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The Ubyssey Sep 20, 1983

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Array High marks needed for admission
By CHRIS WONG
Faced with escalating enrolment,
the UBC computer science department has imposed unprecedented
restrictions for course entrance this
fall.
James Varah, acting computer
science head, said students who
have not achieved the necessary
standard  from  prerequisites or  a
high overall average are now being
refused entrance to certain computer science courses.
One fourth year computer science
course accepted 55 students and rejected 51 whose marks were below
the cutoff point of 65 per cent, said
Varah.
These figures are similar in other
computer science courses, he add
ed.
About one-third to one-half of all
applicants to computer science were
rejected, Varah said. And at least
the same number were turned away
even before applying.
This measure was necessary to
combat the enormous size of
classes, Varah said. "Students
weren't     getting     a     decent
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 3   Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 20,1983
»<s»pj3S3jSiS> 48
education." But teaching assistants
will have their workload increased
and more lab equipment is needed,
Varah said.
UBC's critical financial situation
and the recently imposed hiring
freeze are also responsible for the
imposition of the academic standards, said Varah.
Students have not complained
about the measures, he said. "I
think they're accepting it."
The standards have been lowered
to allow some fourth year students
to enter required courses, Varah
said. "We don't want them to have
to spend another year in
university."
Other faculties may also impose
similar standards to limit enrolment, said Varah.
He added imposing academic
criteria is the "fairest" way to limit
enrolment.
At the University of Victoria,
similar measures have already taken
place. According to John Muzio,
computer science department chair,
entrance requirements hae risen
from a C plus to B average.
Entrance to first year courses is
based on a "first-come, first-serve"
basis, he said. Students also must
re-register each term to ensure their
standard is maintained. Rejected
students are placed on a waiting list.
Freeze creates
larger classes
— noil lucent* photo
FUTURE UBC 1997 Thunderbird linebacker (right) presents a portrait of raw strength and courage in front of
future 1997 Ubyssey sports editor (left). A Thunderbird talent scout found loitering near this scene said, "We're
recruiting as early as we can." A Ubyssey editor found beside the talent scout said, "So are we."
'Community' taken from colleges
By JOHN KNOWLES
Special to The Ubyssey
College instructors are angry over
new legislation that strips community colleges of local control —
and their anger extends to opposition leader Dave Barrett over his
party's refusal to block Bill 20 Friday.
"It's the end of the community
college as a community
institution," Jack Finnbogason,
president of the College Institute
Educators Association, said Monday. Faculty are particularly opposed to the removal of local school
board representatives from college
boards, he said.
With the passage of the College
and Institute Amendment Act Bill
20, the provincial government has
gained exclusive authority to appoint directors to college boards.
The act also dissolves the three
councils that mediated between the
colleges and several provincial
ministries.
Finnbogason said a centralized
college system, such as Bill 20 and
forthcoming bills will establish, can
not meet the disparity of regional
demands for higher education.
"Students have a nasty habit of
wanting what they want — not what
the government wants," he said.
Instructors are also critical of the
New Democratic Party for its weak
stand against the bill, which passed
after the party caucus decided to
reserve its strongest opposition for
what it perceives to be the very
worst of the bills, an unspecified
"Dirty Dozen".
NDP leader Dave Barrett should
resign   immediately,   said   Ralph
Stanton, spokesperson for 400
faculty at Douglas and Kwantlen
colleges. Barrett has promised to
step down at the party's next convention, but for Stanton, it is not
soon enough.
"I'm calling for it right now," he
said, "Obviously he's inept and incompetent."
Stanton said it was impossible to
single out some bills as "dirty"
without implying the rest were acceptable.
"All these bills are a package to
fundamentally change the way of
life in this province," he said. "It's
not good enough to say we're only
going to fight some of them."
And while other faculty representatives may not be going as far as
Stanton, he's not alone in his disappointment with the NDP.
"I prefer the (Operation)
Solidarity strategy of opposing all
the bills," Finnbogason said. "We
are not ready to move into that
society the Socreds envision."
Capilano college faculty
spokesperson Gordon Wilson
agrees with the call for Barrett's
resignation.
"I concur," he said. "Frankly it
seems to me that there has to be an
effective and organized
opposition."
But NDP education critic Mark
Rose (Coquitlam-Moody) said the
opposition could not block all the
bills because it would interfere with
the government's ability to govern.
"That is not practical. I've seen opposition parties dig in their heels...it
just doesn't work," he said.
Legislation eliminating the
human   rights   branch,   curtailing
tenants rights, and emasculating
school boards is more serious than
the college bill, he said. "We just
don't feel it's in the same class.1'
"We decided there were some
bills that struck at the very root of
what we believed in," he seiid.
"We'd go to the mat on those."
He said the NDP did oppose Bill
20 and debated the act thoroughly
before the Social Credit majority
passed it.
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Faculty are lecturing to overflowing classes and students are being
turned away from preferred courses
as UBC's administration imposes its
hiring freeze.
Faced with a budget shortfall of
"catastrophic dimensions", the administration has frozen all new appointments of faculty, teaching
assistants, non-academic and student service staff and has asked
faculties to improve the efficiency
of their resources, vice-president
academic Robert Smith said.
The one month hiring freeze imposed Sept. 9 will be "reviewed"
Oct. 5, he added. Administration
president George Pedersen has indicated the freeze could be extended
beyond October.
"We've had to put our hand on
all uncommitted funds because we
can't get money from a stone,"
Smith said, referring to the fact that
UBC is grappling with a $4 million
budget shortfall.
Students in commerce, arts and
science, the faculties which are experiencing the greatest enrolment
increases, are sitting in classroom
aisles and are having to juggle
course sections and labs as a result
of the freeze.
"Students are being short changed. Classes are becoming straight
lectures rather than discussions,"
said commerce dean Peter Lusztig.
Rooms in the commerce faculty
are filled to capacity and many
courses, especially in third and
fourth year, have waiting lists, he
said. "We can't help the students
on waiting lists if the freeze is extended beyond October," he added.
Students applying for courses
already filled to overflowing have
been told to enrol in others less
popular, Lusztig said. The growing
size of many classes has reduced the
quality of education students are
receiving, he said.
"One hundred and fifty students
in a third year course is not many
people's definition of a university
education," Lusztig said.
Arts dean Robert Will said the
freeze has impaired the university's
ability to respond to the large influx
of students and means no new sections in arts can be opened without
the closure of others.
Faculty have been reassigned
from courses with low enrolment to
others more in demand, he said.
And with a substantial increase in
the student-teacher ratio, arts
students are receiving less attention
from their professors, he added.
"It's a very unhappy situation."
The education faculty is "feeling
the pinch" in its industrial education program, education dean
Daniel Birch said. The provincial
government failed to provide funding for the $1.2 million program,
and as a result, the faculty had to
drum up money to ensure its continuance.
Eight instructors in the program
must now do the work of 10 and only six instructional assistants have
been hired when seven are needed,
Birch added. One instructor was
forced to cancel a leave of study
because of the freeze, he said.
"But the faculty is doing it upmost to ensure students aren't suffering," Birch said.
Women harassed in libraries
Three women using Main and
Sedgewick libraries were sexually
harassed in separate incidents last
week.
The incidents occured on level
two of the Main library stacks and
in the basement of Sedgewick.
RCMP are looking for a 5'10"
white male with light brown hair
and a jaw line beard in connection
with the Main library incident. He
is slim, and was wearing blue jeans,
a light blue polo shirt and carrying a
jean jacket when he exposed
himself to a woman in the library
Sept. 15.
Sedgewicks's suspect is described
as a tall, white male, about 40 or 50
years of age. He had dark brown
hair, dark brown thick rimmed
glasses, and was wearing a grey
three-piece suit.
UBC librarian Douglas Mclnnes
said similar incidents have occured
in the past.
"The main stacks are not as well
lit as they should be," he said.
"The library is a large public
building with a great many users,
and it attracts people who aren't
necessarily students."
But tighter library security would
be difficult, said Mclnnes.
"But unfortunately there aren't
any staff on during the evenings in
the areas of the library where these
things are likely to happen," he
said.
Women's students office director
June Lythgoe said women who are
sexually harrassed in the libraries
should report the incident immediately to a librarian.
"Pay as little attention as possible to the person at the time of the
incident and don't be intimidated,"
she said.
Oi'iHiM ub. nygt# dawn
A UBC English professor has been caught in the crunch of rising
SUB cookie prices.
The professor, who wished to remain unidentified, said he
noticed a drastic increase in cookie prices from 30 to 50 cents for a
package of three. "It meant that the price went up 66 and two-thirds
in a few months," he said.
He complained to food services which said the price increase
was a mistake resulting from a "typing error" on the menu.
The professor, who was not amused, said food services should
be more consistent with their pricing in the eating spots on campus,
"it makes me wonder if this sort of thing has happened elsewhere,"
the professor said.
But a food services employee said these mistakes are rare. "It
happened once this year on maybe 2,300 items," she said.
That's the way the cookie crumbles with food services prices. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 20,1983
9900
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PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Hairy
puce blorgs on this tiny island community raced around the island today madly searching for recruits for
the island newspaper, The Daily
Blah.
Blah gang of three member
Moral Dogma expressed the staffs
desire for more company in the
islands oasis in SUB 241k. "Oooga
diddy tiddy wha!" Dogma was
heard to exclaim as she went madly
searching for victims.
Staffer Bliss Wrong said the
paper also has openings for
reviewers and feature writers.
Wrong confirmed rumors that the
famed Ubyssey movie critic position is up for grabs with the departure of Laughin Sheriff for Pathetic
Pravada.
Dogma added she is looking for
someone to replace her as Ubyssey
religious reporter.
Y?
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UBC CURLING CLUB
2 Draws Available
WEDNESDAY, 5:15-7:15
THURSDAY, 9:30-11:30
Deadline for Application 6:00 p.m.,
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Box No. 27, AMS Office or at our Booth on
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Store shows $2,000 book profit
The Alma Mater Society's used
bookstore has made an unexpected
$2,000 profit.
The profit is a "fluke", according to AMS vice-president Renee
Comesotti, who designed and ran
the project.
Most of the money will help pay
students for books stolen from the
bookstore, said Comesotti.
Although a waiver signed by
students absolved the AMS of
responsibility for theft, Comesotti
said the AMS wanted to reimburse
Positions frozen
A university hiring freeze is
preventing up to 900 students from
participating in UBC's work study
program.
Work  study  is  a  program  for
Oooooooops!
The Ubyssey would like to clarify
a story in the Sept. 16 issue, (AMS
prez moonlighted). In the story,
Renee Comesotti was quoted as saying, "You just have to hire the
president. There's no question
about it." The quote was taken out
of context. Comesotti made the
statement after speaking in defense
of Alma Mater Society president
Mitch Hetman who she felt did a
good job over the summer. She added that several AMS employees
held more than one job this summer, not just Hetman.
students who qualify for students
assistance beyond the maximum
amount available. In UBC's
$325,000 program, more than 1200
students are eligible to apply for
work in university departments for
union wages.
But the hiring freeze announced
last week froze the number of positions filled at 47, even though 900
students were accepted into the program.
"There is a temporary hold until
the (university) president sorts out
the program," work study program
administrator Sheila Summers said
Monday.
The education ministry has contributed $150,000 to the project,
and the university is expected to
find the remainder.
"There will be no more work
when the (university's) money runs
out," said Summers.
students whose books were stolen.
Information on the number of
books stolen was unavailable, but
Comesotti said the figures were not
expected to be high.
"I wouldn't suspect there had
been all that much pilferage," she
said.
The bookstore generally sold required texts, particularily books for
first year English, economics and
science courses.
Most students sold an average of
eight books at the store, said Comesotti.
"People came back often and
sometimes the room was jammed.
Sometimes the doors had to be closed," said Comesotti.
Despite the final success, early
returns for the bookstore were low.
"We didn't get 500 books until
after the sale had started," said
Comesotti.
"We (eventually) had so many
books we couldn't handle the
number. We had over ten per cent
of last year's UBC bookstore
sales."
Next year, the AMS will start
advertising and collecting books
earlier, and will likely extend the
selling period, Comesotti said.
Comesotti said students should
go to SUB 213 to collect money and
unsold books.
UVic picks PIRG purged by UBC
The B.C. Public Interest
Research Group, twice rebuffed in
student referendums at UBC, will
not be active on B.C.'s largest campus this year.
But a vote in March at the
University of Victoria made UVic
the second post-secondary institution to support the BCPIRG Society and organizer-researcher Bill
Brydon said Monday the society
will be administered from the provincial capital.
PIRGs, a brainchild of consumer
advocate Ralph Nader, are independent groups mobilizing public-
spirited people who have experience
in research and technology.
"I think it's going to become a
province-wide organization this
year rather than a Vancouver-based
one," said Brydon.
While Brydon stays on at
BCPIRG's first home at Simon
Fraser University, researching
natural resource management and
hazardous waste, the researcher at
UVic will be joined by a part-time
administrator.
The UVic staff will look into
daycare services as well as hazardous waste, and BCPIRG board
meetings will alternate between
UVic and SFU.
The organization's newsletter,
BCPIRG Report, will have 300 or
more copies distributed at UBC and
students here can join the group as
associate members, said Brydon.
But there will be no organizational drive at UBC this year.
"We've got to consolidate before
we can go nosing around any other
campus, including UBC," he said.
"We do have a number of ex-
PIRG members on campus among
graduate students whom we will be
in contact with, particularly concerning our research in resource
management."
The last attempt to get UBC
students to join BCPIRG and contribute $3 per person to the society
came in January, 1982. The
measure was defeated 2,241 to
1,980.
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10:00 to 6:00 Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 20,1983
Error condition
It's happening, Not in one, quick, swift move, but in a series of
related events — the effects of the provincial government's decision to give edcuation a low priority are being felt.
A zero per cent increase in provincial funding, which did not
reflect an eight per cent increase in federal funding, created UBC's
desperate financial situation. University officials, facing a possible
deficit budget considered illegal by the same officials who contributed to it, were forced to impose a hiring freeze.
The first concrete results of the freeze can be seen in many
classrooms around campus where students are sitting on the floor
as a result of soaring enrolment and a decreased number of course
sections.
But administrators have come up with a disturbing solution
towards the enrolment crisis in one department. They have imposed academic standards on course entrance in computer science.
With this latest restriction, UBC has taken another large step
towards becoming an elite institution not only for the rich, but for
those fortunate enough to maintain what is considered an acceptable standard.
The acceptable standards set in computer science are
unreasonable. Rejection from a popular class because a second
class standing has not been reached cannot be justified. A student
should not be punished for maintaining average marks.
But the department cannot be blamed. Their actions are merely the result of a government obsessed with "restraint" and "fat-
trimming."
But the chain of cost-cutting measures will grow. Government
officials have already imposed academic standards to student aid
eligibility. Prepare for another grave period in education.
One can only hope that the provincial government will trim the
fat from its salaries.
And impose intelligence criteria on its own employees, like Bill
Bennett, for instance.
J1MZZ~~ 0^sscy *?JMH.t
DDQODDOOaOOODOO |
Registration week blues blahs
By DEBRA MILLS
Of all the people I have talked to
during registration week and the
start-up of classes only 20 per cent
had smooth sailing.
Typical complaints of book shortages are at least tolerable since you
know your professor will have a few
shreds of sympathy for the bookless
crowd. Being told off by a professor for having too many people
in the class is disgraceful but when
he encourages people to leave and
cites obscure prerequisites you
know you're really in trouble.
Help wanted      (!pees^e)
A leading student newspaper has openings
for highly motivated, dedicated, intelligent
women and men in photography, newswriting
and editorial administration. No experience
necessary, we are willing to train. No wages
but many fringe benefits. Apply at 241k SUB
in person immediately!
Dead or alive
Flasher: what to do?
This is an open warning letter to
all female students who use Main
Library. There are men in Main
Library who are mentally sick and
get their kicks from exposing
themselves to unsuspecting female
students who are studying in a
deserted area. This has happened to
me twice already. I am writing this
letter to alert other female students
to the situation and hopefully prevent them from going through the
same disgusting and degrading experience.
If you are studying in a quiet area
of the library (particularly at night
or when most classes are in session),
be aware of what is going on
around you. If a man is lingering in
your vicinity for no apparent reason
(possibly he is watching you
through the bookshelves), or if he
keeps walking past, he may be
"staking you out" as a possible
target. If you feel uneasy in this
situation or if you notice anything
the least bit suspicious, get up and
move to another area — IMMEDIATELY. Preferably you
should move somewhere where
other people are studying and no
one can hide behind bookshelves.
If unfortunately you do have the
same disguisting "experience" I
have had, keep calm. Get up from
your desk, go immediately to a
librarian and report the incident.
Try to remember what the fellow
looked like so you can give a
description which is forwarded to
the RCMP. Don't be afraid to
report the incident, the librarians
are extremely sympathetic and
helpful.
But remember, be aware of what
is going on around you — not
everyone in Main Library is there to
study or borrow books.
name witheld
by request
For me, the sink-hole of problems began on registration day.
After turning up half an hour early
for registration in arts, I dilligently
followed the endless mobs in quest
of the appropriate course cards.
Next I had to wait two hours in
line with Science students at the
geological science centre for the
card for my geology 310 elective.
Relieved at last to see the building
from the inside I was informed that
the class had been scratched
because the prof had "fled the
country." Believing this explanation or not I was out empty-handed.
I returned to Buchanan to consult advisors as my timetable from
the beginning had been a mishmash of conflicting classes. Several
courses had been scheduled on top
of each other.
In line for the advisors, I watched
incredulously as a third year student
with a blank sheet of paper approached an advisor and asked him
to work out her timetable.
I was advised to pick up a course
card for any elective offered at a
suitable time so that I could present
a full package of course cards at
War Memorial Gym. In the first
week of school appropriate course
changes could be made. Finally, I
merged with the rest of the robots in
War Memorial Gym.
The first week of school rolls
around and I attend my first class.
The advisor had goofed and hadn't
noticed an overlap in his scheduling
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 19, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian . University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Brian, Brian; wherefore art thou Brian, denounce advertising and refuse thy name, come
back to editorial," lamented Sarah Cox from upon her news desk perch. "Peter Bertin is sick
and green with envy that thou his editor art more fair than he," replied Brian. "The
newspaper is the thing wherein we'll catch the conscience of Chris Wong's poofed Muriel
Draaisma. "Out out damn candle," muttered Verne McDonald, never sure of which of life's
scripts he was in. "Come out Stephen Wisenthal, king of cats, we'll have one of your nine
lives," said Steve Hiens. "Et tu, Craig Brooks," muttered Neil Lucerne, who was dying of
Ubyssey staff conflict wounds. "We come to bury Robby Robertson, definately not to praise
him," said fellow cartoonist Victor Wong. "All the world's a stage, and all the people
players," said Lisa Morry in fit of inspiration. Meanwhile Raymond Lee and Barbara sat back
and gazed through starry eyes at the rest of the staff.
book from which I was quoted
course options. I didn't have my
schedule book with me as I
foolishly believed that summer approval would have cleared up
potential problems in advance.
En route to my new class I pass a
mirror in the hall where I am
greeted by my gritted teeth and furrowed brow. I arrive at the right
room. I couldn't believe it. It was
filled with math students!
Frustrated as hell, I went back to
the psychology office in Angus
where I was told that no room
change had been reported but if I
could wait a few minutes in front of
a certain office a gentleman would
soon return to fill me in.
Patiently, I waited outside the office for five, then ten, then twenty
minutes. The secretary had given
me the wrong office to wait in front
of. But thanks to my incessant pacing I discovered the correct office
with its bespectacled inhabitant.
Joking around at first he soon
realized my unfavourable disposi
tion and began searching soberly
for the room change. Racing
through the halls of Angus I came
upon an empty room with a note on
the board that read, "This has been
Psychology..."
Being a sucker for punishment, I
made my way back to the Psyc office. I was told to contact the t.a.
because the professor wouldn't be
available until Friday.
Terrific, now I had to wait out
the week before knowing whether
I'd be part of the class.
In addition I find out later that
several others had become lost in
the shuffle and wanted to get into
the class as well.
Upon finding out the textbook
titles, I head for the new bookstore
where an enormous line snakes
wildly around the building.
I consoled myself with the
thought that next week would be
different. "Animal House" is a
movie isn't it?	
Debra Mills is a Ubyssey staffer
who gets frustrated easily.
Council questioned
On September 7 the Alma Society
student council voted to join the
Solidarity Coalition. I question
their right to take that stand.
My reasons are twofold: firstly,
council members are not required to
declare their political leanings or
affiliations during their campaigning. It seems wrong to do so now.
Fun runs
'too serious'
The Inaugural Run was a really
exciting race. As the gun went off
the asshole beside me swept his
arms back in a breast stroke
maneuver which halted my progress. The person behind me ran into me and I ended up on the
ground. I spent a lot of time and
energy working my way through the
pack. Despite being boxed in
several times I reached the leaders.
At the halfway mark some turkey
joined the race from the sidelines
but he was quickly passed. After
that, Steve McMurdo took off and
left the rest of the leaders to change
a place or two as we struggled to
keep up the pace.
It amazes me that such bullshit
goes on at a race nobody gives a
damn about winning. If anyone
thinks the intramural races are
more than fun runs, fast training
runs, or friendly races between
aquaintances, then they are having
some serious misconceptions. Is any
race worth losing your integrity for?
I wonder if this sort of crap is
generalized to their daily lives?
Murray Maitland
And secondly, council is supposed
to represent the student voice. If
the student population is representative of the general population
(and I think it is), then it is my opinion that council's concensus
should be to stand behind the majority Socred government in its
restraint legislation.
My sense of it is that higher
education is an earned provilege.
But times are financially tough.
Where does the money come from
to pay for government subsidies —
and who but us will have to carry
the debt load in future? I expect
that most students hate to see
budget cuts. But on the other hand,
we're all pretty good at having to
tighten our belts another notch.
To back the Solidarity Coalition
is to oppose all government cutbacks — including fat-trimming
programs that are essential. We can
all sympathize with civil servants who
have lost their jobs, but not more so
than we do with the neighbour
across the street who lost his job (or
business) in the private sector due to
the economy of late.
I don't think that the students of
UBC are in favour of supporting
the coalition's position on the
restraint program. The student
population must be representative
of the electorate — and that electorate is experiencing fewer handouts from a majority government.
One way or another, we have collectively earned or deserved it. Student
council should be more representative of the views of their electorate.
Norman Yates
law 2 Tuesday, September 20, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
LovE
/ QuicheS
Leaves. There are a lot of them on trees at UBC at the moment. Not for long. Soon those green, red, orange, brown and golden amber creations will soon flutter down to the ground where you can kick through them on your way to class. But not for long. Soon those horrible
machines from Physical Plant will come by and suck them up, spoiling all the fun. At least there is one good thing about cutbacks: tha
leaves may stay longer, but on the other hand you may not have a class to go to. Which LEAVES the all-important question — just what is
this grey box all about? Tune in next edition to find out.
IlllllllllllUinilllllllllllllllllllllllllimilllllllll
BRITTON T.V.
& STEREO
Service • Sales • Rentals
We buy broken down T. V. 's
B&W - Rentals - Colour
2346 W. 4th Ave.,
736-4823.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiimiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi
Thesis, term paper
or essay due?
Take our 'crash' course in word
processing and then we will provide
you with processing time at very
reasonable rates.
Word processing allows you to
store, revise and reprint your
manuscript whenever you need to.
For   further   information,   please
phone    Margaret    Edwards   at
683-4613 during business hours or
732-0948 at other times.
ADVANCE BUSINESS COLLEGE
&8£
Word Processing, Computer Accounting and
English are among the business and academic
courses offered by The Weekend College on
Saturdays. Attention is paid first and foremost to
the needs of individual students, and all courses
are taught in small groups by exceptionally well-
qualified instructors. Every effort is made to furnish classes in relatively uncommon subjects if
requested by three or more people.
For more information, phone Philip
Amos: 683-4613 during business hours on
weekdays or 299-4222 at other times.
pv.9 •&>ilt>fth>fc 7>irT] &op4tnj/yi
2%L \Hesr4m Avenue
Ako at ItCOQtobfXfye toy, Ridnmcfid.
THIS WEEK IN INTRAMURALS
LEAGUE SPORTS
HANDLEY CUP
7-A-SIDE SOCCER '^
OCT. 3 - NOV. 28
REG. SEPT. 16-23
programs for men & women
SPECIAL EVENTS
.  &    LOGAN CYCLE 200
0o^   64th ANNUAL
V* •      ARTS '20 RELAY
LOGAN CYCLE & Harry Logan Track
MEN'S HEATS - Sept. 26-27, FINAL Sept. 29
WOMEN'S - Sept. 28
REG. - Sept. 19-23
64th ANN. ARTS '20 VGH to UBC
Thursday, Oct. 6
RUN
AUTUMN ROAD RUN
3 KM,5 KM
FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, 12:30
RACE CENTRE
WEEKEND* EVENTS
SUPERWEEKEND-SUPERSPORTS
SAT., SEPT. 24
EDGE OF THE RAINFOREST ROAD RUN - EAST MALL SUB
BOOKSTORE TUG-O-WAR (TEAM) - NEW BOOKSTORE
GRAND-PRIX CYCLE RACE (INDIV.I - SUB TURNAROUND
OUTDOOR VOLLEYBALL. TOURN. (TEAM - MaclNNES FIELD
SOFTBALL TOURN. ITEAMI - MaclNNES FIELD
REG. SEPT. 19-Z»
TOUCH FOOTBALL TOURN. - T-BIRD PARK
SAT.-SUN., OCT. 1-2
REG. SEPT. 19-23
REG. BY SEPT. 30, OPENING CEREMONIES 12:30 LOWER SUB PLAZA
 REGISTER IN RM. 203, WMG.	
CREATION
AND
ITS CRITICS
Answers to common questions
and criticisms on the creation
movement.
By
Henry M. Morris
Dr. Morris'
latest publication-
31 pages-
write for a free copy
Creation Science Association
of Canada
P.O. Box 34006
Vancouver, B.C. V6J 4M1
£3Es) Keep Happy!
.STYLING,
Come to Corky's for
styling the way you
like it, a price you
fflh     can afford.    i~
Cutting, styling, perms
for Gals and Guys
CALL
731-4191 3644 W. 4th Ave.
(At Alma)
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty Of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined major,
honours, graduate, and diploma students in each
of the departments and schools of the Faculty of
Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the
meetings of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department
Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Adviser's
Office, and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the
Registrar of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 23, 1983. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 20,1983
TODAY
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS CTEE
Organizing Oct. 9th Gsntral Meeting on provincial budget and legislation. All interested
students welcome. SUB 224, noon.
GEOLOGY
UBC Prof. J. J. Nagel speaks on computer data
bases and museum cases, noon, GeoSci 330A.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
FREE legal advice, noon to 2 p.m., SUB 111.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
General meeting, noon, Buch. A202. Anyone interested may join in.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Introductory meeting, noon, SUB 212. New
members welcome; planning for clubs day.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Evangelist Bob Martin, UC Berkley, speaks, 7:30
p.m., Angus 104.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre conference room.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice sessions are scheduled in SUB partyroom every noon hour. Come out and brush up
on your dancing before classes begin Oct. 3,
noon, SUB partyroom throughout the week.
WEDNESDAY
PSI UPSILON FRATERNITY
Open house for interested people in joining a
fraternity. 7:30-11:00 p.m., Psi U house, 2260
Wesbrook Mall.
LEON AND THEA KOERNER LECTURER
"Greek Myth in Art," Seminar by John Board-
man, 3:30 p.m., Lasserre 107.
"The Great God Pan," lecture by John Board-
man, noon, Lasserre 102.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Lecture, illustrated slides, multiple image: Indian
Art and Society (South Indial neon, museum
theatre.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting to elect secretary, noon
Chemistry 150.
ROCKERS CO-OP
General meeting to elect new executives and
discuss clubs day, Noon SUB 211.
POLITICAL SCIENCESTUDENTSASSOCIATION
First   general   meeting,   all   welcome,    noon
Buchanan A202.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bob Martin — evanoelist from the University of
California-Berkley, 7:30 p.m. Angus 104, and the
the next two days.
Noon celebration, singing, sharing, and short
teaching, noon, Buchanan A100.
GAYS ft LESBIANS OF UBC
Continuation of third annual beer gathering, 4:30
p.m.,  Gallery Lounge.  Come to SUB 239 for
details.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
UBC MEN'S SQUASH TEAM
Team tryouts, 6:30 to 8:46 p.m.. Winter Sports
Centre.
THURSDAY
SAC AMS
Club days. 9:00-4:00 and tomorrow in SUB.
GEOLOGICAL COLLOQUIA
Computer data bases and museum cases, noon
Geological sciences 330A.
UBC MUSICAL THEATRE SOCIETY
Clubs day, all members please check in at the
booth, all day, first floor.
GAYS b LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon. Brock 304. Important, all
interested people please attend.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB party room. Continues
until 3:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Immigration officers meeting students re visas,
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.. International House board
room.
FRIDAY
DEPT. OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture: "The Great Famine of 1932-33 in the
Soviet Ukraine," by Bohdan Krawchenko Buch
A204, 2:30 p.m.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB party room. Continues
until 3:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Sixties Revival dance, 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., IH
Upper Lounge. Taped music, $1 admission.
SATURDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
First wine and cheese of the year, come to SUB
239 for details.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Beginners clinic and practice, everybody
welcome, 10:00 p.m., aquatic centre.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Wine and cheese orientation night — all
members welcome. 7:30-12:00 a.m., SUB 205.
Sylvia's Choice
(your "creative" consignment store)
Merchandise priced
$1 to $200
Consignments very welcome
Come on in and see me
sometime!
HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 9:303 p.m.
Fri. 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
4676 W 10th Ave.
222-1620
tTHE CLASSIFIEDS'
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 66c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
6RAND
?%<>\Hesr4w.AveNt4e
Akcot HOD Elrvtbnije Htoy. Qicitrrenci.
hi* rct'tdurdrcV by
trw'rti*3 all you* pseu/eto-
irvtelletftual "types ■front
U.B.C.
All he hear* rxoic 'i* $ex,
bCrneCd* oA matrix atvaUjs't*.
Rfctee -rhe level of
cowVersVTio*, a* £*vl'$ Zt\A
e*vi©«j -Hve be*+ hamburgers
in. UlMemCWiliiattori.
4391  Wee-t 10th Ave. Va*..      £2-2-1342.
5 - COMING EVENTS
35 - LOST
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
Every Day This Week
10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.
Meet in Main Library Entrance
LOST! Black wallet with all ID. Please phone
Linda at 734-2185.
40 - MESSAGES
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE CLASSES: Wednesdays, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Beginning and Intermediate levels. Campus and
Community Members welcome, no partner
required. UBC International House. Information, Marcia Snider, 738-1246.
10 - FOR SALE — Commercial
10,000 DIFFERENT ORIGINAL MOVIE
POSTERS: Catalogue $2.00. Mnemonics
Ltd., Dept. Z US, 3600-21st Str. N.E.
Calgary, Alta. T2E 6V6.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
MISCELLANEOUS    USED    FURNITURE.
Reasonable prices. Must sell by Sept. 22nd.
Plaid chesterfield and chair; white vinyl easy
chair; blue vinyl rocker; kitchen table; and
end table. Call 734-8956 after 6 p.m.
1976 PLYMOUTH FURY. 4-dr. wagon, 360
V8, auto., 50,000 miles, 4 spkr. AM/FM
cassette stereo. $3395. 321-5138.
WANTED: Women to play rugby. No experience necessary. Practices Tuesday and
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. at Balaclava Park
(West 30th & Balaclava). Everyone
welcome.
WANTED: Libian man with hat. Kyree
(mispelt). From Peter Tosh concert. My
mother? If around, apply to the paper immediately.
50 - RENTALS
60 - RIDES
65 - SCANDALS
70 - SERVICES
15 - FOUND
JUDITH ALEXANDER
Lawyer
731-8323 or 261-8514
Family Law
— Change of name
— Custody
— Divorce
— Family Property
— Separation
Personal Injury Law
SEE WHAT THE
COMPETITION WILL BE
OFFERING NEXT YEAR.
Casio is a world leader in digital technology-, in precision instruments
engineered to incredible accuracies and delivering total
reliability at attractive prices. At Casio, we're
in the business of
making the impossible possible—
before anyone
else does it.
FOUND: Black and tan tabby kitten, about
3 mos. old at 2nd 6 Collingwood. 228-6555
or 738-3601.
20 - HOUSING
TIRED    OF    COMMUTING    ALREADY?
Come and live on campus. Vacancies
available now in the student residences.
Room and board for Ladies. Come to the
Ponderosa Housing Office or call 228-2811.
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
85 - TYPING
30 - JOBS
THE KEG PRIME RIB
and BOATHOUSE
Have openings for students
wanting to work 2-4 evenings per week. We are looking for enthusiastic, hard
working individuals. No experience needed as we train
our people on the job.
Apply any Wednesday between 2:00-3:00 p.m. 566
Cardero St. by the Bayshore.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Essays, reports,
projects. $1.00 per page min. Contact
Louise; 731-0594.	
FAST.   ACCURATE,    PROFESSIONAL
typing.    Double-spaced   page,    $1.50.
Audrey, 228-0378.	
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, essays, thesis,
manuscripts. Copy, or taped by phone.
271-6755.
90 - WANTED
THE CASIO
TEMPERATURE
WATCH.
The only wrist
instrument that
measures atmospheric and water
temperatures. Full
range of timing and
alarm functions.
THE CASIO MAGIC
TOUCH CALCULATOR.
Credit card sized. Solar
powered. Large magic
touch fingertip leaf
keys. Brilliant 8-digit
display.
THE CASIO DATA
BANK CALCULATOR.
10-digit electronic
miracle featuring data
storage-recall in 3
separate categories,
e.g. telephone
numbers/addresses,
memos/appointments,
personal files, codes
and statistics.
THE CASIO ALARM
CHRONOGRAPH.
Analog/digital watch
with quartz action
accurate to 0.5 seconds
per day 28-day auto
calendar plus alarm,
timing and stopwatcte
functions.
MIRACLES IN THE MAKING
SOLD AT
mm BOOKSTORE
T>
$£-
SALE   ENDS
SEPT  30th Tuesday, September 20,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPORTS la being haW over until Friday this WNk. So. if you are looking for a roport of last Friday's footboH eama. or a story about ths soccer sorkw against Simon Fraaar than you wW And
it, along with aH sorts of other goodies. In FrMay*a issue. NeM week It wNt be back to normal,
or an approximation thereof.
INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1983
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of the
Firm. Submit your resume to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus (Forms are available from
the Centre) by October 3, 1983.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 14th regarding campus interviews which take place during the weeks of October 17 and 24th. Additional information is
available at the U.B.C. Canada Employment Centre
and the Accounting Club.
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
WAITING FOR GODOT
by Samuel Beckett
SEPTEMBER 23 - October 3
(Previews Sept. 21 & 22)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Thursday Matinee/September 29 — 12:30 p.m.
[STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - 4 Plays for $12]
1983/84 Season
Sept. 21-Oct. 3       WAITING FOR GODOT (Beckett)
Nov. 9-19
Jan. 11-21
March 7-17
BOX OFFICE
LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST (Shakespeare)
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST (Wilde)
THE SUICIDE (Erdman)
*    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    *    ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
r
f%8BR
5H0R1S-
29U \Hesr4m. Avenue
Ate at 1IOO Elmbrdqe Utiy. Richmond.
* «T i \ —
THE  LAST  EMPEROR   OF
CHINA
ft
— PU   Yl
^
mt
GOLDEN STAR THEATRE
133S KINGSWAY. VANCOUVER, B.C 35V 3E3
m tt »j ®m & %■ % * ii eg # ft m
- ei £i<s' * ° ffi ^ *°** ~m *
H^r^M^a ail — K 1*3 W 7 7
-*'^fp = *,ISI»
Tel.   872-2412
ft Vk *£ »
ft *p ' ib
ffi UJS7
*3?
,5f S * ^ « 5^ ip. 5F — 6£ * n to if fS ifi «f a? C 2
4: ^      - * ft . -I~ « i* Q £ ^ It tt + E
»J«7fe**«-S«»0af   -    ^SlR^i
it» % a ft * h in 7 °r m. *t- w h at« •
*7
/ \  —
ffl A = • £ * q * * **" ffi t£H g ' §E S *
i# «5 *f&tB? * R . 5f. »i@ « . * ^l ^ ^L
is]*****
7 •
IS
trf' —
it a
' «
f'Jffi
Bi
S -
*
+ W   '  7* £ iS JS ' *
*I«i±at
A valuable documentary recording the true life of the last Emperor of China, the Civil War and the anti-Japanese War.
AMS COMMITTEE OPENINGS
Nominations are now open for appointments
to the following positions:
— 5 members of the Student Administrative Commission;
— 1 student rep and 1 community rep, Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre Management Committe;
— 1 student rep and 1 community rep. Aquatic Centre
Management Committee
3 members of the Capital Projects Acquisitions
Committee (C-PAC)
— AMS representatives to the following Presidential
Advisory Committees:
• Concerns of the Handicapped — 1 rep
• Men's Athletic Committee — 2 reps
• Student Services — 1 rep
• Walter Gage Memorial Fund — 1 rep
• War Memorial Gymnasium Fund rep
Recommendations   for   appointments   will   be
Student's Council by the Selection's Committee.
made   to
NOMINATIONS CLOSE SEPTEMBER 27, 1983
All students are encouraged to apply for these postions.
Nomination forms are available in SUB 238.
louche Ross &Co.
Chartered Accountants
We are an international firm of chartered accountants with offices in Vancouver, New Westminster, Langley, Victoria, Prince
George and all major centres in Canada. We are seeking
graduates who wish to make a career in Chartered Accountancy
with future opportunities in a number of specialized areas such as
audit/accounting, tax, valuations, insolvency and EDP.
If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession, we invite
you to meet with representatives of Touche Ross & Co. on October 24/25 & 26 on campus. Interviews may be arranged through
the Employment Centre On Campus until October 3rd. Applications should be accompanied by recent course transcripts. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 20,1983
Sari's
GBP FUII
STOCK UP ON VITAMINS
NOW
aaaBBB^i^MMNaBlB^MBM
aiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiii iiiimii|
I DID YOU GET YOUR   I
1 FREE MUG   1
Biiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iniiiiii
^ UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd. 224-3202
• HEa'yiHTTP/*P<*8p
f £>r the month of SEPT&rA&^K)
BOOKSTORF
6200 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
226-4741
BALLET UBC JAZZ
"Clip 'N' Save" Fall Schedule
j Monday
Tuesday
Wed
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday  j
I Ballet ll/lll
Jazz l/ll
Ballet ll/lll
Jazz l/ll
Ballet ll/lll
Ballet IV
Jazz l/ll    |
I 8:30-10:00
8:30-10:00
8:30-10:00
8:30-10:00
8:30-10:00
9:30-11:00
10:00-11:30 |
1 Partyroom*
Ballroom
Ballroom    |
Dancercise
Stretch
Dancercise
Ballet I
|    Stretch
12:30-1:30
12:30-2:00
12:30-2:00
12:30-1:30
| 12:30-1:30
Ballroom
Ballroom
Ballroom
|   Ballroom
Ballet I
Ballet I
Jazz I
1     Jazz 1
1:30-2:30
3:30-5:00
3:30-5:00
j 12:30-2:00
Jazz I
Jazz II
Ballet II
■    Ballet 1
3:30-5:00
5:00-6:30
5:00-6:30
3:30-5:00
Ballet II
Jazz II
5:00-6:30
5:00-6:30
1       Tap
1   6:30-8:00
L
-J
Dates: Schedule effective September 24 to December 2, 1983
•Rooms: Unless otherwise indicated all classes will be held in the Party Room, SUB.
Fees: Just $40.00 for a whole term of unlimited classes of your choice (You may take any or
ALL of the classes offered. New member "Club Fee" of $5.00 is extra where applicable.)
Registration: Register daily between 12:30-1:30 in 216E SUB or Thursday and Friday
(September 22nd & 23rd) 11:30-2:30 SUB Foyer. Sorry, there will be NO in-class registration
and drop-in fees.
Further info: Available at registration. Room 216E SUB or phone 228-6668.
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
"The Preppy Look"
FOX ^abi
for men     for women
100% virgin wool sweaters
crew or V-neck in many colors
FOX ^tabi $19.98
Striped button-down and
regular collar shirts in several colors
FOX^   $19.95
^fcabl $15.95
Button-down collar, oxford cloth
shirts in solid colors arriving any day.
WE NOW CARRY A SELECTION OF BADMINTON,
SQUASH & TENNIS RACQUETS PLUS BALLS, BIRDS
& SWIM GOGGLES
NOW OPEN AT 8:00 A.M.
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE: 224-1911
HOURS:
MON. TO FRI. 8 AM - 7 PM
SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM
VISA & MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED

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