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The Ubyssey Jan 25, 1972

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Array Tenure law 'unlikely'
in'72
By BERTON WOODWARD
Legislation concerning academic tenure is "not
likely" during the current session of the provincial
legislature, education minister Donald Brothers said
Monday.
Brothers made the statement in Victoria during a
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LUI, No. 41      VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1972
228-2301
telephone interview with The Ubyssey about Thursday's
speech from the throne announcement that the standing
committee on social welfare and education will be asked
to look into tenure at B.C.'s three universities.
Asked if the study would be finished by session's end,
Brothers said: "It should be."
Will there then be legislation this session?
"Not likely," Brothers responded.
He said he decided to have the problem examined
because of the prolonged tenure disputes at Simon Fraser
University and the University of Victoria.
"At SFU they had three professors on full salary for a
year and a half while they (the administration) looked at
their tenure status," he said.
"Where problems exist you should look at them."
Provincial NDP leader Dave Barrett told The Ubyssey
Monday the provincial government may be using the
committee as "a political sounding board" to test reaction
to changes in tenure regulations.
"And it's always good to attack the universities so
you can please the rednecks," he said.
There is a non-philosophy in the area of tenure
policy, he said, and while the NDP believes university
tenure policy should not be interfered with: "I think
there's a legitimate case for clarifying government policy."
Barrett said there will be 11 or 13 members on the
all-party committee, including, from the NDP, Eileen
Dailey, Alex MacDonald, Leo Nimsick and possibly
Barrett.
He said the other members would be known
Wednesday.
Deputy minister of eduction Johann Phillipson told
The Ubyssey Monday the committee study will-parallel a
More on tenure, pages 3 and 4
study made last year by a legislative committee
investigating hiring and firing policy for public school
teachers.
He said the committee would invite "all interested
parties" to make presentations and that he was sure any
group that asked permission to make a presentation would
be invited.
"As long as it's a serious presentation, of course, not
a facetious one," he said. He did not clarify the statement.
Campus reaction to Thursday's announcement was
reserved.
Faculty association president Robert Kubicek said he
was not in favor of any direct intervention on the part of
the government in university tenure policy.
"We have problems — we do not think we are perfect
by any means - but we'd like to get on with working
them out internally. I would be very much against changes
in which we are not on our own.
"However as to what the government is doing, this is
not clear," he said.
Brothers mentioned during the interview that he
believed he had the support of the three faculty
associations. When told of Kubicek's views, he snapped:
"Then tell him not to appear before the committee. If 1
were him I would be preparing a brief."
Administration president Walter Gage had no
comment Monday on the announcement. In a prepared
statement Thursday he said:
"So far we have managed to solve most of our tenure
disputes internally and we hope we shall be able to
continue to do so.
"However we shall be happy to give serious
consideration to any recommendations produced by the
house committee ...
"On the other hand, if the committee feels that we
can provide useful information or advice, we shall be
happy to do so."
Tariq Ali considers next point at Thursday Bangla Desh meeting in SUB.      ~kln, m«,onaW Photo
'Bangla Desh trades old rulers for new'
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The people of Bangla Desh have rid themselves of one
set of oppressors only to have them replaced by another,
Pakistani Tariq Ali said Monday.
"The Awami League (present government in Bangla
Desh) is a petit bourgeois organization supported by the
larger bourgeois organization in Indira Gandhi's
government in India. It will continue with the capitalist
policies favorable to the interests of these groups," said
Ali, a revolutionary socialist and author.
Fie was speaking to a crowd of 150 persons in the
SUB auditorium at a meeting sponsored by the Alma
Mater Society and the Young Socialists.
Ali outlined the history of the struggle between East
and West Pakistan, which he said started before Yahya
Khan assumed power.
"Pakistan was originally formed because of religion —
the only connection between the east and west (which are
1,000 miles apart) is that the people of both countries are
Islamic.
"They have different languages, cultures and even
writing. Although the east is the most developed
historically it has been the west which has recently held
control of Pakistan," Ali said.
He said the West Pakistanis controlled the armed
forces and civil service and that the feudal landlords and
rising capitalists were also mainly from the west.
"This meant that the west held a virtual oligarchy
over the east," he said.
This brought about continuous mass movement
action in 1968-69, headed by the Awami League.
"The Awami League had a platform made of things
like    Bengali   control   of   taxes   and   other   demands
pre-supposing the existence of a capitalist state, which
shows their petit bourgeois make-up.
"But even these demands could not be tolerated, so
when the Awami League won a landslide victory in the
election the West Pakistani generals moved in," he said.
Ali said the West Pakistani generals expected a quick
victory when they marched on the east, but couldn't
achieve this because of their lack of an effective air force.
"The armies had to be centralized in the cities, and so
they had to depend on their air force to take care of the
country.
"Because the base was 1,000 miles away, however,
their air force was rendered almost ineffective since they
couldn't refuel easily," Ali said.
In December, 1971 the situation began to look like a
long, drawn-out struggle, he said, so it was at this point
that Gandhi intervened.
See page 8: BANGLA DESH Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 25, 1972
McLeod files for injunction
By SANDI SHREVE
Georgia Straight owner Dan
McLeod will appear Wednesday
before the B.C. Supreme Court in
an attempt to acquire an
injunction to repossess the
Straight office and equipment.
McLeod announced his
decision to try to get an
injunction at a Monday morning
press conference held by him
outside the Straight office.
Collective supporters were
presented with copies of a writ
and a notice of motion filed
against them by McLeod Monday
afternoon.
The notice is for an immediate
injunction to order the collective
out of the office and will be taken
to court Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
Rodger Jutko, one of
McLeod's lawyers, told The
Ubyssey Monday the purpose of
the writ is "to get everyone out of
the office and have them pay the
Georgia Straight Publications Ltd.
for any damage done in the office
during their occupation."
He said any action to be taken
on the writ would be decided at a
trial which would be held "in a
couple of months."
Collective supporter Ken
Lester said Monday the group
plans to continue its occupation
of the Straight office and is still
discussing with its lawyer, Leo
McGrady, ways to deal with the
notice.
The Straight office was
occupied last week by the paper's
writers   and   typists   to   protest
McLeod's private ownership of
the paper.
They are demanding McLeod
forfeit his ownership and give the
paper legal status as a collective.
The collective is now
publishing an alternate paper, the
Georgia Grape and McLeod is
publishing the Georgia Straight.
Spokesmen from each side said
Monday their papers would
appear on Thursday.
Another one splits
TORONTO (CUP) - Vancouver's Georgia Straight is not the
only Canadian alternative newspaper beset by internal problems.
A split within the staff of Toronto's Guerilla has resulted in the
suspension of 10 members of the paper's general collective and the
founding of a new newspaper.
The split came to a head two weeks ago when the 10 dissidents
published a paper using the Guerilla logo and containing regular
Guerilla features. A regular issue of the paper also appeared that week.
At a meeting of the Guerilla staff the 10 — who were among the
most experienced on the staff — were criticized for what was
described as their elitism and their hard line on polemical action, and
suspended from the staff.
They have since founded Cabal, which first hit the streets last
week. It has offices in Rochdale College and will go into competition
with Guerilla, which has existed for about three years and has a
circulation of about 10,000.
2 China programs coming up
The Alma Mater Society education committee
is sponsoring a two-day China program this week.
Anthropology professor William Willmott, who
toured China in October, 1971 with a Canada-China
Friendship Association-sponsored cultural exchange
group, will speak and show slides on China
Wednesday noon in SUB auditorium.
A panel discussion on China will be held
Thursday noon in SUB auditorium.
The panel members are Willmott, assistant
sociology prof Graham Johnson, who also went on
the October tour, social worker Joyce Marvin and
Earl Wilmott of the CCFA.
Willmott and Johnson will also head a course
on China's social structure, offered by the centre for
continuing education.
The course, part of a series of China studies,
will begin at 8 p.m., Feb. 8, at the Vancouver public
library auditorium.
The series costs $11 for students, $26 for
husband and wife and $16 for others.
Those interested in taking the course may
register at the Vancouver public library or call the
continuing education centre at 228-2181.
BRUCE ALLEN
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The above groups cannot be obtained through any other agent or agency.
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No. 117 — 845 HORNBY ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
ASK FOR BRUCE ALLEN or SAM FELDMAN
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
SENATE ELECTIONS SPRING 1972
Elections will be held on Wednesday, February 16, 1972 for three
student senators. There shall be one senator elected from each of
the following constituencies:
1. EDUCATION    (Faculties   of   Education   and   Physical
Education)
2. COMMERCE AND  LAW (Faculties of Commerce and
Business Administration and Law)
3. SCIENCE   (Faculties  of  Science,  Dentistry, Medicine,
Pharmacy, and Nursing)
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 26th
and close at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 9th.
All students interested in running in these elections should pick
up nomination and eligibility forms from the AMS General Office
or from the AMS Secretary, SUB 248.
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
The following referendums will be voted on in conjunction with
the FIRST SLATE of AMS elections, on Wednesday, FEBRUARY 2, 1972:
(1) S.U.B. EXPANSION REFERENDUM:
Whereas Student Council has recommended the development of the
following areas of S.U.B.:
(1) Area 18-D; and (2) Area 18-F;
and    whereas    Student    Council    has    recommended    the
redevelopment of the following areas of S.U.B.:
(1)  Room 30; (2) the present Lounge and Music areas and (3)
Room 130;
ARE you in favor of extending the term of financing for the Student
Union Building to allow a $350,000 expansion program in these areas, it
being understood that such extension of term will result in no increase in
the amount of the current $15.00 Building Fee portion of the AMS Fee?
(2) FOOD SERVICES REFERENDUM;
In  principle,  are you   in  favor  of  the  AMS  acquiring  control   of the
University's Food Services operations in S.U.B.?
The following referendum will be voted on in conjunction with the Second
Slate of AMS elections, on Wednesday, February 9, 1972:
FEE REFERENDUM;
Whereas the AMS fee is currently divided into a non-discretionary $15.00
Building Fee and a $9.00 Student Activity Operating Fund levy;
and whereas the Student Council of the AMS recommends an increase of
the Student Activity Operating Fund levy;
ARE you in favor of increasing the operating Fund levy from $9.00 to
$14.00?
READ AND CONSIDER
THE ABOVE REFERENDUMS!
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
es
•"   ■       ■     ' - •   s
-Tuesday, January 25, 1972 -■-
wmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmfflmmmmmmm^
Slav studies dismissals perturb students
By JAN O'BRIEN
Something is rotten in the Slavonic studies
department, say eight graduate students of the
department.    * ^ .
Strange things have been happening there: two
instructors have been fired and one assistant professor has
been demoted to the level of instructor.
The students believe the recent firings and demotion -
are   related   to   the   history  of the  "twice-beheaded"
department. ;
The first head James St. Clair-Sobell, appointed in
1947 stayed until 1967 when he resigned for reasons of
"ilMiealth" but remained as a Ml professor.
Bogdan Czaykowski was then appointed as acting
head for one year until Dr. Michael Futrell was brought
into revitalize a department which had been almost
moribund since its inception.
Since Futrell resigned as head in 1971, Czaykowski
has been re-ihstated as acting head with an executive
Firings dig the grave
of a dying university
Political science prof Phil Resnick comments on tenure in the 1970s.
committee appointed by arts dean Doug KennjMo;.assist
him.   • '.'.■'.. -    .
(The executive committee members are chairman Dr.
Ivan Avaku'mbvic of the history department, geography
professor Dr. J. Lewis Robinson, Slavonic studies and
comparative literature professor Zbigniew Folejewski and
Drr H. C. Knutson, associate professor of French and
executive assistant to Kenny.)      '
The two fired instructors, Dr. Vera Reck and
Catherine Leach, who has since resigned, and demoted
assistant professor Frank Beardow, teacher of German and
French and a specialist in Russian language and literature
were all appointed by Futrell. '■'.'..-■       -
The dismissals and demotion, are alleged "budgetary
necessities".
"What justice is there when we have as a tenured
assistant professor in the department, a person whose total
contribution to original scholarship in the field of Russian
literature is the following: in the last 10 years two
abridged translations from the same issue of a Soviet
journal for horse breeders; to wit, two small articles about
horses," . said, the students,. who wished to remain
anonymous, in a letter to The Ubyssey Monday.
"At the same time an instructor in the department,
Vera Reck, who translated a collection of. novels and
stories of the highly original and controversial Soviet
writer Boris Pilnyak (Mother Earth and Other Stories) has
just been notified that her contract will be terminated.
"Reek's political biography "of Pilnyak recently
"qualified her for a PhD from the University of London and
will be published soon in book form by the University of
Pennsylvania Press. '
"Her translations of Andrei. Voznesensky's poetry
done in collaboration with Lawrence Ferlinghetti and
other translators in the department wuTappear in the City
Lights Pocket Poets series in February," said the students.
The assistant professor, who translated horse breeding
articles and teaches two undergraduate literature courses
central to the majors program of Slavonic studies, holds
an MA from the department.
Y
It is assign of how.little things
have really changed in Canadian
u nive r si tie s , p f how-
anti-democratic their basic
structures remain, that such
scandals as the tenure cases in the
sociology, pyschology, English,
and Slavonic studies departments'
should be possible.
The scandal is 'that power,
within departments remains
concentrated in the hands of small
cliques of senior, tenured faculty,
that neither students nor junior
faculty have any meaningful say in
the way tenure decisions are
arrived at, and that the price of
acceptability to the'custodians of
academic morality is conformity,,
mediocrity, and political silence.
The bankruptcy of the
university. does' not, of course,,
begin or end with the department.
In the broader scheme of things,
Canadian universities have become
bastions of the existing social'
order, fat, rich, and complacent
institutions, hooked in at every
level' to^he capitalist powers that
run this society. A cursory glance
at the board of governors of any
major Canadian university, not
least UBC's,- makes this clear. As
that rarest of creatures, an honest
Canadian liberal, Harold Innis;
observed over 25 years ago: "The
descent of the university into the
marketplace is the lie at the heart
of modern society."
That lie reflects itself in all
kinds of ways. In their cubicles,
the Dr. Strangeldves of the
nuclear age pursue their "basic" v
research, using Defence Research
Board funds and American
military grants, as though, science
Were a natural daughter pf the
military. Forestry departments
work hand and glove with the
corporations that rip-off forests,
water resource centres help plan
future Columbia River giveaways,
while in the hum of the ongoing
academic market activity, scarcely
any one raises critical questions. If
the students get too uppity, they
are: shunted off onto meaningless
committees. If any faculty
member gets but of line, he is
quickly, and usually efficiently,
done away with.
Job security is a perfectly
legitimate concern in a society
where the Hobbesian adage, "Man
is to man like a wolf, all too
often applies. But it is significant,
that those with job security on
the faculty are those who have
been put through the hoops; and
who will pose -no threat to their
pay-masters^
How many tenured faculty
members at UBC dared to speak
out against the. War Measures-Act
a year ago October? How many
dared speak out against the
ordinances of the B.C.
government that made nonsense
of-any claim to free discussion in
the school system of this
province? ~ Free . speech, as its
classical   defenders   held,   is   of
significance when used against
oppressive authority, when it
stands out. against a prevailing,
uncritical current opinion. That is
not how .our tenured faculty has'
come to define free speech.
Rather, academic freedom has
come to mean; for. them, the
necessity to conform. '■.
, Tenure ensures protection for
those who" need it least — the
privileged members of the
academic guild - while holding! a
constant whip over those further
down, the ladder. It makes the
criterion of success conformity to
the established model,. and to
norms, "of. an ' often dubious
scholarship. If behaviorism is one
of the techniques of manipulation
and programming of people in
advanced capitalist society, it is
behaviorism that Canadian social
science and psychology
departments, .in emulation of
those in the U.S. foster. If history
means, vindicating two centuries
of bourgeois domination in
Canada and Quebec, it is this
history, rather, than that of class
and popular struggles, that the
universities advance. Those who
. seek alternatives to bourgeois
social science; to traditional
literary criticism, or what have
you, will be duly read out of
"court by the caste of gelded
scholars that.sits in judgment on
any one who breathes or moves.
There is a.legitimate case for
job security for those who work
RESNICK
at the university, but it rests on a
different principle than tenure. It
is the elementary right to. job
security that should be that of
any member of this society, if
c a p italist. economics did not
dictate a .reserve army of
unemployed. It Is the right to
continue teaching so long as that
work is generally-acceptable to
both; students and faculty, hot
merely to the earls-and dukes of
the university. It is the right of a
library worker to organize his/her
fellow workers, without being
fired- by directors who'■■ want
mindless slaves. It is the right,
hay the duty, to teach in a.way
that is subversive of established
wisdom, a criterion which would
require the firing of well over 90
per cent. of Canadian university
faculty.  ' "'■.-.
It is foolish to believe that the
university will be changed from
the top. At UBC, for example, the
president of the-university lacks
the guts to stand up to the
provincial government when it
threatens still tighter control oyer
"its" investment. While paying lip
service to the principle of
university autonomy; he offers to
work hand in glove with ■
government authorities in further
overhauling and refining tenure
procedure. (The Sun, Jan. 21). In
a university whose senior faculty
had the. slightest concern for
academic freedom, this' move
toward further thought control by
provincial government and
university administrations would
, be cause enough for uproar. But
not at UBC, where the vast
majority of faculty quietly count
the    years    until    pensioned
'retirement. The civil service
mentality of the typical Canadian
, academic, the muzzling of any
serious" clash of . ideas in most
Canadian universities, the hundred
and one links that bind them to
business and government, are
symptoms of a rot that runs deep.
Change,'.today as • yesterday,
will have to come from below. If
the student revolts of the 1960s
have blown over, democratization
and structural change in
universities arid in the larger
society they purport.to serve are
no less necessary. The faculty
Thermidoreahs, think . they will
protect their . sinecures . by
banishing dissent and firing those
who. dare to cross them. The
fools. They only dig the grave of-
"their" university, ensuring that
out of its sterility and irrelevance
will come the seeds of future
revolt. Tenure cannot disguise the
cracks in. a dying university.
Sk consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
While a lot of people under 25 pay
extremely high insurance premiums, the
extent to which they overpay has never
really been shown. Until now.
Published in an American academic
journal (insuring its obscurity?), Simon
Fraser economist Richard Holmes
published a report two years ago detailing
how young Canadian drivers are
essentially charged twice for bsing under
25.
in a detailed mathematical analysis
of the rates promulgated by the Canadian
Underwriters Association (C.U.A.)
Holmes compares an average driver over
25 with a single male operator under 25.
Also taken into account is the driver's
accident record.
While the mathematics of the article
are complex the results of the
calculations are fairly clear.
By stilted mathematics the C.U.A.
charges males under 25 twice - first for
the fact that they arc under 25 and in a
group that has a higher accident rate and
second for the fact that they haven't been
driving very long.
In number terms it works out that
undcr-25 males are attributed an accident
frequency five times as large as those over
25 instead of the 2.75 ratio actually
experienced. Moreover, those persons
who have had an accident in the past one
to three years preceding the effective date
of the policy are again overcharged
disproportionate to what that group
actually costs the insurance company.
For example, the C.U.A. associates a
risk factor for a driver who lias had an
accident last year as five times that for
someone who hasn't had an accident in
the last' three years yet the true risk to
the insurance company is less than twice.
Regulations on insurance companies
in Canada contain three basic
requirements: rates shall neither be
excessive, nor inadequate and they shall
"avoid unfair discrimination."
While the interpretation of the first
two conditions is subjective the last one
can be clearly determined. In this case it
has been shown beyond a doubt that
discrimination   does   exist   and   it   is
primarily against young people.
This fact has been known for two
years, yet according to Holmes nothing
has been done about it. A supposed
watchdog group calling itself the B.C.
Automobile Insurance Board has been
sitting around doing nothing. A meeting
with Holmes over a year ago was called
off by the board.
Not one Ottawa or Victoria
politician or civil servant has been in
touch with Holmes despite the fact that a
definite contravention of the law may be
taking place.
With all this secrecy and evidence of
overcharging, it's time the various levels
of government thought seriously about
taking over the automobile insurance
racket. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 25, 1972
Socreds and tenure
It's hard to know what to say about the
Socred government's stated intention of having a
committee look in to tenure at B.C. universities.
On one hand, we are encouraged by the fact
that a major public body has finally recognized
that tenure is a mess — and has been for some
years.
And of course, it goes without saying that
the B.C. Socreds know a little something about
tenure themselves, though the next election will
hopefully see their particular contract terminated.
But while the recognition of the situation is
encouraging — partially because students played
the major role in exposing the whole tenure can
of worms — we find it difficult to stomach the
thought of a Socred-dominated committee poking
around a university that the government hasn't
even seen fit to finance properly.
Neither do we hold too much hope for the
contributions of other committee members, who
are to be chosen from the ranks of the other
provincial parties.
Unlike many members of the university
community, our qualms about the government
tenure inquiry do not stem from an ivory-tower
belief that the community should keep its dirty
little fingers out the academic playground.
On the contrary, our preference is for much
more community involvement.
We wonder, though, just who the community
is that will be represented in this committee's
probe.
And more significant, who will not be
represented.
We suspect the latter category will be
composed of the same groups that have always
gone unrepresented in the bodies that control
universities — labor organizations, ethnic
minorities, students, and so on.
Sure, we'll all probably be able to present our
little briefs to the committee.
But will there be more than one or two of
the people listening who has interests other than anything better in the committee's composition?
those of the people who currently shape B.C. The simple answer is that we shouldn't,
universities? And the equally obvious conclusion is that
Hell,   we  don't  even   have  a  trade union we shouldn't expect much in the way of good
worker on our own bloody senate — let alone the ideas in the recommendations that the committee
board of governors — so why should we expect finally comes up with.
Letters
The view from the stochade
or . . .
What's a nice colonial administrator lihe you doing in a place like this?
The following letter was
written by a member of the
Anthrosoc faculty who for
obvious reasons wishes to remain
anonymous.
Now I don't want any of you
to get upset. Everything is fine.
Couldn't be better. There have
been a few problems this year, but
that's to be expected. Who would
want everything to run 100 per
cent smooth all the time, right?
Of course there are one or two
little   things.   Not   even   worth
mentioning really. I'll only
mention them in passing because
they did happen and well, we'll
try to keep this thing in some
kind of perspective.
You probably know all about
our little tenure problems over
here in Anthrosoc. That whole
business about Silvers and Speier.
Nothing really. Just some kind of
misunderstanding that's all.
Kind of funny though. Take
the last faculty meeting for
example. For one hour and 20
THEVBYSSH
JANUARY 25,1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Sandi Shreve, plunging her lush red, snarling love muscle faster and faster
onward and upward through the likes of Paul Knox and Brian Sproule, lept
up the ass of the ruling Kass, along the Sandy shores, through vales of
death and Mike Sasges and past crooning Jan O'Brien and Randy Frith,
who dazzled as they sang. Leaving the hard-caked icy downs of Mike
Gidora and Kent Spencer, whistling all the while, she chanced upon a small
existential landscape eating Lesley Krueger and Bernie Bischoff. Not
meaning to offend, she slyly stepped on Gord Gibson and Gary Gruenke,
gladly. Klnl McDonald and Pat Fitzgerald floated limply above
unknowing. Only Berton Woodward was left.
minutes the discussion centred
around the issue of
Confidentiality. Unless everyone
promised to keep their mouths
shut about department business,
Cyril told us that certain things
could not be discussed openly in a
faculty meeting.
See, this is how it works.
Certain things that go on in a
department are nobody's business
outside that department. For
instance, if a graduate student
takes a major part in writing a
brief that is embarrassing to the
head, then it's OK for the head to
try and fuck him over. Clear so
far? The head can do this by
writing memos (he is very good at
doing this by the way) to the dean
of. graduate studies. If the issue is
resolved, and the outcome is one
that doesn't make the head
happy, then he can simply write
another memo and open the
whole issue up again. Ask prof
Ken Burridge if you don't believe
me. Even he admits it's a form of
harassment. Now I don't actually
know if he has told Cyril that, but
I know he did say it.
I'm sorry, I keep getting off
the track. What I really wanted to
tell you about is what this whole
business about Confidentiality
means. It simply means that
nothing   of  importance  will  be
talked about in faculty meetings
anymore. The good juicy topics,-
the little deals that Cyril makes,
information regarding new
faculty, all that stuff is going to
take place in the committees from
here on out.
And here's the nice touch. This
is the work of a master. Guess
what? Although there is both
graduate student and
undergraduate representation on
some departmental committees,
they're not on the important
ones. How could an
undergraduate or a mere fledgling
graduate student understand the
intricacies of a committee like the
promotions and tenure
committee, the appointments
committee or the executive
committee? See, things really are
complex and hard to understand.
Students shouldn't feel too bad
about not being on those
committees though. Even faculty
members aren't on some
committees. Or maybe that's not
the right way to put it. With all
the fuss about bureaucracy, it's
understandable that Cyril doesn't
want to mess things up with
another committee.
Take the budget for instance.
Cyril figures that out all by
himself. All that math, adding
columns up, balance sheets, why
it's no wonder he doesn't let any
of us help him. That's hard work!
All those late nights. All that
coffee. We are not trained to do
that kind of work.
Now I will admit that there are
one or two people in the
department that know something
about computers, and maybe in
time one of them would be able
to help Cyril out. But that's a long
way off and there is no reason to
be worrying about that now.
There is one thing that maybe
we should begin to worry about.
You might as well know this
because you are going to find out
about it sooner or later anyway.
Our department, and from what I
read in the newspapers, other
departments DO NOT RUN
DEMOCRATICALLY. There, I
said it. It doesn't sting too much
does it? Of course it is rumored
that they are ideally supposed to
run that way. But you know how
intellectuals are. Talk, talk, talk,
why nothing would get done if
you ran things like that.
So here's what you do instead.
(This is good to know if any of
you are thinking of starting a
department of your own.) You
just tell people it's a democratic
institution. Most people are such
saps, they'll believe anything you
tell  them  anyway.  Well maybe Tuesday, January 25, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
that last statement is a little harsh.
Most people aren't going to
believe this. I'm just a crank. Just
somebody that has got it in for
01' Cyril. There couldn't be
anything to this could there?
Certainly there wouldn't be
anything funny happening in a
department that is run by a man
who is a former colonial
administrator. Especially when
you learn that he was working as a
colonial administrator during a
time when Nazi terror wasn't the
format for television shows, but
was for real. I mention this
because if you have back issues of
The Ubyssey, you could find a
letter to the editor that mentions
something about it.
By the way, that letter was
signed by Cyril Belshaw.
So now you know. You can
quit worrying so much. Cyril has
got tilings pretty well under
control. You know, it makes me
feel good too. I can sleep knowing
that a guy like Cyril is making the
decisions for me. I hate being
upset, hate having to make
important decisions. No ...
people have got this department
all wrong. This is a nice soft berth.
I wouldn't trade places with
anybody on this campus.
There might be one or two
people who still have their noses
out of joint. But we're going to
work that out. Or maybe it's —
we're going to work them out.
You see, I can't say for sure. Cyril
hasn't filled us in on any of that
yet.
Medical
Isn't it wonderful how
knowledgeable the medical
profession is.
If you listen to any given
person in the field you seem to
get an idea of something just short
of omnipotence. Take the author
of What's Up, Doc? He or she just
"knows" that vitamin C is not
necessarily good in large doses,
because his or her conditions for
probing it have not been met. The
writer then has the gall to itemize
the undesirable side effects.
Using his or her criteria, we
would need a random assortment
of people ... etc., etc., to prove
the side effects. As your
columnist admits, no such study
has been made.
But — read the column —
vitamin C definitely does all those
nasty things mentioned: diarrhea,
acid urine and so on.
To top it off, the columnist
links herbal remedies with several
notorious quack "remedies". As a
few MDs will grudgingly admit,
herbal remedies are not to be
scoffed at.
Ever heard of something called
digitalis? Well, son-of-a-gun if it
wasn't an old herbal remedy - fox
glove leaves. And how about
comfrey. Helleluia, brother. Some
drug company is trying (at last
count) to synthesize whatever
comfrey contains which cures
ulcers.
So maybe herbal remedies do
have something going for them.
Let's not be too eager to condemn
something in which you can't
obtain a doctorate.
And that goes for frequent
sexual intercourse as well.
Richard Smiley,
science 2
WESTERN PROMOTIONS PROUDLY PRESENTS
IN CONCERT
B. B. KING
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27
Q.E. THEATRE
8:30 P.M.
$4.00, $5.00, $6.00
Tickets: Concert Box Office, 680 Robson — 687-2801
Outlets: Rohan's, Thunderbird Shop, Grennan's,
Totem Music (Lougheed Mall)
Where's your HAIR at?
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
Can Get it Together
2244636 - 9 a.m.-5;30 Mon.-Fri.     SUB Lower Floor -
REGULAR WEEKLY PROGRAMS AT I.H.
ln1:ernational=Between Nations
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Every Wednesday at 8 p.m. This week
only — at Armoury Rm. 208. Resumes
#   at I .H. next week — Lower Lounge.
I.S.P.C. MEETING
Every Tuesday at 12:30 - Rm. 400
INDIA REPUBLIC DAY
CELEBRATIONS
Wed. Jan. 26th, Upper Lounge
7 p.m.-11 p.m.
REIFEL BIRD SANCTUARY TRIP Jan. 30 - $1.50 - Bring lunch - Sign
up at I.H.
MID-TERM BREAK TRIPS
SKI TRIP TO HOLLYBURN MOUNTAIN
WEEKEND IN VICTORIA
SIGN UP NOW FOR THESE TRIPSI
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) -
Sleazyman blorg Gary Gumtree
announced today in this
incredulous small island
gourmetdom the inclusion of a
Gastown restaurant guide in
Friday's edition of this small
island gourmetdom's only scandal
sheet and all-round rag.
Gumtree, font of the island's
glue business and other assorted
establishments was too busy
eating to be available for
comment.
Got A
PRESCRIPTION?
We'll Fill It!
TRY
ALMA PHARMACY
224-4341
10th & Alma
FLY io RENO
3 DAY All-inclusive
WEEK-END For
99.00
DEPARTURES:
Feb. 18-Feb. 25 - Mar. 24-Mar. 31
For Information
With No Obligation
688-0266
CANADIAN TOUR PAK
A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
COLOR!
Select from a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We
will finish:
• One 8" x 10" portrait in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
• One 8" x 10" portrait in
natural color (group)
$24.95
Ask about our- special
reduced prices on additional
portraits ordered at the same
time.
• Complete selection of Caps
and Gowns available.
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET,
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.*
736-0261
Pre-New Year's Special
Chinese Food Comb. Plate
REDUCED TO 75?
TUES.-FRI. (This Week) 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Auditorium Snack Bar
Free Chinese Tea to All Chinese Food Customers
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
You've Been Throwing a
Lot at Us
NOW
come and see it
chucked back
•
TOTEM PARK
LOUNGE
WED., JAN. 26
DELTA UPSILON FRATERNITY
with
JOAN BAEZ •    JOE COCKER
• CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
• TEN YEARS AFTER  • SLY & THE
FAMILY STONE • JOHN SEBASTIAN
• COUNTRY JOE AND THE FISH
• SANTANA     •JIMI HENDRIX
• RICHIE HAVENS
"^4-"-t-'...
I       •      •      •
M f
■H^Ly
a CINEMAWEST presentation
WED. 26th, THURS. 27th
FRI. 28th,   SAT. 29th
$1.25
7:30
also THURS. 27—12:30 NOON
OLD
AUDITORIUM Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 25, 1972
Hot flashes
IlllllliiiH
Covrf upholds
AMS election
The Alma Mater Society
student court Friday upheld the
Nov. 24 byelection of AMS
president Grant Burnyeat and
AMS secretary Hilary Powell.
Handing down the decision,
student court judge David Grey
said the five court judges "were
unable to come to a majority
decision on the invalidity of the
byelection and therefore it is
valid.
"Two judges, Steve Nathanson
and Pat Haigh, maintained the
court did not have the jurisdiction
to rule on the case and refused to
hand down a judgment on the
byelection," said Grey.
"Of the three remaining judges,
Lynn Smith said the election was
valid and Ian Buchwold and
myself ruled it invalid," he said.
"But because three of us were
unable to agree to support the
prosecution, the defence wins."
The byelection had been
challenged by defeated secretarial
candidate Tom MacKinnon, law 2,
who alleged irregularities occurred
in election proceedings.
More food
Another alternate food service
is happening every Wednesday
noon at the Lutheran Campus
Centre, at Wesbrook Crescent and
University Boulevard.
Homemade soup, bread and
cheese are sold for 35 to 50 cents
per serving.
Poetry
Canadian poet George
Bowering will read his poetry
Wednesday noon in the SUB art
gallery.
Bowering won the
Governor-General's    Award    for
poetry in 1969 for two of his
books — The Gangs of Kosmos
and Rocky Mountain Foot.
Bowering was born in
Penticton and attended UBC in
the early sixties.
During that time he became
one of the most controversial of
the young west coast poets and
was a founder and editor of Tish
magazine which propagated the
aesthetic theories of the Black
Mountain school of poetry.
Pancakes
UBC students bought more
than $450 worth of apples and
pancakes last week.
A pancake sale on Monday and
Tuesday, sponsored by the
agricultural undergraduate
society, picked up $55 for the
Sun's Tiny Tim Fund.
By selling apples, the aggies
collected about $400 for the
Children's Hospital.
'Tween classes
TODAY
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting in St. Mark's music
room at noon.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Executive meeting, members
welcome at noon, SUB 215.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Organizational  meeting at  noon in
SUB 210.
UBC-NDP
Second World War propaganda film,
Nazi Strike, at noon in Buch. 3201.
Also Wednesdays in Buch. 3205.
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian poet George Bowring
reads in the SUB art gallery at noon.
GERMAN CLUB
Organize January ski trip at noon in
IH 402.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Final pre-toumament practice. Car
pools will be set at the new gym B,
8 to 10 p.m.
UBC-NDP
Second World War propaganda film.
Divide and Conquer, at noon in
Buch. 106.
ZOOLOGY TRAVELS
Dr. P. A. Larken on Mexico,
Ecuadaor and Points West at noon
in Biosci 2000.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting at noon in SUB 215.
FRONTIER COLLEGE
Men and women wanting to work as
laborer-teachers in mining camps,
railway crews and fish canneries
meet at noon in Buch. 104.
GO CLUB
A Japanese version of chess at 7:30
p.m. in Buch. 1221.
TAI CHI
Joint hands practice at noon in the
SUB ballroom.
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Communion at noon in the
Lutheran Campus Centre. Also a
film and supper at 5:30 and 7 p.m.,
and co-op soup kitchen at noon.
CINEMAWEST — FILMSOC
Woodstock at 7:30 p.m. in the old
auditorium. Also Thursday through
Saturday.
THURSDAY
BAHA'I CLUB
Noon meeting in Buch. 230.
VCF
Drama — the  in group at noon in
SUB 125.
UBC-NDP
Second World War propaganda film,
Battle of  Russia, at  noon  in  Buch.
106 for 25 cents.
CCF
Fellowship     meeting,    noon,    SUB
215.
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General   meeting,   noon,   IH   upper
lounge.
UBC-NDP
Battle of Britain, noon, Buch. 1066.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General  meeting,  noon, SUB clubs
lounge.
AQUASOC
Party, 8:30 p.m., SUB party room.
GRAD STUDENTS
The Graduate Representative Assembly Meets
Monday, Jan. 31
7 P.M.
STUDENT COUNCIL CHAMBERS S.U.B.
Each department should send a representative (two representatives for depts.
with more than 50 grad students).
It is important to establish communication between grad students on issues
that affect us all — such as unemployment insurance, TA stipends.
If Grad Students want a voice on this campus they must speak up.
MAKE SURE YOUR DEPARTMENT IS
REPRESENTED AT THIS MEETING.
EXECUTIVE
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOC.
Gina Quijano, Pres.
Gordon Bacon, V. Pres. &
GRA Co-ordinator
CLASSIFIED
RotoM Compos - 3 Rmt,  1  day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial - 3 linos,   1  day $1.35;  additional
Boat 30c; 4 day* price of 3.
Cteeaified ads ere not accepted by telephone end are payable
io advance. Deadline ia 11:30 m.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost (t Found
13
Rides & Cat Pools
14
Special Notices
15
I  NEED SENIOR POLI
dents    for    exciting
project on civic affairs
SCI.
non-
732-
STU-
profit)
3470.
  3 FOB $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver,  B.C.
DISCOUNT — STEREO AM-FM
FM - Stereo Tuner - Amplifier,
Turntable, base, cartridge, plexi-
glas cover, two speakers, 2-year
guarantee.. List $200.00, your cost
$125.00 Call 732-6769 for savings.
Also carry Sony, Dual. Akai and
Sansui.
AN EXPERIENCE IN LIFE AND
growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate, 922-4481.
KEN (CHINESE LESSONS)
please call Helen 327-2782—Urgent.
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent   furnished  condominium  opposite   Gondola,   224-0657   eves.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 26 IS THE
first day of Eidul-Adha. Prayers
will be held at the Islamic Centre
at 9:00 a.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
FLY TO EUROPE FROM $170.00
round trir, student vacations and
tours, employment servicese etc.
Air mail for full details. Campus
Agents also required. A.A.S.A.
Limited, 15 High St., Ventnor
I.W., England.
TRAVELLING. OVERSEAS ON A
budget? Then visit your youth
hostels information desk which is
open every Wednesday from 12:30-
1:30 p.m. opposite the concession
stand in the Student Union Building. Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9, B.C.  Phone 738-3128.
SPRING QUARTER, SUMMER
Session, or Junior Year in Mexico?
Write Dr. H. B. Benedict PNW
Rep University of the Americas
3253 Robertson, Bellingham. Wash.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED TO BUY OR BORROW
any or all issues of: The Modern
Utopian, January 1970 to January
1972. Phone 874-8849.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
Auto Repairs
24
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
33
Photography
3S
utyt Hetta anb gutter
[\Vij       Cameras!
J$/ 3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alto at Denman  Plan
"At last we are able
to recommend a moderately priced zoom lens
in this range which has passed
our optical test with flying corrected colors . . . Certainly
among the medium priced zoom
lenses the LENTAR must be
classed as a best, buy."
—February Modern Photography
LENTAR    ZOOM     LENS   $100.95
80-200 mm  f3.5 103
Scandals
37
RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
latest releases in rock, folk &
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctuary 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
LOIS MALYSH EDUC.3 WHY DO
you have to go when I love you.
Life  is cold  without you.
Typing
40
TYPING.   40c   a   page.   Petra,   days
685-9388;     nights     327-1037.     Professional	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable Rates — 321-3838,
Mrs.  Ellis.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745—Reasonable Rates.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, Manuscripts, Term
Papers, etc. Mrs. Troche, Phone
437-1355.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My Home. Essays, Theses, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work. Reason -
able Rates. Phone 263-5317.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick service  on short essays.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
FULL ROOM AND BOARD PLUS
remuneration for 2 or 3 days
weekly assistance incl. driving
paraplegic working woman. Dunbar.  733-2819   (Eves.)
SUMMER   1972
CAREER    -    ORIENTED
SUMMER    EMPLOYMENT
PROGRAM
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Biological, Chemical, Life
and Physical Sciences, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Economics, Social Sciences.
ELIGIBILITY: All fnll-time uni-
niversity students in the above
fields who intend to return to
university in 1972-73. Canadian
citizens have statutory preference
for   appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UPCA application form (available from
your University" Placement Office
and a list of courses taken., to
the Public Service Commission of
Canada Regional Office, 203-535
Thurlow St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Apply   before   January   31.   1972.
"GUARANTEED SUMMER JOBS
in Europe for students. Program
fee, including reception and orientation $99.00. Jobs in several
categories all over Europe. Openings now. Send $1.00 for application forms and details to Dr.
F.V. Tonge, French Dept., Queen's
University. Kingston, Ont."
INSTRUCTION 8c
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
PRIVATE TUTORING LESSONS
offered by experienced teacher
from Germany — IN GERMAN
FOR BEGINNERS & or advan-
ed courses. $2.00 for 1 hour. My
home   8T*-8040.    After   5   p.m.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BARGAIN SALE FROM TURKEY!
Lambskin embroidered suede
coats, sheepskin lining and Angora trim. Selling fast in SUB'S
AMS Co-op Store.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
COMFORTABLE ROOM SEPAR-
ate entrance and bathroom: hotplate, linen provided. Dunbar area.
Phone 733-5772.
Room 8c Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
GIRL WITH FURNISHED APT.
looking for girl to share expenses.
$65,   879-7381.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Communal Houses
85
Houses—Furn. 8c Unfurn.
86
4TH GIRL TO SHARE 4 BDRM.
house Feb. 1, $60. 224-3166. Dunbar
at   29th.	
GIRL TO SHARE HOUSE. OWN
room. Use of all facilities $70.00
per month.  Phone  733 3276.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, January 25, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
—guy woods photo
SKI TEAM COACH, Bruce Goldsmid, takes tight turn on his way to
victory in the men's slalom event on Saturday.
brawl to win games
was also asked to leave early after
he walked out onto the ice in an
attempt to express his displeasure
with the referee.
Hindmarch termed it "a
ridiculous thing hardly worth
comment."
Altogether in that third period,
the 'Birds played two men short
for a stretch of six minutes
straight. Victoria could manage
only two shots on goal in the
entire period.
Sunday's game again saw the
UBC shooters pad their scoring
averages as they clobbered the
Vikings 13-4. WCIAA scoring
leader Bob McAneeley, Alex Dick
and Bill Cartwright were two goal
scorers and seven other 'Birds
added singles.
The two wins move the 'Birds
(10-2) into a first place tie with
the University of Alberta who just
barely squeaked by the University
of Calgary 4-3 in overtime
Saturday night.
By virtue of two games that
resembled at times a street brawl,
a football game and a hockey
game, the UBC Thunderbirds
moved into a first place tie in the
WCIAA hockey league.
Saturday, three 'Birds, Alex
Dick, Laurie Yaworski and Doug
Buchanan each scored twice and
Chuck Carnigari and Brian De
Biaso added singles giving UBC an
8-1 win over the University of
Victoria, in Victoria.
The Viking goal was scored by
Terry Oscarson in the second
period.
UBC took a total of 44
minutes of penalties, most of
them the result of a third period
brawl which saw defenceman Bill
Gaston and Victoria's Dave
Stapleton put out of the game.
'Bird  coach   Bob  Hindmarch
Judo team wins
Led by black belt Charles
Maingon, the 11 man UBC judo
team dominated all competitions
in the Steveston Judo
Tournament on Saturday.
Maingon, a member of the
Canadian national team, battled
his way to first place in the black
belt division. Joe Laing took top
honors in the brown belt
heavyweight division. Roger
Timmins, Gary Forsgren and BUI
Byrd placed second in their brown
belt divisions.
Intramurals
The intramural 'alley and cue'
rats are hard at it again this year.
Every Tuesday and Thursday
evening, the Intramuralers by-pass
the library and the pub to invade
the SUB bowling alleys and
snooker tables.
Why?
For some. It may be the
prestige of upsetting last year's
bowling champs, Pharmacy. Tom
Horn of the Pharmacy team
thinks this is quite unlikely.
For the snooker buff, maybe
picking up some extra beer
money warrants the effort.
In any case don't forget the
Intramural Classic in March, the
Awards Banquet.
BASKETBALL: The Phi
Kappa Sigma squad proved too
much for the Sigma Chi five by a
score of 54-7 in action on Friday.
In division 2, the Gears beat the
Beta boys 22-14.
WRESTLING action takes
place at noon today in the War
Memorial Gym.
Skiers win
all events
Overall champion Joy Ward led
the Thunderbird ski team to
victories in three of the four
events at the Crystal Mountain,
Wash, ski meet held over the
weekend.
The women's team completely
dominated their events, winning
both the slalom and giant slalom
with clean sweeps of the first
three places.
Pam Aiken won the women's
slalom by over three seconds,
clocking 92.4 seconds for her two
runs as compared to second place
finisher Karen Williams' time of
95.8 seconds. Ward's third place
finish completed the UBC sweep.
The names of the winners in
the giant slalom were basically the
same, but in a different order.
Lisa Richardson was the only
newcomer and as such she won
the event in a time of 82.5
seconds. Ward and Aiken were
second and third and two other
UBC skiers, Williams and Kathy
Snowball finished fourth and
fifth.
The men's team had what
could be termed moderate success
as they won the slalom but
through a tough break failed to
complete a UBC sweep in the
giant slalom.
Bruce Goldsmid, who doubles
as the team's coach won the men's
slalom and teammates Guy Woods
and John Kindree finished seventh
and eighth.
Goldsmid was disqualified in
the giant slalom and Kindree
missed the finish gate, nullifying
the attempt for a UBC sweep.
The team leaves by train
tomorrow for Banff where they
will compete in the WCIAA
championships this weekend.
Goldsmid said they "might win."
A western representative team
will be selected following the
meet in Banff and this team will
go on to Mt. Sutton, Que. for the
CIAU championships.
Goldsmid said UBC should
place at least three skiers on the
Western team.
Annual
DIVER-DRIVER
RALLY
Sunday,
February 13th 1972
Open to any holder of a valid drivers license and any qualified skin diver.
SIGN UP NOW at Willoughby's Divers Den Ltd.
RALLY START - 9:00 a.m. at the Den Parking Lot.
Pick up rules, regulations and route between 8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. Sunday,
February.13th at Den.
TWO OR MORE PEOPLE PER CAR - one driver and one diver + kibitzers
— $5.00 per person includes: A chance to win many exciting prizes —
Smorgasbord and Dance after Rally.
SMORGASBORD FEE FOR NON-PARTICIPANTS IS $2.50
BE PREPARED TO SPEND AN UNFORGETABLE DAY
PRIZES INCLUDE: 71.2 cu. ft. "J" Valve Tank "ALUMINUM"
$100.00 worth of Gas
Calypso "J" Regulator
& MANY, MANY MORE
Sign up now — Don't miss the biggest event of the year!
"Rain or Shine we Start at Nine"
Deadline for Entrants — Wednesday, February 9, 1972.
d     WILLOUGHBY'S
ivers
3&den
'Western Canada's Largest
Dive Shop"
2745 West
738-6929
4th Ave.
738-5033
—guy woods photo
PAM AIKEN, UBC ski team member, led the women's team to
complete victory in the Crystal Mountain ski meet as she took this
slalom in a time of 92.4 seconds.
Swimmers place second
Fine individual performances
and a second place finish were
recorded by UBC swimmers over
the weekend in a meet at Tacoma.
Rick Gustavson came up with
his best time of the season to win
the 100 yd. freestyle in 51.7
seconds.
Bill Mahony broke the
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
in   the   200   yd.
win  the  race  in
Union record
breastroke to
2:18.
Carl Waterer won the 100 yd.
butterfly in 1:34, the best time
for Canadian universities this year.
And Bob Tollerton qualified for
the Canadian Intercollegiate
Nationals with a time of 2:11 in
the 200 yd. backstroke.
EDELWEISS HAUS
"SPORTS SPECIALISTS"
WEEKDAYS TILL 9
EDELWEISS HAUS
1230 N. State (Next to Shakey's)
Bellingham, Wash. - 733-3271
MONEY AT PAR
•  •  • •
*•*•••••* Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 25, 1972
New action group to study campus women
A new campus women's group is preparing a study of
faculty, staff and student women at UBC.
"We plan to gather information on the salaries and
job categories of women workers, and on the proportion
of male to female grants among students," Gina Quijano,
spokeswomen for the women's action caucus said
Monday.
Quijano said administration president Walter Gage's
office has offered the group access to any files that might
help in the survey.
The group is still working on the details of the survey,
she said, but decided the main question to be answered is
"what does happen to women on campus?"
A report incorporating the results of the survey will
be published by the group.
"We don't know yet what reactions the report will
cause, because we have no idea as yet what our findings
will be," group member Shelagh Day said.
Several other studies of this kind have been carried
out in Canada. Lynn MacDonald, a sociology student at
McMaster University has prepared a report of the women
on her campus, and students at Queens University have
also completed such a study.
"These reports give women a clear picture of what
our position is on campus," Day said.
The women's action caucus is a group of 60-80
involved in several different studies.
They are also planning an investigation of the number
of women in administrative and policy making positions
in the university.
"We are still planning how to go about this, and we
need people to come and support us," Quijano said.
"There are several independent discussion groups
which all need members, so people have a wide choice in
what they become involved in," she said.
The caucus is holding another general meeting Friday
noon in the blue room of the Arts One building.
Women get mixed reaction
A proposal for an accredited women's studies course
at UBC has received mixed reaction from arts faculty
departments.
"Some departments supported the proposal in
principle but they were reluctant to approve the specific
'Fourth party needed in B.C.'
The people of B.C. need a fourth political party, says
the leader of the provincial Progressive Conservatives.
"The Social Credit government is a one-man
government, the NDP doesn't know what it stands for and
the Liberals are a spent force," PC leader Derril Warren
said Monday.
"A fourth political party is necessary in B.C. so the
people can have a fresh face to look at," he told 100
persons in the SUB art gallery.
He called the Thursday throne speech useless saying:
"The government should not allow two weeks of debate
on this insignificant speech but should bring in its bills
immediately."
Warren said the provincial government should dissolve
the B.C. Mediation Commission, a permanent commission
that deals with labor disputes.
"The commission is an outside group imposing a
solution on labor and management without the approval
of both sides," he said.
He said education "fools the students about the facts
of life.
"The education system is primarily designed to teach
people to face the boredom of life."
Warren told The Ubyssey that the government review
of the tenure turmoil on campus could be the beginning
of a "dangerous encroachment" in the university.
He said the conservatives will run 55 candidates in the
next election if possible.
"And they won't be token candidates."
proposal because of problems in content and
organization," said geography professor Roger Leigh,
secretary of the arts curriculum committee.
The proposal was submitted to the committee by
students from the non-accredited women's studies
program taking place in SUB this year.
Anne Petrie, co-ordinator of the women's studies
program said it is important to remember that they are
not asking for accreditation of the program now running.
"An accredited women's studies course would be
specifically related to university disciplines — English,
sociology, history, psychology et cetera.
"It would have a far more detailed reading list and
would involve intensive research projects."
The proposal outlined an inter-disciplinary program
on the history of ideas about the status of women.
There are at least six accredited women's studies'
courses in Canada and more than 100 such courses in the
United States.
"As well many academic associations, such as the
Modern Languages Association are forming women's
caucuses to promote the growth of accredited women's
studies programs," Petrie said.
Tonight only the women's studies program will meet
at 7 p.m. in the SUB auditorium.
'Refugees were key to Indian intervention'
From page 1
"Had  the struggle been over
quickly    and    Bhutto   of   West
Relax
The fine arts gallery in the
Main Library basement has
established a sitting room for
students.
With the aid of a grant from
the Alumni Association, the
gallery acquired a coffee machine
and furniture allowing students to
read or to drink free coffee in a
relaxing atmosphere. The facilities
will be available during the
gallery's open hours, Tuesday to
Saturday from 10:30 to 5 p.m.
Pakistan won, Gandhi would have
said, 'too bad, but it's over', and
had the Awami League won she
would have said, 'that's better and
good thing it's over'.
"What she wanted to avoid at
all costs was a protracted
struggle," he said.
Ali said the reason for this was
that for a protracted struggle the
support of the masses is needed,
and to get the support of the
masses class struggle has to be
introduced.
"They would have had to
smash the power of the landlords
and create the embryo of a new
socialist state — something Gandhi
didn't want on her border. So,
they intervened to place the petit
bourgeoisie, and incidentally
Calcutta-based, Awami League in
power," he said.
Frontier I
Are you interested in a job
with an alternate educational
system next summer?
Frontier College is presently
hiring men and women to work as
laborer-teachers in low income
areas across Canada.
A representative of the college
will hold a noon meeting
Wednesday in Buchanan 104, to
explain the program and arrange
interviews.
"The Indian intervention also
removed the East Pakistani
refugees in Bengal as a political
threat.
"As Jordan found out, refugee
camps are the breeding grounds of
revolutionary thoughts — and
revolutionary action. Gandhi did
not want to be placed in a
position of having to massacre
revolutionary refugees as King
Hussein had to," Ali said.
What this has done is distort
the national struggle for liberation
in Bangla Desh, he said.
"Although Bangla Desh is now
supposedly liberated, the Awami
League government will bring in
Japanese, American and Western
European imperialists to 'develop'
the national resources," he said.
"But things will not stay as
they now are. The movement will
spread into West Bengal," he said.
"The struggle is not over."
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MUSSOC PRESENTS . ..
LIVE ON STAGE!
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February 3rd — 12th
8:30 P.M.
OLD AUDITORIUM
Tickets $2.50, $3.00
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Special Student Rates: $1.50
February 7 & 8 and
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Spring Rush
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PHI KAPPA SIGMA
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GIVE US A CALL
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Woodstock
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JOAN BAEZ •    JOE COCKER
• CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
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