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The Ubyssey Sep 10, 2009

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Array ^THEUBYSSEYca
YOUR STUDENT NEWSPAPER IS PUBLISHED EVERY MONDAY AND THURSDAY • VOLUME 91, NUMBER II • ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING • FEEDBACK@UBYSSEYCA
09-10
YOUR
STUDENT
COUNCIL
HERE
Last Wednesday
AMS Council
approved spending
$9055 from a slush
fund to send up to 25
councillors to Victoria.
Van $1000
Hotel $2500
Social Event  $2100
Details on Page 3 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2009.09.10
SEPTEMBER 10, 2OO9
VOLUME XCI,   N° II
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Kate Barbaria & Trevor Record:
culture@ubyssey. ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Vacant: sports@ubyssey.cza
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : features@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Kyrstin Bain :production@ubyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic": copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Isabel Ferreras
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the
University of British Columbia. It is published every
Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications
Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run
student organization, and all students are encouraged
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey
staff. They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University of British
Columbia. All editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey
is the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding
principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words.
Please include your phone number, student number and
signature (not for publication) as well as your year and
faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when
submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ol
The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by
phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300
words but under 750 words and are run according
to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is
time sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the
identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey
reserves the right to edit submissions for length and
clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day
before intended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction or other matter
deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society
fails to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad
occurs the liability of the UPS will not be greater than
the price paid for the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors that do
not lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Justin McElroy was just a city boy, born and raised
in south Detroit. He took the midnight train in the
company of Gerald Deo, Celestian Rince and Stephanie
Findlay, going anywhere. On the scene were Paul Bucci,
along with Keegan Bursaw, Ian Turner, Kai Green and
her pet fish Kyrstin Bain. They couldn't rouse McElroy
from his drunken stupor, so they called in reinforcements, including Trevor Record, Kate Barbaria, Bryce
Warrens, Samantha Jung, Katie O'Donnell and Kasha
Chang for help. The following day, Michael Broud drew a
sad comic about the event, and showed it to his friends
Maria Cirstea, Vinnie Yuen, Nilo Tabrizy, Trevor Melanson
and Davina Choy. Davina proceeded to mock Justin
without mercy, but Katarina Grgic' told her to lay off.
Katarina would pay anything just to roll the dice, so she
convinced Grace McRae Okine, Roel Moers, Tara Martellaro, Austin Holm and Chibwe Mweene to lure Justin
back to Koerner's, just one more time. There, he was
greeted by Kathy Yan Li, Pierce Nettling, Sarah Chung,
Kalyeena Makortoff and Gavin Fisher who were born to
sing the blues. Don't stop believing
EVENTS
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \!_\Q
THURSDAY, SEPT 10
Wet Lab Coat Pageant • See the
sexiest Science students strut their
stuff including a walk-off, wet & wild
lab coats, and feats of extreme
whipped cream eating • 12pm-lpm
infront of Abdul Ladha Science Centre,
free
SUS First Week Water Balloon
Fight • Hundreds of water balloons
and a few mystery balloons. Havoc
ensue! • lpm-2pm, free including
complimentary garbage bags to wear
Manhunt • An urban game of tag, of
epic proportions! • 4pm-6pm, Main
Mall concourse, free
Ladha Drive-In Movie • Science
Undergrad Society presents The
Hangover. Enjoy this hilarious film with
complimentary popcorn • 7pm-9pm,
Abdul Ladha Science Centre, free
Robson Reading Series • Vancouver's Poet Laureate Brad Cran will
inaugurate our fall season along with
poets Marguerite Pigeon and David
Zieroth • 7pm-8pm, Irving KBarber,
free
Dodgeball Extravaganza • Brought
to you by AMS Firstweek and UBC
rec, Everyone is invited • Games start
at 3pm and' 4pm-5pm, UBC SRC
Gym, free
UBC Improv presents Breakout •
Two Improv finales -6pm at Walter
Gage and 8pm at Marine Drive
Residence.
"Under the Stars" Dance Party •
All-ages dance party • 9pm-12am,
SUB West Lawn, $4 or free with
Firstweek wristband.
CiTR Open house • Get a chance to
go on the air, have a free DJ lesson
and go on a tour of the radio station
'3pm-7pm, SUB.
FRIDAY, SEPT II
SUS Open House • Meet some
Science professors, find out about
cutting edge research and learn more
about Science programs • lOam-lpm,
Abdul Ladha Science Centre,free
Study Smart • Science Undergrad
Society presents sessions on how
study smart for science class • 1pm-
3pm, Abdul Ladha Science Centre,
free
26th Annual Welcome Back BBQ
• Natalie Portman's Shaved Head,
Thunderheist, Green Go and DJ's Sex
Attack will be in concert. The AMS
will be hosting a BBQ along with a
licensed area for beer and cider •
2pm-8pm, Mclnnes Field, free for
UBC students and guests.
Skating Party • Free Skate Rentals
• 8:45pm-10pm and 10:15pm-ll30pm,
T-Bird Winter Sports Centre, S3
per session or free with Firstweek
wristband.
SATURDAY, SEPT 12
Firstweek Concerts: Mother
Mother, Said the Whale, Hannah
Georgas •  8pm, Pit Pub in lhe SUB
basement, $10 at Ticketwebca or
the Outpost and free with Firstweek
Wristband to the first 100 students at
the door.
SUNDAY, SEPT 13
Work Learn info session • Find out
more about the Work Learn program
and working on campus while studying • 230pm-330pm, International
house
Meditation Group • Introduction to
meditation • 4pm-4:30pm, SUB, all
welcome.
MONDAY, SEPT 14
AMS Minischool Registration
Opens • Beer Tasting, Pole Dancing,
and DJ-ing: oh my! • Registration
continues through the Sept 30.
Community Music & Meal • A free
home-cooked meal and open-mic.
Vegetarian-friendly •  6:30pm-
8:30pm, Chapel of the Epiphany
6030 Chancellor Blvd
Environmental Commitee Movie
Night • Learn about BC's spectacular
Great Bear Rainforest, smell patchouli
in all its forms •  8:30pm, Fairmont
Social Lounge, St John's College
TUESDAY, SEPT 15
UBC Longhouse "Welcome Back
BBQ" • Free hamburger, veggie
burgers, nachos, salads, etc. plus
door prizes, community support.  •
4pm-6pm, free to students, staff,
everyone, their dog.
Free Reading • Oana Avasilichioaei,
Poet Laureate Emeritus of the City
of Vancouver and Canada Council
Writer in Residence, 2009  • 5pm-
6:30pm, dinner to follow; tickets
must be purchased in advance.
Advance Screening • UBC Film
Soc presents The Informant. Matt
Damon pretends to be ugly, awkward; hilarity presumably ensue.  •
7pm-9pm,Norm Theatre.
CLASSIFIEDS
TO RENT: 2-bedroom furnished suite
in Kerrisdale Close to UBC bus route
(Corner of 49th and Vine).
Utilities, internet, Cable, in-suite laundry
INCLUDED
Separate Entrance, Beautiful Patio &
Backyard
Available Immediately $1450.
604 . 263 . 6750
TO SEE: vwwwancouvefseafs.com
TO RENT: 2007 VW Golf, like new, only
13,500 km, 5-speed, A/C, remote, ebony
ext. warranty private 604 727 7200
E-Ball rocks Main Mall
Engineering students take part in "E-Ball," played with an inflatable
ball seven ft in diameter, during the Main Event Carnival on Tuesday,
September 8. gerald deo photo/the ubyssey
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THE UBYSSEY IS
HAVING AN OPEN
HOUSE ON THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 10. BUT
HONESTLY, IT'S A
LITTLE REDUNDANT
SINCE WE'RE ALWAYS
HERE ANYWAY.
JUST DROP IN.
SUB 24 2009.09/ 10/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
That's why I became involved with my student union the AMS. I contemplated on the University's motto...Tuum
est—roughly translated as "it's up to you" or "it's yours". Now, what does this mean exactly? UBC certainly isn't
yours in a democratic sense. The University's largely unelected Board of Governors makes the decisions on this
campus and "it's up to you" to accept them.
—Blake Frederick, AMS President
News
Lobby days = expensive days
AMS spends money on expensive hotel trip to Victoria
Wine and Cheese
$2100
Administrative
$150
Food
$1875
SARAH CHUNG
schung@ubyssey.ca
Some members of AMS Council
are steaming after $9055 was taken
from a non-replenishable fund for
"Lobby Days", an event where dozens of councillors travel to Victoria
to meet with politicians. It's not only
due to the cost of the event though—
there exists a seperate fund used specifically for lobbying the government.
"Lobby Days" is an event that
many councillors feel allows student
societies to lobby politicians on
student issues. The External Policy
Committee (EXPC), managed by
the AMS VP External, organizes a
group of people to head to the event.
The EXPC manages the U-Pass and
TransLink, and plans to send 25
AMS council members to make the
students' voices heard.
The money was taken out of the
President's Fund, a non-replenishable donation (currently worth
$61,000) that, according to AMS
Archivist Sheldon Goldfarb, is used
for "special projects in the areas
of strategic planning, governance,
sustainability, marketing, services,
and other programs developed to
advance the mission ofthe Society."
AMS Councillor Geoff Costeloe
was angry that the EXPC took money
out ofthe President's Fund instead of
their External Lobbying Fund, which
is currently worth $ 16,000.
"I'm really really pissed off that
it came out of the President's Fund,"
said Costeloe. "There was a budget
set at the beginning of the year, and if
more money needs to go to a certain
fund or another, then it needs to be
discussed then, or at least in one readjustment process and not at every
occasion the External Policy [Committee] comes up with an idea they
need to spend money on."
Costeloe also said that this isn't
the second, if not the third time,
that the External Policy Committtee
has asked to take money from the
President's Fund. So far this year,
Transportation
$2170
Accomodation
$2760
the President's Fund has already
been used to pay $ 11,000 for the
Great Farm Trek, $15,000 for the
provincial election campaign and
just over $30,000 to pay back the
Arts Undergraduate Society for their
Arts Country Fair debt.
VP Finance Tom Dvorak echoed
Costeloe's sentiments, and said that
the decision was "disappointing." "It
was not financially prudent...before
you look at the other funds, you need
to use up all money from your own
funds," said Dvorak. "Lobby Days is a
lobbying fund."
VP External Tim Chu said that UBC
has a relatively small External Lobbying Fund in comparison to other universities, such as Kwantlen's student
society, which received $73,000 for
external lobbying this year.
"It felt more appropriate that we
take out Lobby Days out of the President's Fund as opposed to something
like the federal election out of the
President's Fund," said Chu, "which
is probably going to happen."
Science Councillor Tahara
Bhate was also supportive of the
decision. "It can't be run if it doesn't
come from the President's Fund...
and [Chu] has the leanest budget I
have ever seen," said Bhate. "For
the first time we have a real chance
to make a difference...and I think
Lobby Days does that." Bhate said
that Lobby Days is especially important considering the provincial
government's recent cuts to financial
student aid.
Other council members are more
concerned about the budgeting of the
$9055. The costs includes $2500 for
accommodation at the Grand Hotel,
$1970 for the cost of vehicle rental
and the ferry ride, $ 18 7 5 for the cost
of food, and a social event that makes
up more than a fifth of the budget.
But Arts Undergraduate Society
President Guillaume Houle said that
the $9000 is "peanuts" if council
wants to see an effect. "I still think
the AMS is not putting enough [financial and human] resources into really
making good strides towards at least
having an effect....we need to have a
bigger presence in Victoria," he said.
Councillor Matthew Naylor says
that the money is not enough to be
"effective". When Naylor was VP
External two years ago, he spent
$12,000 on "Lobby Days."
Some councillors were concerned
about the $2100 budgeted to be
spent on a social event in Victoria.
Both Houle and Naylor said that an
event like this is necessary to attract
ministers and government officials.
"[The] social event is a tool to interact
on a personal level with MLA," said
Naylor.
"Too many people around the
AMS council see [projects like this]
as just 'spend money, what do I get
back as a dollar figure,' and that's the
wrong way to go about business in a
student union," said Houle.
Chu said that he went to past
executives for advice on the "Lobby
Days" budget. "[Regarding] the budget that was presented," he said,
"I've consulted with previous VP externals that have done [Lobby Days]
before and this is the price they have
given us....and it shows that there
are reasons why we stay at the hotel,
and why we are taking the buses
instead of taking public transit." He
said that taking public transit would
require an additional night to stay in
Victoria, which would add more to
the costs and slow down the overall
lobbying process.
GERALD DEO GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
Still, some council members
remain skeptical on whether the
costs were budgeted effectively.
"The social event, I believe, is totally
awesome..! do believe that having a
home base is important and possibly
renting a suite in one ofthe hotels as
sort of a ground zero [as well]. But
there are so many different ways that
we could go," said Arts Councillor
Jeremy McElroy, who suggested using alternatives such as the U-Pass,
couch surfing or bussing to lower the
expenditure for Lobby Days.
"I think that $2500 for a hotel
is...I'm willing to pay that—but given
the focus of this whole thing, [we
should be saying] liey, you're cutting
our funding, let's find zero spending
ways of getting out there,' which I
think would be a neat thing to do."
"I guarantee that it can be done
cheaper," Costeloe said. He said that
he has a problem with the fact that
some councillors feel that lobbying
is one of the AMS' most important
initiatives.
"I do feel that...AMS Council is
hugely overburdened by politics who
have an affiliation to one party or
another," said Costeloe. "Myself, I'm
included in that because I am into
politics, but I won't mix the two of
them, and I really feel that a lot ofthe
councillors are just trying to weasel
their way to deal like politicians and
to mingle and to do all that stuff.
"I don't think that's appropriate." tu
"It felt more appropriate that we take out
Lobby Days out of the President's Fund
as opposed to something like the federal
election out of the President's Fund, which
is probably going to happen."
—Tim Chu,
VP External
■■vantage point
Managing
money on
your own
PHOTO COURTESY JEANNINE MITCHELL
JEANNINE MITCHELL
Contributor
September is here, after a summer with the toughest job market
for students in years.
If you earned less this summer, take care of your money so
you finish your 2009/2010 school
year without financial panic attacks. Here are some tips to manage your first year budget:
TEXTBOOKS
Used textbooks may not work for
all your courses, but they might
for some of them. Seek a used text
with the current edition. Or see if
the new edition hardly changed
(most common with Arts courses).
Most professors have a library
copy kept on reserve.
Some people share textbooks
or get cheaper deals online.
Classic novels are free at any
library.
If you can rent the film on your
curriculum list, why buy a $30
DVD?
PLAN AHEAD
Budgets aren't exciting, but being
broke by November is the kind of
excitement you can do without.
Leave money for all your needs.
Include a monthly reserve for
unexpected costs like car repairs,
parking tickets or a stolen bike.
If you're new to handling money, use family advice or budget-
planning guides and tools to remember everything to budget for.
Attend a free campus workshop
on money management.
STUDENT LOANS
Ifyou're new to student loans, beware the rush of getting so much
money all at once. It's easy to feel
rich at first and over-spend on
clothes and other gear.
Remind yourself that you
have to pay all of this back—plus
interest.
Keep as much loan money in
the bank as possible. You'll be
ready for an emergency.
If you can save some student
loan money until you graduate,
pay it back so you feel more free,
with less debt to pay.
If your loan money is late, don't
wait until you're in trouble. Seek
help early from campus financial
aid.tl
feannine Mitchell is a UBC alumni and founder of the website
debtlOl.ca 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 0 0 9.0 9.10
Save-On-Foods may partner with UBC Farm
KALYEENA MAKORTOFF
kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
University residents will no longer
have to leave campus to fill their
fridges. Last week, Save-On-Foods
had a grand opening for its new location on 16th and Wesbrook, becoming the first chain grocery store on
campus.
Store Manager Ryan Dennis started on the project six months ago,
but he said the plans to implement
a Save-On-Foods at UBC has been in
the works for years and that community members have been waiting just
as long.
"A lot of our customers have been
telling me they've been waiting up to
14 years for a store to open in this
area," he said.
Genevieve Barrons, a third-year
student working as a residence advisor in Totem Park, expressed the
same sentiment: "I think it's about
time that we have a grocery store.
I couldn't believe there wasn't one
when I moved on to campus."
Opening day, as one would imagine, attracted a variety of customers.
"It was packed, it was really busy,
but it was nice. In comparison to
other grocery store options, Barrons
suggested that "students will use it
more often and it seemed cheaper
than surrounding stores," he said.
"Even though, say, Safeway, isn't
that far away, you have to go through
the Endowment Lands, while the
Save-On-Foods is more usable and
accessible."
Dennis has not been disappointed
with customer response, and says
that the turnout so far has been fantastic. "They put the right store in the
area," he said, adding that the store
"fits the community bill." Catering to
area demographics has so far meant
stocking nearly 200 fast and ready-to-
go meal solutions for students, and
for the families, a full baby section
and a large selection of organic and
local products.
Situated in the still-under-con-
struction Wesbrook Village, the Save-
On-Foods store is also in close proximity to another produce supplier on
campus, the UBC Farm. Friends of
the Farm President Andrea Morgan
said that the grocery store, while providing a service, also has a responsibility to the community.
"I think Save-On's biggest responsibility is to UBC students. The
food there needs to be affordable,"
Morgan suggested. "Since Save-On
is in the position of being the largest food supplier on campus, it also
has the responsibility of promoting
the smaller food businesses, grocery
stores and co-ops on campus as well.
In my personal opinion, a good business does not drown out its fellow
community business members."
Dennis has stated that the store
plans to be involved in a variety
of functions, sporting teams and
initiatives in the community, including participation in the University
Neighbourhoods Association's sustainability fund and events such as
the Community Barn's barn-raising
celebration this upcoming weekend.
A brief discussion surrounding collaboration with the Farm is said to
have taken place last week. "Right
now we're in the process of chatting
with them about the things they have
to offer and we'll go from there," he
said.
Though communication between the Farm and Save-On-Foods
has been minimal so far, Morgan
sees the potential for a mutually
positive relationship. "UBC Farm
is looking forward to developing
good relationships with Save-On
and will make every effort possible
to make this happen. Hopefully the
store can help support the farm
through selling some UBC Farm
produce and other similar things."
"We are now neighbours," Morgan said, "so it makes sense to be
neighbourly."
While many customers and
campus residents will no doubt
enjoy the proximity of the new
store, Barrons wonders how a
large grocery store may be of concern for those interested in the
future expansion of projects such
as Wesbrook Village.
"I think that Save-On-Foods
positively affects students, but I
am interested in seeing how the
surrounding development will affect campus," said Barrons. va
The new Save-On-Foods on Wesbrook and 16th offers ready-to-go meals for students, gerald deo photo illustration/the ubyssey
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1PM IN SUB 24 2009.09/ 10/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
Looking toward the future
The Ubyssey talks to President Stephen Toope about Olympics, recession, NCAA
SAMANTHA JUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
Over the past year, UBC President
Stephen Toope has shouldered the
arduous task of managing the largest post-secondary institution in
BC during a global financial crisis.
The university has recently suffered losses to their endowment
fund and cuts to financial student
aid from the government. UBC is
less than six months away from
the 2010 Winter Olympic and
Paralympic Games, and people
are wondering if the university
is ready. In light of this, Toope is
moving forward to improve the
university and increase its status
on the global platform by pushing
for more graduate students and
stronger ties with the Aboriginal
community.
The last time The Ubyssey spoke
with Toope, he had just reached
{he halfway point in his five-year
term as UBC's 12th president.
Now entering the second half of
his presidency, Toope had a few
reflections on his past accomplishments as he keeps a focused eye
on the future.
THE UBYSSEY: You're entering
your fourth year as President.
Looking back on the past few
years, what are two things that
stand out?
STEPHEN TOOPE: [One is] the in
credible ambition at UBC, both
among students and our faculty
and staff. I'm really struck by their
desire to make this place even better and to have even richer experiences. And I actually think that's
a huge strength of the university
and it wasn't something that I necessarily assumed coming here.
I think the other thing that's perhaps a standout for me—and it's
a bit of a surprise, I guess, in the
job—is the extent to which I have
to pay attention to government
relations. It's actually more of the
role than I expected it would be.
And I suppose if you would think
about it, it makes sense...but the
vast proportion of the university's
budget comes from a combination
of primarily the provincial government through grants, but then
also from the federal government
because of the research budget. So
I have to pay a lot of attention to
public policy issues around higher
education.
U: In a letter addressed to the
university in February, you talked
about what you called an "Endowment Management Policy." Could
you expand on this and other ways
that the university is dealing with
the economic recession?
T: It's an important question, because obviously if you think about
{he whole world around us...[For
example, the provincial] government looks like it will be in a $2
billion deficit situation and not in
a $500 million deficit situation. So
{he world is a little scary. Having
said that, I have been really struck
again, and I don't want to sound
overly optimistic here, but I have
been very struck that UBC is relatively well-positioned to weather
{he financial storm. And I say that
for a couple of reasons:
First, in relation to the endowment: yes, the endowment lost
about 20 per cent of its value, but
that's not an actual loss...we still
hold all of the assets in the endowment. It's just that their value
dropped. Well, happily the value is
starting to come back a little bit....
We've already seen a 3 per cent
increase. 20 per cent was actually
not a huge loss compared to what
a number  of other universities
President Stephen Toope said that UBC is well-prepared for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games, gerald deo photo/the ubyssey
in North America experienced,
which were 30-35 per cent losses.
So that's one point. Not good news,
but not horrendous news. And I
guess the other important point
about the endowment is we're
only reliant on the endowment for
about 8 per cent of our operating
budget, whereas an institution like
Yale, for example, was reliant on
about 35-40 per cent of its endowment for its operating budget.
[Also], we've done extremely
well in government support for
the university. So yes, in the last
budget the provincial government went into deficit, but they
actually increased expenditures
on higher education. So that was
remarkable—it didn't happen anywhere else in Canada.
U: So would you say, then, that UBC
is well-positioned to mitigate or
alleviate the government's recent
$ 16 million cuts to student financial aid?
T: The issue there, broadly, is
there's a challenge because we are
trying to work with student government at UBC, and more broadly,
across Canada...to make the case
that now is not the time to reduce
support for students. Because in
fact there's more need for student
support...So we're trying to make
the case that there should actually should be no reductions, very
strongly. And there will be some
pressures from pure scholarships.
Not on bursaries or on loan support, but on pure scholarships because of the endowment pressure.
There may be a need to reduce
some of the payouts on some specific scholarship funds, and we're
really worried about that.
It is important for everyone
to understand that because of
what's happening in the world,
all institutions are feeling the
financial pressure. We're better
off than many, but we're not immune. So it looks like we're going to have to find ways of saving
roughly $20-25 million over the
course of the next year. We are
working very diligently...the purpose of that is that we're trying
very hard not to make across the
board cuts, instead we're looking
to find savings.
U: In your July interview with
Maclean's as part of the "Big
5" universities in Canada, you
talked about the need to graduate students with higher degrees
and to increase graduate student
enrollment. Could you briefly describe the need for this?
T: If you look at Canada's performance overall in terms of graduate education we are actually
significant underperformers....
So we're actually producing fewer masters students and fewer
doctoral students especially than
those other countries. That has
huge implications for innovation, research and development
across the country. So I am concerned, as are my colleagues,
that we have to do a better job in
increasing the number of graduate students in our top universities....We're saying we've got to
be more competitive internationally and we have to be trying
harder to attract the right kinds
of graduate students so that we
can then deliver them into our
society and our economy so we
can be more innovative.
U: With less than six months to go
before the 2010 Olympics, what
preparations still need to be made
before UBC is ready to host the
world?
T: Not many, quite frankly. UBC
itself is very well-prepared at this
point. The reality is, of course, is
that there are many issues over
which we don't have control. So for
example, we don't have ultimate
control over security preparations...we're asked about things,
we're consulted, but very often
we're told about things.
The other side of this is public
transit. We're still waiting for the
full transit plan to be released by
TransLink...so when we get those
plans released...there maybe some
things that UBC has to do to make
sure that we're aligning properly.
But apart from that, [we were concerned about the Doug Mitchell
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre]. The big issue for us was, "Is the
venue ready?" It was ready on time,
it was ready on budget.
U: It seems that a concern is about
the lack of consultation and people
aren't really sure of changes the
Games will bring. How is the university addressing this?
T: So there are a couple of different
issues there. I think in terms of our
own processes there's been very
wide consultation....So I think for
those internal things, quite frankly
the consultation has been our usual
consultation, which is quite open
and strong. The big challenge has
been for areas like security where
we are not in control of the whole
process....There have been a few
places where we're a bit frustrated
where we can't engage in our normal processes because the control
is actually not situated within the
university as a whole. So we're trying to find ways of bridging that. I
guess I can say from everything that
I've heard, I don't think there are
going to be any great surprises....But
overall, I don't think that students
are going to find anything dramatic
that's really very different on campus during the time ofthe Olympics
and Paralympics.
U: One of your focuses is on Aboriginal engagement. How do you feel
you have made steps forward in improving Aboriginal issues at UBC?
T: We're still in early days, but you
probably know that we have a new
Aboriginal Strategic Plan, and I'm
actually very excited about that....
So a number of very important
things have already happened. For
example, we have hired a whole
series of new Aboriginal professors....The other thing I would say
is very concrete is that we've got
the commitment, I think, from
the deans and from the Senate...
to make this a priority for the university. So very concretely, in the
area of fundraising, for the first
time ever we've really targeted
support for Aboriginal programs
in our fundraising endeavors,
and it's really showing fruit....
So we're trying to make these really concrete, not just grand statements about how much we care
about Aboriginal issues, but very
concretely, how do we develop
the processes? How do we ensure
budgetary expenditures are made
that will, over time, deliver more
Aboriginal students, more support for Aboriginal students, more
Aboriginal professors, support for
those professors and engagement
with the Aboriginal community
outside the university?
U And, finally, will UBC decide to join
the NCAA in its final year of decision?
T: I don't know (laughs) is the short
answer. And the reason I don't
know is because there's a parallel
process...and that is to try to assess whether there are possibilities
for reform within the Canadian
Intercollegiate Sport (CIS). There
are two fundamental problems, I
would say: one is that the scholarship rules are very narrow. They're
low levels and they don't permit
flexibility to try and make sure
that we can attain, attract and retain outstanding student athletes.
Second, there's a real worry about
the way the CIS—and the Canada
West in particular—is structured.
I hear from many student athletes
and from people in the community
that they're worried that the quality of the competition is going to
be affected by the creation of a lot
of new smaller universities and
schools that are going to be fielding
one or two or three teams, but not
necessarily at the level of competition that our student athletes have
a right to expect. If it's possible for
CIS to address the traditional concerns of western universities, effectively the issue of joining the NCAA
looks different. I'm not saying it
answers all of the questions that
arise there, but we at least understand what we're comparing. Right
now I feel that we're comparing a
situation in Canada, which is very
troubling, to a seeming opportunity
within the NCAA where we don't really know what some of the effects
will be.
Quite frankly, I'm also quite concerned about certain key issues
in applying to the NCAA. So we're
trying to do everything possible to
get the facts clear, and then we'll
go back to public consultation." tl 6/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 0 0 9.0 9.10
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Blue Chip Cookies
now sells icy drinks
Renos come with tasty treats
The newly renovated Blue Chip Cookies, open for business, gerald deo photo/the ubyssey
VINNIE YUEN
Contributor
When students return to campus in
the fall, they will notice that a few
things have changed at Blue Chip
Cookies, the AMS alternative to
Starbucks.
This summer, Blue Chip Cookies adopted a more contemporary
look and expanded their menu to
include mocha and latte frappes, and
iced fruit smoothies.
Perhaps the most noticeable
change is the new brown and teal
colour scheme. According to Nancy
Toogood, Food and Beverages manager, their coffee supplier, Canterbury Coffee, was looking to change
their look to a more contemporary
image. The company funded most of
the renovations, including the paint,
the wood stain, the new chalkboard,
new signs and various costs involved
in re-surfacing the store.
There were complaints made
regarding the regularity of barista
coffees such as lattes and mochas. To deal with this problem,
specific training on the espresso
machine was given to staff, ensuring drinks are of a consistently
great quality.
None of Blue Chip's food and
drink prices have increased due
to these renovations. Because they
reused both the condiment stand
from the upper level offices and
the ice well from the no-longer-
existent Snack Attack, they were
able to complete renovations with
only labour costs, tl
No more old Cheeze
Engineering hangout to get a makeover
VINNIE YUEN
Contributor
The Cheeze Factory, home to the
Engineering Undergraduate Society
(EUS), is to be replaced by a new stu-
I dent centre.
The Cheeze Factory is one of the
oldest buildings on campus, and although it carries with it much history
and sentiment, the 90-year-old building has had ongoing maintenance
problems such as mould issues,
algae growth and rat infestation.
Lin Watt, president of the EUS,
is excited for the new building.
"Not only will the new building be
better and bigger," she said, "but it
will function as a central meeting
place of engineering students and
student groups to increase involvement, community and all-around
awesomeness!"
In November 2008, a referendum
waspassedwith 75 per cent of voters
agreeing that it was time for a new
student centre. Andrew Carne, AMS
council representative for the EUS,
has worked three years on the project. He stated that about half of the
costs for this project will come from
an escalating student fee, which will
start from $15 this fall and cap at
$ 5 0. This student fee will cover about
$2.4 million, while the faculty will
fundraise to match this number. The
Informal Learning Space Commit-
| tee, which supports initiatives aimed
at developing or enhancing UBC's
informal learning spaces, will also
contribute $250, 000 to this project.
Because the EUS is not a legal entity, a financial agreement was approved by AMS Council on May 2 7.
The next step is for the agreement
to be approved by the Board of
Governors. Depending on the success of fundraising, construction
for this new building is expected to
commence in one and a half to two
years.
Construction should take nine
months to one year to complete.
All timescales are rough estimates
for now, as are the preliminary site
plans.
Carne said that the new building
will be styled to reflect the current
Cheeze Factory. The beams from the
Cheeze may be placed in the student
centre, bringing old elements to the
new building. The new centre is
estimated to be about 9000 square
ft with two floors, and envisioned to
have plenty of study space, a common social area, offices for EUS executives, a computer lab and smaller
rooms available for booking.
"Due to the condition of the current facility, and some of the past
history of the society, many students
feel reluctant to come by the Cheeze,"
said Carne, "The new building will
serve to finally erase this stigma and
be a facility that all Engineering students can be proud of." vl 2009.09/ 10/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/7
Looking at UBC's $25 million deficit
cc
It means both larger and smaller [classes]" says VP Finance
SAMANTHA JUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
UBC recently announced they are
expecting a $25 million deficit
for the 2010/2011 year, of which
$ 13 million is an unsustainable
structural deficit.
At an Alma Mater Society
(AMS) student council meeting
three weeks ago, UBC VP Finance
Pierre Ouillet announced that the
university has begun implementing an eight-step plan to deal
with the structural deficit. At this
point, however, the plan leaves
unanswered questions.
Plans are still in the early stages, but they include: increasing
professional fees for students,
doubling the number of international students on campus,
reducing teaching costs through
larger amphitheatres, combining
administrations of smaller faculties on campus and increasing
revenue generated by cultural
venues on campus.
This is part two of The Ubyssey's look at the university's
plan.
WILL THERE BE BIGGER CLASSES?
UBC is changing the way their
classrooms and faculties operate
this year, focusing on administration and classroom initiatives
as a method of saving money.
In a presentation at a recent
AMS Council meeting, UBC VP
Finance Pierre Ouillet said that
the university is talking about
"larger amphitheatres, smaller
experiences" regarding class
sizes.
"It means both larger and
smaller [classes]," said Ouillet.
"So instead of having a lot of medium-sized classes and very little
focus on managing that, what we
would do is use, and again, it's an
idea, to use some of our star professors to teach larger [classes],
because it doesn't make a huge
difference if there's 70 or 90
students...but at the same time
make sure that everybody after
that has a small class experience,
which is a group of 20-25...[and
is] much more interactive."
Kathy Nomme is a senior
instructor in the Biology department at UBC. She teaches Biology
111 and 121 this semester, and
about 230 students are registered in each course.
"I think once you get beyond a
certain size, beyond 50, the dynamics change within the classroom," she said. "And so there is
a difference in that there is more
evaluation that has to be done,
there's marking, there's communication issues, so it does make a
difference with every student you
add to a course."
She said that she has adopted
techniques to keep students interactive, and has been fortunate
to get a TA to help manage the
large number of students.
"When you have a large class
like that you have to try to make
it as interactive as possible," she
said. "Given that you can't really
have one on one interaction with
students, but I've adopted other
techniques such as using group
work."
Nomme said that class sizes
are limited by the size of the
lecture halls, but unless there are
more classrooms, more sections
and more instructors, smaller
classes aren't going to happen in
her faculty.
"The smaller the class the better for the students, because then
you have more interactions with
the instructor," she said. "But
that's not going to happen here
so we have to make the best of
what we have. And unless they're
going to start building new classrooms, classrooms of varying
sizes, classrooms that can fit
200-300 people, we're going to
have to restrict our classes to the
230 that we can squeeze into [the
classroom] Bio 2000."
On the administrative side,
UBC wants to combine the administration of smaller faculties
on campus as a means to save
money.
"Every faculty today has its
own IT department, they have
their own HR department, they
have their own finance department," said Ouillet. "It's not efficient if you are a small faculty because you don't necessarily need
a full-time chief financial officer,
you can merge your IT with some
of the others...we're looking at
some centralization there, of
these types of services, and it's
just the right thing to do."
Dean of the Faculty of Dentistry Charles Shuler said that
talk centers around making administration of smaller faculties
more efficient. He said that sharing resources would be helpful
and that if the university pushed
for full centralization, the deans
of smaller faculties would be
against it.
"Most of the deans of the
smaller faculties agreed that we
probably need the support we
have but what we don't have is
much depth," he said. "So working together we might be able to
fill some gaps."
MORE MONEY IN CULTURAL
VENUES
UBC's cultural venues, which include
the Chan Centre, the Museum of
Anthropology and the Botanical Gardens, provide a source of revenue for
the campus. However, Ouillet said
that the venues are not at their full
potential.
"We don't have the level of public
traffic from the community, from
Vancouver," said Ouillet, "so we
think there's a...need to market, to do
some core marketing, to have group
pricing. Anything we can do to give
more exposure to the community
and frankly, make more money."
Ouillet said that this would include
more of an increase in traffic than
admission, but did not specifically
say that there would be no increase
in admission prices.
Representatives from the various cultural venues on campus
were either not available or declined comment, va
The smaller the class the better for the students, because
then you have more interactions with the instructor, but
that's not going to happen here so we have to make the best
of what we have. And unless they're going to start building
new classrooms, classrooms of varying sizes, classrooms
that can fit 200-300 people, we're going to have to restrict
our classes to the 230 that we can squeeze in.
—Pierre Ouillet
VP Finance 8/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 0 0 9.0 9.10
No more provincial exams for incoming students
NILO TABRIZY
Contributor
Beginning this September,
provincial exams will not be required for BC students' applications to UBC.
The motion was approved on
May 14, 2008. No additional provincial exams will be required
to be accepted to UBC, other than
those which are required for
high school graduation.
Student Senator Azim Wazeer
said that the policy was amended
in order for UBC to be fairer towards BC students who are applying to BC universities.
"This policy came about primarily because UBC wanted to
attract the best and brightest
across Canada," he said. "The
disadvantage with the previous
admissions system was that
UBC had to wait until well into
the summer for BC provincial
examinations results, which lead
to the brightest students going
elsewhere because they were getting confirmed decisions earlier
from other universities."
According to Lisa Collins, associate registrar of senate and
curriculum services, the change
came about when the provincial
government passed a policy
that stated that students are
only required to write the English exam in order to graduate,
prompting universities to reexamine their own admissions
policies. Consequently, since the
Ministry of Education was not requiring certain provincial exams
to graduate, universities were
then free to consider whether
examinations made sense as an
admissions requirement.
"This leveled the playing
field      for      BC      universities
to attract desirable students as
they could now make final
admissions decisions as early in
the process as other universities,"
Collins stated, elaborating on
how this policy is now fairer to
BC students wishing to attend
local universities.
Dr David Fielding, chair of the
senate admissions committee,
believes that enrolment will not
increase as a direct result of this
amendment as not all students
admitted to UBC were admitted on the basis of provincial
examinations. Since only one
province was subjected to provincial exams as an admissions
requirement, taking away such a
requirement would not increase
enrollment substantially.
However, Fielding believes
that if anything, this amendment has improved "fairness"
for prospective BC students as
local students will now be able to
receive confirmed acceptance to
UBC as early as other competing
universities. Also, this amendment has no impact on current
UBC students, but this change
was widely supported by UBC students at the time it was adopted.
Fielding said that the competitive nature of admissions will not
change.
"Enrollment at UBC before the
implementation of this policy
was very competitive; afterwards,
it remains the same," he said.
The amendment allows UBC
to be on the same playing field
as other universities that did
not require provincial examinations. Now, UBC can give letters
of acceptance to prospective
students as early as every other
university.
The University of Victoria has
made   this   amendment  before
UBC, and Simon Fraser University made the switch shortly after
UBC.
Olga Woodland of Argyle
Secondary School in North Vancouver believes that educators
support the notion of exams as
they give a reflection of how one
group of students are performing academically versus other
districts and other schools.
"Personally, I like the exams.
They serve as an audit across the
province, putting all the schools
on the same playing field," said
Woodland. She is concerned that
students will not be evaluated at
the same level as they are currently; and that the only method
of assessment would be through
school evaluation. Woodland has
already noticed a pattern of the
majority of Grade 12 students
choosing not to write their exams, tu
Funds, fees and where to opt-out: a look at your tuition fees
SARAH CHUNG
schung@ubyssey.ca
Did you know that the fees you pay
at UBC include a donation towards
refugee students who wish to study
here? How about the fact that some
services can be opted out where you
can save up to $234.31? This Ubyssey
exclusive gives a detailed breakdown
of your student fees.
ATHLETICS AND RECREATION FEE:
$189.66
The annual fee is still a large
amount, but now students get
discounts. Some of these changes
include a four-month pass to the
BirdCoop, from $148 down to
$25; almost all intramural sports
are between $5-10 per person; the
Aquatic Centre offers free student
access at all times; and the Doug
Mitchell Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre offers free public skating and
drop-in sports at $2.
U-PASS: $190
At the price of $23.75 per month,
this mandatory blue pass will allow
you to travel freely by transit. In
2010, the Canada Line will include
an add-fare for passengers heading
to the Vancouver Airport, and it will
not be included in the U-Pass.
SEXUAL ASSAULT FUND: $3
The fee for the Sexual Assault Support Centre (SASC) went up $2 this
year. The SASC promotes anti-violence and anti-sexual harassments
with free confidential services from
a professional and experienced staff.
Their advertising and promotion
budget tripled for this upcoming
year to push for more workshops,
campaigns and outreach awareness.
AMS STUDENT SERVICES FEE: $9
For free services such as tutoring,
counselling, health and well being,
security, as well as for our student
radio station CiTR and its magazine,
Discorder. Bring your student ID and
you can get a big bag of non-perishable goodies up to six times a term
from AMS Foodbank. Also check out
AMS Minischool for cheap and sexy
classes such as Pole Dancing 101
and Strip Tease.
MANDATORY AMS FEE: $23.28
Other than covering general operational costs of AMS such as wages, office
supplies and yummy grubs for their
council meetings, this money is used
for lobbying against the government to
lower tuitions, increased grants, having better housing laws, etc.
WUSC REFUGEE STUDENTS ASSISTANCE: $2.50
This fee went up $1.50 this year.
UBC sponsors at least three refugee
students every year through World
University Services Canada (WUSC)
that enables those students in need
to come to UBC and have the ability
to continue their education.
SUB RENEWAL FEE: $30
Part of an $ 8 5 million student investment—the largest single donation in
UBC's history—to build a new $110
million Student Union Building. The
contribution is being financed by
an annual student fee that started
at $20 in the 2008/2009 year and
will continue to rise by an increment
of $ 10 per year up to and including
2016/2017, where the fee will remain constant until the building is
paid for.
2 PER CENT TUITION INCREASE
Last April, the UBC Board of Governors
raised tuition fees for the 2009/2010
year at the maximum set by the Liberal
government. The tuition increases will
cost a domestic undergraduate an
extra $80 for 30 credits and $985 for
international students.
Ian Burgess, the comptroller of
UBC Finance, said that "[the money]
will be used to accommodate the
rise of general costs such as wages,
supplies, etc." However, for the
2010/2011 fiscal year, Burgess recommends a 75 per cent allocation
directly into faculties for teaching
activities and 12-15 per cent of all
domestic tuition to Student Aid.
Statistics Canada reported that
the average full-time undergraduate tuition fee for the 2008/2009
academic year was $4724 in Canada
and $5040 in BC.
FEES WITH OPT-OUT PROVISIONS
You can save money by opting out
of some AMS fees. These include
the AMS/GSS Extended Health
and Dental Plan at $216.31, Student Aid Bursary Fund at $12,
Student Legal Fund at $1, and
finally, The Ubyssey Publications
Society Fee at $5. wl
THE LIVE SESSIONS
TELUS STUDIO THEATRE AT THE CHAN CENTRE | UBC
Be a part of a live studio audience with these intimate Thursday afternoon recording sessions
for CBC Radio 2's Canada Live series. Each fall, some of the hottest locally-based artists are
featured on this unique series held in our Telus Studio Theatre at the Chan Centre.
featuring
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ALL AGES!    Student tickets only $10
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MULT1 ORGASMIC SEX
Silicone Vibrators * Lubes ^Condoms 4 DVD's]
Books * Erotic Art * Private Batchelorette Parties]
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Mon - Sept 14
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the art of loving
JW / 1819 W. 5th & Burrard | 604.742.9988 | www.artofloving.ca
Open 7 Days a Week 110 AM -10 PM on Thursdays and Fridays
MONDAY MEETING TIMES
SPORTS: 12PM
NEWS: 1PM
CULTURE: 2PM
IDEAS: 3PM
COME MEET US! WE'RE HIRING! <
2009.09/10/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/9
The Ubyssey needs a Sports Editor Cover games, interview athletes and be a part of our Olympic coverage!
If you're interested in working with your official student newspaper, email feedback(?ubysseyca for more information.
Sports
T-Birds Season Preview: Men's Soccer l"ATHLETE PR0F,L
The men's soccer team will look to improve on their second place conference finish in 2008. keegan bursaw file photo/the ubyssey
Can UBC return to the national stage?
ANDREW BUCHOLTZ
Contributor
It was a difficult ending to stomach
last October. After finishing second
in Canada West during the regular
season, the UBC Men's soccer team
looked set to defend their second national championship in three years
at the nationals in Ottawa. They ran
into an unexpected roadblock on
the way, falling to the Trinity Western Spartans on penalty kicks in
the Canada West semifinals. Head
coach Mike Mosher said that loss
should provide extra motivation.
"When you think you have a good
team and something like that happens, it's disappointing," he said.
The Thunderbirds return an
impressive array of talent, though,
which may help them fight their
way back to the top. Their defence
conceded only 7 goals in 14 regular
season games last year, and all four
of last year's starters on the backline
have returned.
"It's huge to have them all back,"
Mosher said. "They were a strength
lastyear."
lhe back four will be playing in
front of a new goalkeeper though,
after the graduation of All-Canadian
keeper Srdjan Djekanovic. Mosher
said Djekanovic will be missed, but the
strong defence will help the transition.
"Srdjan, he wasn't all that busy
through a lot of the regular season
because the guys in front of him
were so good," Mosher said.
There will be an interesting battle
for the starting spot in goal, with the
favourites being fifth-year veterans
Elliot Usher and Nikolai Matni.
"This is their opportunity, they
know that," Mosher said. "I think
they'll do just fine."
If the veterans falter, new recruits may take up the challenge.
The Thunderbirds have two highly
prized goalkeeping recruits in Simon Thomas, currently the backup
for the Vancouver Whitecaps, and
Matt Robinson. Mosher is pleased
with the depth accumulated.
"We've set ourselves up to be
good in goal moving forward—for
years to come, hopefully," he said.
The midfield also has plenty
of depth. Mosher said the team's
strength in midfield will likely make
lineup decisions difficult.
"We're quite deep in that position, which gives us a variety of options," he said. "It's a nice problem
to have."
The strikers may pose more of an
issue, but Mosher said the coaching
staff is working on addressing the
lack of goals.
"We're aware of it going into this
year," he said. "We think we've got
quality players.... Hopefully, a couple
of guys will get hot."
The team has four other recruits
from the Whitecaps residency and
prospects programs; William Hyde,
Greg Smith, Ashley Ankiewicz and
Harry Lakhan. Hyde may challenge
for a starting spot in the back four,
while Smith, who spent last season
with the youth squad of German
Bundesliga team Energie Cottbus,
can play anywhere on the field.
Mosher said making it back
to the nationals isn't going to be
easy. Trinity Western is hosting
this year, which means that there
will be only one berth for another
Canada West team. He said there
are benefits and drawbacks to
having the nationals so close, especially with the growing parity in
Canada West.
"If you get the one spot, I guess
it's a blessing, but it's definitely
challenging," Mosher said. "Each
passing year, you think it couldn't
possibly get tighter, but it does."
The team kicks off their season
this weekend on the road against
the Alberta and Saskatchewan Huskies. Mosher said both matches will
be difficult.
"It's always going to be a battle
against those teams," he said. "Really, you can't take any team in this
conference lightly." *U
STANDING: 2nd in Conference
ON OFFENCE: 19 goals scored (5th
in Canada West)
ON DEFENCE: 7 goals allowed (1st
in Canada West)
2009 PREVIEW
RETURNING STARTERS: 8/11
OFFENSIVE STAR: Canada West
rookie of the year Devin Gunenc
had 5 points and started 14
games, the second most on the
team.
DEFENSIVE STAR: First-team
AH-Canadian defender Graham
Smith takes over as the team's
sole captain this year after splitting the duties with Nick Poole
lastyear.
SCHEDULE:
Sept. 12 ©Alberta, 2:15pm
Sept. 13 @ Saskatchewan, 2:15pm
Sept. 18 vs. Lethbridge, 7pm
Sept. 19 vs. Calgary, 7:15pm
Sept. 26 @ UVic, 2:15pm
Sept. 27 @UFV, 2:15pm
Oct. 2 @ TWU, 7pm
Oct. 9 vs. Fraser Valley, 7:15pm
Oct. 10 vs. UVic, 7:15pm
Oct. 16 vs. TWU, 7:15pm
Oct. 23 vs. Saskatchewan, 7:15pm
Oct. 24 vs. Alberta, 7:15pm
Oct. 31 ©Calgary, 2:15pm
Nov. 1 @ Lethbridge, 2:15pm
GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
He's Greene,
but he's ready
IAN TURNER
Contributor
Mid-season last year, Billy Greene
became UBC's starting quarterback.
And while the first-year product of
Surrey's Holy Cross High School impressed at times, he also struggled,
throwing five interceptions and no
touchdown passes, losing the three
games he started.
"I think he did a pretty good job
under the circumstances. It's pretty
tough to come in in that situation,
and do any more than he did," said
Ted Goveia, UBC's head coach. "He's
improved tremendously."
So far, results seem to bear that
out. After two weeks, the Thunderbirds have one win and one loss.
But there is work to do. For one,
though his more experienced offensive line makes him feel "very, very
safe...and confident," in the practice
preceding our interview—one that
Goveia admitted "wasn't the sharpest"—Greene's timing with receivers was off, resulting in numerous
dropped passes. But he made up
for it by picking up a lot of yards
running.
"His confidence is pretty good,
and he has got good leadership,"
said Goveia. "He's just young. He's
going to experience new things and
go through it."
All of Greene's peers said he has
a great character, is a solid athlete,
and provides leadership in the
huddle and the locker room. When
it came to his interview after practice, Greene oozed confidence and
poise—academics excepted.
Those are good qualities to have
if Greene is to fulfill his dream: be
a player in the Canadian Football
League. In case that falls through,
he is "trying to get [his] grades together" to make it into Law school.
Short-term, he plans on majoring
in political science. But this summer his priority was football. Five
times a week, a ninety-minute workout. Four times a week, a series of
ball-drills.
All Goveia wants from Greene "is
quick delivery and that he makes
the right reads, but that is something that gets better with game
experience..! don't see any major
weaknesses except inexperience,"
he said.
Hopefully for the Thunderbirds,
all the experience Greene needs will
come early, giving UBC a chance in
the Canada West conference, tl  OPEN  TO  THINKING  THAT  CAN   CHANGE  THE  WORLD
Why UBC is a place of mind
How does a decent provincial university of 20 years ago now find itself
positioned among the elite of the world's 35 greatest universities?
Why does a Nobel Laureate choose UBC to change the teaching of
science on a global scale?
Why do UBC's medical researchers rank in the North American top 10
for bringing their work to patients in the marketplace?
Why has UBC taken the national lead in Community Service Learning
and sustainability? Interesting questions,
SKETCHING THE FUTURE
WHERE'S THE NEW LOGO?
THREE STUDENTS AND A TREE - NOT
GETTING IN POSITION
To prospective undergraduate and graduate students, UBC is the Tier
One international research-intensive university that, better than any
other, offers a fresh, open environment that provides the freedom to
learn, discover and contribute in one's own way.
Elements of
the brand
A   BRAND   NEW   IDEA:   THE   TWO-YEAR   JOURNEY
Fall 2007
Spring 2008
Summer 2008
Fall 2008
Winter 2008
Winter 2007 Overwhelmingly, internal and external audiences, gravitated to one particular execution:
• the tagl ine a place of mind
• a big, bold idea to show how open thought can change the world, crafted in a headline that ends
in the phrase From Here
m equally bold "heroic" imagery that invites viewers to see themselves as part of wide open photographic vistas that
characterize the West and UBC's place in that geography
Spring 2009
Summer 2009
Fall 2009 www.aplaceofmind.ca
public.affairs a ubc.ca aplaceofmind.ca
WEB 2.0
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loers at ubc are taKing on towering environmental cnanenges. in
the first university in Canada to make a commitment to sustainability. The community has extensively reduced campus emissions to below 1990
levels. And UBC professors and students came up with the concept of "our ecological footprint," launched the carbon offset company used by the
Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games, and are developing what may be the greenest building on Earth. It's part of our nature.
UBC       a place of mind 16/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/2009.09.10
GAMES AND COMICS
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l-DON'T-CARE COMIC, MARIA CIRSTEA
MEDIUM
solution, tips and computer
programs at www.sudoku.com
"SCIENCE VS. ARTS"
BY GRAHAM TEMPLETON AND BRYN HEWKO
THE PEAK (SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY)
#51
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CAMPUS & COMMUNITY PLANNING
www.planning.ubc.ca
Public Open House
UBC Bioenergy Research and Demonstration Project
The University of British Columbia, in partnership with Nexterra Energy Corp., proposes
to build and demonstrate an advanced renewable energy system designed to provide
clean heat and power to campus. The system features B.C. technology on biomass
gasification combined with high-efficiency engines. As a first demonstration of this
combined approach to clean heat and power, the proposed facility would leave a
legacy of learning and research opportunities for UBC students, faculty and staff. You are
invited to attend the Public Open House for details.
Date:   Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2009, 4 - 6 p.m.
Place: Atrium - Fred Kaiser Bldg, 2332 Main Mall
CONCEPTUAL OESWN STUDY - UBC -UtMONSTRATION PUNT
WILLIAM RHONE ARCHITECT
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, karen.russell@ubc.ca
^
Do you suffer from neck pain,
back pain, headaches or fatigue?
Call us to schedule an appointment today!
www.vancouverspinecarecentre.com
Broadway at Pine 604-873-6029
PREFERRED FEE SCHEDULE FOR UBC STUDENTS
Dr. Dean Greenwood Dr. Richard Hunter
CHIROPRACTORS
^
J
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
ORPHEUM THEATRE 8PM
Arnie Roth conductor
Nobuo Uematsu composer
UBC Opera Ensemble
" tantworlds.co
Presenting the Canadian Premiere of a unique and thrilling
performance of Nobuo Uematsu's award-winning music
from FINAL FANTASY! This extraordinary concert features
state-of-the-art video projected on screens to showcase the
game's most memorable and thrilling sequences, with music
performed live by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, with
Grammy" award-winner Arnie Roth conducting. This concert
will also feature the North American premiere performance
The Drunken Uncles and the Anti-Love Brigade play the Dirty Basement twice a week, Sundays and Wednesdays, SUB 24.
Tickets online at vancouversymphony.ca
or call VSO Customer Service at 604.876.3434
VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA 2009.09/10/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/17
HISTORY OF FRINGE
The original Fringe Festival was born in 1947, when eight (rejected) performance groups set up shop on the edge of the Edinburgh
International Festival in Scotland. These shows took advantage of unsuspecting theatre goers, and gained popularity in the following years.
Canada hosts ten Fringe Festivals—more than any other country in the world. For more information on the Fringe Festival, go to page 19.
Culture
Culture Editors: Kate Barbaria & Trevor Record
Welcome Back BBQ: the rundown
Energetic crowds enjoying last year's AMS Welcome Back BBQ, which featured the Clips, the Matinee and
KM GREEN
Contributor
September is all about on-campus
livin' as the AMS attempts to establish itself as your "totally radical"
student society with cheap, good
concerts. Chief among these is the
Welcome Back BBQ, which will terrify the neighbors at Maclnnes Field
on Friday September 11. The Ubyssey breaks down upcoming bands,
and the talking points you'll need to
navigate serious musical discussions
with serious musical people you'd
like to seriously sleep with.
THUNDERHEIST
What is Thunderheist like? Most
of the good parts of Gnarls Barkley
without the unfortunate Paris Hilton
connection. Think aggressive beats
and lots of booty-shaking; lyrics with
a heavy dependence on sex, partying
and innuendo. It's club music for the
discerning undergraduate, and after
three beers it's an excuse to dance
like a complete tramp. Keep your hips
in line and repeat after me: 'crunky.'
GREEN GO
Shout-along choruses like "Dance Till
Your Death" could seriously fracture
your cool credibility. Bugger that; nobody likes a joyless scenester. When
Green Go takes the stage, let the
dance-rockers from Guelph entice
you and your object of desire into a
few poorly-realized dance moves.
This is spontaneous, fun-loving
music along the lines of !!! or Franz
Ferdinand—minus,  of course,  the
overplay. Go west, young man, and
boogie down.
NATALIE PORTMAN'S SHAVED
HEAD
NPSH formed on a whim and they
still seem shocked by what they've
created: keyboard-way-heavy sing-
alongs punctuated with guitar, claps
and enough self-conscious irony
to fill the Biltmore. To add to their
already expansive hype, NPSH is
populated by a girl and boys little
older than the frosh currently crowding you out of the refreshments line,
singing songs about what they're
gonna do to your daughter. How
to turn these baby geniuses to your
advantage? Either use their youth
and pseudo-retro neon gaudy hijinks
as a foil for your superior maturity,
GOH  IROMOTO  FILE  PHOTO/THE  UBYSSEY
or remark on how much this sounds
like your old garage band. Oh yeah,
we totally could have gone big...but
then I thought, university—that's
where it's at.
SEX ATTACK!
Self-described "button-mashers"
with a rabid teenage fanbase, Sex
Attack! are the musical equivalent of
canned soup—sure, it's been made
beforehand, but sometimes it hits
the spot. Whether or not it will fly on
the field is up for debate, but once
the first button has been mashed,
it'll be time to embark on a psuedo-
intellectual discussion of, say, the
performative aspect of live music.
Possible topic: Are we paying these
young gentlemen to stand on stage
and hit "PLAY?" Technically, yes. vi
Happiness is the best magical power
An interview with Natalie Portmans Shaved Head
TREVOR RECORD
culture@ubyssey.ca
Natalie Portman's Shaved Head
(NPSH) will be headlining the annual
AMS Welcome Back BBQ on Friday,
September 11 at Maclnnes Field.
The Seattle-based group is known for
their unique brand of party rock and
charmingly garish music videos. The
Ubyssey interviewed NPSH members Luke Smith, David Price, Claire
England and Shaun Libman during
the Sasquatch! Music Festival. The
full transcript is available at ubyssey.
ca/culture.
UBYSSEY: I've heard that a few of you
wanted to go to UBC at some point, is
that true?
NPSH: That's true...(Luke) I was looking to get in there at one point when
I was looking at schools. I wanted to
do film. Vancouver is a beautiful city.
U: You met at an art school, is that
right?
NPSH: We met in an art high school.
It was a high school that was very
art-focused.
U: Were you more focused towards
music or visual arts?
NPSH: The surprising thing is, they
didn't actually have any music at
that school. We went there for film.
There was one semester of music in
the four years we were there. And it
was really crappy. They had a drum
kit in storage all four years we were
there, it never got used. Sometimes
we'd skip class and go play with the
drums in the storage room.
U: I've read that the band was started
to meet girls. How has that been
working out?
NPSH: That's a funny little piece of
Wikipedia.
U: I checked it out, and found the interview where it had been said.
NPSH: It makes sense, in that it's
something we might say, but it's not
completely accurate. Well, I don't
know, maybe it's partially true.
U: Your band has been together since
2005. Are you still good friends?
How has touring worked out for you?
NPSH: We started off as friends, and
some of us have been friends going
on seven years now. And it's been
a blast hanging out...going to play
music with your best friends. There's
nothing else I can imagine anyone
ever doing, or wanting to do.
U: You guys have toured with Matt &
Kim and The Go! Team in the same
tour, how was that?
NPSH: CSS was also there. To be
able to be with all those great
bands, which we all like a lot, on
our first great tour was amazing.
Matt & Kim are the single—or I
should say couple—nicest people in
the world. The Go! Team...we never
really got to meet, except once. We
were in the backroom and the singer [Ninja] came in while they were
doing an instrumental part. She
burst in sweating and was grabbing
some towels and we chatted with
her then.
U: You are sort of personal friends
with the band CSS, is that right?
NPSH: Not exactly....Well, yeah, Luke
has video chatted with them. (Luke)
The video chat was the culmination
of a long, cultivated MySpace friendship. We were chatting over a long
time and, you know, we ended up
going on tour with them.
U: When you started to gain in popularity, it was largely internet-based?
NPSH: Yes, definitely Well, I think
that the live shows started it, though.
It was the internet, but it was being
able to hear that people were liking
the live shows, and also connecting
with people so that we could play
shows. It was all about making connections with people so we could
play shows. So it was like a gateway.
U: If you each had magic powers,
what would each of your powers be?
NPSH: (Dave) I'm going to go with
time travel, that would be really rad.
(Luke) I think I'd like to fly. (Shaun)
Yeah, I'd really like to fly. We've
been to LA a few times, and passed
by Magic Mountain Six Flags, and
we always looked at it longingly. And
we finally got to go there, and we
found this one ride called "Tatsu."
It's a dragon-themed one, you're facing the ground, and it's like you're
flying, it was an awesome feeling.
(Luke) I think when people are
asked this question it's something
like 70 per cent who say they'd
choose flying. (Claire) I think when
anyone is asked what superpowers
they want, it'd be flying, x-ray vision,
all the basics.
U: We're not talking super powers,
though, we're talking magic.
NPSH: (Claire) Whoa! I would just
want to be like a Harry Potter kid.
U: What, and get all the powers?
NPSH: (Claire) Yeah, I just want to be
magic, c'mon! (The rest of the group
generally disagrees with this.)
U: What if you get just one aspect of
your life to be magical, like that it's
generally happy?
NPSH: That'd be good. That'd be really great actually. I'd hate to be able
to fly and have a shitty life.
U: So do you at least have that power,
the happy life?
NPSH: Definitely tJ
IN   THE   PIT
Mother Mother
comes home
PHOTO COURTESY OF LAST GANG RECORDS
GRACE MCRAE-OKINE
Contributor
Mother Mother's upcoming show
at the Pit Pub on September 12
should be one to remember, so
mark your calendars now. The
last time Mother Mother and Vancouver rocked out together was
early August, when the crowd was
described as "particularly rambunctious." If you aren't already
a huge Mother Mother fan, don't
worry—you're still cool. But only
for so long.
Since the release (and re-release)
of 2007's Touch Up and 2008's
immaculate Oh My Heart, the
Vancouver band has been lauded
for their keen sense of harmony,
Pixies-esque girl/boy vocals, and
incredible rockability. After opening for Sam Roberts on tour this
summer and debuting the video for
their single "Hayloft" on MuchMusic September 4, Mother Mother is
prepared to take over the top spot
on your iPod, after having done the
same to all of your friends.
"Hayloft is the current band
favorite," said singer/guitarist
Ryan Guldemond, "doing the video
brought the joy back into that song
for us. Playing a song a million
times over a period of time can really make you forget what originally
made it good."
The band has seen some recent changes, from a quintet to a
quartet and back again after last
year's departure of Debra-Jean
Creelman, who was replaced this
spring by Jasmin Parkin on keyboards and vocals. Along with Ali
Siadat on drums, Jeremy Page on
bass and Molly Guldemond with
vocals, Mother Mother is still on
the road.
Lucky for hometown fans, the
band is also on the internet, with
a Twitter page that has a new-car
smell, a tour diary on their web-
page, and (at least) one blog post.
There isn't any beef between the
group and social media, they're
just "learning to love it."
"I update those," said Guldemond, "I posted one really good
blog, hoping that it would be a catalyst for more blogs. Take what you
can get," he added, with a laugh.
As awesome as social media is,
there's still nothing quite like the
real thing, so head over to the Outpost to pick up tickets while they
last. Get excited UBC—we can outdo
"rambunctious," can't we?
"We're excited to see you too,"
said Guldemond. tl 18/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2009.09.10
CVC rebuilds image
The Chinese Varsity Club is growing up
DAVINA CHOY
Contributor
Widespread misconceptions, a banana suit and a promotional video
that went awry are some ofthe things
that incoming President Eric Chan,of
the Chinese Varsity Club (CVC) hopes
to shake off this upcoming year.
On a quiet Monday afternoon,
he and Brian Cheung, the internal
vice-president, wait to unveil a new
promotional video to the Student
Advisory Committee vice chair. This
new video, entitled I Can, is worlds
away in tone and content from the
infamous video of semester past.
In that controversial video, the
CVC is pitted against the "Typical
Honger Club" in the manner of the
PC vs. Mac commercials. The "Typical Honger Club" member speaks
with a thick accent, mistakenly says
"Viagra" in place of "variety" and
struggles to pronounce the word
"multicultural." The implication
being that CVC, by comparison,
is more diverse (unless you're an
immigrant), up-to-date, and, in a
word—better. Needless to say it was
not well received despite Eric Chan's
assertion that "it was obviously not
meant to be offensive."
For Eric, the video is in the past
and he is looking forward. The I Can
video is an attempt to re-brand CVC
as culturally inclusive and communally minded. Against a background
of inspirational music, it features a
handful of student clubs saying what
they can do, ending with a mosaic of
members' faces fitted together like a
jigsaw puzzle. But with a name like
"Chinese Varsity Club"—with the
ethnic emphasis built right in—can
multiculturalism really prevail?
"It's a concern," said Chan, "but
the name is part of its history." CVC
was founded in 1930 as a way for
Chinese students, then a small minority, to socialize and play sports.
Eric's own parents and uncles were
members of CVC in their youth. Now,
almost 80 years later CVC has grown
into the largest student club at UBC
with over 1200 members and 70
executive leaders. As a social club, it
aims to attract members across the
racial spectrum, but the perception
remains that CVC caters mainly to
Chinese students.
The Aqua Society is neighbours
with the CVC office in the bottom
floor of the Student Union Building.
Brendan Andresen, an Aqua Society member and Alberta native, is
friendly with CVC, but apprehensive
about attending their events. When
asked why, he answers, half-smiling,
"You've got to be Asian, don't you?"
Andresen is unsure what exactly
it is that CVC does. "They got a lot of
members and there's always someone hanging out [in the CVC office]
and they're usually really friendly."
He considers several possibilities
and settles on one that is sure to
raise a few eyebrows: "I think they
help international students from
China get into UBC."
These are the kinds of misconceptions that Chan hopes to dispel. To
him, CVC is like a family—all-inclusive and welcoming, and if this is
true, then the role ofthe warm, pipe-
smoking patriarch belongs to him.
As the I Can video rolls to an
end, Chan is positively beaming.
His comments to Cheung—who conceptualized, organized, filmed and
directed the video—have a distinct
proud-parent quality: "the tiling,
man—very nice"; "Sweet video. It
was awesome" and "I like how you
framed their faces," followed by
laughs and a high-five.
To stretch the family metaphor
further, it's clear that Chan's heart
belongs to CVC for the long run. As
a fifth-year student, he is stretching out his remaining five classes
to ensure that he has ample time
left over to run the club. With their
membership growing each year, it's
apparent that CVC is doing something right.
A large percentage of their members are first-years, and like most
clubs, CVC relies on their optimism
and  youthful   energy.   Recruiting
first-year executives, however, is no
Cakewalk. Interviews run for two
days and more than 150 first-year
applicants are whittled down to fill
only fifteen or so positions. It has
the makings of high drama and
many dreams are dashed in the
recruitment process.
Being a first-year "exec" is a coveted position and Chan is genuinely
baffled by it. "I just don't know why.
I guess they want to get involved,
but being an exec isn't the only
way." Worse, he notes that many
applicants who didn't make it don't
continue to participate in CVC. "It's
a rejection issue," he says. In matters of recruitment, hell hath no fury
like a first-year scorned.
The newly-launched website is
tricked out, glossy and features a
photo gallery, videos, a bi-weekly
podcast and an article series on
everything from bussing to food to
tips on taking naps, aimed at helping out first-year students. It's no
wonder Timmy Cheung, incoming
president of the Chinese Students'
Association (CSA), considers CVC
one of the best and most entertaining clubs on campus.
Members look forward to the
annual ski trip where, according
to longtime member Felix Cha,
one can expect "lots of drinking
and parrying," in addition to snow
sports and short-term romances in
the comfort of shared cabins or the
always-reliable hot tub. A fashion
show, the Chin and Chow Interactive Dinner (in the style of Tony and
Tina's Wedding) and the Supaskillz
talent show are signatures in the
roster of CVC's annual events.
If the I Can video manages to attract a more diverse membership,
then everyone wins. To be sure,
CVC is an attractive club. Its legacy
provokes curiosity and, if Chan
and Cheung are any indication,
the genuine niceness of its leadership provides a safe, welcoming
place for students to get a taste of
what the largest club on campus
has to offer. tH
How to beat textbook burn
and get the deal you deserve
TREVOR RECORD
culture@ubyssey.ca
The textbook publishing business
is greased with students who didn't
put in the time or energy to look for
the best possible deal. Even with
a light course load, you're likely
to pay several hundred dollars for
textbooks each semester.
Don't be one of those people.
If you're sneaky and creative, you
can cut down your course material
costs significantly (sometimes even
completely).
1 The UBC Bookstore has overpriced materials, which they buy
back from students for much lower
prices than when they're resold.
Returns are not accepted for new
course packages after you have
opened them, even a day after they
were purchased. Since course packages are sold exclusively at the UBC
Bookstore, they've almost got you
in a bind.
2 Don't buy textbooks until
you've been to your first classes.
There is a chance you will find out
that you don't actually need some
ofthe textbooks. There are plenty of
courses which recommend you buy
a $50 textbook that has only one or
two of your required readings.
3 See if you can find your materials online. From William Blake to
Sylvia Plath, a large portion of the
texts that make up your 100- and
200-level poetry courses are available for free—just a Google search
away. The same applies for philosophy, film and many other Arts
courses. It can't hurt to try. Unfor-
I ornately, you'll probably have less
luck finding a good resource for
science or math texts that match up
with the one in your class.
4 Many of your texts will be
available in libraries. You may
not always be able to take them out
for as long as you need, or even at
all in some cases, but you can't
argue with free. This route has the
| added bonus of placing you inside
a quiet environment in which you
are more likely to actually do some
studying.
5 Shop around for the best
deal. In the Student Union Building basement, you'll find iBook
Union—a student-run operation
which allows students to sell their
textbooks at a price that they set.
They include the prices that the
same used textbook would be at
the UBC Bookstore. It's also a great
place to sell your textbooks since
they allow you do set the price of
your textbook yourself, and only
take 19 per cent comission. Another option with a larger stock of
books is the Discount Bookstore.
You'll find it in the University Village, above the International Food
Fair. They often have better prices
than the UBC Bookstore. Make
sure that you purchase the right
edition ofthe textbook you need.
6 Also consider buying your textbooks online. You can find good
deals for used books on saveon-
book.com, half.com or amazonxa,
although you should keep in mind
that there will be a longer waiting
period due to shipping.
7 Keep your eyes open for flyers
advertising used textbooks. Many
students, frustrated with the chump
change that they get for used books
from the UBC Bookstore, post flyers around campus offering to sell
their used textbooks. The chances
that you'll find the textbook you're
looking for are higher if you're
looking in the right faculty building. Even so, it is unlikely you're
going to find all of your textbooks
this way.
8 Consider  textbook  sharing.
I've done this a few times in the
past with mixed results. If you
are sharing a class with someone
you see often, this can work well.
You can also end up in a situation
where you both wait to study for
far longer than necessary, and
end up squabbling over book visitation rights, til
THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Student Information Services
Ground Floor, Brock Hall, 1874 East Mall
Winter hours, effective Saturday,
September 12, 2009
INFORMATION CENTRE
Saturday: 9:30 am to 2:30 pm (Welcome Centre only)
Monday: 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
Tuesday: 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Wednesday: 8:30 am to 5:30 pm
Thursday: 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
Friday: 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
HELP SHAPE THE
SUSTAINABILITY ACADEMIC
STRATEGY.
ATTEND the SAS Community Consultation
COMMENT on the draft Discussion Paper:
Wednesday September 16, 9am-12noon
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Golden
Jubilee Room (fourth floor) 1961 East Mall,
Vancouver, BC.
The Sustainability Academic Strategy sets the course
for UBC's next phase of leadership and collaboration in
sustainability research, teaching, learning, campus
operations and community partnerships.
You can also comment on the draft discussion paper online:
www.sas.ubc.ca
fUBC SUSTAINABILITY
STRATEGIC INITIATIVE
JOIN THE CULTURE TEAM AND COME OUT TO OUR MEETINGS.
LAST TIME WHEN ONLY CELESTIAN RINCE SHOWED UP,
KATE CRIED OPENLY AND TREVOR STARTED DRINKING AGAIN.
CULTUREPUBYSSEYCA 2009.09/10/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/19
On the Fringe; 25 years of acting out
KATE BARBARIA
culture(?ubyssey.ca
The Vancouver International Fringe
Festival began its 25th season on
Wednesday September 9. An inglorious, and often whacked-out celebration of new theatre, Fringe returns
with a whopping 65 shows. It all
adds up to 471 performances in 11
days all across the city of Vancouver.
It has the most international participants of any Fringe Fest in North
America and reigns supreme as BC's
largest theatre festival.
So be prepared, potential patron of
these dubious arts! This gargantuan
labor of love features a cast of lucky
lottery winners who applied for a spot
in the festival. This means two things.
First, since there are no juried entries,
the show you choose to see could be,
in the words of an esteemed patron,
''mind-bendingly passionate and
amazing," or conversely the worst
thing to walk across a stage since Britney did it again. Secondly because it's
fringe theatre, anything goes.
Shows range from the temporal,
van-based performance Wagabondi-
Ho (that's right, inside of a moving
vehicle alternately used for driving
kids to soccer practice or elaborate
road trips), to Alms, a physical-
theatre show about a coin dropped
at a bus stop.
Does the possibility of being
confronted by a buxom burlesque
dancer or a horny Catholic priest
stop you cold in your tracks? While
not an inappropriate response, try
not to be overwhelmed by the eau
d'pretension which Fringe gives off
to the uninitiated masses.
Executive Director David Jordan
admits that a lot of people feel intimidated, but countered that by saying,
"It's probably the most accessible
theatre available to audiences in
Vancouver." Because every artist or
group is pulled from a lottery instead
of hand selected, "the audience, and
the patrons, can be the artistic director," Jordan said. "They decide who
is the best and the worst by word of
mouth and ticket sales. There's no
one deciding ahead of time what the
most important show will be."
Lastyear saw 25,000 ticket sales,
including "Pick of the Fringe," a special four-show series featuring the top-
rated shows at the festival each year.
Ml boxoffice proceeds go back to the
performers to help pay for time, lodging and travel. It's a hard-knock life
for the non-profit group, but they get
by each year on government grants
for the arts and sponsorships.
Vancouver Fringe is feeling the
burn in BC's grant squeeze. According to Jordan the majority of theatre
groups in the Lower Mainland expect
up to an 80 per cent drop in fiscal
support from the government in
the next two to three years. "It won't
hurt us this year or next, because our
grant has been locked in....But we
have to start thinking about alternate
sources of revenue for future years.
No one [can] make it like this."
The Fringe's popularity shows no
sign of abating this year, however.
Amidst the pile of film and music
festivals, it has become a mainstay
of Vancouver's autumnal arts blitz.
Voted Vancouver's Best Arts Festival
for five years in a row by Georgia
Straight readers, one hopes it has
enough loyal followers to stick out
the leaner (potentially more pricey)
years to come.
Sure, Fringe ain't your mommy
and daddy's theatre festival, with
linear story telling and a costume
department. But haven't you always
wondered what a grown man dressed
in a red body suit with an undulating
pot-belly would do on a stage? The Red
Bastard and 64 others will be only too
happy to indulge your imagination. ^J
kri
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UPCOMING HIGHLIGHTS
Over the next two issues, The
Ubyssey will bring you reviews
of: The Lesson, Cam and Legs (a
puppet show), Dog Sees God Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead
and Hive and the New Bees.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF VANCOUVER FRINGE FESTIVAL
'Triage ain't your mom and daddy's theatre festival...But
haven't you always wondered what [a man] in a red body
suit with an undulating pot-belly would do on a stage?"
UBC
CULTURE
•FEST
20n9
JOIN US SEPTEMBER 14-20 FOR THE 2nd ANNUAL UBC CULTURE FEST.
Discover some of the cool cultural attractions that UBC has to offer.
Pick up a Culture Fest voucher and receive a free 12oz coffee or tea at select UBC Food Services outlets.
For more information and full event details visit: WWW.CULTUREFEST.UBC.CA
JUL. 10 to OCT. 12 TONEL: PARTS OF ME THAT SWEAT THE MOST WHEN I GET NERVOUS
An exhibition of Las partes que mas me sudan cuando me pongo nervioso, A large wall drawing, by
the artist Tonel. FREE.  Koerner Library, 1958 Main Mall
JUL. 20 to SEP. 20 MALCOLM LOWRY EXHIBIT
A showcase about one of B.C.'s most famous resident-writers is on display in Rare Books and Special
Collections (RBSC). FREE. Irving K Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
SEP. 4 to SEP. 20  INTERROBANG: UBC MASTER OF FINE ART GRADUATE EXHIBITION
The exhibition INTERROBANG presents work by UBC's graduating MFA students. FREE. Public Critique
with artist Liz Magor: Sep. 12, 12 to 5pm. Belkin Art Gallery, 1825 Main Mall
SEP. 3 to SEP. 30 TATAU: SAMOAN TATTOOING & GLOBAL CULTURE
The show features over 40 photographs by distinguished New Zealand artist Mark Adams. Monday
closed. Free for UBC students. MOA, 6393 NW Marine Drive
SEP. 17 TOUCH THE SOUND Take a remarkable sound journey on screen with Dame Evelyn
Glennie, a Grammy-winning classical percussionist whose solo work is unrivalled. She is also
profoundly deaf. FREE. 12pm - Royal Bank Cinema at the Chan Centre, 6265 Crescent Rd
Sep. 17 The Live Sessions - Hey Ocean!  Hey Ocean is a young band with a talent for blending
musical styles into their own brand of infectious pop. $15 | $10 students | $12 UBC staff & faculty.
5 to 6pm -Telus Studio Theatre at the Chan Centre, 6265 Crescent Rd
SEP. 17 MOA MASHUP An afternoon of spontaneous outbreaks of music, dance and interactive
video & light throughout the galleries. FREE. Cash bar. 5 to 8pm - MOA, 6393 NW Marine Drive
SEP. 17 & SEP. 18 UBC BOTANICAL GARDEN INDOOR PLANT SALE
Hosted by Friends of the Garden, tropicals, cacti and more at great prices!
11am to 6pm - Botanical Gardens, 6804 SW Marine Drive
•
SEP. 17 & SEP.18 UBC OPERA AT GREENHEART CANOPY WALKWAY Enjoy the sounds
of opera high above in the beautiful forest canopy at UBC Botanical Garden. $20 adults | family,
children and senior rates available. Sep. 17 - 2:30 to 3:30pm and Sep. 18 - 1 to 2pm
Botanical Gardens, 6804 SW Marine Drive
SEP. 19 UBC FARM MARKET Come visit every Saturday 9am to 1pm every from June to October
rain or shine, to get your hands on local organic produce. FREE. UBC Farm, 6182 South Campus Rd
SEP. 19 FestEVOLVE! OPEN HOUSE Bring the whole family to learn about evolution and
celebrate biodiversity. Meet scientists, conduct experiments and create works of art. FREE. Hosted by
the Beaty Biodiversity Museum. 10am to 2pm- Beaty Biodiversity Museum, 2212 Main Mall
SEP. 19 MANITOBA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Extraordinary solo percussionist Dame Evelyn
Glennie joins the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra in a program of works ranging from Shostakovich to
Evangelista. Music director Anne Manson. $37—$45 | student & senior discounts.
8pm - Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Rd
SEP. 20 THE SINGERS WHO TEACH THE STARS OF TOMORROW Voice Faculty from the UBC
School of Music in concert performing opera arias and art song. Tickets available at the door,
$20 | $18 Seniors | $15 Students. 2 to 4pm - Music Building, 6361 Memorial Rd
THE CHUNG COLLECTION: ONGOING One of the most exceptional and extensive collections of
its kind in Canada, the Chung Collection offers insights into the very essence of what it means to be
Canadian. FREE. 12 to 5pm- Irving K Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
FREE GUIDED TOURS - CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Enjoy a 50 minute
guided tour of one of North America's premier performing arts venues. FREE. Space limited. Visit www.
culturefest.ubc.ca for dates and times. Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Rd
Presented by Community Affairs in collaboration with UBC Attractions
www.communityaffairs.ubc.ca | www.attractions.ubc.ca 20/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2009.09.10
torn the desk of THEUBYSSEY
Dearest students,
Tirie Ubyssey would like to revive our letters section. You seem to have had a summer fling with another paper, leaving us sad and alone and missing our scintillating (and sometimes steamy)
correspondence. If you could just let us know what's going on in your life, or what you think of textbook costs. We miss you. Please write us.
Love,
The Ubyssey
Ideas Editor: Trevor Melanson
ISEX   COLUMN
TOO SEXY
Dear readers,
Answering your letters has been
truly swell, but as itinerant sex
columnists at large, we need our
freedom. We hope you won't take it
personally. It's not you, it's us. We
want you to know thatyou and your
letters are very special to us and
that we really value the connection
we feel with you. But the open road
calls, and these cowpokes gotta
roam.
This issue of Too Sexy, we're
taking a break from one-on-one
advice to bring you a set of pointers hopefully useful to every reader
alike. Think of it as a giant orgiastic
bonanz—as opposed to the quiet
candlelit nights we've brought you
thus far—and everyone's invited.
So without further ado, we present
to you The Hall of Shame. Here are
the top five things sure to get you
kicked out of bed—or worse, ruin
your chances of getting there in the
first place.
5. H-Y-G-l-E-N-E!
This one's obvious, and for that
very reason too often neglected,
but trust us—good grooming is a
surprisingly important aspect of
being appealing. We at Too Sexy
sympathize with the legions of the
messy. In fact, we're card-carrying
members. It's easy to let things pile
up, especially once class work kicks
in, turns you into a stress monkey.
But that doesn't change the fact that
a grimy living space and poor personal hygiene are major obstacles
when seducing those special some-
ones. So remove the mouldy socks
from the sink, take out that trash
you said you were going to dispose
of last week, and shower once every
couple days at least. And for goodness' sake, launder the sheets.
4. KEEP YOUR FRIENDS CLOSE...
Okay, exploring new frontiers and
boldly going where it's none of
your business if others have gone
before is exciting and all. So exciting that often your first instinct is
to tell all your friends. And while
sharing is caring, remember that
loose lips sink relationships. Over-
disclosure can turn your best friend
into your worst enemy if they know
something they shouldn't—and
can't keep a secret—and it's one of
the surest ways to put a damper on
your sex life if your lack of discretion gets back to your partner. You
know that scene in Teeth where the
guy spills the gory (literally) details
to his buddy over the phone while
he's in bed with Dawn? Yeah.
3. PANTS ON FIRE
Lying of any sort is generally bad
for relationships. We don't mean
"creative answers" to inane questions about articles of clothing; we
mean the big stuff. If your casual
squeeze asks ifyou're sleeping with
other people, tell the truth. Ifyou're
not feeling it anymore and you want
to break it off, avoidance is not the
answer—honesty is. If you get a
sexually transmitted infection, tell
your partners. Which brings us to...
2. THE BUG
We can't stress this enough: go
to the clinic, get tested and know
KASHA CHANG
S> AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
your STI status. If you get sick, take
measures to cure it or control the
symptoms. And above all, be honest with your sexual partners about
STIs. While having that conversation is never pleasant, it's a heck of
a lot better than the angry Facebook
messages, phone calls, manifestos
and stabbings you're going to get if
you pass along that little something
extra to a partner without making
them risk-aware. Seriously guys,
this is really, REALLY important.
Not only can an STI you don't
know about screw up your sex life
in the short run, it can have pretty
unfortunate consequences for your
long-term health and that of your
partner if left untreated. So listen
to the little voice in the back of your
head and ask a doctor about that
peculiar smell.
I. THE EASY BUTTON
A UBC Residence urban legend tells
of a fellow who had a Staples Easy
Button on his nightstand. When
finished with coitus he'd roll over,
press the button, and an automated
voice would say, "That was easy."
We at Too Sexy don't know for sure
if this legend is true, but regard-
less...DON'T BE THAT GUY. If you
are that guy and an irate ex-partner
hasn't axed you by now, rest assured you're gonna get what's coming to you.
That's all, folks. Next week we
return to our regularly scheduled
programming, so be sure to send
your questions, comments, rants
and raves, hurt feelings and furry
little problems to toosexy@ubys-
sey.ca. It's anonymous, tl
ISTREETERS
How much did your books for the term cost?
Janice Hanson
Psychology 4
"I haven't bought
my books yet.J'd
probably buy
them from the
discounted bookstore, but even
then I'd probably
be spending too
much....! do book
buy back every
year....! made good
money this year
so that was
awesome, but
sometimes I've
definitely been
ripped off."
Toby Lee
Engineering 2
"They were like
$500 for four
subjects, which is
a lot. One of my
books was the
tiniest thing ever
and was so thin...
like 100 pages and
it was $150, which
is ridiculous.Jhey
have new and
used prices, except there are no
used books. So
you have to buy
the new ones—it's
like they're teasing
you."
Hannah Keller
BAPSC2
"I bought.books
at the discount
bookstore and I
still felt like they
were ridiculously
expensive....Buy-
backs are a ripoff
because you don't
get very much
money....My other
books I'm getting
from students last
year that took the
classes....! don't
want to spend
that much money.
I spent like $300
for two classes."
Chrison Wong
Science 1
"I bought [my
books] at the UBC
bookstore and it
cost about $600-
$700."
Trueman Lam
Forestry 1
"I got half from
the Discount
Bookstore and the
other half from the
UBC Bookstore.
And I think so
far I've spent
$200-$300....l was
looking for used
books everywhere, but then I
realized all of [the
books I needed]
were new editions,
so it's not like I
could buy them
anywhere else
anyway."
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
-Coordinated by Tara Martellaro with photos by Chibwe Mweene
UBC doesn't care, do you?
As the first few classes of the new school year have passed by, there is a
good chance that while walking down Main Mall or University Boulevard
you've looked up, seen the teeming masses, and thought "Whoa. That's a
lot of people." Or words to that effect.
Yes, there are 46,121 of you enrolled at UBC. The vast majority are
undergraduates finding their way in the world. And the truth is this university doesn't care for you all that much.
What UBC really cares about is graduate students and research. That's
what brings in dollars and prestige. And when UBC President Stephen
Toope sat down with Maclean's magazine two months ago (along with
the presidents of other large Canadian universities), he advocated for the
government to step in to allow UBC to take in significantly less undergraduate students in order to "put more money towards graduate education and research." It's an argument that won't get much sympathy.
As Jeffrey Simpson noted in The Globe andMail last month, universities like UBC already receive a mammoth amount of federal grant money,
and have sophisticated fundraising methods that bring in millions upon
millions every year, much of which goes toward research.
The top priority of UBC shouldn't be getting more federal dollars to
fund research. It should be looking at the undergraduate students who
are here right now, ensuring they get a satisfying university experience.
They pay good money to come to what they're told is an internationally-
renowned university. They shouldn't have to put up with classes of 150
people, tenured professors who can't be bothered to learn names, and
sessional lecturers who are overworked and underpaid.
UBC consistently ranks near the bottom of the country in all student
engagement surveys. We know Toope cares about improving this. So the
next time he decides to get up on a national soapbox, we would appreciate it if he talked a little more about improving that. Imagine it.
AMS sucks at spending our money
The AMS voted at their Council meeting last Wednesday to approve $9055
for funding for Lobby Days, an annual event for student societies of post-
secondary institutions that aims to lobby government officials and representatives for change. Council took two hours to reach a decision, first
arguing about where the money would come from, then about the amount
of money and if the funding could be better spent.
We at The Ubyssey feel that some of the items on the list could have
been allocated differently. Spending $ 1000 for a mini-van rental and
$2 500 for one of the nicest hotels in Victoria? Holy crap. We're glad that
our student society is trying to make our voices heard, but we don't like
how our money is being spent.
Lastyear the AMS decided to drop down to associate member status
in the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA), an organization
that lobbies the federal and provincial governments on student issues.
The drop meant that the AMS no longer holds voting rights within
CASA and a $22,000 decrease in the amount of fees they paid to the association. One of the reasons for this was so that the AMS could use this
money to put more resources into lobbying initiatives.
Except that the External office isn't spending money very wisely. In
the summer, $ 19,000 was spent on five ads for the 24 Hours newspaper
during the May provincial elections. The AMS has a President's Fund,
which was created after a large donation was given, and used up rather
quickly. It is allocated to be used for special projects. Some councillors on
the AMS are upset about the existence ofthe President's Fund.
We are too. The fact that the AMS has a huge wad of cash they can use
at their discretion makes us a bit nervous—especially since they used it to
pay for a swanky hotel this time.
So, Tim Chu and the External office, don't spend our money on nice
hotels and trips to the island. Ifyou're going to lobby for change, do it on
a tighter budget, tl j3 While reading this feature, you should be listening to 'Sky and Sand" by Paul Kalkbrenner.
SPOTLIGHT
2009.09/10/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/21
/
MigofA^'
LEAVING The SquTh
W 9ver<.c£
J      NEITUiJ (r
WelCOITie tO Part TWO of Pierce Nettling's chronicle of
his journey through the South, in which he questions his wanderlust,
his grandmother's attitude toward death, and the hypocrisy of
the Southern Ideal. In Part One, Pierce reflected on his childhood
experiences in the South, and the destruction of its natural beauty.
For the full story, read our last issue, or go to ubyssey.ca.
PIERCE NETTLING
Conributor
FINDING MANCHESTER
While the strip mall is America's architectural and city planning gift to the
world, the majority of small towns in the
US still have a functioning town centre.
This somehow escapes the South, especially Manchester, Tennessee—home to
the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival.
Driving through Manchester, you'll
realize nothing is in the town. On the
night my sister and I were there and in
need of food, our options were limited
to the local Waffle House or the Huddle
House. We were about to experience
Southern culinary excellence whether
we wanted to or not.
The Waffle House, much like all of
the chain's establishments, has the
look and feel of a place of last resort.
This building was no different, with its
traditional yellow roof and darkened
windows, a lonely down-and-out man
slumped over at the bar consuming his
generous portion of late-night waffles.
On this particular night, I wasn't in the
mood for waffles. So in the monsoon
rain, we drove across the street to the
Huddle House.
The Huddle House chain is a relatively new revelation for me. Apparently during the decade that passed since
my last visit, it has taken a sizeable
share of the Waffle House's business.
While the Waffle House was composed
of its usual drab and unwelcoming
exterior, the Huddle House was bright
and shiny and welcoming. It was
nearly freezing inside, though, which
had me second guessing the decision
to not bring the winter coat—you never
know when you'll need it, even in August. The interior mirrored the Waffle
House's 50's diner style, with a miniature jukebox on each booth's table, an
exposed kitchen in front of the bar, and
the audible ambience of Fox News. It
was small, intimate and charming.
SMALL TOWN AMERICA
Upon entering a Southern establishment, you'll be greeted like family. The
cook with jheri curls says hello sporting a genuine smile, and the waitress
is welcoming and warm. We could do
As a young twenty-something, my friends are
always temporary. I will eventually venture out
into the world at the expense of my friendships.
Yes, I do travel the world in search of knowledge
and culture, but I do all of this exploring alone
with a rather empty personal life.
no wrong tonight at the Huddle House.
Before receiving our food, the waitress
explained that Jeremy, the cook, was
"working on his masterpiece."
"It's your lucky night," she said, 'he
rarely goes to this length."
My sister's strawberry waffle was
the most elaborate I'd ever seen. The
whipped cream was exquisitely placed
in nine small swirls around the strawberries. The waffle was amazing. We
really didn't want to eat it; we wanted
to admire the work.
The two employees represented the
essence of small-town America: two
young people in the small town they
grew up in, perfectly content.
For most of my life, I've always struggled to come to terms with this ideal.
How could someone find eternal bliss in
a place where time stands still has never
sat well with my insatiable appetite to
wander, explore and travel. I've always
associated small town America with
wasting one's life, having it pass by.
My urban elitism probably developed
through my mother's upbringing
her desire to get out. She grew up in
this world, a place I've always unfairly
looked down upon, and left for more
opportunities. As the only woman in
her graduating class to go to college, her
70's feminism—faced with a society that
believed women should stay home—still
colours my beliefs. But I do wonder if
my life is really more fulfilling than that
of the employees at the Huddle House.
Yes, I do travel the world in search of
knowledge and culture, but I do all of
this exploring alone with a rather empty
personal life. Instead of my parents
being three doors down, they're three
airports and a country away.
As a young twenty-something, my
friends are always temporary. I will eventually venture out into the world at the
expense of my friendships. The absence
of stability in my life always compels me
to question if all of this is worth it Do we
really live the more fulfilling life? Is it
even possible? When I come home to the
place I grew up in, with Mends and family not recognizing who I am anymore, I
can't honestly say I'm better off.
GEORGIA: THE DUKE BOYS
OF HAZZARD COUNTY
The beauty of the Appalachian Mountains stands in stark contrast to Georgia's dry, flat sprawl.
MORE ON PAGE 22  2009.09/10/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/23
SFU still
part of CFS
National
BURNABY, BC (CUP)-BC Supreme Court Justice Richard Blair was
unable to come to a decision regarding the nearly year-and-a-half long
trial waging between the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) and
the Simon Fraser Student Society.
The judge announced on August 10 that he could not come to a
decision, and instead of the case going to a 15 to 20 day trial, the
two parties should attempt to settle their dispute out of court to avoid
substantial legal costs. Check out peak.sfu.ca for more.
What is the CFS?
The Canadian Federation of Students
is an organization dedicated to
advocating for post-secondary issues
federally and provincially UBC is an
associate member of Canadian Alliance
of Student Associations (CASA),
another student lobbying group
cThey gave us a couple of minutes and kicked us out5
Montreal students evicted from apartment say city and media created emergency
CLARE RASPOPOW
The Link
(Concordia University)
MONTREAL (CUP)-"Slumlords
don't come in and work on the building every single day," said Mary Walton as she stood outside her former
apartment building, trying to stow
what she could of her belongings into
a backpack.
Residents of a Montreal apartment building at 1900 Tupper Street,
including Walton, are upset by what
they see as media spin surrounding
their hasty eviction on the night of
September 4, when police arrived
after receiving a tip that the building
violated fire code.
Those living in the building—
largely students from McGill, Concordia and L'Universite de Montreal
—were given minutes to grab what
possessions they could before being barricaded from their homes
by emergency workers. Many of the
evicted were international students.
"The news networks made it seem
like our landlord was a slumlord.
That the building was hanging by a
thread.' It's not," said Walton on the
afternoon of September 6.
"Everyone who lives here loves the
apartment building. We're like a big
family. Our landlord is a great guy."
Those living in the Tupper apartments were allowed back into their
homes during the day on September
6 to retrieve some of their things.
Walton and other residents picking
up their belongings said that the city
overreacted and made the situation
worse than it had to be.
"There was no emergency," explained Walton. "We weren't given
any time to fix the things they found
wrong. If they had let us, we would
have run out and gotten some fire
alarms and extinguishers. They mentioned a blocked fire exit; it wouldn't
have taken us long to clear it. We
could have done that and stayed in
our homes. Instead, they gave us a
couple of minutes andkickedus out."
Walton and other students claim
that it was city that created the
emergency, and the media just
made it worse.
"The whole building likes our
landlord and nobody had anything
negative to say," said Walton, getting
nods of agreement from the other
residents at the building.
"The building owner is commit
ted to this building and is doing
everything he can to get us back in,"
said one resident who requested his
name not be used.
"The only person that CTV talked
to who had anything bad to say,
doesn't even live in the building. We
all watched the news coverage and
were absolutely shocked. No one
knew who that guy was," said Walton
in reference to an unnamed young
man on Montreal's CTV Evening
News on September 5, who spoke out
against the building administration.
Walton and others said they believe that the series of events was
the fault of an ex-resident who had
recently been kicked out for using
drugs in the building. The resident,
whose name they refused to divulge,
had called the tip into the city as a
form of revenge.
"He called some of us as the fire
trucks were sitting outside, laughing and asking how things were
going," said Walton.
Those who have apartments in the
building must now figure out how
to get to their classes from the Park
Inn Hotel near Pierre Elliot Trudeau
International Airport, where the Red
Cross has placed them. ^J
Residents had little time to pack before doors were chained, courtesy of the link
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