during the
summer.
And student senator Bill Broddy
said Wednesday one of the reasons
the SRA decided to suspend
elections was because some
members want to get former
student senator Ron Walls, med. 2,
who is not prepared to campaign,
back on senate.
"This is a way we could get a
certain person on who doesn't have
time to run," Broddy said.
SRA president Dave Van
Blarcom said Wednesday the move
to appoint the senators instead of
electing them is "an
abomination."
"Students should have a chance
to elect the members that
represent them. Senators should
have a  campus-wide  mandate."
Van Blarcom said the move sets
a bad precedent, although he
thinks the SRA will be careful
choosing the senators.
"I think the candidates will be
chosen carefully, but the principle
stinks."
And Van Blarcom said if Walls is
not prepared to campaign for a
position on senate he shouldn't
serve.
I think Ron was an excellent
senator. But if the guy doesn't have
time to put the jam in the job he
shouldn't be there.
Ron has said he will serve, but he
won't campaign or come to SRA
meetings. He's good, but is he that
good?"
Gordon Funt, student law
representative on senate, said
Wednesday he moved the motion to
appoint the new senators because
they will have only six months of a
one-year term left when they take
office and campaigning in an
election would cut into that time.
"It makes more sense just to
appoint them. It would be a waste
of everybody's time and money to
trold elections," Funt said.
But Van Blarcom said an election to fill the two senate vacancies
could have been held Sept. 29 along
with a referendum on whether or
not to allow vendors into SUB.
Funt said appointing the
senators is democratic, though
students won't have a chance to
vote, because SRA members who
will make the appointments are
elected themselves.
Funt refused to say if one of the
reasons he proposed appointing the
senators is because he wants Ron
Walls back on senate. Walls and
Funt worked closely together on
senate last year and Funt is
currently serving another  term.
"I would like to see Ron Walls
back on senate this way (by appointment) or the other way (by
election)," Funt said.
Broddy, who is in charge of
See page 2: SENATORS
and many other things into consideration," said Kenny.
He warned of many "unknowns"
still remaining about education
needs in the interior, and said he
wished Winegard had taken more
time to research and consider his
report.
"It is my belief that Dr.
Winegard has grossly underestimated the capital costs of
the new institution," said Kenny.
"I also think he has grossly
overestimated the operating
costs."
"Whether (control of the new
university) should be restricted to
one university is an open question
in my mind," he said.
"There is a need in the interior of
the province for higher education.
Dr. Winegard wanted to establish a
need for higher education in the
interior and he has definitely
established that need."
Kenny spoke in response to a
report to senate on the commission
from law professor Donald MacDougall, a member of the commission's advisory panel, who also
criticized the findings.
MacDougall, who is head of a
UBC committee on continuing
education, was asked to submit a
formal report on the commission
findings to the October or
November senate meeting.
The Winegard recommendations
differed from UBC's suggestion,
which was presented in a brief to
the commission June 26 and circulated in Senate Wednesday.
"We recommend that a
university centre be created at
each of the interior community
colleges as soon as it is clear that it
is appropriate to offer advanced
programs in the area served by a
See page 7:  UBC
Rick won't budge
By CHRIS GAINOR
Rick Murray reiterated Wednesday that he will not resign his
post as student representative on
the board of governors even though
he is no longer a student.
Murray, who is also a member of
the Alma Mater Society's student
representative assembly, said in
an interview he now holds a full-
time job with the City of Vancouver
engineering department and is not
currently taking any courses at
UBC.
He is considering taking a course
because of possible constitutional
problems with the AMS, said
Murray, who is one of two students
on the board.
"Anyway, I won't be returning
as a full-time student, that's for
sure," he said. "If I were to resign,
the soonest there could be an
election is late October or early
November."
Murray, whose second term on
the board began early this year,
announced in March that he was
considering taking a full-time job
and would not resign his board seat
if he took the job. His term expires
at the end of the year.
Shortly after his March announcement, Murray came under
fire from board member George
Hermanson, who said: "If he's out
working downtown, then he
shouldn't be a student representative."
Board chairman Thomas Dohm
said at the time, "if he isn't a
student, then he can't represent the
students." Dohm added he didn't
mean that Murray should resign.
Other board members said they
wanted to check provisions of the
Universities Act. Murray, an
engineering student, was elected
for a one-year term along with
fellow gear Basil Peters.
"I don't really see that I have a
choice," said Murray. "I did a lot
of ' soul-searching. I think the
See page 2: JOB Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 16, 1976
As residences fill
House listings increase
By DEB van der GRACHT
As the amount of available off-
campus housing for students is
increasing, the number of
vacancies in UBC residences
lessens daily.
Dave Johnson, co-ordinator of
the UBC off-campus housing office,
said Wednesday the number of off-
campus listings has increased in
the last few days but nobody is
taking advantage of them.
"There's a lot more available
now and new listings come in every
day. There just seems to be less
people looking. It's really perplexing."
Johnson said the office was
really busy three weeks ago and he
assumes most people have
somewhere to stay. "Sometimes
we get busy, but not very often."
The office receives an average of
50new listings a day, Johnson said.
"Two days ago we received 90
listings in one day."
The off-campus housing office
has filled close to 2500 vacancies
since May 1976. "Most students
that come in want a self-contained
unit close to UBC, like an apartment or a basement suite.
"Basement suites are especially
high this year because they're not
covered by the 10.6 per cent rent
increase (ceiling).",
In contrast the vacancies in
UBC's residences are disappearing
quickly Mary Flores, UBC's
housing office assignment coordinator, said Wednesday.
"All the men's accommodations
are gone in all three residences,"
Flores said. "We filled seven
vacancies for men in Gage due to
cancellations."
Job offer 'unexpected'
From page 1
students would be ill-served if I
resigned. For me, personally,  it
would be the easiest thing to do to
resign."
When asked why he ran for a
second term if it was possible he
would be leaving, Murray said the
job was offered to him unexpectedly . He had planned to be on
campus this year, he claimed, but
he went to a job interview on the
suggestion of a friend.
"I will be on campus a lot during
the fall," Murray said, although he
admitted it would be mainly at
night.
"Who's going to spend $75 on a
campaign for two meetings?" he
added.
Murray said he discussed his
position with UBC registrar Jack
Parnall, who is responsible for
running board and senate elections. Also discussed were possible
changes in election procedures and
terms to prevent future members
from getting into the same
predicament, he claimed.
Parnall confirmed Wednesday
that no election could be called
before November if Murray
resigned immediately. He said it
was possible that his position
would be left unfilled for the
balance of his term.
The registrar also said a change
in board terms to coincide with the
academic year would be difficult
and almost impossible to bring into
effect.
UVic rates also up
From page 1
public universities only a 9.5 per
cent increase in funds — in effect a
reduction  due  to   the  effects   of
inflation.
The Socreds' tight money
policies are unlikely to change next
year, and tight university budgets
will continue. Already at UBC,
Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria, drastic
cutbacks are in effect.
UVic administration president
Harold Pecsh indicated in a recent
interview that tuition there would
rise.
The budget also sharply reduced
outlays for capital spending at
universities. Except for the
aquatic centre, there is almost no
construction now going on at UBC.
In the future, universities will
fund capital projects through
borrowing. The move, which was
promised by education minister
Pat McGeer, would give universities more freedom to plan capital
projects, but it also means that
universities will shoulder a larger
burden of the cost.
Education minister Pat McGeer
said Wednesday B.C.'s universities
would set their own tuition rates
through their respective boards of
governors, and that his department had no influence on tuition
fees students must pay.
Senators
appointed
From page 1
appointments to SRA committees,
said the SRA will decide at its
meeting Wednesday what
procedure it will use to appoint the
senators.
But he said the SRA might decide
in a private, informal meeting
which candidates to appoint and
then present the names to an official SRA metting.
Broddy said the six months of
senate meeting left this term
represent almost a full term and so
there is no reason for appointing
rather than electing people for the
sake of expediency.
"I think it would be a little better
if we held elections," he said.
cTWarleiie'S
boutique
A ladies wear boutique
with fashions for all occasions
Men waiting for vacancies
should go to the housing office
before noon because numbers on
the waiting list are called at 1 p.m.,
she said.
Wednesday there were 18 single
women's rooms available in Totem
Park and in Place Vanier. Four
Women's doubles are open in
Totem and five double rooms are
available in Place Vanier.
"Many people apply for
residence because they don't know
Vancouver and they want a sure
thing. This year they seemed to
think they'd be able to get
something off campus."
Flores said some people have
returned to Housing after their
waiting list numbers have been
called. "All we can do then is put
them on the waiting list and ask
them to be patient."
U.B.C.
-fit
' 11
Ihb^K1
KUNG FU CLUB
' '^Jjjjfl
wk\\t\\\\iz    ^*a\\
Chief Instructor Grand Master
RAYMOND LEUNG
m
li^i
Classes on every Monday & Wednesday
4:30-6:30 P.M.
PARTY ROOM SUB
I           t     '    ^T^
1  1
i
}
New Members Welcome1.
^P -"^ £■
m Mk^.
■** iS
|5$&4
Hillel House Thursday Lecture
Sept. 23 1976 — 12:30 pm.
MR. HERMAN LEBOVITZ
The New Executive Director of the
Jewish Community Centre
will conduct an open dialogue on
ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO JUDAISM
3673 W. Broadway
738-6323
VA
zipping
around campus?
There's lots to do. Like locating your
classes, deciding which profs to avoid,
and checking out the action at the campus
pub. But before you wear yourself out,
drop by your Bank of Montreal nearest the
campus and open an account. We'll
answer any questions you have (like
which account is best for you). As well as
give you a free metric converter — so you
can calculate how many meters-per-
minute you have to dash from the fo<
of your bed to your 8 o'clock class.
^
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal Thursday, September 16, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ed to
The effects of Social Credit's
education policies will not be felt in
the classrooms for two years,
education minister Pat McGeer
said Wednesday.
And those policies will be aimed
at getting more people trained for
B.C.'s job markets, he said.
Technical and vocational schools
and medical schools will be emphasized and "pure" learning —
the arts and pure sciences — will
be de-emphasized, McGeer indicated.
McGeer has recently received
the Winegard report on post-
secondary education in non-
metropolitan B.C.,  and he said
BC's jobs — McGeer
separate reports on universities,
technical and vocational schools
and community colleges^ are
expected during the next months.
No education policies will be
formulated until the data and'
recommendations in these reports
are completed and have been
studied, McGeer said;
The Goundry report, studying
B.C.'s universities system "with
special reference to (courses for
which there is great) demand and
where jobs are available for
graduates," will be on his desk in a
week, he said.
"That report is not oriented to
the less practical side of university, let's call it:"
McGeer made the remarks in an
interview after a Point Grey Social
Credit Party constituency annual
meeting in UBC's Faculty Club.
Earlier, he repeated to the
audience the mainstay so far of his
educational policies — that Social
Credit is "getting back to the three
Rs."
"There is a quiet revolution in
the education system of B.C.," he
told the Socreds.
"We're going to put some strong
content into the core curriculum of
schools," he said. Then he mentioned such stock Socred ideas as
"the work ethic" and something
about "productive citizens" before
reading to the shocked audience
the first-term schedule of the grade
10 son of a cabinet colleague.
"I couldn't believe it myself," he
said. "Here's the content of this*
grade 10 student, the son of a
cabinet minister. There were five
courses. The first was food; the
second was gourmet; the third was
drama; the fourth was physical
education and the fifth was
woodworking."
He also repeated his promise to
double the size of UBC's medical
school, but did not say when this
would take place; he only said the
school "obviously" couldn't double
in size overnight, and the department and B.Cs medical faculty
are studying the problem.
And he repeated his promise that
there will be no increases in Insurance Corporation of B.C.
premiums next year, citing profits
in the first half of this year as the
reason.
Insurance claims in July were
McGEER .. . more reports
the lowest since ICBC's first month
of operation in March, 1974.
"The wreck-it-and-fix-it syndrome is finished," he said. "The
money is finding its way back to
the motorist's pockets."
UBC draft dodger
detained by U.S.
By HEATHER WALKER
A UBC student is being held in
New Jersey on charges of evading
the United States Vietnam draft.
Sam Israel, a first year creative
writing student, was arrested in
New York City August 15 while
returning to Canada from Europe.
Israel left New Jersey in 1969
after he was denied conscientious
objector status. He became a
Canadian citizen last May.
He is being held in the U:S. on
$20,000 bail, but has been released
on his own recognizance to his
parents' home in Atlantic City,
New Jersey.
Israel cannot return to B.C. to
await his trial unless the bail is
paid. He is planning to appeal for a
reduction in his bail.
Israel could not be reached for
comment Wednesday because he
was consulting with his lawyer in
New York.
— James quinn photo
TEMPTATION TO DO DIRTY on instructor Alex Kwok was resisted by Wayne Quong (in white) during
kung fu demonstration in SUB ballroom Wednesday. It's just as well, because Kwok, picked to play Bruce
Lee in upcoming screen biography on the martial arts movie star, could probably take Quong apart.
Lottery launched for covered puddle
Fund raisers for UBC's new
covered pool have decided to
launch a lottery to help raise the*
$1.2 million needed to finish the
project, Doug Aldridge, chief pool
fund raiser, said Wednesday.
Undergraduate societies and
clubs will begin selling $1 tickets
soon for a grand prize of $2,500 and
three second prizes of $500.
And Aldridge said the final cost
of the pool may jump to $5 million
from $4.7 million, necessitating
either more fund raising or cuts in
the project.
Aldridge added the completion
date for the pool has been postponed to December, 1977 from
September, 1977. He said a major
reason for the delay was the six
week construction labor dispute
this summer.
The dispute added $40,000 to
$50,000 to the cost of the pool and
delayed construction of the roof, he
said. The dispute also will mean a
delay in the letting of tenders for
the second stage of the project,
Other fund raising projects include an appeal to UBC staff at the
end of September, an alumni appeal in October and an appeal to
corporations in spring, 1977.
Construction of the $2,156,400
first stage of the project began in
November, 1975.
Students have been paying $5 a
year to the project since 1972 when
they voted to build a pool with a
cost estimated at $2.8 million. The
cost has almost doubled since then.
Students total contribution to the
project will be $925,000 and the
UBC administration will match
that amount. The provincial
government will pay $333,333.
Aldridge said he is still waiting
for a possible $400,000 grant from
the federal government's physical
resources development program.
Students are paying about 20 per
cent of the cost of the pool in return
for 14.4 per cent of pool time, The
Ubyssey learned last year.
But Aldridge said students with
student cards can use the pool any
regular class day. He said the pool
will be divided into three different
activity areas, so students,
physical education classes and
people from the community can
use it.
Aldridge said the area around
the pool will be landscaped and a
small grassy hill will be created.
Gears and other animals mix
By TED DAVIS
Because of their rowdy behaviour over the past
years the Engineering Undergraduate Society has
been refused office space in the new civil and
mechanical engineering building.
Instead they have been given the option of sharing
an old agriculture building with chickens and rabbits,
EUS president Keith Gagne said Wednesday.
Applied science dean Liam Finn, said Wednesday
the decision came "because the faculty felt if they
behaved in the future the way they behaved in the
past the building would be defaced, not by the
engineers but by others seeking retaliation upon
them."
Last winter the old civil engineering building was
vandalized, causing $4,000 of damage.
It is not known who did the damage, but Gagne said
the engineers were indirectly blamed. "They see us
as the ointment that attracts the flies," he said.
The EUS was promised room 1214 in the new
building for office and lounge space, said Gagne, and
plans for the building showed the room belonging to
the EUS.
But at a meeting last week between members of
Finn's staff,  administration vice-president  Erich
Vogt, members of the departments of civil and
mechanical engineering, and some unknown
engineering students, the final decision was made not
to give the EUS the room, Finn said.
At the meeting some engineers said they didn't
care if the EUS got the new office. But they weren't
speaking for the EUS, Gagne said.
Gagne said the faculty has justified its decision by
repeating the statements by the unknown engineers
and by referring to crowded conditions in the building
and the need for more teaching space there.
Gagne complained about the smell, noise and lice in
the agriculture hut known as the 'cheese factory', and
about the fact that the EUS would only get half the
building, but said they would accept it if they got the
whole building.
He also complained that the present EUS office in
the old Civil's building is separated from the rest of
the engineering faculty which has buildings in the
south-west area of the campus. The 'cheese factory'
is in the area of the new engineering buildings.
Gagne said the EUS is appealing to the faculty and
the departments of civil and mechanical engineering
to reverse their decision and it may take the matter to
the board of governors.
An appeal was originally
scheduled for Wednesday, but was
postponed until Friday, Israel's
wife Brenda Webster said Wednesday.
"The standard bail in these cases
is $5,000," Webster said.
"It's absurd for them to ask so
much."
Webster said Israel's lawyer told
her the bail was high because
Israel had come to Canada before,
"and they expect him to run off
again."
But, she said, other people in
Israel's position have only paid
$5,000.
I don't see why we should be
charged such a high bail," Webster
said. Israel and Webster earlier
turned down an offer from a
Vancouver school board electrician to pay the full $20,000 bail.
Hugh Burton heard of the case
through a story in the Vancouver
Sun and phoned the paper with his
offer.
Webster said she was "overwhelmed" by the offer.
"I was over on the island
(Vancouver Island) at the time,
and I wasn't aware that the arrest
was even in the papers," she said.
She said she and Israel both felt
they could not accept the offer. "If
the bail was reduced to $5,000, I
don't know if we would accept or
not, but I don't think so.
"The issue is the morality of the
whole thing," she said. "Sam's
family was prepared to make
arrangements to pay the bail, but
we didn't agree with that, either."
No date has been set for Israel's
trial, but Webster said it would
probably take place just before the
U.S. presidential election.
If Israel is convicted of draft
evasion, she said, his penalty
would depend on the judge.
"There is a small possibility of
imprisonment, but we don't want
to think about that," she said.
"Otherwise, he could be told to
pay a fine, or might be put on
probation for two years.
"As far as I can see, that would
only mean if he doesn't resist any
more drafts for two years, he'll be
all right."
Webster said the arrest took
place when the couple had to
change planes in New York.
She said they had to pass through
U.S. customs in order to change
planes, and the officer looked up
information on people with non-
American passports. When the
customs officer saw Israel had
evaded the draft, he was arrested. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 16, 1976
Democracy too slow for AMS
Isn't democracy wonderful?
The student council has
decided to appoint two students to the university senate
to replace senators Brian Higgins and David McKinnon,
who resigned during the summer.
You can't always elect
new people to replace the
ones who resign in mid-term.
But Higgins and McKinnon
didn't resign in mid-term;
they were elected in March,
attended the April meeting,
then decided they weren't
coming back to UBC and so
resigned. Their terms don't
end until March, 1977.
There is plenty of time to
set up a by-election to pick
two student senators-at-large
to replace Higgins and
McKinnon. But the reason
the AMS didn't do so, according to vice-president Bill
Broddy, is that Ron Walls,
the person the AMS heavies
want in Senate, doesn't have
time to campaign.
"Hey, I have an idea,"
some AMS hack must have
thought. "Why not simply
appoint Walls and someone
else? Then we don't have to
worry    about   this   election
nonsense."
Good idea. Fast, efficient,
and cheap. Also, you don't
leave important stuff like
choosing senators up to students. This way, the people
who know who would make
a good senator get to pick
him/her.
Walls is knowledgeable and
smart. He was a good senator
during his term last year. But
the reason he refused to run
for re-election this spring is
because he thought his workload would be too much to
allow him to do a good job
on senate.
Broddy    said   Walls   indi-
y'CCMoW   PRcFFESSef^ IT'S
Nor that   rrie G&jeiiUMEMT-
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Huh? Litteracy problem?
Didja see that Insight '76, the guide to
UBC put out by your student council and
distributed during registration week?
Cuz if you did, you might of noticed
the same thing we did. It's the best proof
we've seen that you don't have to be able to
write good to get throught university.
Heck, Moe Sihota, the guy who wrote
it, is a real good guy, and he worked real
hard over the summer to do it, and it's full
of information. But jeez, the guy can't write.
The Alma Mater Society could probably of
have found one student out of 23,000 on
campus who can write to do the guide.
Anyways, the part that really gets us is
the part talking about The Ubyssey, the part
that goes "... the paper needs writers cuz it
ain't nothing without your help."
The paper ain't all that needs writers.
cated he'd be too busy to
campaign. If he's too busy to
campaign, how much time is
he going to have to spend on
senate work?
And even if he will have
time, why not elect him? For
years students screamed and
yelled to get representation
on senate; last year, they
screamed    and    yelled    that
they, and not the administration, should conduct student senate and board elections; the administration has
indicated it is amenable to
that. So what does council to
this year? It does away with
elections for two student sen-
ators simply because
democracy isn't fast and
efficient enough.
Come on in
Seeking fame, notoriety,
simply a cure for the stifling
boredom of classes?
Join The Ubyssey!
The paper is eagerly seeking staff of all sorts, especially sports writers and photographers. And we always can
use newswriters, news
photogs, reviewers — anyone
who wants to work on a
newspaper.
The Ubyssey, by the way,
is perhaps the only bastion of
True Democracy on this campus.
All decisions on the
paper's content and the way
it's run are made by the
entire staff.
So come to the office in
SUB 241K at noon today,
meet our friendly, smiling
staff, and JOIN!
TT'S   3u<tr   THAT  THESE
l>Ar+N    CLAy TABLETS yoo
<2?IVE WS To   IrVRlTE  <3rJ
WonV Pit im rAY
TVPEWRITER, I
Letters
Pesch
gehabt
I would like to congratulate the
appropriate authorities in their
appointing of Michael Batts as the
head of the German department.
This fine gentleman has developed
a unique method of ensuring he will
"not be bothered twice by helpless
students whose main field of
studies is unfortunately not German but who (impudent devils!)
still want to take a German course.
I was lucky enough to witness a
flawless application of this
technique by a man who must
certainly be considered a master in
his own field.
On the Tuesday afternoon I
walked into his office, Batts was in
fine form. I explained to him that I
wished to take a certain German
course whose prerequisite I did not
have, but that I did feel I could,
because of my native background,
easily handle the course-load.
Batts then bagan babbling about
the fecal deposits of earthworms
(!) and asked me if I could handle
them. "Sure," I felt like responding, "but not with my bare
hands."
However, I restrained myself
and began wondering which
department I had actually walked
into.
Batts   then,   quite   succinctly,
explained to me, that "they" did
not want "my kind" to take German courses just to pick up credits.
However, after further
enlightening conversation, the
good doctor revealed that I could
take the course with permission of
the instructor, but that I would
have to pass an exam which was to
be held in Ottawa.
Despairingly, I asked: "How can
I write an exam that is only being
held in Ottawa?" After a short
burst of laughter, Batts caustically
replied:     "Well,    that's    your
problem!"
So I figured it was, and, knowing
that I could get no sense out of this
particular individual, I left the
office'.
I wish to launch no vendetta
against the entire German
department — in fact, the majority
of professors there were and
remain friendly and helpful — but I
do wish to point out to whoever is
guilty of this man's placement and
to members of the student, body
who intend to take up German as a
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 14,1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
-241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
These worked: Ted Davis, Steve Howard, Chris Gainor, Ralph Maurer,
Charlie Micallef, Heather Walker, Marcus Gee, Marcus Gee, Les Wiseman,
Jackie Landry, Ian Currie, Sue Vohanka, Dave Wilkinson, Matt King, Jim
Quinn, Doug Field, Bob Krieger and Deb van der Gracht.
Reminder to all staff that there will be a staff meeting at 1 p.m. today In
The Ubyssey office.
field of study, that Batts, while
obviously displaying a marked
predisposition towards handling
the fecal deposits of earthworms
{with or without bare hands) as
opposed to students' problems,
should not couple his incapabilities
in this particular field with a surly
and sarcastic manner.
Tom Botz
commerce 2
Count Jem
I had been meaning to write
several times during the past 58
years on this point but somehow,
despite being an avid reader, I
never got around to doing it.
Reading your opening issue for
1976-77, however, I noticed with
pleasure that someone else had
finally developed an eagle eye. I
refer, of course to your volume
number which this year is listed
corcectly as volume. 59. Listed
correctly for the first time since
my fine days on campus as an
English undergrad (and society
editor of The Ubyssey).
So congratulations, staff of '76-
77, on a job so far well done.
Thank you.
Edith Gransby
arts '18
You can't count so well yourself,
Edith. The volume number has
been wrong for only the last 10
years, not 58, as you state. — Staff
Rebunked
I must take issue with the article
entitled TM Debunked in
Tuesday's Ubyssey. It is a sad
example of sloppy journalism and
a negative, subjective attitude.
As any scientist will tell you, one
negative piece of research is
hardly a signal to so thoroughly
damn a technique practised by ten
thousand people in Greater Vancouver alone.
There are now over four hundred
pieces of scientific research which
show TM to be a highly beneficial
technique for relieving stress and
improving general health. Why
didn't you print that, too?
J. K. Fraser
arts 4
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
» Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Thursday, September 16, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Seabed riches beckon miners
By MICK LOWE
The following article first appeared in
Miner's Voice, a publication of the United
Steelworkers of America, and is reprinted
from Canadian University Press.
In August, 1973, a strange-looking ship
quietly weighed anchor in Philadelphia
Harbour and began a deep-sea voyage that
was to have, immense consequences for the
Canadian economy.
The decks of the ship were crammed from
stem to stern with derricks, cranes and
super-secre.t machinery. Built by billionaire
Howard Hughes at a cost of $343 million and
dubbed the Glomar Explorer, the vessel's
publically-announced purpose was to
recover mineral-rich nodules from the
ocean's depths.
But in March, 1975, the Glomar made
headlines around the world when its real
purpose was revealed — to raise a sunken
Soviet submarine off the floor of the Pacific
for study by the Central Intelligence
Agency.
No iairytale
Yet, some sharp-eyed observers wondered, which cover story was covering
which?
In the long run, Hughes' debut as an ocean
miner could prove more strategically vital
than decoding the Soviet military secrets
allegedly contained in the sunken sub.
A wealth of riches will accrue to the
company or the country that first perfects
"If we remain complacent too long,
the voyage of the Glomar may be the
beginning of the end for Canada's
copper and nickel industry."
the technology of raising the fist-sized
nodules that litter the ocean floors.
But more than that, the nodules could
make the fondest dreams of the Pentagon
come true — they could provide the United
States military with its own guaranteed
supply of strategic minerals like nickel,
copper, manganese, and cobalt.
Today, the U.S. is forced to import 82 per
cent of its nickel and manganese, 77 per cent
of its cobalt and 4.6 per cent of its copper.
A large percentage of these minerals,
except manganese, are imported from
Canada.
Our country's exports of nickel and copper
were worth $1.5 billion in 1975, and they
meant tens of thousands of jobs in mining,
smelting and transportation.
Two of Canada's biggest employers in the
metals industry — Inco Ltd. and Noranda
Mines of Canada — are already in the
forefront of developing the new seabed
mining technology.
And judging from the money that both
these shrewdly-managed multinationals are
investing in their respective consortia, they
mean business.
"Seabed mining is no fairytale," says
Inco's representative to Ocean Management
Inc., John Shaw, "but it's not in the bag,
either, by any means. It's all very new and
very risky."
The big question mark at the moment,
Shaw explains, is the technology needed to
raise the potato-shaped nodules from the
ocean floor at depths as great as 10,000 feet.
Shaw is understandably reluctant to
divulge details of his group's mining
methods, but it's clear they involve a
strictly capital-intensive operation with no
mine workers as we know them today.
Basically, Ocean Management plans to
dredge the nodules in a ship similar to the
Glomar Explorer by using a 10-inch
diameter, thick-walled steel pipe three
miles long.
The pipe will be suspended from the
recovery vessel and the nodules will be
sucked off the ocean floor by a collector
head similar to a vacuum cleaner.
Once on the recovery ship the nodules will
be transported toa freighter for transport to
a land-based refinery.
Stretching even the strongest steel pipe
through three miles of turbulent ocean
depths may seem like science fiction, but
the Ocean Management group plans to have
its experimental ship operating in the
Pacific by next fall.
Costs unknown
If all goes well, according to Shaw, the
first full-scale operation will be onstream by
1982. The nodules will be a bonanza for Inco
et al., because their metal content is far
higher than the richest grade ore to be found
anywhere in the earth.
How will all this affect Canada's vital
copper and nickel industry?
"I don't think it will affect it substantially
for a long time to come," says Shaw. "It will
mainly depend on economics — whether the
new recovery method is more or less expensive than the old."
But at least one Canadian mining expert,
former Ontario Mining Association
president Charles Elliott, sees cause for
concern about seabed mining.
"One reason for concern is that we don't
really know how cheap seabed mining will
be. But there are insiders in the industry
right now who say the nodule recovery
process will be cheaper than land-based
mining."
The first traditional operations to be
threatened will likely be the lateritic nickel
deposits in Guatemala and the Dominican
Republic, Elliott says.
Although the cost of mining lateritics is
cheaper than recovering the sulphide (or
sulphur-bearing) ores found in Canada, the
laterite refining process is energy intensive.
As energy costs continue to skyrocket,
Elliott predicts the laterite deposits will be
less and less competitive.
Four major variables will determine the
future of Canada's nickel and copper industry relative to seabed mining — long-
term demand, long-term supply, the costs of
production of the respective methods, and
international law determining jurisdiction
of the richest seabed areas which lie in international waters.
Embargo threat
The latter point is one of the major issues
at the Law of the Sea Conference. U.S.
mining companies are anxious to start
mining the seabed, but the U.S. State
Department has so far insisted that the
jurisdictional hassles will be resolved first.
But once Americans start recovering
nodules in commercial quantities, Elliott
fears, they may place an embargo on imports of nickel and copper, with disastrous
consequences for the Canadian industry.
At least one Canadian, New Democratic
MP John Rodriguez, has a plan of action
that he believes the federal government
should pursue before it's too late.
The representative for the Sudbury
Basin's Nickel Belt riding, Rodriguez knows
that his constituency stands to lose most
from seabed mining.
The government, he says, should buy out
Falconbridge Nickel Mines Ltd., the only
major Canadian producer not already involved in a seabed consortium.
Once Falconbridge is included in the
federal government's Canadian Development Corporation it should join one of the
existing consortia so that Canada will be on
the forefront of seabed developments.
The profits from the Falconbridge venture
should then be invested in the Sudbury area
to compensate for any loss the Basin might
suffer as a result of seabed mining, says
Rodriguez.
It's a safe bet, too, that unions
representing Canadian miners and smelters
in the nickel and copper industries will soon
start hearing about seabed mining at the
bargaining tables.
Just as the Third World lateritic deposits
were used by the mining companies as a
threat in order to reduce wage demands, so
will the threat of seabed competition.
Any real threat from seabed production is
still probably 20 years away, and if the
Canadian government wakes up to the long-
term problems, damage to our economy can
be minimized.
But if we remain complacent for too long,
the August, 1973 voyage of the Glomar
Explorer may some day be recognized as
the beginning of the end for Canada's billion-
dollar-a-year copper and nickel industry.
Consortia collude
WEST COAST SHORE . . . farther out, millions lay deep.
The world's major mining corporations
are already ganging up into huge consortia
that are scrambling to develop the new
technology necessary to plunder the wealth
of the ocean depths.
The major companies, their consortia,
and estimated investments are:
Ocean Management Inc., which includes
Inco Ltd., a Japanese combine comprising
Sumimoto, Nippon Mining, Dowas Mining
and Sedco Ltd., a Dallas-based exploration
firm.
Total investment: $35 to $40 million over
three to four years.
The Kennecott consortium, owned 50 per
cent by Kennecott Copper Corp., along with
Britain's Rio Tinto-Zinc Corp., Japan's
giant Mitsibushi Corp., and Britain's
Consolidated Gold Field.
Total investment: $50 million.
Deepsea Ventures involves Tenneco Inc.
of Houston, U.S. Steel, Belgium's Union
Miniere, and yet another Japanese consortium.
Investment: $20 million.
Summa Corp., owned by late billionaire
Howard Hughes got off to an early lead, but
Hughes' death combined with the Russian
sub scandal has slowed its progress.
The Soviet Union and West Germany are
believed to be in the running with exploration firms of their own. Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 16, 1976
Gays hit streets
TORONTO (CUP) — ".One —
three — six — nine — lesbians are
mighty fine!"
"Two — four — six — eight — we
don't overpopulate!"
These were some of the chants
echoing in the streets of downtown
Toronto as 400 marchers gave an
enthusiastic show of support of
pride among lesbians and gay
men.
The march was held Sept. 4, the
opening day of the three-day
Fourth Annual Gay Conference.
On the more serious side,
demonstrators focused their
concerns on job security and the
need to have sexual orientation
included in the Ontario Human
Rights Code.
The marchers rallied to hear
speeches emphasizing the need to
change laws and attitudes that
discriminate against homosexuals
in Canada.
One speech was made by a
spokesperson for the Committee to
Defend John Damien. Damien, a
former steward of the Ontario
Racing Commission, was fired
from his job in February, 1975
because he is homosexual. He is
challenging the dismissal, and his
case has become a rallying point
for gays across Canada.
Currently, gays in Ontario have
no redress through the Ontario
Human Rights Code. The code is
civil rights legislation protecting
individuals from discrimination on
the basis of race, sex, religion and
age, but includes no provision for
sexual orientation.
The   spokesperson   said   that
under current law, gay people are
not secure in their jobs since they
can be fired on the whim of an anti-
gay employer.
Jim Turk, Ontario New
Democratic Party president, said
the struggle for gay rights is one
way of achieving a better life for
the working people of Canada.
' 'One of the chief obstacles to this
effort has been the practice of
employers to exploit differences
among working people, so that
while a few are well paid, the
majority are not — while a few are
secure, the majority are worried
from one day to the next," he said.
"It is inexcusable that today
lesbians and gay men live in fear of
losing their jobs because of their
sexual orientation. Sexual
orientation must be added to all
human rights codes so that in law
employers cannot continue this
exploitation of gays."
Turk added: "We need to
question why changing the law
isn't enough. The answer, I
believe, is that the law operates
within our all pervasive capitalist
economic order.
"And capitalism thrives on
competition in which the few exploit the many. The few, with their
vast economic power, can control
the cultural reality in which we all
live. Through this control, the few
are able to get us to be participants
in our own oppression."
The march was considered a
success by participants, because of
the attendance and the presence of
Jim Turk.
HILLEL HOUSE
is serving daily lunches
Kosher Meat Sandwiches
and  Cold  Drinks   (at a nominal fee)
(free hot drinks)
•
This is a co-operative project
of
Vancouver Chabad
and
Hillel House UBC
Rendale
Apple bee .
Wrangler
Lee
Levi's
Big Blue
Seafarers
Brittania
Pface for Pants
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK
RED RYDER?
By Mark Medoff
SEPTEMBER 17-25
(Previews Sept. 15 & 16)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
Setting by Douglas Higgins
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $6)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 15-25 WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK RED RYDER? by Medoff
Nov. 3-13 THE BOYS FROM SYRACUSE by Rodgers and Hart
Jan 12-22 A COLLIER'S FRIDAY NIGHT by D. H. Lawrence
March 2-12 THE REVENGER'S TRAGEDY by Tourneur
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 207
Wontei
I'S II
itrami
jral 1
,roj
jram
Schedule of Events 1976-77
EVENT
DEADLINE
DATE
ACTIVITY                 TYPE OF
DATE                COMPETITION
TIME
FACILITY
Joggers 2 Mile
(Mem. Gym -
Westbrook Cres. to
16th Ave. & return)
Friday
Sept. 17
Timed
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mem. Gym Field
(Mclnnes Field)
Joggers 2 Mile Run
(Mem. Gym to St.
Anselm's Church on
University Blvd. & return)
Friday
Sept. 24
Timed
12:35
Noon
Start/ Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Slo-Pitch
Friday
Sept. 24
Sunday
Sept. 26
Double
Elimination
1:00-
4:30
John Owen
Field
Novelty Swim
Meet
Friday
Sept. 24
Thursday
Sept. 30
Recreational
12:35
Noon
Empire
Pool
Canoe Trip
Friday
Sept. 24
Saturday
Oct. 2
Recreational
All Day
Pitt Lake
Volleyball
Friday
Sept. 24
Monday
Sept. 27-Nov. 8
Except Mon.Oct.
Leagues
11
7:30-
9:30
Memorial
Gym
Ice Hockey
League
Friday
Oct. 1
Thursdays
Oct.7-Nov. 25
Leagues
7:30-
9:30
Winter Sports
Centre
Joggers 3 Mile
Run (Gates & return
via University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 1
Timed
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
Broomball
Friday
Oct. 1
Thursday
Oct.7-Oct.21
Double
Elimination
7:30-
9:30
Winter Sports
Centre
* Tennis Tournament
(Singles)
Friday
Oct. 8
Saturday
Oct. 9
Double
Elimination
10:00 a.m
4:00 p.m.
Armouries
Turkey Trot
Friday
. Oct. 8
Timed
12:35
Noon
Memorial
Field
Flag Football
Friday
Oct. 8
Thursday
Oct. 14,21
Double
Elimination
12:35
Noon
Memorial
Field
Joggers 3 Mile
(Gates & back via
University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 15
Timed
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym)
Joggers 4 Mile
(University Blvd.-
Blanca Chancellor Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 22
Timed
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym)
» Squash
Friday
Oct. 15
Mon-Thurs.
Oct.18-Oct.21
Double
Elimination
Weekdays
P.M.
Winter Sports
Centre
Curling
Friday
Oct. 15
Saturday
Oct. 23
Double
Elimination
All
Day
Winter Sports          i
Centre
Great Pumpkin
X-Country Cycle Race
Thursday
Oct. 28
Timed
12:35
Noon
SUB Parking
Lot
Ringette
(floor hockey on ice)
Friday
Nov. 12
Thursday
Nov.18-Nov.25
Double
Elimination
7:30
9:30
Winter Sports
Centre
Basketball
(for second term)
Friday
Dec. 3
Monday
Jan.10-Jan.24
Double
Elimination
7:30-
9:30
Memorial
Gym
Ice Hockey League
(for second term)
Fun Hockey League
(for second term)
Friday
Dec. 3
Friday
Dec. 3
Thursday
Jan.13-Feb.24
Thursday
Jan.13-Jan.27
Leagues
Recreational
7:30-
9:30
7:30-
9:30
Winter Spprts
Centre
Winter Sports
Centre
* Badminton
Friday
Jan. 14
Wednesday
Jan.19-Feb.9
Double
Elimination
5:00-
7:00
Gym A
Bowling
League
Friday
Jan. 21
Tuesday
Feb. 1-15
Leagues
7:30-
9:00
SUB Bowling
Lanes
Volleyball
Friday
Feb. 14
Monday
Feb. 7-14
Leagues
7:30-
9:30
Memorial
Gym
Curling
Friday
Feb. 18
Saturday
Feb. 26
Double
Elimination
All
Day
Winter Sports
Centre
Soccer
Friday
Feb. 18
Thursday
Feb.24,Mar. 3
Double
Elimination
12:35
Noon
Memorial
Field
* Racquet ball
Tournament
Monday
Feb. 28
Tues.-Thurs.
March 1-3
Double
Elimination
5:00-
9:00 p.m
Winter Sports
. Centre
* Sign up on posted schedules outside the Intramural Office.
** Check drawsheet in Off
ce for your start
ng times Thursday, September 16, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC hits report findings
From page 1
particular   community   college,"
the UBC brief said.
"We believe that this condition
has been satisfied already in most
areas served by a particular
community college. Each
university centre would be
operated by one of the three
existing public universities,
preferably in co-operation with the
community colleges," the brief
said.
Under the UBC proposal, the
centres would offer degrees from
the associate university, and the
university would offer courses
using the combined facilities of the
university and college. The college
would retain its autonomy, and the
university would use its facilities
on a lease basis, the brief
proposed.
The commission was set up by
education minister Pat McGeer
May 5 and presented its report last
week. McGeer said he will not
make a decision until he has heard
from the communities involved,
the Universities Council of B.C.
and SFU, which has until the end of
the year to accept or reject the
proposals.
The University College of Simon
Fraser University, as the report
calls it, would have campuses in
Prince George, Kamloops,
Kelowna and Nelson, and a
headquarters in Vernon. If SFU
rejects the commission's
recommendations, then the institution should be set up
autonomously, the report says.
The B.C. Students' Federation
has endorsed the Winegard report,
although it called for more community and student input.
"Dr. Winegard made the same
mistake as the MacDonald report
(on higher education in 1963); he
worried about the role of the
universities," MacDougall told
senate.
"It is not the best of meeting the
needs of the people in the interior.
Dr. Winegard has chosen to throw
a heavy burden on Simon Fraser
University,"  MacDougall  added.
Jindra Kulich, at the Centre for
Continuing Education, who is
another member of the advisory
panel, told senate that people in the
north of B.C. do not want a physical
university, especially with an
Okanagan campus, but an increased emphasis on independent
study courses.
During debate on the report,
several members of senate attacked it. Education dean John
Andrews said he is "disappointed"
in the report.
"We have lost in a very great
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
way," he said. "The best stance for
this university to take is acceptance of whatever happens."
Andrews said UBC has assigned
a low priority to extension
programs in decisions of the last
few years, which have led directly
to the report's recommendations.
Medicine dean Dr. David Bates
said UBC should not attack the
proposal for a new institution on
the grounds that its academic
standards may be lower than those
of existing B.C. universities,
because the Winegard report gave
a high priority to increasing accessibility.
"There is some merit in offering
a program of some kind," Bates
said.
During the debate, Kenny said
Winegard should have looked at
the idea that students from the
interior attending UBC should be
subsidized.
Winegard estimated the institution's capital costs over its
first five years at $8.5 million and
its annual operating costs at $7.1
million a year.
The commission was formed
partly to deal with the disposition
of   Notre   Dame   University.
MOVING & TRANSFER
amU  Reasonable
'J^     Rotes
Big er Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
FOAM!
Mattresses
Bolster
Camper—Boat
Cushion
Foam Chair
Orthopedic
Wedges
Camping
Pads
MADE TO ORDER
Open Six Days a Week
9 a.m.-5:30 P.M.
United Foam 1976 Ltd.
3696 W. 4th
738-6737
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KENNY . .. pooh-poohs report
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'Traditional
Qieco-Roman Cuisine
Whole Wheat Pizzas
Whole Wheat
Spaghetti
Souvlaki
Mousaka
Kalamari
Game Hens
LUNCH
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
DINNER
5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
733-6824
2222 W. 4th Van. B.C.
AND NOW AT LAST SUB FILMS
present another film different from some of the other
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I Tprhn,< r.inr '■ * Recommended ai ADULT ENTER'
This Thurs., Sun. -7:00
& Fri., Sat.-7:00/9:30
R.comm.nd.d ai ADULT INTIITAINMINT
Plus: Chill of the Phantom
Creeps- Fri., Sat. -7:00
Men's
Inti
ramuN
il Prog
ram
Schedu
le of Events
1976-77
EVENT
DEADLINE
DATE
COMPETITION
DATE
TIME
FACILITY
Football
Friday
Sept. 17
Monday
Sept. 27
12:30
Noon &
After 5:30
Thunderbird
Park
Soccer
Friday
Sept. 17
Tuesday
Sept. 28
12:35
Noon &
After 5:30
Thunderbird
Park
Joggers 2 mile run
(Mem. Gym-Westbrook
Cres. to 16th Ave.
and return)
Friday
Sept. 17
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mem. Gym Field
(Mclnnes Field)
Slo-Pitch
Friday
Sept. 17
Sunday
Sept.26-Oct.3,17
10:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
Thunderbird
Park
Contract Mile
Thursday
Sept. 23
12:35
Noon
Harry Logan
Track
* Outdoor Tennis
Tournament
Friday
Sept. 24
Sat. & Sun., Sept
25& 26
All Day
Outdoor Courts
Joggers 2 Mile Run
(Mem. Gym to St.
Anselm's Church on
University Blvd.
and return.)
Friday
Sept. 24
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Golf
Tournament
Saturday
Sept. 25
12:00
University
Golf Course
Swimming
Tuesday
Sept. 28
Wednesday
Sept. 29
12:35                                        Empire Pool
Noon
Heats-50M Free
Breast, Back, Butterfly;
100M Free, 12:35 Noon
All Sept., 28 Finals plus
200M Free, Medley Relays
Hockey
Friday
Oct. 1
Thursday
Oct. 7
Weekday
Evenings
TWSC
Joggers 3 Mile Run
(Gates & Return via
University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 1
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
*'* 3 on 3
Basketball
Friday
Oct. 8
Sunday
Oct. 17
10:30
4:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Basketball
Friday
Oct. 8
Monday
Oct. 18
Weekday, Noon
& Evenings
Memorial Gym
Turkey Trot
Friday
Oct. 8
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Arts 20 Race
Friday
Oct. 8
Thursday
Oct. 14
12:35
Noon
VGH to UBC (Start
at 12th & Heather)
Joggers 3 Mile Run
(Gates & back via
University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 15
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Joggers 4 Mile Run
(University Blvd.-Blanca-
Chancellor Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 22
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Curling
Bonspiel
Friday
Oct. 22
Sat., Sun.
Oct. 30, 31
All Day
TWSC
Great Pumpkin
X-Country Cycle Race
Thursday
Oct. 28
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
Joggers 5 Mile Run
Cross Country
Friday
Oct. 29
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(War Mem. Gym)
* Squash
Friday
Nov. 19
Sat. & Sun.
Nov. 20, 21
Evenings
& All Day
TWSC
Pre Registration
for Second Term
Hockey
Friday
Nov. 26
Thursday
Jan. 6
Evenings
TWSC
Volleyball
Friday
Jan. 7
Monday
Jan. 17
Evenings
Gym A&B
Bowling
Friday
Jan. 7
Tuesday
Jan. 18
7:30-
10:30 p.m.
S.U.B. Lanes
Basketball
Friday
Jan. 7
Wednesday
Jan. 19
Evenings
& Noons
Memorial Gym
* Badminton
Tournament
Friday
Jan. 28
Sat. & Sun.
Jan. 29, 30
10:30 a.m.
-4:00 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Wrestling
Thursday
Jan. 27
Weigh-ln
7:30 p.m.
Bout Start
8:00 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Bonspiel
Friday
Jan. 28
Sat. & Sun.
Feb. 5 & 6
All Day
TWSC
* Snooker
Tournament
Friday
Feb. 11
Sat. & Sun.
Feb. 12 & 13
AM Day
S.U.B. Games
Area
Rugby
Tournament
Friday
Feb. 25
Sat. & Sun.
March 5 & 6
Daytime
Thunderbird
Park
Track & Field
Championships
Thursday
March 3
12:35
Noon
Harry Logan
Track
Hockey Finals
Thursday
March 3
As Scheduled
TWSC
Nitobe Basketball
Tournament
Mon. - Thurs.
March 7-10
As Scheduled
Memorial Gym
* Sign up on posted schedule outside the Intramural Office — Room 308 War Memorial Gym
** Check the posted schedule outside the Intramural Office — Room
308 War Memorial Gym Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 16, 1976
Library workers ask 20%
U of T talks fail
TORONTO (CUP) — Library
workers' demands for a 20 per cent
wage hike and increased benefits
have been rejected by the
University of Toronto administration in the latest round of
conciliation talks since their
contract expired June 30.
The 390 workers, who staged the
first major strike in the university's history last year, now enter a
15-day waiting period before they
can legally strike.
Members of the Canadian Union
of Public Employees, the workers
set up information pickets outside
two university libraries Sept. 13
and 14 during the latest talks.
The university rejected the 20
per cent wage demand and offered
nine per cent and 7.5 per cent increases for first and second year
employees respectively.
The current starting salary is
about $7,000 a year.
CUPE president Judy Darcy
said: "The management has the
Anti-Inflation Board as an excuse
this year and they're using that
excuse to the hilt."
A key issue in negotiations is
protection against technological
change, said Darcy, adding that
workers fear the library system is
quickly moving towards
automation.
Other demands include: a dental
plan, better maternity leave and
increased vacations on the same
basis as professional librarians.
The university has refused to
give the workers a requested two-
hour lunch period per month to
hold union meetings.
Eighty per cent of the Local's
members are women and pressing
family obligations make it difficult
for them to attend meetings after
work hours, Darcy said.
Ed stats up, down
OTTAWA (CUP) — Enrolment
in universities and colleges will
rise about four per cent this fall
while elementary and secondary
school enrolment will continue to
decline, according to Statistics
Canada projections for the current
academic year.
There will be a total of about
616,490 post-secondary students —
385,090 in universities and 231,400
in colleges. Because of the growing
size of the 18-24 age group, post-
secondary enrolment is expected
to rise for the next few years,
although more slowly than in the
past.
The projections are based on 1972
population statistics.
Elementary and secondary
schools will probably see 78,268
fewer students this year, bringing
total enrolment to about 5,531,795.
Because of the low birth rate in the
last decade, enrolment at this level
is expected to decrease by more
than 200,000 in the next two years.
The size of full-time teaching
staff reflects enrolment trends.
This year there will be about 49,795
post-secondary teachers, an increase of 1,740 over last year. The
number of elementary and
secondary school teachers will
drop by more than 2,000 to 276,170.
Total education expenditures are
estimated to rise by 12 per cent this
year to $14.5 billion.
The steady increase of degrees
granted is expected to continue this
academic year with BAs up five
per cent to 84,570, MAs up 5.7 per
cent to 12,245 and Ph.Ds up 3.9 per
cent to 2,110.
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Hours: Monday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. - Sunday 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.
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(Under New Management)
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Young Adult Leagues
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Phone 224-6737
4346 W. 10th Ave.
Co-Recreation Intramural Program
Schedule of Events 1976-77
REGISTRATION
EVENT
1                                 DEADLINE
ACTIVITY
DATE
TIME
FACILITY
Joggers 2 Mile Run
(Mem. Gym-Westbrook
Cres. to 16th Ave. & return)
Friday
Sept. 17
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mem. Gym Field
Mclnnes Field
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Sept. 30
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Joggers 2 Mile Run
(Mem. Gym to St. Anselm's
Church on University Blvd.
and return)
Friday
Sept. 24
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Golf (See note 4)
Joggers 3 Mile Run
(Gates & return via                  v
University Blvd.)
Sunday
Oct. 3
Friday
Oct. 1
1:00 p.m.
12:35
Noon
University Golf
Course
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 7
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 14
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Joggers 3 Mile Run
(Gates & back via
University Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 15
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Badminton
(Doubles)
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 21
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Joggers 4 Mile Run
(University Blvd.-Blanca-
Chancellor Blvd.)
Friday
Oct. 22
12:35
Noon
Start/Finish
Mclnnes Field
(Mem. Gym Field)
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Oct. 28
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Racquetball    (See note 5)
(Doubles)
Friday
Oct. 29
Sunday
Oct. 31
1:00-
5:00 p.m.
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Nov. 4
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Friday
Oct. 29
Saturday
Nov. 6
10:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
TWSC
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Nov. 11
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Badminton
(Doubles)
Drop in
Thursday
Nov. 18
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Ski Trip to
Whistler    (See'note 1)
Wednesday
Jan. 19
Saturday
Jan. 22
Leave 6:00 a.m.
Return 6:30 p.m.
Departure:
SUB (Bank of
Montreal)
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Jan. 20
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Jan. 27
7:30 p.m.
-9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Ski Trip to             (See note 2)
Cypress Bowl &
Hollyburn (Downhill
or Cross Country)
Wednesday
Jan. 26
Saturday
Jan. 29
Leave 7:30 a.m.
Return 5:00 p.m.
Departure:
SUB (Bank of
Montreal)
Ski Trip to            ,_          .   _,
Cypress Bowl &   (See note 2)
Hollyburn (Downhill or
Cross Country)
Wednesday
Feb. 2
Saturday
Feb. 5
Leave 7:30 a.m.
Return 5:00 p.m.
Departure:
SUB (Bank of
Montreal)
Badminton
(Doubles)
Drop in
Thursday
Feb. 3
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Friday
Feb. 4
Saturday
Feb. 12
10:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
TWSC
Ski Trip to              ...          t   _.
r.              r>      io     (See note 2)
Cypress Bowl &
Hollyburn (Downhill
or Cross Country)
Wednesday
Feb. 9
Saturday
Feb. 12
Leave 7:30 a.m.
Return 5:00 p.m.
Departure:
SUB (Bank of
Montreal)
Volleyball
Drop in
Thurs.
Feb. 10
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Ski Trip to
Cypress Bowl &    <See Note 2)
Hollyburn (Downhill
or Cross Country)
Wednesday
Feb. 16
Saturday
Feb. 19
Leave 7:30 a.m.
Return 5:00 p.m.
Departure:
SUB (Bank of
Montreal)
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Feb. 17
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Spring Football    (See note 3)
Friday
Feb. 18
Tues. Mar. 1
Fri. Mar. 11
12:35
Noon
Mclnnes Field
Ski Trip to       ,_          .    ,,
Whistler           <See note J)
Wednesday
Feb. 23
Saturday
Feb. 26
Leave 6:00 a.m.
Return 6:30 p.m.
Departure:
SUB (Bank of
Montreal)
Badminton
Drop in
Thursday
March 3
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Spring Golf    (See note 4)
Tournament
Sunday
March 6
1:00 p.m.
University
Golf Course
1. SKI TRIP TO WHISTLER: TOTAL COST: $5.00 (Transportation only)(Lift tickets -$8.00 extra)
(Recreational) $2.00 DEPOSIT
2. SKI TRIP TO CYPRESS BOWL or HOLLYBURN:   COST: Cypress-Bowl (Downhill) - $3.50 (Transporation only)
(Recreational)  Hollyburn (Crosscountry) -$4.50 (Includes 1 lesson)
Lift ticket is$7.00 extra.
$2.00 DEPOSIT: Must reserve by deadline date at Dept. of Recreational Services - 228-3996 -
Rm. 203 Mem. Gym.       INFORMATION ON COST OF RENTALS IS AVAILABLE
3. SPRING FOOTBALL - FLAG FOOTBALL: 4 men and 4 women make a team, QB must be a woman.
4. GOLF TOURNAMENT: Men and women as a team - play the same ball alternating shots.
5. SIGN UP ON POSTED SCHEDULES OUTSIDE THE INTRAMURAL OFFICE - Rm. 202 - War Mem. Gym
FACULTY, STAFF AND GRADUATE STUDENT
INTRAMURAL PROGRAM
For the first time an Intramural Division for Faculty, Staff and Graduate Students has been organized.
This year, volleyball will be the only activity organized. Registration closes on Friday, Sept. 24 with play starting in
early October and continue for the entire year.
For further information and submission of entries contact:
Mr. FRANK MAURER
Hut B-8 Room 100F
Phone 228-4329
EVENT
DEADLINE
DATE
Volleyball
Friday
Sept. 24
COMPETITION
Round Robin
TIME
6:30-11:30 p.m.
FACILITY
Gym A Thursday, September 16, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
ASIAN CENTRE . . . future up in air
matt king photo
Centre needs funds
By TED DAVIS
The half-finished UBC Asian
Centre is again short of money —
so short it can no longer finance its
own fund-raising campaign.
The UBC board of governors
budget committee decided in June
not to extend the centre's fund-
raising budget, UBC administration spokesman Al Hunter
said Wednesday.
Without the extension the fund
raising committee could not afford
to renew the contract of chief fundraiser Vian Andrews Judy Mah,
Andrews' former assistant, said
Wednesday.
Located at the west end of
campus near Place Vanier
residence, the centre was eventually to house the university's
175,000 book Asian studies library,
offices of the asian studies
department and an area for
cultural displays and performances.
The centre is a replica of the
Sanyo pavilion at Expo '70 in
Osaka, Japan and the framework
was brought from Japan to the
UBC site.
But serious financial troubles
have put the centre's future in
doubt.
When the building was designed
in 1973 the cost was estimated at
$1.7 million. This amount was
raised but with inflation and rising
construction costs lasted only long
enough for the outer shell of the
building to be built.
Call
BRENTLEANEY
our man on campus
REDUCED PRICES
Financing O.A.C.
For U.B.C. Students & Staff
The total cost for the building is
now estimated at $3.2 million to
$3.5 million, leaving at least $1.5
million to be raised.
Mah said the resources council,
which co-ordinates UBC fund
raising activities, is currently
approaching Canadian and
American corporations for help.
She said it is also asking corporations and private individuals
and governments in Asia for
donations; either in cash or in
goods such as books, furnishings
and art work.
The centre received very little
funding this summer, aside from a
$3,000 donation from a division of
Imperial Tobacco and some
private donations, one for $1,500.
The original benefactors of the
building were the Federation of
Economic Organizations of Japan
which donated $550,000, the World
Expo foundation, also of Japan
which gave $350,000, and the
governments of B.C. and Canada
which each gave $400,000. Another
$50,000 was donated by corporations.
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
THE BOYS FROM SYRACUSE
by Rodgers and Hart
to be presented November 3-13
Directed by John Brockington
will be held on
TUESDAY, September 14 - 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, September 15 - 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, September 16- 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, September 17- 12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
Auditions Open To All UBC Students, Faculty and Staff
(Please bring a piece of music for the audition
New Chevettes
From $3150
1974 No»a 6-std.
4 dr. gold white
walls. 14,000 miles
1 of a kind.
1974-TR 6 Roadster
Gold-AM FM 24,000
mint condition.
1974 Vega HB-white
std. 22,000 miles
a very clean car.
1975 Dodge Monaco
X-RCMP 50,000 miles
make me a crazy
offer.
1967 Cheuelle
283 - 4 Dr.
Orig. Paint
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ERIC'S BUG STOP
1897 BURRARD     731 -8171 03
J Page  10
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 16, 1976
Combat
conservatism
The     Committee'   for    a
Democratic University is hoJding a
general meeting today at 1 p.m. in-
SUB 260.
The committee was formed in
January by political science prof
Phil Resnick, then-AMS president
Jake van der Kamp and Association of University and College
Employees president Ian Mackenzie.
They formed the committee to
counter the conservative attitudes
of students and faculty on campus
displayed during the AUCE strike
last December.
The meeting today is to discuss
the possible Canadian Union of
Public  Employees'  strike,   labor's
Hot flashes
Oct. 14 day of protest and activities for the year.
Insight
Still confused about what
makes things go at UBC? Well, the
Alma Mater Society has produced
a guide designed to help students,
be they confused newcomers or
grizzled veterans.
The guide. Insight '76, is still
available in the publications
office, SUB 241.
Oh yes, look out for the
numerous grammatical errors.
Low advice
If you were arrested for being
drunk and disorderly on Friday
night and feel that you can't
afford to hire F. Lee Bailey to
represent you at your hearing
next week perhaps the UBC Law
Students   Legal  Advice  Clinic  is
what you are looking for.
The clinic is held every Tuesday in SUB 234 from noon to
2:30 p.m. It will provide free legal
counselling and referral to anyone
who needs it.
Rowing
If gliding over the water, sore
muscles and an occasional dunking in the drink interests you then
attend the open house and organizational meeting of the UBC
Thunderbird Rowing Crew.
The meeting is Sept. 18 at the
Vancouver Rowing Club, near the
entrance to Stanley Park.
There will be films, demonstrations and equipment displays.
Anyone interested is invited to
attend.
'Tween classes
TODAY
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
First general meeting, noon, SUB
207-209.
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Noon-hour concert with Walter
Zuben Armstrong ensemble, UBC
president Doug Kenny, dean of
women Margaret Fulton, and
others, noon, SUB conversation pit.
UBC YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Meeting on Chilean political
prisoners, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Sing and talk, noon, SUB 205.
UBC CYCLE TEAM
Organizational meeting, noon, War
Memorial Gym 211.
UBC GAY PEOPLE
Organizational meeting and
get-together, noon, SUB 211.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Organizational .meeting for square
dancing, noon, SUB 212.
COMMITTEE FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
General meeting and discussion of
CUPE strike, 1 p.m., SUB 260.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
First dry land training sessions for
men's and women's ski teams, 5:30
p.m., Gym E, Thunderbird winter
sports centre.
'DECORA TE WITH PRINTS*
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3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
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Photo Blowups
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Jokes - Gifts, etc.
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CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Orientation night, 7:30 p.m., upper
lounge, International House.
FRIDAY
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Organizational meeting of campus
Christian groups on co-operative
activities, noon, SUB 213.
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Noon-hour concert with Denise
Larsen and friends, AMS president
Dave Van Blarcom, chaplain Don
Johnson, noon, SUB conversation
pit.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting, find out why
French is a romance language, noon,
upper  lounge,. International  House.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
* COLES NOTES
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* MONARCH NOTES
300 Titles
*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
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50 titles
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IBETTER BUY]
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4393 W. 10th Ave.
Duelists
On Friday, 17th September, at 7:00 p.m. in Gym 'E'
of the Winter Sports complex, the U.B.C. FENCING
CLUB will hold its first general meeting of the* 1976-77
session. Everyone, whether they are simply curious
about the sport, a novice, an intermediate or a senior is
invited to attend.
The club is well equipped with foil, sabre and ep^e
(and electric equipment) and offers professional
coaching in all three weapons.
We are host to two important competitions this year.
Representing the university will be both Ladies and
Men. Will you be one of them?
FENCING CLUB
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To help restore poor quality
hair to its original strength and
beauty, the U.T.S. have the
latest reconditioning
treatments, which improve the
hair not only for a few days,
but for many weeks. And of
course, we are always pleased
to give free advice on home
hair care. Bring this article to
Upper Tenth Hairstylists, and
get a bottle of Savanol 151 for
$2.29. This special offer
expires October 15, 1976.
Upper Tenth Hairstylists
4574 W. 10th Ave. 224-6622
— ADVERTISEMENT
CANDIA
pizza factory
228-9512 1    or    | 228-95131
4510 W. 10th Ave.
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.i
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
MUSICIANS
Join the West Point Grey
Community Centre Concert Band
Wed. evenings, 7:30 p.m.
LORD BYNG SCHOOL
3939 W.  16th
Phone 224-0710 for further
information
20 — Housing
FEMALE needs second person to share
great bsmt. suite near UBC. $175 p/m
(all). Phone 261-9695.
RUMMAGE SALE and Bake Sale, 1855
Vine Street, Vancouver, Friday, Sept.
17 from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday,
Sept. 18 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sponsored by False Creek Housing Co-op.
PAPPAS ANNUAL Used Fur Sale. 150
genuine fur coats and jackets, $25 to
$50. One day only. Sat., Sept. 18,
10 a.m., 459 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, B.C. 681-6840.
FLEA   MARKETIII   FREE,   FREE!!   Just
bring your old goodies to grass field
behind SUB parking lot. Today frr^j
9 A.M. ^fc
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
'71 AUSTIN AMERICA, 2-door sedan.
Showroom condition. Snow tires and
just city tested. $1200. Must be seen.
738-0335.
'47 AUSTIN 1.100. Radio. CT. clean.
Mechanic's special, needs engine
work. Running. $150 as is. 980-8082—
6-8 p.m.
LAB COAT SALEI Definitely the lowest
prices possible. All sizes. 876-8215—
leave message.
1973 HONDA 500, oblique/4-cylinder,
mint shape, saddle bags, wind
screen, headers, crash bar and more.
Asking $1400. Days 682-7841(49),
Evenings  926-7915.  R.  Hepple.
lr=Jr=Jr=jUJi=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jr=Ji=Jr=J
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
Jl=|g=lr=lB=ln=lg=ll=Jl=lCd^n=
FRASER ARMS HOTEL
A few rooms still available
for students, $110-$ 140 per
mon|h. Fully furnished, T.V.
and full bath. Contact: Don
Buchanan, 261-7277, 1450
S.W. Marine Dr., Vancouver.
25 — Instruction
35 - Lost
LOST SILVER and Abalone necklace.
Made in Hawaii. Near Educ. Bldg. or
SUB.  Reward if found.  Ph.  733-8081.
60 - Rides
RIDES NEEDED Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Fridays for classes starting 9:30 A.M.
Phone Marta Heyman, 266-9529, 2271
We«rt 33rd Ave.
65 — Scandals
WFF N' PROOFER wanted. Must know
at least reiteration of '62 edition-
Phone Doug at 224-7879.
BUY YOUR Favourite Old Chair from
The PIT!! Today in AMS Flea Market.
70 — Services
PIANO TUNING — Special rates for
UBC students. Phone Dallas Hinton,
266-8123 anytime.
90 - Wanted
TWO GIRLS need babysitter, Thurs.,
3:30 to 5:30. $1.25 per hr. CaU eve*.
274-6465, Anne.
99 — Miscellaneous Thursday, September 16, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 11
Social Credit displays
its pioneer mentality
at faculty club meet
By RALPH MAURER
Maurer, presented with a
newspaper with lots of room for
stories, decided to turn a non-story
about a Social Credit constituency
meeting into an outrageously
biased, negative, self-indulgent
opinion piece.
What kind of political party
would hold its constituency
meeting at the posh Faculty Club
of the University of British
Columbia, way out on the tip of
Point Grey?
You said it. Social Credit.
Boy, was it funny, too. There was
discreet Socred president Peter
Hyndman in his regulation grey
flannels, smoothly directing the
meeting and apparently seeing to it
that the Point Grey Social Credit
party was rebuilt along lines laid
down by the provincial party
executive.
There was big, charismatic
Garde Gardom, the nice attorney
general who, in his 15-minute
speech tohisconstituents managed
to say something nice about
everything, including, incredibly,
marriage.
GARDOM . .. charismatic
There was Pat McGeer, in his
1965 hornrims and his comfortable
tweed jacket, nervously fidgetting
with his buttons as he told the
appreciative audience absolutely
nothing they didn't already know.
And there was constituency
president Arnie Nelson,
mechanically going through his
prepared speeches, then, while
outlining some constitutional
changes recommended by Socred
head office, anxiously turning to
Hyndman when someone asked
him a question he didn't know how
to answer.
Hyndman got things going when
he introduced Nelson. "I can tell
you, from my own experience, a
more conscientious riding
president you won't find," Hyndman said generously.
"I'm not the only non-elected
president this year," Nelson told
the audience. No response. "Get
it?" he added lamely. Still no
response.
Then he quickly got down to
business: a whole slew of
executives had to be elected, to
replace resignees, who included
former constituency president
Frank Hillyer who quit to run in
Vancouver Centre in the December
election after he failed to wrest a
nomination from the
McGeer/Gardom power play.
"But first," piped up the constituency's treasurer from the
front row, "let's pass the hat to
keep the organization going." And
they did — one of those
strawboaters from their confident
fall convention and euphoric Dec.
11 victory party.
The Social Credit party seems to
thrive on ghosts and memories: its
solutions are always taken from
the past and its Utopias are never
future Utopias but pioneer, work-
ethic utopias from 60 years ago.
Then it was Arnie Nelson and his
five-point blueprint on how to
reorganize the executive. Nothing
very complicated; it consisted of
increasing the size of the executive
to 10 from nine, and holding
elections for half the slate every
two years. But people couldn't (or
pretended not to, to give Arnie a
hard time)  understand the plan.
Nelson gamely tried to answer
some questions, then said
helplessly, "I hadn't really thought
about it, quite frankly," and turned
to Hyndman for help.
"Basically, if you check your
Unity News . . ." Hyndman began,
and within very few minutes he
had people agreeing on the first
three points, and a few questions
later, convinced everyone but one
dissenter to approve all five points.
When the guy from headquarters
spoke, the troops listened and
obeyed.
"Alright, let's have Arnie read
the motion again, and listen very
carefully."
Finally, the elections. He was
happy as a pig in shit when seven
people ran for five positions on the
board of directors.
"This will give you the opportunity of having an election and
choosing the directors," he said,
obviously thrilled at the prospect of
a     chance     to     demonstrate
Strike decision
today, CUPE says
The Canadian Union of Public
Employees, local 116, and the UBC
administration met with provincial
mediator J. E. Waterston Tuesday
and Wednesday in an attempt to
resolve their contract dispute.
But neither side would reveal
Wednesday if any progress was
made during the negotiations.
CUPE members voted 80 per cent
Sunday in favor of strike action.
The union and the administration
are meeting with the mediator
again today and union president
Ken Andrews said CUPE will
decide today when and if to serve
72-hour strike notice against the
university.
"It will probably go one way or
the other tomorrow," Andrews
said Wednesday.
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
FREE ESTIMATES
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
4861 Kingsway; Burnaby
YOUNG CANADIAN
MUSICAL COMPANY
Needs Small Investors!
Interests in Composition —
Management Agent —
Performing — Publishing
Low Risk — No Guarantees.
Ph. ART 687-0161
McGEER . . . fidgety
Democracy in Action.
Then the election speeches ("I'm
a mining engineer . . . when
there's mining to be done." Again,
that obsession with the past), the
election,  some  questions  to  the
ministers from the floor before
Hyndman smoothly choked the
questioners off and ordered
everybody back to the bar. I've
never seen a crowd so reluctant to
get back to the bar . . .
CUPE, which represents UBC's
1,500 support staff including food
services and physical plant
workers, is seeking a wage increase of 12 per cent or $120 a
month, whichever is greater.
The university has offered eight
per cent. The last contract expired
March 31.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
UBC ALUMNI
Tutorial Centre
The place to go when your marks are declining and your verbs aren't.
The centre operates in cooperation with Speakeasy, in SUB,
and the coordinator is on duty 12:30 to 2, Monday to Friday, to
register tutors and students. There's a $ 1 registration
fee, returnable if a tutor can't be found for a student or vice versa.
For more info call Speakeasy, 228-45 57.
Creative Writing Contest
The alumni magazine, The Chronicle, is sponsoring a
short story contest, open to all UBC students. A-prize fund of $400
is provided by the UBC Alumni Fund. Entries - not more
than 3,000 words - must be received by January 31, 1977. Phone the
alumni office, 228-3313 for a brochure with the full details.
You too, may find that writing can be profitable as well as fun.
Young Alumni Club
The YAC membership — senior students and recent grads —
gathers weekly at Cecil Green Park for activities - social, sporting
and otherwise. A year's membership is $8, available at
the door, Thursdays and Fridays, 8 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
Live music and full facilities.
Alumni Fund
A fund created and contributed to by the graduates of UBC.
Last year over 300 students received financial aid
from the fund in the form of scholarships, bursaries and other awards.
But the fund can help in other ways too. If your campus
group has a project that needs assistance it may
be eligible for aid from the fund. In the past athletics,
cultural events and special projects — remember the
engineers' Wally Wagon? — have benefitted from alumni fund aid.
For details contact the fund director, Scotty Malcolm, 228-3313.
The UBC Alumni Association's campus home is Cecil Green Park,
a beautiful old mansion at the north end of the campus
donated to UBC by Dr. Green, a former student. The association's
activities cover a wide range of services to the nearly
70,000 alumni, the university, the students and the community.
The association executive director is Harry Franklin.
He'll have a lot more to tell you about the alumni when you visit
Cecil Green Park. The welcome mat's out.
o Page 12
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 16, 1976
Delays mar parlor opening
By CHARLIE MICALLEF
Hour-long delays and mistakes
in the kitchen opened the SUB
pizza parlor Tuesday night.
"We waited nearly an hour for
our pizza," said Linda Reiser, a
second year student. "And then we
got the Vegetarian pizza instead of
the Graduate which we ordered."
Janet Smith said the pizza
service didn't matter much to her.
"I just came to get a little bit
drunk," she said.
"Maybe if there was dancing and
better music," said Roberta
Robinson, "I'dgo out of my way to
come here. But we just happened
to be on campus and thirsty."
Jody Krehel physical education 4
and Kathy Brooks . geography 3,
said they waited about 40 minutes
for their pizza.
Pit is
better
Krehel was surprised at the
transition of the cafeteria into a
pizza parlor, but said she was not
very impressed. "The Pit is better," she said, "and I'm here more
for the booze than the pizza. I tried
the Pit first, but it was full."
Brooks said she was surprised at
the heavy turnout for the first
night. "We had a night class so we
just stopped in for a drink. The food
is good," she said, "but I like
cafeteria food."
Max Schlagintweit, engineering
2, said he saw the parlor ad in The
Ubyssey but came mainly for the
booze. "The decor and all that does
the job, but I'm sure it will become
another pub," he said.
"Wewaited 40 minutes before we
even got our pizza, so you have to
drink, almost," Schlagintweit said.
The pizza tasted better than most
but he said he would not come out
of his way to go to the parlor if he
lived off campus. Schlagintweit
lives in Gage Towers.
The parlor is open Tuesday to
Friday from 8 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
and Saturdays from 7 p.m. to 12:30
a.m. The parlor will be closed
Sunday and Monday.
Doorman William Low, an
engineering student, said security
for the parlor would be fairly tight.
The five doors to the parlor are
electronically monitored by a
security device watched at the
main door. A red light will flash
and a horn will sound on the device
if entry is made.
The door person or floor personnel will check the patrons'
student card. If the patron has no
card or is not a guest of a student or
staff member he or she will not be
let in.
"It is a pain," said Low, "but the
doors can't be locked because
they're emergency exits."
Troublemakers and "undesirables," Low said, are not
allowed in the parlor.
The campus police and RCMP
will handle any major problems,
Low said. A hand stamping
procedure will be used on busy
nights for those leaving the parlor
temporarily.
Parlor manager Marvin Woolley
estimated that 350 people attended
— iames quinn photo
THERE'S MORE TO UBC than forms to fill, books to buy, profs to
see and lineups, lineups, lineups for everything. Science students
Bruce O'Neill and Jocelyn Bennett took advantage of this quiet place
between Sedgwick and Main Libraries Wednesday for a break from
campus madness. At the rate greenery is being paved, gravelled,
prickly-shrubbed and bulldozed out of existence, it's only a matter of
time before there'll be lineups for spots like these, too.
the Tuesday opening. "Money-
wise, we sold more pizza than
beer," he said. "It worked out to
about 50 cases of beer and 130
pizzas for the first night."
Manager
happy
Woolley, a former district
manager for Shakey's Pizza and an
ex bush-pilot in Alaska, said he
answered the ad placed in a local
newspaper for the position.
"We were happy about the
opening night," he said. "There
were problems but we're working
on them."
Dennis Zomar, SUB cafeteria
manager, said delays were bound
to occur. "At one point we had 38
pizzas on order at once. We did fall
behind but it was a trial period for
us," he said.
Zomar said the opening had no
affect on attendance at the Pit.
Red tokens have been issued for
beverages. Pit tokens will not be
honored at the parlor.
Parlor routine works like this: a
patron, providing he has been
okayed by the doorman, proceeds
to the cashier and makes his
selection of pizza and beverages.
He pays, then receives a token for
his drink, a numbered paper stub
for his pizza and continues to the
bar.
At the bar he receives his drink
and proceeds to the pfzza counter
where he will present his pizza stub
to the counter person.
He retains part of the ticket as
his pizza number. He waits for his
number to be called over the public
address system. He then presents
his pizza stub at the pizza counter
and collects his food.
"It was the only system we could
think of," said Woolley, "considering the set-up in there. It
seems to work. In the first hour we
had about 100 people seated and
eating," he said. "We might add to
the menu, but not in the near
future," Woolley said. "Dancing
will not become a part of the
parlor. We have a restaurant
license and it prohibits dancing."
Laval profs strike
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
executive of the Canadian
Association of University Teachers
has unanimously voted support in
principle for striking faculty at
Montreal's Laval University and
endorsed individual loans for the
strikers.
The committee said in a release
Sept. 9 it supports "the principles
of academic freedom being
defended by the striking
professors."
The freedoms are 'essentially
the right to fair and equitable
treatment of faculty including the
right to a grievance committee and
appeals system,' said CAUT
executive secretary Victor  Sim.
Sim   said   CAUT's    financial
guarantees to the strikers do not
constitute a strike fund.
The strike, which began Sept. 7
after Laval professors voted 83 per
cent against accepting' the
University's latest contract offer,
has curtailed registration and
delayed classes for 23,000 students.
Most of the university's other
employees have refused to cross
picket lines.
The faculty have been
negotiating their first contract for
almost one year. Issues still in
contention are salaries, job
security, implementation of a
faculty salary structure, participation in establishing teaching
criteria and creation of a
grievance procedure.
RECREATION U.B.C.
The 1976-77 Program
Is Now Underway!
All Facilities Open Until 11:30 p.m. Daily
BASKETBALL
BADMINTON
CIRCUIT TRAINING
FLOOR HOCKEY
GYMNASTICS
VOLLEYBALL
WEIGHT TRAINING
TENNIS
NO CHARGE FOR STUDENTS THIS YEAR.
FACULTY AND STAFF $10.00
NOTE:
RECREATION U.B.C. CLASSES
WINTER SESSION 1976-77
A  class will  only  be formed  if a minimum of ten (10)  people register. All classes wil
commence October 4 unless otherwise indicated.
ACTIVITY
'Badminton
Basic Skating & Elementary Figure Skating
Contemporary Dance
Golf
Gymnastics
* Karate
Movement & Stretch
Stretch Exercises
**Tennis
Weight Training
'Women Self-Defense
Yoga
'Faculty & Staff Exercise Class
Swimming
'Classes commence on the week of Sept. 20th
"Classes commence in October
DAY
M. Th.
M. W. Th.
T.
Th.
M. W. F.
M. W. F.
Th.
Sat.
W.
T.
M. or T. W.
or F.
M. W.
T.
T. Th.
M. to F.
Information
TIME
11:30-12:20 p.m.
9:00-10:30 a.m.
1:30-3:00 p.m.
7:30-9:00 p.m.
12:30-1:20 p.m.
7:30-9:30 p.m.
7:30-9:30 p.m.
10:30-12:30 p.m.
7:00-8:30 p.m.
3:00-4:30 p.m.
12:30-1:20 p.m.
PLACE
Mem. Gym
Rink
Armo 208
Armo 208
Gym E
Gym G
Gym E
Gym E
Armo 208
Armo 208
Armoury
3:30-4:30 p.m.
7:30-9:30 p.m. Gym E
4:30-6:00 p.m. Mem. 25
12:30-1:05 p.m. Gym B
posted outside Rm. 203, Memorial Gym.
INFORMATION ROOM 203, WAR MEMORIAL GYM, 228-3996

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