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The Ubyssey Mar 8, 1979

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Array SUA lauds 'pretest' ride
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The organizers of the Lady Godiva ride
were congratulated by the student
representative assembly Wednesday night
because a few engineering students were
holding placards protesting tuition fees at the
ride.
The motion asked SRA "to congratulate
the organizers of the Godiva ride for their
successful mass action against cutbacks and
tuition increases, it being the largest and
most widely publicized of all events on this
campus to date dealing with the cutbacks
issue."
Law representative Arlene Francis condemned the motion for condoning the sexism
in the ride.
"All of this has been done to hide the fact
that the ride is sexist and out-of-date," she
said.
Bruce Armstrong, student board of
governors representative, claimed he
supported the ride because it. is a "fun
event."
Armstrong, who seconded the motion,
said the Godiva ride was a good example of
"student spirit" which must not be suppressed.
"If we kill student spirit, we kill ourselves," he said.
Student senator Chris Niwinski said that
because a couple of engineers carried signs
reading "Freeze the Fees," they had given
serious exposure to the tuition problem.
"The freeze the fees placard was
prominent on the (television news) show I
saw," said Niwinski.
Student senator Arnold Hedstrom said he
thought the ride was taken much too
seriously.
"When I saw the freeze the fees sign I
thought,   'that's  not  all  that's  going  to
freeze,' " he said.
The SRA censured the engineering undergraduate society for the ride last year, but
according to Hedstrom this year's ride was
"alright"   because   no   violence   occurred.
"Last year there were assaults. I would
like to congratulate the women's committee
on how they handled this year's ordeal."
Student senator Jeff Barnett, who
sponsored the motion, said: "if it takes
something like that to get people out, then
I'm all for it."
See page 7: SAC
(THE UBYSSEY
Qfol. -Hfllt No. 59 VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1979    °€^48   228-2301^
Pit's top boss
ps off again
• • •
ENGINEERS DISGUISED as themselves and Roman Citizens carry out
ride of Lady Godiva (see picture page 5) despite controversy and protest.
Unlike previous versions, ride did not prance through cafeteria and
violence was avoided, but strong manure odor still pervaded atmosphere
— peter menyasz photo
surrounding SUB. Gears seemingly supported tuition fee freezes, lower
taxes, and fornicating of books. One important issue gears seem to have
forgotten is that today is International Women's Day.
'Women fo blame' for unemployment
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada's
high unemployment rate has been
partially caused by too many
women looking for jobs, finance
minister Jean Chretien says.
Chretien told a Toronto audience
recently that the shortage of jobs
was partially a result of the
unexpectedly-high participaton of
women in the labor force in the last
few years. He said he expected "this
rapid increase to taper off in the
future."
But an executive member of the
national action committee for the
Status of Women says this statement only confirms the government's attitude that women are to
blame for unemployment.
Carol Swan said Wednesday the
remarks indicate "the feeling of the
government as a whole — 'let's
blame the victim for the
problem.' "
"Presently, it's a very
fashionable   approach   to   blame
women for the unemployment problem, when it's clearly the
economy's inability to respond to
the needs of a growing work force
that is the culprit."
The opposition parties have also
questioned Chretien's assertion that
the participation rate will level off,
in view of previous vastly incorrect
predictions.
Women's participation rate has
already reached the level predicted
by the Finance department for 1986.
In a paper presented to the first
ministers' conference in November,
the department admitted it had
underestimated the growth, and, as
a result, the labor force would grow
faster in the 1980s than previously
predicted.
The C. D. Howe Institute also
states in a recent report that there
were strong reasons to believe
women's participation would continue to rise.
In the House of Commons Monday, Progressive Conservative MP
David MacDonald questioned
Chretien's rationale, given that
"previous estimates by his department were so woefully wrong."
Chretien responded that the rapid
increases in the past few years and
the lessening gap in participation
rates between the U.S. and Canada
indicates "the acceleration will stop
very soon."
By VERNE McDONALD
For the third time in nine months
the manager of the Pit beer operation in SUB has resigned.
Pit supervisor Rick Papineau
handed in his resignation Tuesday
after a meeting of Alma Mater
Society managers and Pit supervisors.
Papineau said Wednesday he had
originally planned to leave his job
in June, but "things came to a hilt
during the past few weeks" and he
resigned effective immediately.
His resignation was for "personal
reasons," AMS general manager
Bern Grady said Wednesday.
Papineau's duties in managing the
Pit have been taken over by assistant general manager Hank Leis.
Managers of the operation who
have quit previously include Nick
Sehler, who resigned Dec. 20 after
three weeks as social services
manager, and Tor Svanoe, who left
the job of Pit manager last July,
citing "frustration" as being
among his reasons for leaving.
Lethe supervisor Bill Simpson
said there is a "management crisis"
in the Pit that was the cause of
Svanoe's departure and had a bearing on Papineau's resignation.
"The management crisis which
resulted in Rick's resignation was
not an existing one, but one created
by overzealous student workers and
members of the student government.
"In Tor's case it was more the
student government. In Rick's case
it was more the workers," he said.
Simpson said the interference of
others in the Pit manager's job
caused the problem and will make it
difficult for the AMS to find someone to fill the position.
"If I were applying for the job
and found out that the three people
who ran the place before me had
resigned, I would want to talk to
them and find out why," he said.
"The only way they're going to
get and keep a manager is to make
the Pit autonomous, answerable to
the AMS but run by the manager."
Simpson said he could not
elaborate on the reasons for
Papineau's resignation.
See page 3: PIT
Intramurals, AMS need bucks
Organizers of next week's Alma Mater Society fee
referendum are afraid the referendum will fail.
The referendum will ask for a S3 increase in next
year's AMS fees. Half of the increase would finance
intramural activities, and the other $1.50 would be
applied to general AMS acitivities and services.
Success in the referendum is necessary for the
continuation of intramural activities at their present
level, intramural coordinator Nestor Korchinsky
said Wednesday.
"We'd have tojeadjust the balance of where money
is spent if the referendum fails," he said.
But he added he was not sure of the referendum's
success.
"I don't think the referendum is a sure bet."
Korchinsky and AMS external affairs officer Kate
Andrew agreed that lack of sufficient publicity might
hurt chances for success in the referendum vote.
"I don't think too many people are talking about
the referendum," said Korchinsky at a meeting of
referendum organizers Wednesday.
Another potential problem is recruiting volunteers
to help with the voting procedure.
"No one is willing to staff polls," said Andrew.
Referendum organizers at the meeting agreed that
immediate publicity of the upcoming vote is essential
to any hope of success.
See page 7: VOTE Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 8, 1979
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THE      UBYSSEY
Pag« 3
WHAT A DAY FOR A DAYDREAM, AT UBC
—michael hambrook photo
Lockout escalates SFU dispute
By PETER MENYASZ
Simon Fraser University's
lockout of 40 library employees is
an attempt to pressure their union
into accepting a six per cent wage
hike, a union spokesman said
Wednesday.
"Management is looking for an
excuse to lock people out," said
Chris  Eve,  vice-president  of the
Association of University and
College Employees local 2.
Strike coordinator Gary Harris
said the library employees were
locked out at 10:30 a.m. Monday.
"We (the union) had pulled two
keypunch operators in the library
and the administration said that
they couldn't operate the library
without them," Harris added.
The administration was forced to
lock out the library employees
because the work that would
normally come through to them
from the keypunch operators was
not coming through, an administration spokesman said.
"Ten minutes later, the rest of
the employees in the library and the
bookstore walked out," said SFU's
labor relations director Tom King.
He added that he felt the rest of
the employees were honoring the
picket line that had been set up by
the 40 locked-out employees.
King said that he did not know
how long the library employees
would be off the job.
"The  lockout   notice   did   say
Board ratifies residence fee hike
Students applying to live in
residence next year will face at least
an 8.6 per cent rate increase, the
board of governors decided
Tuesday.
An 8.6 per cent hike will be imposed for Totem Park and Place
Vanier   residences,   while   Gage
Towers residents will be paying 8.9
per cent more next year.
Students planning to live in the
highrise section of Gage next year
will pay $1,057.54, in Totem Park a
single room will cost $1,723.68,
while in Place Vanier the fee will be
$1,738.20.
Housing director Mike Davis said
there will also be a cutback of maid
service for Vanier and Totem
residences.
The board did not discuss tuition
fees in the open part of the meeting,
meaning a decision regarding any
Euthanasia isn't a dead issue
By JUDITH MICHAELS
Euthanasia does not give terminally ill patients a dignified death
and should be regarded as killing, a
clinical research Institute of
Montreal director said Wednesday.
"The right to die in dignity is not
the right to be killed, nor the right
to kill oneself, nor the right to be
aided in killing oneself," Dr. David
Roy said.
"Euthanasia is the compassion-
motivated, painless deliberate
termination of a human life.
Euthanasia means killing."
Roy was a panel speaker on
mercy killing, along with
radiologist Dr. Colin Harrison and
articling law student Ruth Busch.
He said terminally ill patients
should not be put to death, but
should be placed in hospitals where
the patients are cared for, the pain
is controlled, and they are allowed
to lead independent and hopeful
lives while they are dying..
"Euthanasia by omission
usually involves severe burn victims
and newborn babies with extreme
deformities. Here the question is
whether the patient can be saved?
And can the life be prolonged and
saved for a very very long period of
time?" he said.
"Euthanasia by omission is
unjustifiable and morally rejec-
table."
Harrison said the notion of
accepting    mercy    killings    was
Pit is hit with third split
From page 1
"There's nothing you can put
your finger on. It's the culmination
of a lot of little actions causing tension, which kept on rising rather
than being resolved until it built up
to the point where something had to
snap," he said.
When asked whether what
transpired at a Pit supervisors'
meeting Tuesday affected his decision, Papineau said: "yes and no.
It's been a lot of things that have
been going on for some time. I had
already made my decision to leave,
I just changed the date."
"Papineau said he plans to go into
a private business venture within a
few weeks which he was organizing
in anticipation of his leaving the
Pit.
Papineau worked two years in the
Pit and had held the positions of interim Pit manager and interim
social services manager before Leis'
appointment.
directly in opposition to providing
medical care.
"Medical care provides relief to
the patient while he is still living,
whereas mercy killing provides
relief to everyone but the dead
patient."
Dying is an emotionally
exhausting business and physicians
should not feel that they have been
placed in the role of executioner,
Harrison said.
Busch said section 205 of the
criminal code states that when
death is caused either directly ir
indirectly by an ommission, the
person responsible is guilty of
homicide.
"Suicide is not defined as an act
of crime in the criminal code, but if
someone aids or abets a person
contemplating suicide, then it is a
crime," she said.
Roy said medical personnel
cannot be left with the responsibility of making moral
judgements in aiding terminally ill
patients.
"Who's going to decide who
should live or die? It is hard to
make a general rule. Rights,
responsibilities, duties and values
all have to be considered. The
medical profession does not have
the responsibility to totally
eliminate human suffering or to
promise happiness."
fee hikes will be made after regular
classes have been finished.
The board was also presented a
brief by the committee for the
defence of human rights in Chile,
which calls on the university to use
its 8,000 shares in Noranda Mines
of Canada to protest a proposed
investment by the company in a
mine at Andacolla, Chile.
The committee asked the board
to voice its displeasure about
proposed investments by Noranda
in the repressive regime of dictator
Augusto Pinochet.
The board declined to take any
positive action in response to the
committee's recommendations.
Last year the board gave its proxy
votes as a shareholder to the
company, a sign of tacit approval
of company policy.
A proposal for the construction
of a $4 million parking lot for
UBC's new extended care hospital
was also accepted by the board.
The financing of the two-storey
above-ground structure will be split
between the Greater Vancouver
Regional District and the ministries
of health and education.
The parking lot, scheduled to be
completed this summer, will only be
available for doctors, patients and
staff at the hospital. No room is
planned for student parking in the
1,000 lot building.
In other business, students will
have to pay more for their-
transcripts, supplemental exams
and late registration fees. Board
members were told the new rates
could generate almost $39,000 in
additional revenue next year, and
were accepted by the board after
the registrar's office asked for the
increase to offset incidental expenditures.
'immediately and until further
notice.' "
He said regular library hours
were being maintained and as high
a level of service as possible with
only management personnel.
Eve said he found it hard to
believe the university had locked
out these particular employees as
there are other areas of the library
which would be harder hit by the
loss of the keypunch operators.
He also said he was surprised the
university would admit that the
strike action of the two keypunch
operators could cause problems in
the library.
"They've (the university) been
saying for 13 weeks that the strike
wasn't having any effect," said
Eve.
Thirty AUCE members will go to
Victoria next Tuesday to talk to
members of the provincial
government, Harris said.
"We hope to bring to their attention the fact that government
funding for universities is being cut
back and that is one of the reasons
that the board of governors has
given for rot giving us any more
(money)."
King said he did not see the
provincial government getting
involved in the strike dispute.
"The operation of the university
is a university matter."
There is no expectation that the
government will intervene, said
Eve.
Arts students
elect SRA reps
Marc St. Louis, Bob Staley, Jack
Hittrich and Anders Ourom have
been elected as arts representatives
on the student representative
assembly.
St. Louis got 93 votes; Staley, 77;
Hittrich, 71; and Ourom, 58,
defeating Neil Cadger, Jeremy
Cato, Mark Crawford, and Jack
Bowman in their bids to sit on SRA.
Fewer than 200 arts students
voted at the polls Wednesday.
Meanwhile, Valgeet Johl was acclaimed to her second term as arts
senator, while Roger Bhatti was acclaimed as arts undergraduate
society president. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 8, 1979
Letters
Disco bears cross
In response to a letter from a Mr.
Chris Smele printed in the Tuesday,
March 6 edition of The Ubyssey
about disco.
In your letter Mr. Smele, you
refer to disco music as "obviously
anti-Christian, anti-democratic and
undermining the very spirit which
makes this country so great."
I would like to point out that
many Christians attend discos and
find them entertaining and enjoyable places to spend money,
meet people and expend energy.
Disco is not anti-democratic.
People attend discos because they
want to, not because they fear
liquidation by some subversive
organization.
What is "the very spirit that
makes this country so great?" I
don't think it is only rock and roll. I
agree that rock and roll is here to
stay, but there are many other
"spirits" that make up Canadian
life. One of the beauties of our
country is the existence of free
choice. Disco does not limit our
field of choice, it expands it and
Biases blasted
Ah, Sonja (in regards to your After all, we are all aware that
letter in the Friday, March 2 edition "engineers do not know how to
of The Ubyssey) it is such a joy to dance," and that "they have no
read letters such as yours which sense   of  rhythm   and   lack   the
lack any prejudice or bias against imagination for body movement,"
certain   groups   of   people   (we with the exception of the 50 or so
wonder   who!).   Anyone   reading engineers that we know (at least 30
your   letter   would   automatically of which are very close friends; and
notice that you have not included in case you were wondering, they
any generalties in it at all.
Romantic
overtures
Randy, I must admit that your
response io my letter regarding
campus romance left me rather
taken aback: somehow, it was not
quite the reaction I had expected.
However, nonc-thc-less, Mi. Lane
you have made yourself a date.
As you state, it is sad that most
romantic overtures arc rejected as
meie invitations to hop into the
sack. I am sure thai many would
look upon your invitation as
nothing more than just that. But I
think it is quite clear (hat you have
i t'Siiri hihli> ftf ift'il  rf\m'lilia^     inrl   I
cannot help but believing that a
great deal of frustration on this
campus could be alleviated if only
others would share your outlook.
I look forward to our little tryst
as the perfect opportunity to take
a first step in the resurrection of
UBC romance —- you have certainly set an appropriate scenario.
Now, tell me Randy, where do
you hide yourself; how do we
arrange this rendez-vous of ours?
Judy Carrington
are very good dancers). So much
for your first assumption, eh
Sonja!
Also, seeing as you "have attended many engineering dances,
they can not be all that bad at
dancing, right! As far as general
appearances go we all know that
they dress as slobs, don't we; mind
you we fail to see the differences
between how they dress and how
any other faculty dresses.
Therefore, it would seem that in
your description of the dress code
for the engineers you have merely
described the dress of the entire
university! By the way, how do you
know what they have laid out for
them on the bed every morning?
Somehow, we can not really picture
you as a "friend" of any engineers
(with friends like you they sure
don't need any enemies!).
In conclusion, Sonja dear, we
suggest that you keep your personal
prejudice and bias to yourself,
instead of making an ass of yourself
as you did in your letter on Friday.
Seeing as you believe in
generalities so strongly maybe you
could tell us if the one concerning
arts people is true: are they really all
gay?
Sharon Hack phys ed
Karen Oleksyn
education 1
many people have chosen to accept
disco as a legitimate form of entertainment.
Disco music sales and the disco
night club business have enhanced
the lives of many Canadians, including U.B.C. students. Disco
creates jobs, pays bills and
generates tax revenue. Above all,
disco provides us with another way
to enjoy ourselves if we so choose.
Saturday night in the Pit is advertised as "The Saturday Night
Disco, presented by the Pit and
produced by CITR-UBC Radio". It
is a known fact that one will hear
disco music and lots of it.
With the above in mind, I would
like to ask you Mr. Smele, why you
so masochisticly spent your
Saturday night dollar on a cover
charge at a CITR-Pit Disco and
proceeded to experience "four
hours" of what you thought was
some sort of Machiavellian plot?
Entertainment is designed to
create a type of environment in
which we enjoy ourselves. Discos,
punk rock concerts and rock and
roll concerts are provided for those
who choose to pay to enjoy them as
these events create their respective
entertainment environments.
To create a revolution to stop
discos and punk rock concerts, in
the name of Christianity,
democracy and the Canadian spirit,
is ludicrious. By limiting choice,
you are contradicting your cause.
Enjoy your rock and roll Mr.
Smele, and let those who choose,
enjoy punk rock and disco.
Greg Plant
CITR-UBC Radio Disco
Can you s\
The Alma Mater Society is in dire straits.
You've heard that one before and it is still true. A simila
fee referendum was attempted last fall to raise much needec
bucks for running the AMS but it was narrowly defeated. Th<
urgency of the situation is underlined by the fact the society i:
going to the polls twice in the same year to try to raise the
dough. Inflation has caught up with the AMS and an influx o
funds is essential if programs and services, which UBC
students now take for granted, are not cut.
A 9    f>
Rurmino on emp
'Ride a vict
Mr. Hamilton, you have got to be
kidding. From your premise that all
women should feel degaded and insulted by the Lady Godiva ride I
must assume that you advocate that
all Catholics should feel degraded
by Adolf Hitler because they are of
the same religion, and that all
blacks should feel insulted by Idi
Disco-droids evil
In the March 2 issue of this
paper, Sonja Sinclair wrote that the
"disco scene can really help build
character of people with positive
self concepts, but for the engineer
there is no hope." In contrast to all
the other deep psychological
revelations of self exhibited in her
letter, this one is of paramount
importance to an understanding of
how the serious sickness of western
society as a whole is reflected in the
influence of the subconscious on
the writings of the conscious mind.
Sonja says that engineers are vile
selfconseious pitiful creatures and
that all engineers hate disco. This
has the effect, in the context of her
letter, of raising disco, and the
surrender of oneself to disco as a
beneficial, if not desired, event.
Contemporary western society is
caught in a headlong rush to the
'Final Solution' because people
with no hope are turning themselves
over to the self-centred disco ethic
of staying alive. The disco-droids
say they are good people following
the rules. They feel that because
they are good people they make the
system better. What they really are
doing is making the system function
better. The effects of this better
functioning system is of no concern
to them.
In conclusion, Sonja, let me say
that on the whole your letter reveals
far more about your inner psychic
makeup than it does to illuminate
the relative merits of disco and
gears. What you must do in order
to get a grip on the specific interrelationships of our society is to
consider the setting of our society
in relation to the other societies of
our planet.
Specifically, with reference to the
part of your letter quoted above,
you must consider that if the
system's effect on the rest of the
world is basically evil, then an
increase in the efficiency of that
system means that the world as a
whole becomes a worse place to
live, even though your physical and
psychic comfort is increased.
Mark DeFazio
grad studies
Amin because they are of the sai
race.
You describe the ride as bei
"oppressive". Who is being c
pressed? You say that the ride is r
a "victimless crime". Who is t
victim? Surely you would not s
that it is the engineers who spons
the ride. Is Lady Godiva the victir
No! She takes off her clothes a
gets up on that horse of her o\
free will. Am I the victim? No! r
one makes me watch the ride, r
one can make me feel degrade
ashamed, or guilty for the actio
of one woman because we share
common gender.
However, you do have a poir
Mr. Hamilton. There are no vi
timless crimes! A crime implies
victim, one who suffers injury fro
the acts of another. A victim c;
only be found as a result of an a
of aggression or coercion, not fro
an act of free will. Lady Godiva
ride only becomes an act of aggre
sion if her horse tramples over inn'
cent spectators, and only beconr
an act of coercion if she ties tl
"victims" to trees to watch th
spectacle — even then they a
close their eyes!
Mr. Hamilton, you speak of sel
censorship. Is that really equivale;
to state censorship which is censo
ship by a third party based on i
subjective views of morality? No -
you claim the right to censor othe
Infusion needed
As a representative from the
fraternities and sororities on
campus, we feel that the $1.50
increase toward the men and
women's intramural program is
essential in maintaining the
standard of intramural sports on
campus. To remain successful,
intramurals need this funding
desperately to meet rising costs and
in anticipation of activity expansion.
Fraternities and sororities are
involved very closely with intramural sports from the arts 20 race
at the beginning of the year through
volleyball, basketball, badminton,
curling, ice and field hockey,
swimming, soccer, and several
other events throughout the entire
school term. But everyone can
benefit from the intramurals program — the clubs and the individual. It means great fun, great
friends and good exercise. If you're
already involved in a particular
aspect of intramural sports you
know how important this funding is
to the future of the program; if not,
then find out how you can get
involved. Start by supporting the
$1.50 increase! See you at the polls!
Diane Gillis
activities representative
Panhellenic
THE U
MAR
Published Tuesdays, Tniirs
university year by the Alma
B.C. Editorial opinions are
AMS or the university ac
University Press. The UbysJ
ly commentary and review,
room 241K of the Student
merits, 228-2301; Advertisin
Editor:
I'm proud to be a wino from Tofino," be\ci
ing a trail of pungent footsteps in his wake. (V
goes the neighborhood." Julie Wheelwright
Tielemans." "The fluoridation of beer saps
McDonald. "I'll say," giggled Judith Michael
brook. "Women should be kept barefoot, pre
"Rankins are all right, but I wouldn't want my
worldly Peter Menyasz. "So what's wrong
photographing phenom replied. "Bill Bennett'
choked to death in his own vomit. "Our paper
Conn. When the dynamic duo were last seen
under a mountain of phone books.
V.
■*•■*« Thursday, March 8, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
ire a dime?
Letters
An example of one of the programs which might be cut
back is the intramural sports program. Many of the sports
which are more costly to finance, such as hockey, will be cut,
leading to a decline in the quality and variety of athletic programs available to UBC students.
The situation in intramurals is faced by many of the
society's other efficiency should recognize that the operating
fee students pay each year has not been increased since
1947, despite the many-fold increase in operating costs.
Initially, inflationary pressures on the society were met with
increased student enrolment which allowed the society to
operate without raising fees.
But in recent years declining enrolment and a higher inflation rate has put a double squeeze play on the society's
budget.
That the AMS has survived at all in recent years despite
these pressures is due to a series of conservative finance
directors who cut subsidies to clubs and other organizations
such as the intramural sports program.
Many of the cuts this year have crippled formerly strong
campus organizations such as the CITR radio station, which
has had its budget cut by over 90 per cent.
Most students groups have felt the pinch and many have
been cut to the bone.
Next week's fee referendum will be a turning point for
many student activities, some of which may be cut altogether
if the referendum fails.
Advance polls open Tuesday and voting will continue until
Friday. Be sure to vote next week, and vote "yes".
nless crime9
Cops oppress punks
Lady Godiva .
because of your divine inferences
about this ride. Some may infer that
this ride is a symbol of liberation
for women. You have chosen to infer that it is a degradation of
women.
If you are making a case for the
irrational   behaviour   of  humans,
after hours
-mike mong photo
tYSSEY
, 1979
and Fridays throughout the
ir Society of the University of
3 of the staff and not of the
stration. Member, Canadian
jblishes Page Friday, a week-
Jbysse/s editorial office is in
in Building. Editorial depart-
1-3977.
e Bocking
"ieleman, as he weaved through the office, leaving turned his head in disgust, muttering "there
d and said "well, some of my best friends are
lie's vital juices," snorted a glassy-eyed Verne
bemused pair of Mike Mong and Michael Ham-
nd in the kitchen," Jeff Rankin solemnly stated.
3 marry one," Geof Wheelwright confided to the
imen being on pedestals, it buats horses," the
Barest," shouted Kevin McGee, shortly before he
>r wrong," quipped Tom Hawthorne and Heather
/ere stilt attempting to extricate themselves from
then you are setting yourself up as a
prime example. For if, as you say,
all human beings are irrational
animals, how do you account for
your own 'rational' view of the
Lady Godiva ride? For that matter,
if mankind is not rational then who
among us is qualified to distiguish
right from wrong if it is not the individual? It was not individualism
that gave us the atrocities of Nazi
Germany. It was a 'collective'
movement by a group of individuals
who had relinquished their free will
to the dictates of Hitler.
Everyone has been giving their
views of the "real issue" underlying
this ride. Now it's my turn! The real
issue — "Enlightenment" notwithstanding — is the right of the
engineers to stage the Lady Godiva
ride, and of the spectators to view it
or not to view it. In the whole of
this dispute, objectively the only
ones being oppressed are' the
engineers. Not only do their opponents take it upon themselves to
tell the engineers what they mean by
the ride ("that women are weak,
passive, defenseless, and compliant
with any and all forms of assault"),
but also to stop the ride using their
subjective moral indignation as sole
justification.
Kelly Connell
arts 2
The police are conducting a
concerted operation to eliminate
the punk scene in Vancouver. The
manner by which they are attempting this is simple: they are
intimidating the people who wish to
put punk concerts on by
threatening to revoke liquor
licenses. This is, of course, how the.
RCMP cancelled the gig which was
to happen on Feb. 24 here on
campus. Since then the Vancouver
City Police have similarily
threatened both O'Hara's and the
night club which has been the focal
point of punk rock for a number of
months now, the Windmill.
In the Georgia Straight of March
2 there is an article headlined
'Punk' 'Violence' Stops Show'.
That article tries to explain why the
people at O'Hara's decided to
cancel the punk gig which was
supposed to happen on March 15.
The reason given is that they are
afraid that there might be violence
happened at the Saint Valentine's
Day Massacre gig. The real reason
for the cancellation was police
intimidation. The police informed
the people at O'Hara's that they
were going to be present at the
club on the 15th and that if minors
were about, or if violence broke
out, O'Hara's would lose its liquor
license. Faced with such a threat the
operators cancelled the show. If the
police had not intervened the show
would have gone on, with
professional bouncers to deal with
the possible confrontation between
bikers and punks. It is likely that
the idea for the March 15th concert
didn't even occur until the earlier
gig had shown how profitable punk
gigs could be — that is, all along the
promotors were aware that they
might have a problem with
violence.
As to the Windmill, the police
have also used intimidating tactics
to see that punk is stopped. The
Windmill has had punk shows a
couple nights a week for some three
or four months now. During this
time the bands playing there have
been getting a poor shake — they
were getting ripped off by the
management. Sometimes a band
member would get as little as $7 for
playing a night there. Seeing that
the bands were getting fucked
around, two weeks ago John Owen,
manager for DOA, suggested that
the bands refuse to play until the
Windmill gave them a better and
well-deserved deal.
Now most of the bands took
advice and refused to play. At this
time the punk band Private School
approached the managers at the
night club with the idea that they
should bet a week long gig. This is
where the police step in. Just as
Thanks to
workers
On behalf of the open house
committee we would like to extend
an open letter of thanks to all the
students who participated on March
2 and 3. There were many tired
individuals by the time the doors
closed on Saturday night. A special
mention is for the stoic volunteers.
who spent long hours in the cold
and rain, the red men on the trains
and traffic, the information booth
types and the tour guides. Thanks
for being worked over.
John Pellizzon
traffic co-ordinator
Van McLean
tour guide director
Geoff Smith
chair
everything was coming together the
Vancouver police came up to
manager Mike Kleple and told him
that should he have punk bands
playing at the club the police will
make a point of dropping in
looking for reasons (minors) why
the Windmill's liquor license should
be revoked. Just as the AMS
bureaucrats and people at O'Hara's
found that they couldn't face up to
such intimidation neither could the
Windmill.
John Walker
Protest a crime
A large number of the supposedly enlightened members of the
university community seem to be incapable ot accepting the reality of
this world in which wc all live. As wiih all readers of The Ubyssey, I am
constantly confronted with ihe propaganda expounding upon the
necessity ol a union fee freeze. Why don't >ou people siep off of your
idealistic little platform and take a good long look at what is going on?
Inflation is today an integral part of all of our lives. I can see nothing
wrong with tuition fee increases tied to the cost of living. I am a little
more lhan sick and tired with these crybabies clamouring that they are
being oppressed by [he Socied nasties and thai a urmersiiv educa;ion in
B.C. will noon only be available to those people with surnames
beginning with Vandcrbilt and Rockefeller. I fail to see how tuition fees
keeping pace with inilation will price the cost of education out of reach
of the student of average financial capabilities any more than any other
facet of the cost of living. I really don't see how the accessibility to
higher learning will be diminished.
I iust wonder how mans have taken a look at what it costs to obtain a
comparable education in the United States. Digging out my copy of the
1976 World Almanac, I opened it to ihe page lisuiin iunion lees (noi
fees for room and board or any other expenses) for 128 representative
American universities. Taking my pocket calculator, 1 totalled and
averaged Ihe fees (using the lower figure when a range of fees was given)
and came up with an average figure of $1760 per year. 51760 IN 1976!!
(hat is three times what we are paying in 1979!! I feel pretty damned
lucky that I'm paying only S573 this year for a university education.
If I was a taxpayer, I'd be pretty bloody unhappy with the university
Mudenti, who are in the first place only paying about IS per cent of the
total university costs, bitching about tuition fees going up for the first
tunc in two years as if these little bastards should be privy to a non-
inlla:iiinai> world This n noiwiihsiandiii); [Inr fact that much ol ihe
funding of universities goes toward work which is of dubious value (eg.
the self-propagating English department). In conclusion, to those
people who feel like persisting and voicing your opinions against tuition
fee increases, fine. It's your right lo do so. But just don't waste A.M.S.
monies (which students paid for) on your ridiculous little rallies advertisements in the Ubyssey and stupid little buttons. That is a real
crime.
I.. Scott Forbes
science 3
Ride a tradition
Yes, ladies and gentlemen . . .
Oh! Excuse me! I mean "fellow
university students" (Damn! guess
that sexist address gave it away!).
Yes, I am an engineer and I am
writing in regards to the hottest
issue on the press these days.
It seems to me that most people
who have expressed an opinion on
the Lady Godiva ride have been
somehow sidetracked on to the
totally irrelevant topic of their
choice. One can almost feel the hot
breath and spittle of frothing
mouths as these do-gooders reveal
their biased nature under the
auspices of defending their ignorant
and helpless fellow men.
Even though I get a good laugh
out of these articles I do get rather
tired of ignorant, erroneous and
repetitious references like "Nazis",
"sexist", and (heaven forbid!)
disco haters (hope you got a good
laugh over Sonja's "character
building" article, too!). Let's take
this opportunity to set the neurotics
back on track. The ride is not intended as an insult to womanhood
nor is it a brazen show of "political
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
power" (Perspectives-Friday, Mar.
2). These connotations are the
figments of fevered imaginations.
The ride, when isolated and observed impartially, can be seen in its
proper context. That is, the ride is a
tradition and an integral part of
being a UBC engineer, nothing
more and nothing less.
Rob Pearce
applied science 1 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 8, 1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
AWARDS OFFICE
Representative available to discuss financial aid
for students, noon, SUB Speakeasy.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Frank Bertram speaks about stimulating communication, noon, Buch. 204.
CCF.
Communion service and elections, noon, SUB
205.
CSA
Jim Wong Chu discusses Hong Kong: A victim
of narcotics and corruption, noon, Buch. 322.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Voting for elections, at noon until Friday, SUB
216A.
UBC LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting and discussion of social planning, noon, SUB 224.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY AND SIGMA SI
Incredible Machine will be shown, 8 p.m., IRC 1.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
T-shirts and elections of new executive, noon,
IRC 1.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Discussion with Vancouver novelist David Watmough, 12:30 p.m., SUB 212.
DIETETIC STUDENTS
Vegetarian luncheon with soup, low calorie
cheese cake, ruffage rolls and much more, 12
noon, SUB grill.
PLANNING STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Speakers on planning for low income populations of Asian cities, noon, Lasserre 205.
PREVET CLUB
Lecture on mixed animal practice, noon, MacMillan 158.
CCCM
Panel on Genetic research: Who should set the
limits?, noon, SUB 207.
ASIAN STUDIES
Seminar on British imperialism in 18th century
India, 3:30 p.m.. Brock 210.
FRIDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion, midi, la Maison Internationale.
CASH FOR YOUR
OLD RECORDS
Collector's RPM
BUY it SELL
3623 W. Broadway
Open 12-6 Mon-Sat.        731-3925
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
UBC SKYDIVING
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
CSA
Annual general meeting, 6 p.m., SUB 207.
'INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Airbrush   performs,   call   228-5021   to   reserve
tickets, 9 p.m.. International House.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Bzzr garden and raffle draw, 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.,
SUB party room.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth with new form letters, noon,
SUB lobby.
UBC NDP CLUB
New Westminster MP and provincial candidate
Stu Leggatt speaks, noon, SUB 207.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Meeting and slide show, noon, SUB 111.
SATURDAY
CSA
Movies  on  The  Golden  Bird  and  The flying
Swallow    Meets   Spring,    2:30    p.m.,    SUB
auditorium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Disco dance, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Holiday Inn on
Howe St.
SUNDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Lion and lamb regional slalom, 10 a.m., B lot.
MONDAY
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Poetry reading by Anne Marriott and Seymour
Mayne, noon, Buch. 203.
TUESDAY
SKI CLUB
Elections, noon, SUB party room,
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper at 6 p.m.,  Gregory Baum tells of his
travels at 7 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
AMS FEE REFERENDUM
On MARCH 13 to 16
THE AMS WILL BE ASKING YOU
FOR A $3.00 INCREASE
IN THE AMS FEES.
$3.00
I
$1.50
Intramurals
$1.50
Operating SUB
Undergraduate Society Grants
Programs/Special Events
Etc.
THINK ABOUT IT
VOTE
MARCH 13-16
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
STEREO
SERVICE CENTRE
A worn needle can ruin your records
"Free" Inspection
Most popular stylii in stock
1988 W. 4th Ave. 731-9813
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 linn, 1 day Sl-50; additional line* 35c.
Commercial - 3 line*, 1 day $2.75; additional lines 50c Additional days $2.50 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room 247, S U.B.. UBC. Van., B.C. V6T 1W5.
5 — Coming Events
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Aiiutyrayli   ^iuiUnu JQi).
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
K0RRES
i* MOVING AND T-
51 TRANSFER LTD. h
•STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. lOthS
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
Appearing now at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Mark Hasselbach's
"AIRBRUSH"
CBC Recording Artists
Music for your Head and Feet!
9 p.m., March 9th
S2.00 Mon-members $1.00 Members
IN ADVANCE or Phone 228-6021 to RESERVE
DANCE CONTEST
$200 FIRST PRIZE
HONEY BEE DISCO
3371 HAZEL ST., ABBOTSFORD, B.C.
March 8, 9. 10
8:30 p.m.-2 a.m.
SUBFILMS HAS BROUGHT YOU THE FEVER
DON'T MISS IT!!
228-3697
Thurs., Sun. 7:00
Fri. Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
ADMISSION $1.00
Extra show Captain Marvel
Sun. 9:30!! senes. Fri., Sat.
7:00 only
Dr. Frank Bertram
Speaks about
"STIMULATING
COMMUNICATION"
THURSDAY,
MARCH 8
12:30, BUCH 204
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
44 DART. V-8, auto, teste*. Excellent
mech. cond. New brakes, exhaust.
S650 o.b.o.  298-6668  eves.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
HOUSE for rent. West Vancouver. 3
bedroom. Near school and bus. Ocean
view. $580 per month, available May
1. Lease  1 year.  922-8286.
RESPONSIBLE couple with excellent
references available to housesit and
caretake your home, garden. A minimum of one year from April or any
time through to September. Willing
to   negotiate.   228-8904,   eves.
TWO bedroom basement suite to share
with young working male. Laundry
available.  Near UBC.  228-0995.
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
"The Future of
YOUR AMS
The Fee Referendum next week will
determine how effective YOUR Student Society will be in providing: Intermurals Program, Student Union
Building Operations, Undergraduate
Society Funding, and all of the other
AMS Services presently offered.
VOTE YES in the AMS Fee
Referendum   to   ensure
continuation   and   expansion of YOUR AMS.
JOBS M/F. Sailboats! Cruise ships! No
experience, high pay. See Carribean,
Hawaii, Europe, world! Summer
career. Send $3.95 for info to Sea-
world, HD Box 60129, Sacto. Ca.
95860.
EXOTIC JOBS! Lake Tahoe Cal! Little
exp. Fantastic tips pay $170O-$4O0O.
Summer. 35,000 people needed in
casinos, restaurants, ranches, cruisers, river rafts. Send $3.95 for info
to LAKEWORLD, HD Box 60128,
Sacto, Ca. 95860.
70 — Services
M.A. Grad will proof read theses and
papers. Can also check bibs. 601-7940.
Tony.
WEDDINO Photography Specialist.
Complete professional coverage at
very reasonable rates. Call for consultation at your convenience.
732-9651  eves.
ART&
ICALLIGRAPHYl
SUPPLIES
NOW AVAILABLE.
For lower prices and a wide
range of office and school
supplies, try
MOLLIES
QUALITY STATIONERS
4479 W. 10th AVE.
85 — Typing
TYPING — 75c per pace. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
FOR ACCURATE typing on an IBM Selectric Correcting typewriter call 986-
2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush work accepted.
FAST     efficient     typing,
rates.  266-5053.
Reasonable
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-4870   after  6:00  p.m.
40 — Messages
JDM: Fear not — QT PIE is safe. I repeat what are you going to do about
TYPINO. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equatlonal, reports, letters, resumes. Fast, accurate.   Bilingual.  Clemy 324-9414.
TYPING: Exp. Secretary will type
theses, essays, reports, at 70c per
page. Can transcribe from tape re
oorder.   872-0505   (mornings).
65 — Scandals
"IMAGE". Single Scene America. Calendar of events. Telephone 689-3098.
Dances every Friday and Saturday
in   Vancouver's   finest   ballrooms.
FOR SALE
THANK YOU for the return of Hannah.   We   appreciate  it.   D.G.'s.
TODAY! David Watmough, author: NO
MORE INTO THE GARDEN, and
much  more!   12:30.   SUB  212.
DISCO SUCKS fans who wish to remain alive should not come to Sub-
films   "Saturday  Night   Fever".
ATTENTION Students: I will do your
typing in my home. Electric Typewriter. Manuscripts, thesis, etc.
Phone   Adrien   987-3569   anytime.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI   WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   ewes. Thursday, March 8, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Vote banked on
From page 1
Andrew distributed posters at the
meeting, to be put up around the
campus Wednesday night.
The committee decided to hire
the CITR radio station sound truck
to advertise the referendum during
lunch hour on the voting days.
The group also decided to buy a
half-page advertisement in The
Ubyssey next Tuesday giving the
locations of the polling stations.
Bruce Armstrong, one of the
referendum organizers, added that
the advertisement would also list
student politicians in support of the
referendum.
He said that would include
engineering undergraduate society
president Brian Short, AMS
president Valgeet Johl, board of
governors member Glenn Wong,
himself, and others.
Some members of the committee
were concerned about the cost of
buying such advertising, but the
concern was quashed by one of the
representatives of the intramural
program.
"If we don't spend some money
now, we won't have any money to
spend a year from now," said
Marnie Parton.
Committee member Chris
Niwinski said at the meeting that
the student representative assembly
could be called on to provide staff
for polling stations.
"We could pull the old guilt trip
on them," said Niwinski. Andrew
said the guilt trip approach was
attempted without success prior to
the October fee referendum.
The group also agreed on the
importance of talking to students
during lectures, especially those in
first year classes, and will try to
arrange for volunteers to give the
talks.
Voting on the fee referendum will
begin on Tuesday, March 13 and
continue through Friday, March
16. Locations of the polling stations
will be announced as soon as they
are finalized.
SAC censvre fails
From page 1
Education senator Steve
Ferguson said the logic of the
motion was ridiculous and made no
more sense than promoting violence
to get publicity for the tuition
problem.
"I could go downtown and
firebomb banks wearing freeze the
fees buttons and (I) would get
attention," he said.
But Hedstrom said the ride could
be an event for students to rally
around in the interests of
promoting student solidarity. The
motion was passed with 12 votes in
support, eight against and five
abstentions.
At the same meeting the SRA
defeated a motion to censure the
student administrative commission
for their action in rejecting an
application to hang a freeze the fees
banner outside SUB.
Kate Andrew, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer, said
there was no reason or excuse for
the commission's refusal if they
properly understood SRA's position on tuition increases.
"To anyone who has been aware
of student's activities, it should be
clear that SRA has come out
against tuition fees," she said.
r-UULlC
228-61 21
mWlMMMMmP*
GlirJG
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00— 3:00 p.m.
] \\i
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS           $1 25
THUNDERBIRD
y      - &.
WINTER
'^
SPORTS CENTRE
YOU ARE INVITED TO A FREE LECTURE ENTITLED
"The Science of Christian Healing"
given by
MR. JACK EDWARD HUBBLE
Friday, March 9, 12:30 p.m.
Room 102, Buchanan Bldg.
Sponsored by the Christian Science Organization
on Campus.
master charge
rd
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922  fliP
224-9116   teiii|»
5784 University (next to Bank of Commerce)
VANCOUVER
ISLAND WEST
School District
No. 84
Qualified Teachers wishing to teach in
School District No. 84 during the 1979-80
School Year should submit applications
and vitae to
Dave Price, Director of Instruction. Box 100. Gold River. B.C.
VOP 1G0, before March 16. 1979.
Teachers granted interviews in
Vancouver,   March   26   and  27,
1979, will be contacted by letter
or telephone before
March 23, 1979.
Your A.U.S. I S.U.S. Presents
SUNRISE
NIGHT!!
FEATURING
Shots, Sunrises and Tacos
SEE YOU THERE
MARCH 9
4-10 P.M. in
BUCHANAN LOUNGE
*  jBibiflnctersson Fernando fley
"frank &whac%$ ficrt^flte^^Pattteia (tesnfck
STARTS TOMORROW       DAILY 2:50 4:55 7:00 & 9:05
 CAPITOL 6,
820 GRANVILLE MALL
■"" THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1979 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Lord Lloyd of Hampstead
The Quain Professor of Jurisprudence in the University of London, Dennis Lloyd was
made Lord Lloyd in 1965. His reputation as one of England's great legal scholars has
grown from his work as a member of law reform committees; his association with the
Department of Law at the University of London; and his publications on topics of
public policy and the development of law in the United Kingdom. His book The Idea of
Law has a wide distribution, even being translated into Japanese. His is currently working on the question of a Bill of Rights for England.
WHAT USE IS A BILL OF RIGHTS?
Thursday, March 8 In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE FREEDOM OF THE PRESS
Saturday, March 10 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 p.m. (A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund Pag* 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 8, 1979
Waters brings audience to tears
By BILL TIELEMAN
Outside the Commodore Sunday night
Granville Street is busy, as always. Drunks
who have no respect for the Lord's day and
sidewalk freaks parade about the mall.
But for the cement city cowboys outside
the ballroom, none of the nonsense matters.
They're chatting to friends and strangers
alike, their stetsons nodding up and down,
about the biggest country and western event
to hit Vancouver in 25 years.
Hank Williams is in town.
And when Sneezy Waters and his Excellent
Band leave the stage two hours later, you'd
swear it was true.
But even the most loyal Williams' fans,
while singing along to classics like Your
Cheatin' Heart, Jambalaya (On the Bayou),
Hey Good Lookin' and I'm So Lonesome 1
Could Cry, know deep down that Sneezy
Waters is not the long-gone Hank.
Hank Williams, The Show He Never Gave,
is a play, rather than an imitator's concert,
that has been receiving rave reviews as it
tours across Canada. It's easy to see why.
The Waters show brings out, along with
Williams' music, a look at the man who died
early at 29, from alcohol and a broken heart.
The premise the play starts on is that
Williams didn't die in the back seat of his
Cadillac on New Year's day, 1953, on his way
to a show. Instead Hank, already drunk,
manages to make it to a New Year's show,
the show he never gave.
And the Commodore is the perfect place
for the show, filling in as the typical C&W
hall of the early '50s. On stage a Happy New
Year 1953 banner completes the time trip.
Williams' back-up band, the Drifting
Cowboys, come on first and sets the place
humming with some fine instrumentals. The
Sunday night crowd is mildly perturbed when
they learn that no booze is available, but they
really came for the music and they get it.
After a couple of tunes, the musicians look
somewhat anxiously at each other and the audience nods knowingly. They've heard about
Hank's drinking problem, rumored to be
why he hasn't played the Grand Ol' Opry for
a fair stretch.
HAHK WILLIAMS HDD
HEAR OAK HILL, WLUIL,
ON JAHUABY 1,19S3.
RE WAS 89.
THE DRIVER Of THE
HEW 1953 CADILLAC	
FLEETWOOD, HOT WAHTIHG
TO DISTURB HIM, DROVE
FOR FIVE HOURS BEFORE
REALIZING THE
RECUMBENT PASSENGER
IH THE BACK SEAT WAS
DEAD.
THE CORONER'S REPORT
STATED ALCOHOL WAS
PRESENT IH THE BLOOD
STREAM; HOW MUCH WAS
HOT SPECIFIED.
PAGE THURSDAY
March 9-11
ove Goddesses
Outrageous
7:30
9:15
Mar. 12-14
The Ruling Class   7:30
Morgan 10:15
Box office opens 7:00
16th & ARBUTUS, VANCOUVER
738-6311
But then there he is, in the flesh, wearing
his trademark white suit with musical notes
and bars sewn on it from top to bottom.
Hank smiles, waves to the crowd, stoops a
little to the mike and drawls into Lovesick
Blues, his first big hit and the song that
"brought the house down" the first time he
played the Opry in 1949.
Unfortunately his intake of "milk," as he
calls it, has already affected his performance
and he flubs a line. "That's one song I
should know," Hank apologizes to the audience.
And so it goes. Waters is not only Hank
Williams, he's Hank Williams in a last
pathetic performance, drunk and pouring
out his life story between the songs.
As the show progresses the audience
realizes that it is indeed a drama, and a tear-
jerker too. When Hank, under a single
spotlight, begins singing I'm So Lonesome I
Could Cry, his voice strained and slurring,
his hand listlessly strumming chords, you
know he died long before 1953.
When he says, "My best songs are so
depressin'," the crowd laughs and Hank
smiles knowingly. And when a woman yells
out, "Make us cry, Hank" everyone knows
that it's true.
In a way Waters', or is it Williams',
monologue becomes unnecessary, even embarrassing, after a while. He talks about
looking forward to the rest of 1953 and of
how the newly-elected team of Eisenhower
and Nixon might be able to bring the boys
home from Korea.
Hank dedicates You Win Again to "the
bums," the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team,
whom he says are the favorites of all the
losers and ramblers who have no place to call
home.
And throughout the night Hank counts
down the minutes to the new year. But the
countdown is a more chilling one than that
and when he leaves the stage after singing the
haunting Angel of Death, it's 20 minutes early.
"Happy New Year Hank!" the crowd yells
out as he departs one last time.
$124
00
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• Super Fitting     Rex Soft 60
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341 NORTH ROAD
-tm «<» COOUITLAM 931-7441
»,c* „^!«L,. * BETWEEN COLOMBIAN
NEAR GRANVILLE PAPER ANO LOUGHEED
1535 W. BROADWAY
You're prepared
for a job.
Now prepare for
a profession.
TWENTY-FIVE VOLUNTEERS
ARE NEEDED TO COMPLETE A STUDY
OF THE SIDE-EFFECTS OF A NEW
BIRTH CONTROL PILL.
The pill contains less of the female hormone estrogen
than current low-dose contraceptive pills. The pill has
been used in humans and effectively prevents pregnancy.
Volunteers will be asked to keep a diary of any side-
effects and a blood sample will be taken every six
months.
Contact:
Dr. Robin Percival-Smith,
Student Health Service
-228-2151
These are challenging times for
young people. And the challenge will
continue even after you find a job.
You'll be competing with qualified
people who are just as eager to move
ahead and just as ready to work hard.
The professional edge can set you
apart to help you achieve your
career goals.
The Management Accounting profession is an idea whose time has
come. The economic situation may be
a problem for many, but it's an
opportunity for the RIA Management
Accountant.
The business climate has never been
so competitive. Government must
restrain costs while meeting
social needs.
So there is growing demand and
scope for RIA Management Accountants. The professionals.
As the name suggests, they are not
accountants in the traditional sense of
the word.
Their RIA training provides a
thorough grasp of accounting principles and information systems. In
addition, they are trained to interpret
quantitative data from the management perspective. Their focus is on the
future as they work with senior
management to plan policy and
achieve objectives.
So it's not surprising that so many
men and women with the RIA
professional edge become
senior managers.
The profession is open to everyone
with a taste for hard work and the will
to succeed.
Business graduates can often earn
RIA accreditation in two or three years
of evening study. Many B.A.'s, B.Sc.'s
and other non-business graduates can
also qualify for RIA course exemptions.
For further information, contact the
Society today.
Society of Management Accountants
Suite 401 - 750 West Pender Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6C 277
Telephone 687-5891

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