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The Ubyssey Mar 5, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
VoL XLIX, No. 53
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1968
i iv o; tv*
i»B_
224-3916
SFU students
meet to fill
vacant govt
BURNABY (Staff)—Simon Fraser University students in
effect today remain without a government.
A mass meeting will be held Wednesday to establish
some form of student government, said ombudsman Rob Walsh,
one of three signing officers not affected when student council
resigned Friday night.
The resignation followed a referendum in which 1,342
students voted 57 per cent to impeach council.
Meanwhile a three-man SFU board of governors committee
will meel; students this week to discuss grievances, including
a request for open board of governors meetings.
More than 150 SFU students confronted the monthly board
of governors' meeting Friday night in an attempt to open its
meeting.
The 10-man board listened for an hour and a half to a
delegation asking for open meetings, as 150 students milled
around in the fourth-floor administration offices corridor.
Delegates were student senators Simon Foulds and Stan
Wong, former acting president Lena Dominelli, teaching assistant Marin Loney, John Cleveland, Peak newspaper editor Alan
Bell, and councillor-at-large Bill Engelson.
After listening to the students, the board retired to an in-
camera session, in which it appointed local racing executive
Jack Diamond, appeal court justice Angelo Branca, and lawyer
Richard Lester to meet with students.
During part of the sit-in outside the board chambers,
governor  Diamond sat among the students.
As the board meeting proceeded, a folk-rock band played
outside the chambers for the waiting students.
"We were worried for a while that it would disturb the
governors," said editor Bell. "But we found out that every one
of the old bastards is deaf."
When former student president Minelli began talking, SFU
chancellor Gordon Shrum asked her to speak up, Bell said.
"He told her that he served in artillery in World War I and
couldn't be expected to hear her."
If the board decides to open its meetings, it will be the first
at a Canadian university to do so.
Ombudsman Walsh is acting president until a new student
government is formed. He, electoral officer Paul Burke and
former councillor Simon Holwell are carrying out the administrative duties of council.
"I'm disappointed at the board's decision," said Walsh
Monday. "[ would call it an evasive decision. There could be a
student election Monday. The whole thing is really up in the air."
GOVERNMENT MONEY . . . . . . NEEDED FAST   Science  boobs   bllSted
— kurt hilger photo
GODDAM THOSE nosy photographers, can't a guy even take a few daffodils and roses home
to his wife. Jacob Spryker, one of the friendly, cheerful physical plant men bestows a
friendly spring smile on one and all.
Loyola faces closure
MONTREAL (CUP) — Loyola College, $7.5
million in debt, may shut its doors next September.
Student council president Graham Nevin
plans to ask students to withhold fees for the
coming year until the Quebec government bails
the university out.
Quebec has not yet recognized the 3,100-
student institution as a university. It gets operational grants as a classical college at a rate of
$550 per student. Universities receive grants
based on $1,500 per student.
The administration has been asking for a
university charter for  10  years, with no  luck.
The government has promised to review
Loyola's case this month prior to release of the
provincial budget.
But the government is in a dilemma. If it
recognizes Loyola as a university that makes
.hree English universities — Loyola, McGill,
and Sir George Williams — in Montreal to one
French one. On the other hand, if they don't
increase Loyola's capital and operating grants,
it will fold up and its buildings will be sold to
pay off debts.
Nevin hopes to dramatize the plight of Loyola
in order to force the government to act.
"If the government doesn't come forward
with more money," he said, "we will just have
to shut the buildings next fall so that public
sympathy will build up for our case.
"We are, in fact, a university, but the government is giving us peanuts."
Loyola's claim to university status is debatable in the Quebec context. With the new two-
year colleges between the secondary and university levels, Loyola is considered by some to be
a beefed-up college, similar to several of the
province's classical colleges. It does not yet
offer graduate degrees, and its engineering
schools offer only the first three years. Yet its
degrees are recognized through English North
America.
Loyolans receive their degrees through the
Universite de Montreal as do a score of classical
colleges. But they have no other ties with that
institution.
Their fees are also inflated, $590, second to
only McGill, which at $630 has the highest fees
in Canada.
Student leaders called a meeting for today to
discuss the whole question.
The annual science stag party barely came off Friday.
Police raided the party, at the Legion Hall, Broadway and
Alma, and charged two women with staging an indecent performance by talcing off all their clothes.
Sciencemen told The Ubyssey Monday two police cars
and two paddy-wagons arrived at the hall about 7:30 p.m.
Police waited outside for three hours while the alleged indecent
performance took place.
They i;old the sciencemen they would not raid the hall
unless the party became excessively boisterous.
They entered when a table was overturned and sciencemen
began throwing beer bottles through the windows. Six men
were questioned but later released.
The women, Joan Colleen Cole, 31, and Betty Joe Cosby,
29, were said to be employees of the Penthouse night club. They
pleaded guilty and were remanded to March 8 for sentence.
Knowplace raided \
ft
•; A p slice raid on a dance at a free school Saturday  §|
night netted one bottle of beer. 1
Two officers interrupted  the spring prom at  Know-   1
'    place, on York, asking to see the man in charge. §f
The students elected a spokesman, then crowded around   j
the officers in the kitchen  of the old house.   Some took   |
photographs.
After about 20 minutes of talking, the police demanded
all liquor in the house, on the grounds that it was being
-   consumed in the presence of minors.
They returned to the station with one unopened bottle
of beer for analysis. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5,  1968
I Survey  results
i 'disappointing
Fewer than half of the
i 7,000 housing survey ques-
I tionnaires sent out by the
i: Alma Mater Society have
-/ been returned, AMS first
-t vice-president, Don Mut-
«   ton said Monday.
"The  results have  been
"   disappointing,"   said   Mutton.
"If 600 more question-
. naires are not received in
~ the near future the percentage of returned questionnaires will be low
enough to invalidate the
survey."
Statistics from the survey are expected to give a
clear picture of student
preferences in housing and
to support their demands
for improvements, he said.
Questionnaires were distributed Feb. 13 to every
married student and to
one in every three single
students.
Student strike works,
administration meets
student demands
TORONTO (CUP) — Striking students at the Ontario
College of Art have forced the
administration to come to
terms.
• The college has rehired
two instructors who were fired
last week for supporting student  grievances;
• a student-faculty-administration board has been promised to study curriculum
changes;
• a study will be made of
the college's governing structures.
These measures were announced in the Ontario legislature Friday by education
minister William Davis, ending two weeks of strife and
eigth days of class boycotts at
the college.
Summer work
up for grabs
That time has come once
again for students to start
worrying about next year's
fees.
Students may register for
summer employment with
UBC's placement office at
noon today in Math 100.
Further sessions will be held
at noon Wednesday and Friday  in  the  auditorium.
Students not registering
this week will not have
another opportunity until
April  1.
G-G big Rollie
Michener to attend
spring convocation
Canada's governor-general,
his excellency Roland Michener, will attend UBC's spring
convocation May 29-31.
He will receive an honorary
degree on May 31, the same
day that Dr. Kenneth Hare
will be installed as UBC's new
president.
Eight others, including novelist Dr. Hugh MacLennan,
will receive the degrees.
Engineers election
wins 3 council votes
The highest turnout of voters in any UBC student elections
has given engineers three votes on student council.
Ninety-five per cent of the 1,080 engineering undergraduate
society members eligible to vote cast ballots.
According to the AMS constitution, an undergraduate society can obtain three votes on council with an election turnout
exceeding  1,000 voters.   A total of 1,023 engineers voted.
The EUS previously had two votes on council.
Fraser Hodge, civil eng. 3, is president-elect with 865 votes
of 1,003 ballots cast in a write-in ballot.
First vice-president with 537 votes is Don Sheraton, chemical
eng. 3, who won over Doug Linzey, mining eng. 3, and Ed
O'Brian, mining eng. 3.
Secretary is Duane Zilm, electrical eng. 2, who won over
Jay Hamilton, chemical eng. 3.
Harvey Fellowes, electrical eng. 2, is sports coordinator,
while Jim Kawaguchi, civil eng. 3, is social coordinator.
A new ex-officio position of Fog Ducker was won in another
write-in ballot by Larry Russell, eng. 2, followed closely by
Herbie Hext, civil eng. 3, and Al Nichols, electrical eng. 3. Last
was U.S. President Johnson with five votes.
McGill wants recruiters
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill students Wednesday voted
more than two to one in favor of open industrial recruiting on
campus.
Over 4,000 students cast ballots on two questions: the first,
asking the student council to rescind a previous motion calling
for non-discrimination in the use of placement centre offices,
was defeated 2,960 to 1,426. The second, calling on the university
to ban recruiters from companies engaged in production of
materials for use in Vietnam, lost 3,260 to 1,161.
The resolutions fared worst at the McConnell engineering
building poll where results on the two questions were 578-141
and 642-74.
The moral question implicit in the recruiting issue has been
debated extensively on campus in recent months.
University   of Guelph
referendum   favors   CUS
GUELPH (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students has won
its fifth referendum of the year.
University of Guelph students voted 564 to 310 in favor
of the national union, along with the Ontario Union of Students
which was tied with CUS on the same ballot. The returning
officer declared 172 ballots spoiled.
In Ottawa Friday, CUS head Hugh Armstrong pointed out
the Guelph victory is the fifth substantial endorsement for CUS
policies this year.   Acadia University was their only loss.
He said opposition to CUS this year has been political, and
the fact CUS has won five referendums indicates it has broad
student support for policies that came out of the London congress
last September.
No  nominations  yet
Nominations for Alma Mater Society president will
close Thursday noon, returning officer Chuck Campbell
said Monday.
Although there are none so far, Campbell said he is
sure that Dave Zirnhelt, World University Service committee chairman, will announce he is running.
The re-run presidential election will cost the AMS
another $200 — for advertisements, ballot printing, and
largely, for office staff time, Campbell said.
Meanwhile, AMS sub-committees are being organized.
AMS co-ordinator-elect Jill Cameron said a meeting
will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday in Mildred Brock lounge
to discuss the committees, which deal with the bookstore,
library facilities, SUB, and special events.
TRAVEL
ON  A SHOE  STRING
The Youth Hostel organization is well established
in over 40 countries. Youth Hostels exist in Asia,
Europe, North and South America and Africa. In
all 4000 well-equipped Youth Hostels are ready
and at your disposal when travelling. Travel the
economic   hostel  way.
WITH THE
YOUTH HOSTELS
1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9
738-0918 Days
738-9838  Evenings
SOCIAL WORK POSITIONS
The Department of Social Welfare of the Province of British
Columbia will have a number of positions in various parts
of the province.
The following opportunities are available:—
(a) Master of Social Work graduates — salary range $599-
$670 per month.
(b) First-year Students, School of Social Work — salary
range $496-$580 per month.
(c) Bachelor of Arts graduates—salary range $476-580 per
month.
The Department provides an eight-week in-service training
course for B.A. Graduates during which period a training
allowance of $62.50 per week is paid. These applicants must
be prepared to accept a commitment to work for the Department for a minimum of two years.
Applicants must be Commonwealth citizens holding a valid
British Columbia driver's licence and be free to accept a
post in any part of the Province. All usual Civil Service
fringe benefits apply.
Interviews will be held commencing March 11, 1968.
Appointments can be made through the Student Placement
Office on Campus
If you are unable to arrange an appointment around this time,
write or telephone the Training Supervisor
Department of  Social Welfare
800 Cassiar Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Telephone:  299-9131
Book Store
ANNUAL
SALE
STARTS TODAY
New Items Added Daily
During Sale Period
Education  Students
are invited to attend
TRUSTEE
DAY
At University of B.C.
ON MARCH 12, 1968
to meet representatives of
School Boards of  British  Columbia
Students from other faculties are welcome to attend to
discuss career opportunities in Education
WATCH YOUR BULLETIN  BOARDS FOR TIMES
AND PLACES OF MEETINGS Tuesday, March 5, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
I CAN SO reach higher with my umbrella than you can. So spake Cindy Sharp, arts 1, as
her battle with Chris Blake, sc. 1, reached its fearful and slightly damp climax in the rain.
Result of contest — two bad colds.
Hoye now President's advisor
Former Alma Mater Society treasurer Dave
Hoye will continue in his old job as a hired
financial assistant.
Student council Monday night decided to pay
Hoye $300 to serve as an advisor to AIMS presi-
lent Shaun Sullivan, who was appointed acting
xeasurer.
Hoye was declared ineligible to hold office
is treasurer by student court Feb. 28. He ten-
iered his resignation the same day and it was
accepted by council Monday. Sullivan made it
:lear that Hoye would continue to act as he
lad while he was treasurer.
"Council members should treat Dave the same
is they did  before," he said.
In reference to the appointing of an acting
;reasurer, Sullivan said other alternatives were
lot feasible. If a by-election were held, the new
;reasurer would not have time to become acquainted with the budget before treasurer elect
3onn Aven  took office, he said.
Aven said he did not want to assume office
early because he wanted to pass his exams and
was not familiar with the job.
"I know as much about the budget as anyone," Sullivan said. "I suggest I be appointed
acting treasurer until Aven takes office May 31."
Ball  models viewed
UBC engineers will display their ball models
in Brock today.
Ball models, so named because they are first
displayed at the annual engineers' ball, are scale
models of modern engineering equipment.
The display is sponsored by the engineering
undergraduate society, which aims at communicating engineering ideas to the rest of the campus.
"We want to bridge the gap between the
idealists and the thinkers on this campus," said
past BUS president Lynn Spraggs.
Students may view the exhibits from 11:30
a.m. until 2:30 p.m.
Planners revolt
UBC community planning students are fed up with the
educational setup in their school.
The 50 students in the post-graduate school say they're dis*
satisfied with the exam system, lack of communication between
the four profs and students, and with at least two courses.
Spokesman Paul Conradi, a graduate in geography and in
his first year of the two year planning course, said students are
fed up wiih lecture attendance requirements and exams.
"Roll call isn't taken but your attendance is noted," he said.
Conradi said the group — mostly first-year planners —
wants the institution of a pass-fail system and the re-evaluation
of some courses.
Because of the varied background of planners, one course
runs through every discipline that might have something of
interest to planners, Conradi said.   "It's bloody superficial.
"We're also very unhappy with one course given by an outside lecturer — an engineer. He just read the book to us.
We can do that ourselves.
"There's not enough communication between faculty and
students, that's one of our gripes. Faculty seem to have outside
interests — consulting."
Students met Monday with planning school head Dr. Peter
Oberlander, Conradi said. He said Oberlander admitted the
faculty-student ratio was high and agreed to discuss setting up
a student-faculty committee with powers to make curriculum
changes.
Students favor a course like planning 500, Conradi said, a
lab course in which students all work together under a prof's
direction on projects.
Oberlander said Monday night it was premature to comment on a student-faculty committee. He also refused to comment on the students'  complaints.
Frontier college calls
Frontier College needs students.
Euch summer, third and fourth-year university students
work alongside laborers on regular shifts, then teach the men
for a few hours afterwards.
"A university student, from any faculty, is generally equipped to teach anyone up to the high school level," Peter Knowles,
grad. studies creative writing, said.
Knowles worked for the college on a Canadian National
Railways track crew.
College workers receive the laborer's pay, he said, which
can be quite high.
He is always sent at least 500 miles from his home town.
Transportation is paid for by the employing company.
Trade unions and industry sponsor the Frontier College
most heavily, the government paying a small subsidy.
Beside:; being a teacher, the Frontier College worker is also
an organizer, said Knowles. He himself established a baseball
team and a library.
A recruiting session will be held Wednesday noon in
Buchanan 106.
Pre-registration   problems
may be solved by students
Arts pre-registration is up for consideration again.
Faculty department heads will discuss it in a meeting today.
Previously, dean of arts Dennis Healy said pre-registration
for his faculty would foe cancelled.
Carey Linde, Alma Mater Society vice-president-elect, said
Healy told him the problem was that there was not enough money
to pay students to do the paper work.
"If he needs help we will give him help We can provide
the people to do the paper work for him free," said Linde.
"We will give him anything he needs so that we can get
what we need."
Registrar J. E. Parnall said he understood if the arts faculty
wants pre-registration, money would be provided.
"The problem is that arts pre-registration is in August. The
people "who handle it have their whole summer ruined,'' Parnell
said.
"It should be all be done in June and July when the sciences
have theirs  Then it wouldn't be so painful."
POLESDEN'S TWO R?l£NDS ARE
GETTING HIM 0UT0FJAI.. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,   loc.   23;  advertising,   loc.   26.  Telex  04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded' by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
"There's nothing we need more in the world
than a generation of young people who are
violently dedicated to social reform."
—Dean of engineering  William Armstrong
MARCH 5, 1968
Final solution
Whoopee! It's genocide time again.
Now that the Germans have done some solid work
on the Jewish Problem and Uncle Sam is busily at work
on the Yellow Peril, lower middle class Vancouver is
getting ready to start on — you guessed it — the Hippy
Horror.
The hysteria is on. A fledgling gossip hack, in a last
desperate lunge to win over the little old lady readership,
has gravely predicted an influx of 40,000 of the monsters
this summer.
Something must be done. After all, look what just
a few of the creatures — by their very existence — have
done to that nerve centre of the West, Georgia and
Granville. They have disrupted the once-delightful drab-
ness of the corner. Their appearance has distracted the
suburban matrons scurrying for the latest $1.49 Day
bargains. They have, it is said, thrust nasty remarks —
undoubtedly in reply to nasty remarks — toward these
same $1.49-minded females.
Yes, something must be done. We are not, it must
be remembered, dealing with individuals — in fact it is
questionable whether hippies are even people as such.
Rather, they are a Problem.
From the tight-lipped tone of the gossipist's droppings, we suspect he contemplates herding the incoming
visitors into concentration camps -where an efficient final
solution can be effected. Or maybe he merely plans to
recommend a new law: no one allowed at Georgia and
Granville but hags wearing pedalpushers and hair-
curlers and clutching $1.49 Day ads.
We don't like either idea. In fact, we are of the
opinion Vancouver will be a better place to live when
the hippies outnumber the scandal scribblers and the
cops.
And to prove that all Vancouver isn't Nazi-minded,
we cordially invite 40,000 flower people to the city for
the summer. We suggest they camp on the nearest gossip
columnist's front lawn.
Thanks, chaps
Two strong UBC faculties lost quite a bit of muscle
last week when two department heads flexed their administrative and catalytic abilities for the last official
time.
When fine arts head B.C. Binning and Harry Hawthorn, head of the UBC anthropology and sociology
department, announced they were resigning to teach and
create, they left a huge pair of sandals and boots to be
filled.
Binning, fine arts head since 1949, has bred an
enthusiastic acceptance of the arts by UBC students and
was instrumental in establishment of the Norman MacKenzie Centre for fine arts.
Hawthorn's 21 years as anthropology and sociology
head helped structure an internationally known department.
More than demonstrating the energy which made
their faculties vibrant and mature, the two attracted the
respect and devotion of both staff and students.
We congratulate B.C., who is certainly not a has-
Binning, and Harry, whose haw dulled any thorns along
the way. Good luck in your renewed roles as teachers
and researchers.
—I.F.
"Whafd'you mean I'm ineligible? I don't have long hair. I dress neatly. I can't be ineligible!"
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Asian traders exploited
their hosts in East Africa
By  DAVID  P. M.  HADOTO
Hadoto is a third year science
student from Africa. This article
was prompted by the current
exodus of Asians from East
Africa.
Before political independence, the social structure of
the East African countries
(Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda)
could be divided up into four
major groups: the colonial sector, the settlers, the Asians
and  the  Africans.
The colonial sector controlled the key positions in administration, army, technical-planning and education.
In Kenya, the settlers (typical colonialists) contributed
immensely to the agricultural
economy.
The Asians (mainly from India) by and large were in commerce and industry. They
were city landlords, merchants, and owners of extensive farm estates. In a nutshell,
they were the custodians of
the economic sector.
BITTER STRUGGLE
The indigenous Africans had
diverse occupations. Many engaged in subsistence farming,
some were active in the bitter
struggle for a voice in their
governments and the young
ones were in search of education to better equip them to
shape the destinies of their
countries. In a number of
cases, a slight overlap in responsibilities w i t h i n these
groups was a common phenomenon.
With political independence,
the social structure and the
issue of citizenship came under
serious study. One of the consequences of the review has
been the Asian dilemma in the
East African community. The
recent exodus of the Asians
from Tanzania and Kenya
raises several questions: Are
the African governments becoming discriminatory ? (Note
that "African" is used in a
continental meaning). Can
these countries afford to lose
the skilled merchants and businessmen during these years of
national reconstruction ? After
are    the    driving
all,     what
forces ?
NOT DISCRIMINATION
A careful review of the bill
of human rights and the citizenship laws of the various
countries reveals that the issue of exodus is neither group-
discrimination nor political upheaval. Moreover, if it were,
India would not hesitate to
open her doors as would the
remaining members of the
Commonwealth.
The Asian-dilemma stems
from two major sources: dual
loyalty and non-involvement in
the national aspirations of the
East  African  countries.
Dual loyalty involves the
holding of British passports
and two year term citizenships
by Asians who refuse to acquire full citizenship. Of late,
however, the African governments discovered these temporary periods of residence led
to hectic and sometimes fraudulent commerce followed by
capital-transfer. Thus, the host
country became a means for
economic exploitation, a situation that -widens the gap between the have and the have-
less nations.
ASIANS UNINVOLVED
Besides, after a careful survey of the Asian community,
it can be said that the majority of Asians hold a policy of
non involvement in spheres of
politics, national economic advancement, and harmonious
communication between
Asians and non-Asians. Their
closely-knit city communities
almost ensure Asian purity in
religion, morals, philosophy,
color and monopolistic commerce. This creates a subculture     withdrawn     from     the
mainstream of life from which
they demand autonomous
rights and maximum safeguards. The Asian contribution
in the economic sphere is a
special case of non involvement — trade enhances individual property which is shipped out of the country.
It is worth mentioning that
the Africanization policy involves all races in search of
employment. When it is taken
on a smaller scale, Africanization assumes such names as
Kenyanization, Tanzaniazation
and Ugandization. It is open to
the Asian community to reconsider the real meaning of the
words and make decisions that
will help the countries of their
residence — as some of them
have.
She  gets  letters
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Thank you so much for
your kindness. I am so pleasure to received kindly letters.
I would like to correspond for
a long time. I could not write
all the letters but I shall try
to ask my friends and members of Youth Council for
International Contact to reply
all the letters. Thank you
very very much for your kindness.
AKIKO INOUE
149 No. 3 Maruyama
Okayama City
Okayama-ken
Japan
Ed   note:   Akiko  Inoue   wrote
to The Ubyssey  requesting
pen pals.
EDITOR:
Danny  Stoffman
City     	
.        Stuart Gray
News
Susan Gransby
Managing
.     Murray   McMillan
Photo	
Kurt Hilger
Senior
       Pat Hrushowy
Sports       .   ..
        Mike   Jessen
Wire
Norman Gidney
Page  Friday
       Judy Blng
Ass't. City
     Bonl Lee
And a braw, bricht conference it
was too—Usk by moonlight, Krestova
Flats in the foggy mist and a dozen
fetid souls in the back of a delightful
Black Hole on wheels. Mike Fitzgerald
survived, so did David Salmon. Franz
Lizst played Appolonasia all the way
back. Rather Lawrencean, it was.
Mike FYntay anc? Stave Jackson, minus
his hero sandwich, cried out to all
the pretty maidens who thronged the
road. Paul Knox was faithful, Irene
Wasilewski did her washing by
candlelight in the ogre's desk.
Judy Young was fresher than ever
and Lawrence Woodd, L.W., L.W.,
and multiplied his genes before the
incredulous eyes of the assembled
multitudes. John Twigg barked Tree's
company" as he picked pine needles
out of his many hued haversack.
Finally Jim Maddin and Bob Banno
rode in on polo ponies and conducted a practice match before an
applauding and quite appreciative
crowd. Thanks to your local Sottler
who made the whole debacle possible. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Dien-Bien-Phu  viewed
SOUTH EAST ASIA
PROJECT
Prof. Bill Willmott, on from
Dien - Bien - Phu to Ngo - Dinh
Diem.  Noon today,  Ang.   110.
SOUTH EAST ASIA
PROJECT
Charles Bur chill, UVic, on
Chinese agression, myth or
menace, Ang. 110, noon, Wednesday.
BACK   TRUDEAU
COMMITTEE
Meeting noon today, Bu. 202
—discussion of special events.
All welcome.
ALLIANCE FRANCIAISE
Important  meeting  Wednesday, noon, Bu. 1221. All members please attend.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Father R. Parsons of London,
England, on the Fullness of the
Gospel without Fanaticism,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 202.
Time for both questions and
prayer with Father Parsons at
7:30 p.m. at the Luthern Student Centre.
WOMENS ATHLETICS
1968 - 69 women's athletic
director positions open for application. Executive positions
open until March 11. Managerial positions open March 6 to
19. Apply to women's athletic
office, women's gym or contact
Diane Romaniuk, 876-4060.
FILMSOC
James Bond as 007 in Gold-
finder,  Thursday,   12:30,   3:30,
6   and  8   p.m.,   auditorium  —
50 cents.
FRONTIER COLLEGE
Recruiting session for Frontier College, Wednesday, noon,
Bu. 106.
ONTOLOGY
The drug story — presented
by the ontologist, Ron Polack,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
IL CAFFE
Massimo    Verdicchio    will
speak  on Napoli,  Wednesday,
noon, IH 402.
DANCE CLUB
Lounge open to practice for
competitions and pin exams.
Sign list in lounge for ski trip
to Mt. Baker Friday.
Full Gospel
Students
FATHER ROY
PARSONS
Anglican Priest In
London, England
Fullness
Without
Fanaticism
BUCH 202
WED., NOON
FINE ART GALLERY
Today, Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday — one free haircut
a day at noon, fine arts gallery,
as part of Chairs exhibition.
Call at gallery or phone 2759
for reservations.
IH
Polka party Friday, IH.
STUDENTS' WIVES
ASSOCIATION
Meeting   today   Cecil   Green
Park,   8  p.m.   All   wives   welcome.
DEBATING UNION
Forum   debate   today   noon,
Bu. 217.
GERMAN  CLUB
Kommen Sie und lerner Sie
das Polka oder das Schuhplat-
tler. Heute mittag I.H. 402.
No meeting this week.
B'NAI B'RITH
Cantor Murray Nixon of Beth
Israel Synagogue will present a
program in honor of Jewish
music month. Wednesday noon
in ed. 100.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Field trip to Riverview Hospital, Thursday. Leaving at
noon from Bu. ext. All members welcome.
PRE-MED   SOC
Dr. Dave Suzuki speaks on
Man, Genetics and Medicine,
Wednesday noon in Wes. 201.
Microscope day, Thursday
noon, anatomy block.
KARATE CLUB
General meeting   March   13
at 7 p.m. in education gym.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau and Andy Schneider today noon, Bu. 203,
forum on psychology, on Freud.
COMPUTER CLUB
Peter Ingerman, manager,
language systems, standards
and research, RCA, will talk
Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. in Ang.
207.
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5754 University Blvd. in the Village    224-3202
FILMSOC PRESENTS
JAMES  BOND 007
IN
GOLDFINGER
Thurs., Mar. 7 — Aud. - 50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Danceii                                          11
Typing—Cont'd
TYPING, MY HOME 30c PER PAGE.
Linda,   263-8075,   after   5:30.
ternational    House,    9:00-1:00.    German   band,   only   $1.00!!!
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after  10   a.m.,   738-6829.
DIRECT   FEOM    LASSETBR'S   DEN
Vanier,   Friday,   March   8,   9:00-1:00,
$1.25.
DON'T   MISS   KENTISH  STEELE  —
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day; 25c page; phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
Strange  Brew — Light Show at the
Armouries —  Saturday,   March  9 —
$1.50,   $1.00.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female              51
Lost &: Found                               13
LOST—ONE   MAN'S   WATCH.   CON-
toli   gold   strap,   phone   Larry,   738-
8298,   reward.
HELP WANTED WITH PHYSICAL-
ly handicapped intelligent child and
with light housework: part mornings and early evenings. Salary,
live   in   or   out,   RE   3-3018.
MAN'S  GOLD  RING FAMILY HEIR-
loom, lost wed. afternoon, near Geo.
Building,   reward,   phone   224-0531.
Help Wanted—Male                   53
FOUND    —    GOLD    WATCH    IN    H.
Angus, Feb. 29, please claim pub of.
HELP! NSED TUTOR IN ORGANIC
Chemistry 230.  ph.  224-3155,   Gowan.
LIFEGUARD & SWIMMING IN-
structor wanted. The Village of
Lillooet requires the services of a
lifeguard & swimming instructor
from May 15, 1968 to Sept. 1st, 1968.
Salary range to $500 per month,
depending on qualifications. Interested persons please contact the
undersigned before April 15, 1968,
stating qualifications and salary expected. G. A. Wiley, Village Clerk,
Box   610,   Lillooet,   B.C.
Rides iic Car Pools                       14
RIDE   NEEDED    NORTH   VANCOU-
ver,   8:00   a.m.   988-8886.
TWO   GIRDS   WOULD   LIKE   RIDE
to North Okanagan,  Kamloops  area
Mar.   13   after   3:30.   Phone   732-5937,
after   6:00   p.m.
Special Notices                           15
CONCEPT   —   JOE   MOCK   —  FOLK,
blues,   Brock,   March   7th,   12:30,   admission   25c.
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
WORK IN SPARE TIME, CHOOSE
your own hours between 9 a.m. &
5 p.m. Up to $5.00 per hour, tel.
253-6712.
FROM  ENGLAND VIA  LASSETER'S
Den   .   .   .   Dance   to   The  Five   Man
Cargo.   Place   Vanier,   Mar.   8,   9:00-
1:00,   511.25.
INSTRUCTION
DO   WE!   HAVE   PRESS   RESPONSI-
bility";     Open    meeting    to    discuss,
Thursday,   March   14,   Brock.
Instruction   Wanted                    61
SUPER    SPECIAL    —    KENTISH
Tutoring                                       84
day;  Mar. 9th — Armouries — $1.50,
$1.00.   Light   Show —  8:30-1:00.
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,    736-6923.
Travel Opportunities                 16
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SiALE                                 71
Wanted—Miscellaneous             18
UBC   TEXTS   BOUGHT   AND   SOLD.
Best   prices,   Busy   "B"   Books,   146
West   Hastings,    681-4931.
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR   SALE   —
WANTED:    STUDENT    DISCUSSION
with     the     Ubyssey.     Opportunity:
Thursday,   March   14,   Brock.   Paddy
Sherman,   Gabor   Mate.
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues  50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publications  Off.,
Brock   Hall
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale               21
.375 S&W MAGNUM REVOLVER—
New with many extras. Phone Phil
433-7668   after   6:30   p.m.
Motorcycles                                   26
BRAND NEW VELOCITE SKIS —
Never    used,    only    $40.00,   921-7012.
BUSINESS SERVICES
MUST  SELL CUSTOM-MADE HAND
Miscellaneous                                32
327 Chev. Ask for George, 263-7301
cr   Barrie   277-1440,   after   6:00   p.m.
Orchestras                                     33
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
FOR   MUSIC   WITH A   SPARKLE —
Hire    the    Lamplighters    trio,   ban
Rooms                                             81
quets,     receptions,     cabaret,    phone
684-8858   or   732-5895   after   6.
WADKINCt DISTANCE TO CAMPUS
near Village & meal services, 224-
9662,   $40  month,   2250  Wesbrook.
Scandals                                       37
ROOM TO MOVE AT THE AR-
mouries with Kentish Steele! —
Strange     Brew!     —    Light    Show!!
Mar. 9th, Saturday, 8:30 — 1:00, $1.50
&   $1.00.
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The    Bookfinder.    4444    West    10th
Ave. 2 28-8933.
HORNY?     COME    TO     PLACE    VA-
nier!     Dance:     "Five    Man    Cargo"
from   Lasseter's   Den,   Mar.   8,   9:00-
1:00,   :51.25.
Room & Board                           83
SCANDALOUS!   SHOCKING!   UNBE-
lievab.e!   Kentish   Steele —   Strange
Brew   —■   Armouries   —■   Mar.    9   —
Furn. Houses & Apts.               83
8:30-1:00 — $1.50,   $1.00.  Light show
included —■   Saturday.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.           84
Typinei                                            40
EXPERT    TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC    —
224-6129   -   228-8384.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
BUY - SELL - RENT
"GOOD    EXPERIENCED    TYPIST
available   for   home   typing.   Phone
277-56J0".
UBYSSEY
TYPING  —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
TYPING!.  PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
5:00.    266-6662   after   6   o'clock.
CLASSIFIED
GIRL   WITH   B.A.   ENGLISH,   WILL
type    papers.    Contact   me   at    255-
8528.    1770  East   Georgia. Tuesday, March 5, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTER TO  THE  EDITOR
Lyndon-loving prof all mixed up, reader says
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The issues raised, by visiting
professor of history W. C. Holt
in your issue of Feb. 27 raise
questions as to the usefulness
of historical analogy in understanding the forces which are
not only most vital in the
world as a whole but which
are particularly crucial in understanding the conflict in
Southeast Asia. These forces—
nationalism, freedom from
Western interference, desire
for an improved standard of
life — are not referred to by
Holt in his analogy with Hitler's Germany.
Holt raises the following
issues: (1) The SEATO agreement as a justification for
American military action in
Vietnam (an American committee of lawyers who examined this and other legal documents last year declared unanimously that the war had no
legal basis whatever); (2) The
asserted parallel between German military aggression and
the support given to the National Liberation Front by the
North Vietnamese army. The
inappropriateness of this analogy can be seen in every facet
of the conflict and in its origins —■ namely the indigenous
resistance of South Vietnamese to the American-supported
Diem   regime   after   the   1954
Geneva agreements. Why must
the myth of North and South
Vietnam as separate nations be
continually used by otherwise
intelligent people?; (3) That
the tacit consent of other nations is justification for the
moral correctness of this approach. It is historical events
and realities which must be
brought to bear on the issue,
not the statements of equally
rnisquided politicians. (4) That
there are numerous precedents
for the U.S. waging war without a formal declaration and
the assent of Congress (perhaps unfortunately true; just
as the willingness to engage in
the Bay of Pigs fiasco and to
invade the Dominican Republic were examples of American military adventures undertaken without reference to
Congress or to the American
people) (5) The Tonkin Bay incident. I do not propose to
answer this in more detail
here since it requires heavy
documentation. Suffice it to
say that enough evidence has
arisen to seriously undermine
the state department version
of events (recently dealt with
in, for example, Tom Wicker,
The Province, February 27,
John Finney, New Republic,
Jan. 27, 1968 and I. F. Stone's
Weekly).
My   main   concern   here   is
Richard J. makes
your mind work
By MURRAY McMILLAN
Richard Needham is his own
happening.
Half an hour talking with
the lecherous, scotch-guzzling,
establishment-damning columnist for the Toronto Mop and
Pail — as we did in The Ubyssey office Thursday — makes
you begin to doubt everything
your precious high school
taught you.
He gives flowers to people—
just passes them out, not asking anything in return.
"What's the gag?" asks the
prim WASP lady. "There's got
to be a gimmick."
There's no gimmick — Richard just enjoys making people
happy.
The phenomenon of giving
something and not expecting
anything in return violates all
rules of the high school mind.
Nobody does nuttin' fer
nuthin'.
Needham does.
Government: it's a choice
between bumbling, boring
bureaucracy under the Liberals
or bumbling, boring bureaucracy under the Conservatives,
says Rudolph J. Needleberry.
But that's not what your
social studies teacher taught
you about those kind sweet
men in Ottawa, is it?
Needham is good for people,
he's a people person. He makes
the mind work, just a little at
first, but slowly people cease
to vegetate and start to come
alive. A rare experience in
today's environment.
Richard was up to his
usual tricks, — distributing
flowers — Saturday noon at
the courthouse fountain.
Richard Needham is a happening, a happening worth attending.
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with Holt's view of the world,
his fear of monolithic Commu-
nim, belief in "freedom", the
nature of his understanding of
cause-and-effect in Southeast
Asia. Rather like the 14 academics who signed the "moderate, rational statement" the
Southeast Asian situation (The
Province, Feb. 10), he sees the
world as a place which must
be made safe for Western institutions and the American
definition of the world. He
does not see the Vietnamese
conflict or "wars of liberation"
as a response to Western interference and oppression in the
underdeveloped world. Should
they in fact be so, then this
type of American response
serves only to narrow the possible area of Western influence.
Hans Morgenthau would argue
that, in terms of power politics,
present American policies invite not only the expansion of
China but encourage wars of
liberation (e.g. his contribution
in The Vietnam Reader eds.,
Raskin and Fall). Ideologies
cannot be put out like brush
fires, they inspire people, and
in the case of liberation movements we cannot offer an attractive alternative to the Com
munist model (which is why
such movements lead us to a
deep introspection about the
values of our society and its
image in the world). A recent
article by a liberal American
economist, Robert Heilbronner
(Commentary, April, 1967), entitled "Anti-Revolutionary America", argues that Communist-
type revolutions may be the
only effective ones in transforming backward countries
into self-sustaining development. And that these represent less of a danger to world
peace than the American response to such economic and
social change.
Perhaps Professor Holt has
not seen the statements of
thousands of academics, lawyers, religious leaders, publishers, business groups who
are opposed to the war in Vietnam ? A recent survey of Harvard seniors revealed that one
in four students would flee the
country or go to jail to avoid
induction if deferment was refused, and 50 per cent would
make a "determined effort" to
avoid   military  service.
Isolationism, Professor Holt?
Or rather the response of people   with   doubts   and   repug-
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The new SUB will provide the following student services:
—Cafeteria & snack bar, seating   1200 & expected  to
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For further information, watch for future ads, or
contact the SUB office, 2nd floor, Brock South.
nance at this immoral war 7
I suggest you look carefully at
their reasons and their lack
of willingness to fight for
what you describe as "freedom" and that you will discover the historical analogies
are more of a hindrance than
an illumination in understanding the present conflict.
PETER BELL
post-doctorate  fellow  in
economics and Asian studies.
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BARRIE.   ONTARIO Tuesday, March 5, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Soccer men
hit bottle
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds are a thirsty team.
The Birds are making a
strong bid to qualify for the
Pacific Coast Soccer League
playoffs for the first time and
are planning on using brewery
sponsored teams as a stepping
stone.
UBC defeated the North
Shore Luckies 1-0 Saturday at
Callister Park to remain in a
first place tie with Victoria.
UBC
Victoria
Fireftrs
Columbus
West   Labs
Burnaby  V
N.    Shore
Pacific   Coast   League
P    W D L     F    A Pts
16
15
16
13
15
17
14
30 18 19
31 23 19
26 23 17
28 19 17
21 22 16
22 40 12
2 10    13    26
On Wednesday at 8 p.m.
the Birds meet the New Westminster Labatts in their second-last game of the 18-game
schedule. UBC plays South
Hill Luckies on Saturday in
Thunderbird Stadium in Province Cup action as a sidelight to their quest for the
PCSL  championship.
UBC's winning marker
against North Shore came off
the foot of Harvey Thom on a
hard 18-yd. drive that eluded
the Luckies' goalie.
Thom, Gene Ross and Dave
Kotula had been placed in the
starting lineup for the first
time in five games by coach
Joe  Johnson.
The Birds played badly and
they were lucky North  Shore
was unable to take advantage
of all the opportunities hand-1
ed them.
The last time the Birds
played New Westminster the
game ended in a 1-1 tie but
on Wednesday the Labatts will
have to play to win if they
hope to be one of the four
teams to make the playoffs.
'r=Jr=Jr=Ji
1
E
1
0
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fl
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Jr^r==Jr==Jr=Jr==J[=^r=Jr=ir=ii=ii=ir=Jr=Jr=jr==irs=ir
FRONTIER COLLEGE   I
Needs Labourer-Teachers
For May - Sept. 1968
No teaching experience required.
Students of all years and faculties welcome.
FOR  FURTHER INFORMATION  COME TO  BUCH.  106
Wed., March 6th, 12:30-1:30
s
Thunderettes
win their final
The Thunderette basketball
team ended their season on
the weekend by winning a
prestigious tournament at
Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington.
UBC swept three games,
from the University of Idaho
65-22, Central Washington
University 42-30, and Whit-
worth College of Spokane 75-
21, and thus won the "A" class
while being the only Canadian
entry in the Pacific Northwest Girls' Rules Tournament.
As an added bonus, every
team member scored. They
are: Angie Radanovich, Judy
and Janet Douglas, Janice
Zingrich, Becky Willoughby,
Nancy Wells, Elaine Stewart
and Susan Barr. Betty Ross
didn't attend this trip.
The tournament win was indicative of the Thunderette
season as they were successful
in two leagues.
The Thunderettes finished
third in the city league playoffs and came first in the
WCIAA league. Miss Radanovich and the two Douglas sisters were the three top scorers in the  WCIAA.
Jr=Jr=ur=ir
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Thursday, March 7
12:30 P.M.
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AY-NOON-AUD Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Birds take WCIAA title
bound for Nova Scotia
—  derreck webb photo
UBC THUNDERBIRD goalie Rick Bardal, aided by Blaine
Pollock's (3) fancy footwork, stopped this shot but let 11
others by in weekend hockey action against the University
of Alberta Golden  Bears.
Cuban woman defects
gymnastic tournament
A member of the Cuban women's gymnastic team here for
the North American Gymnastic Championships has defected and
is seeking refuge in Canada.
Manuela Ponce, 24, went missing Sunday as other team
members were boarding a bus to Vancouver Airport for the
flight to Cuba via Mexico City.
Miss Ponce, who was the only Cuban woman to reach the
final in the three-day gymnastic tournament, officially sought
political asylum in Canada Monday.
The head of the Cuban contingent stayed in Vancouver and
will attempt to locate the girl to find out if she really wishes
to stay in Canada.
The gymnastic tournament, one day of which was held at
UBC's War Memorial Gym, was swept by the American men's
and women's teams.
The American men took four out of six events while the
women dominated all their competition.
Canada's women's team was second over-all to the Americans in team standings, while the Canadian men finished last
behind the U.S., Cuba and Mexico.
UBC's Bill Mackie performed well for his first big competition but was a disappointment in some events.
Mackie's best showing was in the free exercise event in
which he placed tenth over-all. He was particularly weak in the
side-horse and still rings competitions.
By BOB BANNO
UBC 88—Alberta 70, Friday
UBC 87—Alberta 91, Saturday
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds clinched the western
conference title Friday at Edmonton but were downed by
another Champion  Saturday.
With rookie center Frank
Rotering and senior forward
Neil Murray leading the way,
the Birds raced to a 41-28
half time lead Friday and
coasted the rest of the way.
Hitting well from close in,
Rotering emerged the game's
high man with 20 points. Murray added 18 points, mostly on
long, soft jumpers.
UBC guards Phil Langley
and Bob Molinski scored 14
and 13 points respectively.
The victory, worth four
points in conference standings, gave the Birds the right
to represent the west in the
Canadian Collegiate Championships this weekend at St.
Francis-Xavier University in
Antigonish,   Nova   Scotia.
On Saturday, the Birds
managed a 55-49 lead at the
half but couldn't contain Alberta's big, mobile Warren
Champion.
The Golden Bear's pivotman
accumulated 35 points to
hand UBC its second conference loss of the year.
Murray boosted his scoring
average to 17 points per game
with 22 points. Captain Ian
Dixon added 19 points for the
Birds.
The Birds finished their
regular season with a creditable 15-12 won-lost record.
Against conference teams,
UBC was  10-2.
Five teams vie for championship honors at Halifax,
UBC from the west and Carle
ton, Waterloo Lutheran, St.
Mary's and Western Ontario
from the east.
UBC has a bye into Friday's
second round when they tan
gle with the winner of Thursday's Carleton - Waterloo Lutheran match.
The   Birds   emerged  second
in last year's tourney.
.•ost
Points
5
22
6
20
6
20
9
14
14
4
BEARS MAUL BIRDS
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds were mauled by the
University of Alberta Golden Bears in two weekend games at
UBC.
Friday night the Bears clawed the Birds 5-1 in a one-sided
contest. Mickey McDowell scored UBC's only goal with three
and a half minutes remaining.
WCIAA FINAL STANDINGS
Team Won
Alberta      11
Manitoba     10
Sask _..     10
UBC  —      7
Calgary         2
Alberta took their four goal lead in the Hamber Cup series
into Saturday's game but didn't need it to win the two game-
total goal series.
The (Bears easily won 6-1, scoring six straight goals in the
final 15 minutes and therefore took the cup 11-2.
The previous weekend the Birds and Bears split two games
in Alberta by scores of 5-2 and 5-2, thus forcing a replay of
the series at UBC.
The twin losses finished the season for the Birds, leaving
them with a seven win and nine loss WCIAA record, good for
a mediocre fourth place finish.
There Are Now Only
352 U.B.C. SWEATSHIRTS
AND
60 CRESTED SUMMER JACKETS
AT
COLLEGE SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
(Hard to find but worth  looking for)
L
Officers In The Canadian Forces
With The Excitement Of Travel
UNDER GRADS
May Qualify For Subsidized
University Training — Including:
# Tuition Fully Paid
# Book Allowance
• $187 M. Salary
12   Mo.   Yr.   While   Attending   University
• Month  Paid  Holiday Annually
• Medical & Denial Care
# An Assured Future
Enjoy Challenging Jobs
and Responsibility, and
There May Be A Place For You Among Them
UNIVERSITY GRADS
May Qualify For :
9   Immediate Commissions
# Excellent Pay
# An Assured Future in a Unique and
Interesting Profession
# Early Pension Benifits At Top Rales
Phone  or  Visit The
Canadian    Forces
Recruiting Center
547 Seymour St.
Vancouver
684 - 7341

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