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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1966

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Array •while
you are
THE UBYSSEY
if you think
you are
pa&     Lnd^>q^X    224-3916
Vol. XLVIII, No. 4
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,  1966
— derek webb photo
UBC REDCOATS, complete with transport, make hasty exist Thursday noon from Buchanan
and set off towards Brock Hall. They populated the campus with chickens, (top right
of  picture  is  camera-shy  hen),  and  finished  their  lunch  hour with  a  tanking  session.
ONLY ON PAPER
Bank blocks land payoff
CriftHng
hit library
By KRIS EMMOTT
UBC library, Canada's finest university library, is growing faster than Harvard's —i but is short of money, short of
staff, and critically short of space
"The library has low priority
B.C.'s three public universities will get no money from
UBC's Point Grey endowment
lands until Premier W. A. C
Bennett gets his bank.
Attorney-General Robert Bonner told The Ubyssey Thursday the proposed UBC endowment lands corporation, chart
ered in February, 1965, will
exist only on paper until the
Bank of British Columbia is a
reality.
Plans for the endowment
lands were first announced in
January, 1962, by the now-
defunct developers, Webb and
Knapp (Canada) Ltd.
It planned a $300 million
development in the area between Wesbrook Road and the
Vancouver boundary-
The provincial government
then conceived the idea of combining income from the endowment land with that from the
proposed Bank of B.C. building
in downtown Vancouver.
The whole complex was to
be administered by a five-man,
government-appointed commission supervising division of the
profits between the province's
three public universities.
Necessary legislation was
passed in February, 1965—but
Reds rush campus, leave
followers, crumbs behind
Engineers introduced a new animal look to the campus
Thursday.
Five chickens, two sheep and a squat red car led the
red horde into Brock, Buchanan and Hebb Theatre.
The chickens were left in Brock lounge, along with
plenty of crumbled crackers which the engineers scattered
on the floor.
Entry of the engineer's vehicle into Buchanan was
temporarily halted until the red horde blocked the stairs
with posts and engineers to keep artsmen clear.
The sheep led the red rush to Hebb and then were
shown the finer points of tanking with the participation
of a few science students and frosh.
since then nothing has happened.
Bonner said no timetable has
been set up for the appointment
of the five-man administrative
commission.
"We expect the situation to
be clarified when the bank application comes up for review
in parliament."
This could be as much as a
year away.
The endowment lands were
to be used for specialized industrial research centres near
the campus.
The development would allow industry to use university
brainpower in research programs, a university spokesman
said.
At the same time the university would use the industrial
facilities for faculty and graduate students work on special
projects.
There are about 2,000 acres
available for expansion in the
endowment lands. The present
residential development covers
less than 500 acres.
UBC makes nothing from the
taxes paid on this land and receives nothing in rent, the
spokesman said.
among university projects,"
chief librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs admitted to a library
committee meeting this week.
"The space situation inside
the building is acute and likely
to get worse," warned Stuart-
Stubbs.
INo more additions are practical to the main library,
which was built in 1925.
"At the rate we are acquiring books and materials, all of
our shelf space will be completely filled by 1968. The
situation is approaching a
crisis, and because of the
money shortage little can be
done," he said.
40,000 TO CATALOG
A staggering total of 40,000
new books need cataloguing,
Stuart-Stubbs informed the
committee. But the library is
frustrated because even if it
had the extra staff it needs,
there is no room for them to
work.
Another library headache is
stack space — when present
space is gone, says Stuart-
Stubbs, books will have to be
put in storage.
Large areas of stacks and
storerooms have been given
over   to  uncatalogued   books.
"According to university
planners, a good commuter
university should have enough
study space and seating, in the
library or elsewhere, for 25 to
30 per cent of the student
body.
SHORT OF NEED
"Our main library has space
for about 2,000 and Sedgewick
holds 475—way short of what
we need."
If books are not sent out to
storage when stack space becomes filled, present student
seating might have to be used
for books.
Last resort is the large room
under   the  stairs  next to the
ladies' washroom. This room
now holds duplicate government documents.
If these are made available
to other universities, compressed shelving may be used to
fill it with 70,000 books, he
said.
HALF YEAR'S WORK
The backlog of 40,000 uncatalogued books represents
half a year's full-time work for
the present staff of 280.
But with their other duties,
they are hard-pressed just to
keep the backlog under control, Stuart-Stubbs said.
"With our inadequate staff
we can't keep all the reference
and circulation desks manned
during the hundred hours a
week the library is open," said
Stuart-Stubbs. "Yet we cannot
ask for an appropriation for
more staff because the work
space is so limited."
Assistants have fainted in
cramped work rooms with
seven-foot ceilings and no
ventilation, Stuart-Stubbs said.
Top  bureaucrats
buttondown  Up
Two Alma Society executives tried something new
Thursday — listening instead
of talking.
President Peter Braund
and vice-president Charlie
Boylan were to speak to students outside the Library at
noon.
However, they postponed
their speaking engagement
until Friday when they
learned it conflicted with
civil rights spokesman
James Meredith's speech in
the  auditorium.
BASIL   STUART-STUBBS
' . . . will get worse'
The library has a growing
microfilm division, providing
compact storage for bulky material such as government
documents and newspaper
files. But, said Stuart-Stubbs,
microfilm means more readers,
which are bulkier than books.
"No adequate solution is in
sight for our space problem,"
said Stuart-Stubbs. "We would
like to build a system of decentralized libraries for various disciplines. In separate
buildings they would cost
about $20 million dollars, but
it's unlikely federal or provincial governments will increase university grants
enough."
Within the next few weeks,
questionnaires 'will be appearing in The Ubyssey asking for students' opinions and
complaints about the library. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 23, 196o
Meredith steams over
yellow peril tea-party
By TOM MORRIS
If blacks and whites in North
America don't join forces, they
will be overrun by the yellow
peril, warns civil rights leader
James Meredith.
Meredith told 1,200 students
in UBC Auditorium Thursday
if the race conflict isn't resolved North America will
wind up pouring tea for the
people of the East.
"The only alternative to
China being on top is American
unification," he said.
He charged Canada is neutral in the Vietnamese war because it is protected by American military might.
Meredith, who was shot in a
4__& «a
JAMES MEREDITH
. . . 'join forces'
Drilling men practice
talents on students
Got a toothache, eh.
Haven't got money to pay
a real dentist to take it out,
eh.
Well, UBC's dentistry faculty has a solution for you.
The faculty's six third year
students are practising their
art on voluntary patients.
Their.work is reliable and
they are extremely careful,
said the faculty.
But, with at least two faculty supervisors breathing
down their necks at all times,
the students can't afford to
make a mistake.
Dr. D. G. Middagh said:
"Voluntary     patients     have
nothing to lose but their time.
"The students have responded very well to their dental
duties. They are efficient, but
slow."
The program, headed by
Dr. Trevor Harrop, is designed
to give students an opportunity to practise routine dental
treatment under supervision.
However, Middagh said:
"The plan is a teaching device,
not a charitable dental organization."
Interested students could go
to the dental clinic building
or make an appointment by
calling 228-2621, to see if their
teeth qualify for treatment.
summer civil rights march, said
black and white must unite
against the power of Asia and
the Chinese menace.
He blamed the race problem
on white society, white superiority and institutions built
around them.
"Already the official central
government had decided the
Negro should became an integral part of American society
but local governments and the
people aren't convinced," Meredith said.
"I have faith America is going to make me a part of
its society. I will become its
enemy when I loose this faith."
Asked about new immigration laws for Canada, Meredith
charged Canadian immigration
has always been discriminatory.
"White Canadians intend to
keep, Canada white. You can
be assured that any change in
the immigration laws won't
come for a long time."
Meredith said Canadians
could begin an objective study
of American racial problems
and suggest solutions to these
problems.
He emphasized the role of
white superiority feelings and
"our Oriental neighbours to the
east" in the global racial conflict.
"All responsibility for racial
tensions must lie with the
white population," Meredith
said.
Seattle housing shortage
forces student rents up
SEATTLE (UNS) — A critical housing shortage at
University of Washington here has forced student rents
up as much as 65 per cent.
* The housing shortage—worst since world war II—
has forced students to seek housing miles from the
campus.
A house-hunting crew discovered a six-room house,
suitable for six women students, listed at $180 had gone
up to $300.
Asked about the $180 figure, the landlady said: "Oh,
that was the summer school price—it's gone up."
Director of student residences, J. Arthur Pringle,
at UW says the price climbs do not represent gouging
or exploitation.
"They just represent the facts of life," he said.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL ST. ANSELM'S
September 25
11:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m.—Holy Communion
"What Are We Doing?" and Sermon
"No Thank You, Jesus"
11:00 a.m. Martins
7:00 p.m. Talk-Back St. Anselm's
"DEATH OF CHRISTENDOM"
HAROLD L. MacKAY JIM McKIBBON
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
-M_____aa
THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS
by Carlo Goldoni
Classic farce of the Italian commedia delParte
SEPTEMBER 23 — OCTOBER 1
Student Performances — Monday, Sept. 26 — 7:30 p.m.
and Thursday, Sept. 29 at 12:30 noon
TICKETS 75c
Tickets Available — Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
Note — Some tickets at 75 cents available for all performances
SUPPORT YOUR OWN CAMPUS THEATRE
I
EXAMINE THIS PHOTOGRAPH CAREFULLY.THEN TAKE A REVEALING PERSONALITY TEST.
WHICH STYLE OF DAY'S SLIM LINE SLACKS DO YOU PREFER?
(Check one or more and refer to the upside-down analysis)
A.
rteHOYSTER®
B.
*/*'STRIKER'®
C.
^'HIPSTER®
D.
any DAY S slacks
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.CanaDay's Apparel Ltd., Moose Jaw.- Way, September 23,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
PAPERBACK REVOLUTION
Store bursts bindings
By JILL  GREEN
UBC needs a new bookstore
and the paperback revolution is
to blame.
Piles of the cheap, paper-
bound books are bursting the
shelves of the campus' spread-
out bookstore facilities, book
manager J. A. Hunter said
Thursday.
Hunter said professors who
once assigned one or two texts,
now commonly require 50-60
paperbacks.
The paperback trend plus increasing student enrollment is
rapidly making bookstore facilities inadequate.
There are no immediate plans
to enlarge the store or build a
new one, Hunter said.
—powell hargrave photo
FORMER PAINT-SHOP  in  basement of old  house  is only
place Dick Ablett, arts 4, can find to live. He's only one
of   hundreds   caught   in   the   student   housing    squeeze.
UA tenure probers
to release report
OTTAWA   (CUP)   — Results  of  formal   investigation
into a bitter tenure dispute which erupted last winter at
the University of Alberta are expected in about a week.
A   Canadian  Association  of
University Teachers spokesman said here Monday the association's academic freedom
and tenure committee will
meet this weekend in Toronto
to discuss the cases of two
philosophy professors denied
tenure in Edmonton early this
year.
When the committee issues
its report next week, it will be
only the second time in CAUT
history that such an investigation into tenure proceedings at
a Canadian university has been
held.
The two lecturers involved,
Colwyn Williamson and David
Murray, are both teaching on
the Edmonton campus this
year.
They were both granted one-
year, terminal contracts in
March, after their academic
staff association and university
administration were engaged
in lengthy negotiations about
their cases.
Both lecturers have been
strongly critical of Alberta's
Social Credit government in
recent years, but both have
said they do not believe their
cases have political overtones.
Williamson is editor of Com-
monsense, a controversial left-
wing pamphjet which has frequently attacked Premier
Manning's administration in
Alberta.
Murray, formerly an officer
of the Edmonton Film Society,
has openly Opposed film censorship practices in Alberta.
At least seven lecturers left
their jobs as a result  of the
tenure dispute or procedures
followed in deciding the two
professors' fates.
The only other case investigated formally by the CAUT
occured in 1958, when associate professor Harry S. Crowe
was dismissed from United College in Winnipeg following, a
dispute over a private letter
which reached the college
principal.
Contents of the letter have
never been made public, but it
was alleged to have been critical of the college administration.
The CAUT investigation
committee recommended reinstatement for Crowe, but the
United College board of regents refused to reinstate him.
Several other faculty members resigned from United
College over the case.
Engineers
outbreed
educators
UBC has more red jackets
and fewer teachers this year.
Registrar J. E. Parnall said
Thursday 17,233 students have
registered so far, up 896 from
last year and 200 from the
predicted 17,030.
Parnall's figures show
drops in only education and
pharmacy, with the greatest
percentage increases in engineering and commerce.
He said the extra students
may be partly stolen from
Simon Fraser University,
where only 4,200 students enrolled this fall instead of an
expected 5,000.
Arts is up 171 students,
science 224, commerce 128
and forestry, law and medicine all gained about 35 students each.
Parnall said: "Not many
people registered late, and
registration for most undergraduate faculties except arts
is now cut off.
"A total of 80 registered
students haven't shown up
yet, but I'm sure they will,"
he said.
He said graduate student
registration is still continuing,
and will probably add another
200 students to the total.
But an expected attrition of
200 students by Christmas will
keep the final figure about
what it is now, Parnall said.
J. A. HUNTER
. shelves bursting'
UBC needs a bookstore as big
as the present fieldhouse.
He stressed the desperate
need for adequate storage
space.
A bookstore the size of the
fieldhouse would solve split
operational problems and the
store could operate year around
in one place, Hunter said.
Hunter claimed the book
store makes a gross profit of
only 12 per cent per book.
Even a co-operative bookstore could hardly do better, he
said.
Questioned about the five per
cent rebate policy at the year's
end instead of at time of purchase, Hunter said the system
is used in most university bookstores in Canada and the U.S.
>   "V
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Long wearing blends and
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%:#** THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.-
The Ubyssey  publishes Page  Friday, a  weekly  commentary  and     review;
and  Focus, a  weekly  news  magazine  of world   university   affairs.   Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS).
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday,   loc   24;   Focus,   sports,   loc.  23;   advertising,  loc.   26.   Night   calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
SEPTEMBER  23,   1966
To resist him that is set in authority is evil.
—Ptahhotep, 2675 B.C.
Ballooning books
"During the year, internal alterations and additions almost doubled the capacity of the book-stacks. The Library is thus ready to cope, for a few years at least, with
the accelerated flow of acquisitions that will arrive as a
result of Dr. MacMillan's gift (of $3 million for new
books, made in February 1965, to be spent over the next
10 years).''
—Report of the President, 1965
Dr. John Macdonald
UBC is buying books as fast as the best North American universities, using both the normal operating monies
and nearly $350,000 annual acquisition revenue from the
MacMillan gift.
This may solve the acquisition problem and make
President Macdonald's dream of a great, super graduate
school come true — if many book are the only criterion.
But before those books are useful, there must be
room to read them, places to put them, and catalogues to
find them with.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs says the increased acquisition rate has left him 40,000 books un-
catalogued, with little hope of catching up.
Library staff members say they spend half their
time tripping over each other and skirting great mounds
and boxes of books.
Even with the $900,000 stacks doubling addition
completed last year, Stuart-Stubbs says he can hold out
only until 1968 before the whole construction reaches
critical mass and explodes.
More staff won't solve the cataloguing jam, not
when present staff hasn't enough working room.
More library space is the only answer, but the
board of governors hasn't the funds to build anything.
Nor does the university have the funds to staff any
new structure, even if it could be built
The library is the real innards of the university.
Libraries should be top priority, and the order of
business must first find funds to build such essential
facilities.
We've got a third of a library—the books. The rest
is staff and space.
It's ludicrous to continue filling rooms with un-
catalogued books nobody can read.
It's an absurd way to build a good university.
(Gasp) coffee
No man can study late without hogsheads of the
life-giving coffee . . . and that's why the library isn't
open late.
No coffee.
UBC tried it last spring—opening the Sedgewick
library beyond its midnight closing hour and the main
stacks past its ten p.m. lock-up.
Of course the experiment failed. The food services
staff still went home at ten p.m., locking for the long
night the bus stop cafe, the only place on campus serving past dinner-time.
Now, far be it from us to praise the viscose liquid
food services calls coffee.
But even that minimum is better than the long
weary trek to Tenth Avenue.
Come on, Ruth Blair . . . your growly ladies won't
turn into pumpkins at midnight.
EDITOR: John Kelsey this paper: Jill Green,, Joan  Fog-
arty,   Andrew   Scott,   Bryce   How-
Managing  Richard Blair ard,  Tom   Morris,   John   Appleby,
News                                       Carol Wilson Bob    Hansen,    Peter    Duschinsky,
ST "  __...i..(Z_ Sussane Duska, Val Thorn, Diane
City  Danny Stottman Fillmore,     Charlotte     Haire,    Val
Photo Powell Hargrave Zuker,      Maria     Giardini,     Cedna
Pag* Friday    _  Claudia Gwinn Jukich,    Maureen   Madill,   Norman
__J!_.                       <-__.__. D__._.h.M_.n Gidney,      Linda  * Holden,      Carol
Focus     George Reamsbottom Wa,d*an(    Mary    Schiller,    Mary
Ass't City Rosemary Hyman     ussner,   Ron Simmer,  Gail  Wyatt,
Ass't News     Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf     Kris   Emmott,   and   Gordon Corn-
Asst Photo Dennis Gans    wa|l- A" other «taffers absolutely
Mss-r mora uennn wun.     we|come>   t00.   |f you   don't   know
All these  people are coming to      where    and    when    already   drop
a party tonight.  They  also  made        into Brock basement today.
CRACKING UP
BY GABOR MATE
Greeks really Maori thugs
I  could  be cracking  up.
This is what I dreamt the other night:
The Beatles were elected president of
the United States.
God is not dead, someone told me in
my dream,, he is alive and safe in
Argentina.
The Ku Klux Klan held a protest
march in Harlem, demanding to integrate
the Negro slums. They claimed every time
they moved into a slum, the Negroes would
move away and property values would
plummet.
President Nasser became a Zionist and
went to live on a kibbutz.
I dreamt Ian Smith became a black
revolutionary, while Kwameh Nkrumah
became prime minister of South Africa to
replace Dr. Voerword, who went to
Heaven to replace God, who went to
Argentina.
At the same time, Dr. McGregor of the
Classics department published a thesis
proving beyond a shadow of doubt that
the ancient Greeks are merely a figment
of his imagination, and Plato and Aristotle
were actually Maori chiefs posing as go-
go dancers to cover up an illicit marijuana
operation.
Lyndon Johnson, I dreamt, was eaten
by a Texas steer at a barbecue. The steer
then seduced Lady Bird, and they ran off
to Venezuela together,, where they sought
asylum in the Cuban embassy.
Because of anti-Semitic outbreaks, God
was forced to flee Argentina, and become
an economic advisor to the Beatles, who
had just been inaugurated as president of
the U.S.
Lester Pearson, I dreamt, lost his bow-
tie, grew a beard, and went to live in
Greenwich Village. He soon released a hit
record called "I Couldn't Smoke The Grass
On My Father's Lawn," and became a
teenage idol.
I dreamt I was two cats and I played
with each other.
God was almost captured by the
Israelis who wanted to try him for crimes
against humanity, but he escaped and
became head of UBC's Religious Studies
faculty, where he lead the "God is Dead"
school of theology.
I dreamt the Beatles resigned as president and became the prime minister of
Canada instead. Meanwhile, De Gaulle
came to Quebec and became a separatist.
The Texas steer became fed up with
Lady Bird, and went to Greenwich
Village to become Lester Pearson's mistress. But Pearson had gone to Athens to
pose as a figment of Dr. McGregor's imagination. The steer became a beat poet.
I also dreamt I was a herd of buffalo,
and I trampled one another to death.
It could be that I'm cracking up . . .
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Bookstore claimed  one of best
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
A report in Tuesday's Ubyssey purporting to be the statements of Professor Batts,
Department of German,
would appear to require some
comment.
1. Dr. Batts is said to have
stated the Bookstore is "slow
in delivering books".
Investigation has shown
slowness in delivery is due to
faculty members who fail to
give notice of book requirements soon enough to make
the delivery in time for lectures.
In an inquiry conducted by
the faculty association in
1965, it was noted that only
86 text requirement lists out
of 585 were returned to the
bookstore by the required
date.
2. Dr. Batts is said to have
stated that the prices charged
are  too high.
Investigation has shown university bookstore prices are,
when taking into account the
5 per cent rebate, as low as
or lower than in any other
bookstore in Canada. This
opinion was confirmed by
the faculty association. The
bookstore does not control
the price of books; this control rests with the publisher.
3. Dr. Batts suggests the
bookstore order fewer books
than are requested by the University departments. Examination of the order forms show
in all cases the bookstore
orders the exact number of
books   requested    by    the
faculty members concerned.
4. Dr. Batts is said to claim
that dictionaries for German
200 were ordered in March,
1966, but have not arrived
yet.
Investigation shows in
April the publishers were
notified that these books
would be required but subsequently the bookstore learned the publishers were out of
stock.
Again the university bookstore was unable to control
the situation. On this particular order there was, therefore,
no fault by the faculty member and no fault by the University Bookstore.
The bookstore, at the
present time, is having a very
difficult time due to lack of
space. Various sources have
suggested that it is one of the
best run bookstores of its kind
in North  America.
At the same time, its prices
are equal to or better than
any other source. Students
and faculty should be proud
of the service it renders to
the university.community .
J. F.  McLean,
Director of
Ancillary Service?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Congratulations Ian Cameron! Is he the only reporter
who has the courage to tell
your readers the truth about
the administration?
Permit me to add a few
comments of my own.
On housing: The administration has no intention of
replacing   Fort   and   Acadia
Campus with permanent residences.
Why should they? They can
still rent the slums to students
willing and eager to live
there.
Besides, the faculty and administration do not live in
either camp or in Dictator McGregors' jail on Marine
Drive.
On food services: Excellent
in the Faculty Club also
quite reasonable.
On the book store: Probably actually operates at a
loss due to typical administa-
tion inefficiency. The faculty
don't use it anyway, since
they can obtain most of their
books free of charge.
On the administrators:
UBC's illustrious, 100% inaccessible president. He is
suffering from an acute case
of Cassius Clay "I am the
greatest complex", which is
promoted by bootlicking
faculty and Brock bureaucrats.
He hasn't got the courage
to face the average student,
look how he avoids answering
any and all questions unless
absolutely cornered.
As a measure of good faith
he should move out of his
Marine Drive mansion, paid
and maintained by the University, and give up his Lincoln, also paid for by the
university, and move into the
worst For Camp slum for one
week.
If he survived the experience he might appreciate how
the students think and live.
Disgusted
Arts 4 friday pf
SEPT. 23,  1966
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants: judy bing
bob cruise
ON  THE  COVER:
Dennis Gan.s photo
Meredith meets Mate
beware
"You cannot possess
what you cannot understand."
Sounds good, especially
if you're hearing it for the
first time. Most platitudes
do. But beware of the liberal ones which sound
good until they are administered.
We must be realistic
about such things and consider all the alternatives.
After all we are committed.
To w h a t . . . to the
"sounds good" rhetoric
which so often waylays
logical reasoning and postpones any action? Of
course action can only be
taken if there is a position
on which to take it.
As long as one only
rambles endlessly in fancy
but meaningless platitudes, there is no position
on which to be attacked.
Great if you have no position.
■ Does one with a definite
platform find it necessary
to decorate his speech
with verbal gargoyles?
It's unlikely.
The new method of liberal double talk is a package deal complete with
new writer and simply
says what you want to
hear.
If you have a chance to
hear any of these ... go.
But beware!
James Meredith talks to Gabor Mate.
pf: James Baldwin, Negro author and
civil rights -leader, said when he was
here that all whites are prejudiced
against Negroes. Would you agree with
him?
Mer.: I don't know what else Baldwin
said. I think that all whites either consciously or subconsciously are aware
of the fact that western civilization
offers some privileges to whites that
are denied all others.
pf: You said in your
speech that if you
were a white American you would also
want to maintain your
position of superiority to * and exploitation of the Negro. If
this is true of Americans why do you expect them to give up
MATE this position?
Mer.: Well it is pretty obvious that
they are not going to give it up. They
haven't in four hundred years. Unless
there is good reason and I think that
there is a good reason and Ixthink that
soon the Americans are going to see
this reason.
pf: What is this reason?
Mer.: If the country is going to remain strong and viable it is going to
have to make use of all its energies and
resources. Much of the energy and resource of America is non-white.
pf: How soon before you think the
American whites are going to realize
this?
Mer.: It may take another war and
a near defeat to make them realize this.
pf: In other words you don't believe
that peaceful evolution will lead to the
Negro's emancipation?
Mer.: No. I don't think that would
convince the white that there is any
reason for him to give up his preferred
position.
pf: A year ago James Farmer (then
president of CORE) said, "F'or all the
hoopla and the speech-making and the
legislation, very little has changed in
the reality of Negro life in this nation."
Now it's a year after the passing of the
Voting Rights Bill. Is Farmer's statement still true?
Mer.: Yes it is quite true. America is
still basically the same place it has always been.
pf: Do you think the Johnson admini-
station is sincere in its professed desire
to help the Negro?
Mer.: The Johnson administration, as
all  other administrations,  is political.
'■mm
And the political does only what it has
to do, what the majority requires.
pf: In other words, inasmuch as the
white majority does no. want the Negro
emancipated, neither does the Johnson
administration.
Mer.: That's right.
pf: In other words they are not really
sincere when they say that they do?
Mer.; The Johnson administration
may be sincere, but it basically still
has the old white supremacist attitude.
Consequently, even if they were sincere
it wouldn't matter too much.
pf: This week a very diluted version
of the Housing Bill was defeated in the
American Congress. Does this mean
that legislation has reached the limit
of what it can do?
Mer.: Yes, I think legislation reached
its limit quite some time ago. The American Constitution includes everything
that an American would desire. And
this business about legislation is just an
ameliorating and a stalling process.
pf: If the whites now don't want
Negro equality, and until they change
their mind, what can the Negro do?
Mer.; The Negro is going to have to
utilize his own resources much better
than he has done in the past.
pf: Is this is what is behind the "Black
Power" slogan?
Mer.: I don't know what's behind the
"Black Power" slogan.
pf: There are several major tendencies within the Civil Rights movement,
ranging from the NAACP on the right
to SNCC on the left. Do you think there
are contradictions within the movement?
Mer.: It may very well be but it doesn't matter. As far as the bigger question
is concerned, if all the groups had total
success to the fullest of their strength
it wouldn't really touch the heart of
the problem. And if they did nothing
it wouldn't really make that much difference.
pf: You seem to have a very phlegmatic attitude towards the whole struggle in that you don't think there is anything particularly that the Negro can
do. Is this true?
Mer.: Yes. I mean the Negro has to
utilize what he has, the education that
he does have, the opportunities that he
has. But the utlimate answer rests
with the whites.
pf: In other words if the Negro is to
get equality, it has to be given to him
by the whites?
Mer.: No, I don't mean that.
pf: Can you tell me then what you
mean?
Mer.: I meant whatever the Negro
would desire and wish for and seek,
unless the whites decided that it should
be, it will not be. Whatever the whites
don't desire or condone, won't exist,
because they have the majority and the
power. Of course, the Negro is powerful enough to destroy America from
within but this would only lead to the
destruction of the Negro, and maybe
of the whites as well.
pf: If conditions don't change do you
think that instead of aimless riots the
Negro will begin organizing for violence? Will he become more revolutionary?
Mer.: I hope that it will not become
necessary. I hope conditions will
change.
pf: In your speech today you suggested that one way the Negro will be assisted will be the whites' realization
that they will need Negro help to keep
the Asians from taking over. Could you
explain that please?
Mer.: I think the day of unchallenged
western domination of the world has
reached its end. If the West is to continue to dominate it is going to be a
colossal fight and I believe the West
cannot afford the luxury of leaving a
large proportion of its energy unutilized.
pf: In this fight you want the Negro
to take the side of the West as opposed
to the dominated nations?
Mer.: The Negro has no choice but to
take the side of the West.
pf: In other words there may come a
time when the American Negros take
a position where, along with the whites,
they are dominating and exploiting the
colored nations of the world?
Mer.: Well, this is exactly what is happening already, only that the blacks are
aot fully participating. It has only
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
been through the energy of the American Negros that much of the domination and exploitation has been carried
on.
pf: And you want the Negroes to participate more fully in this exploitation?
Mer.: Certainly. It will have to be
that way.
pf: If you want the Negro to take a
fuller part in the exploitation, does that
mean you condone exploitation?
Mer.: Well, there are better words
that you could use . . .
pf: You used it yourself a few moments ago.
Mer.: . . . words that sound less harsh
and direct, I suppose. Frankly, in the
world that I've known and read about,
someone always had a dominating position. Various nations in the past have
dominated, England and France for example. Germany has tried to dominate.
(Continued on PF 4)
SEE: MORE MEREDITH
Friday, September 23, 1966 KILL THE GOOSE WHO LAID THE EGG
Credibility   gap   gives
US.   right   to   lie
By BOB CRUISE
It seems appropriate to
start the international affairs ball rolling with a
good  swing at  Uncle  Sam.
While President Johnson
continues to spout liberal
rhetoric and manipulate
American opinion there are
an increasing number of
signs that his attempt to export the Great Society to
Viet Nam is meeting with
rising opposition.
While trying to remain objective about U.S. foreign
policy we cannot help but
be distressed when a Liberal paper, like the Sun, documents the fact that Johnson's statements about stopping aggression in North
Vietnam are lies (July 4,
1966) and that, as Senator
Fulbright has carefully
pointed out, the U.S. is the
only real (aggressor in
South East Asia.
It is more distressing to
learn that a Harvard survey this year which sampled opinion in the U.S.
showed that 56 per cent of
the American people did not
trust their President and did
not feel that he was telling
them the truth about the
war.
There was a time when it
was possible to talk about
the National Liberation
Front of South Vietnam and
suggest that this vocal minority of 100,000 to 200,000
armed guerillas might have
good cause to unite the country against the corrupt military regime in Saigon. Now,
with the war- extended to
the North that seems to be
forgotten.
Soon, one can anticipate,
we will be asked to forget
about the North and just
think about our enemy
China.
As Prime Minister Harold
Wilson, Konrad Adenaur,
and Anthony Eden join the
ranks of those taking issue
with the American policy of
expanding the war not to
mention U. Thant, De Gualle,
Bertrand Russell, Jean Paul
Sartre, senators Morse and
Fulbright, and Martin Luther
King, one begins to take a
closer look at the substance
of the criticism.
American   " buttonology "
provides a range of reactions. Some students from
the 'west coast wear "War is
good business, invest your
son," while others, from the
heart of funland, can be
seen with "I like the bomb,
it keeps me free" buttons.
Fewer and fewer students,
it would appear, are sitting
on the fence. There are Ayn
Rand study groups for those
technocrats who did not
learn the lessons of the Second War. Ad Hoc committees to stop the war are in
abundance.
As Canadian students we
will toe seeing a number of
new faces bearing landed immigrant status but talking
very much like  our  neigh-
over one and a half million
members of its armed forces
around the world could be
doing a little more than simply defending a small country from the terror of communism."
Is it not time to examine
whether ANY of the rationalizations: balance of power,
domino theory, stopping
communism, defending freedom, keening face in Asia,
committment, invitation, exporting the Great Society,
containing China, etc., can be
said to justify sending one-
third of a million Americans to interfere in a civil
war?
Is it not possible that there
never was any justification
for having a single Marine
on   Indo-Chinese  soil?
If the U.S. suggests that
Red China is a threat when
it does not have one member
the emperor has no clothes,
then, it is hoped, that alternatives to Johnson's naked
aggression will be found.
Bobby Kennedy as a peace
candidate undercutting
LBJ in '68 seems most unlikely. Perhaps Republicans
can draft General Westmoreland to come out of the
swamp and be President on
the slogan "no land war in
Asia . . . I've been there
and we can't win" or maybe
just "let's bring the boys
home" the way Ike killed
McArthur's crusade in Korea.
Then, too, perhaps, Americans will begin to see Vietnam as only a symptom of
a wider phenomenon. Putting
together the Bay of Pigs, the
Marines visiting the Dominican Republic, subversion in
Guyana, the build-up of
troops in Thailand and Cambodia,   the   interference   in
bors in the south. While the
hawks yell "shame" "cowards", and "traitors" to the
draft dodgers many of us
will not put on the patriotic
blinders but instead listen
to the suggestions that these
'Vietniks" may well be the
most staunch champions of
democracy.
Is it not conceivable that
a nation as large as the U.S.
with 60 per cent of the
world's    income   and   with
of the Red Army on foreign
soil, then what kind of
threat is the U.S. with
1,500,000 troops around the
world and over 3,000 military bases outside its boundaries?
Whether you mildly criticize U.S. foreign policy, or
condemn it outright you will
be amused at the ironic exhibit featured by the U.S.
at the Montreal world fan-
next year. $12 million has
gone into a huge egg (geodesic sphere) with translucent plastic covering. Inside,
carefully protected, is the
largest unsupported escalator
in the world.
Without pushing the parallels to U.S. foreign policy
in Asia one could assume
that the unsupported escalator is for real.
Although presently protected by an egg-shaped
cover (the manipulative
superstructure) any clear
sighted person should begin
to be able' to see through
the translucent gauze.
When, despite the barrage
of propaganda and repeated
doses of cold-war slogans,
the people begin to say that
Guatamala, the questionable success of the only declared war on U.S. poverty,
the Negro riots sparked by
brutal white police forces
. . . one might timidly suggest to Uncle Sam that the
enemy is not from without
but lurking within.
The time is running out
when LBJ can rely upon
hysteria , anti-comm. paranoia, the credibility gap,
press manipulaton, and the
cult of trust to support his
ride on the escalator.
Soon the Great Egg must
be cracked, the lie structure exposed so sane Americans can sit together and
calmly discuss their liberal
dilemma. If you feel you
cannot feather your nest
and still crack eggs then put
on your strontium 90 bonnet, join the Easter Crusade,
and get ready for W.W. HI
with you know who!
pf 3hree
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Friday, September 23,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 fascist?
I was looking forward to interviewing
James Meredith, "famed civil rights leader",
the courageous fighter for liberty, the man
who almost lost his life in his struggle for
racial equality. Instead, I met James Meredith, Uncle Tom and black fascist.
only handouts
Meredith, as is evident from the interview, does not believe in civil "rights."
There are no rights, only handouts from
the whites. And if the whites are to end
their exploitation of the Negro, they will
do   so  only   because   they   will  need  the
Negro's help to exploit others.
There is nothing wrong with the strong
exploiting the weak. That was what Hitler
said. Germany tried it, says Meredith, only
it wasn't strong enough. America is strong
enough, and the Negroes must help her.
hold the towel
From this I can infer that if Meredith
had lived in Nazi Germany, he would have
begged to be allowed to manufacture soap
out of human flesh: after all, the strong
has to dominate, and if the strong wants
to wash with human flesh, the most one can
can hope for is to be allowed to hold the
towel.
Uncle Toms
If Meredith was a white, he says, he
would also exploit the Negroes. In the U.S.
blacks such as Meredith are called Uncle
Toms. The Nigerians call them "white
negroes." I would call him a fascist, or if
he is not a fascist, it is only because his
white masters do not allow him to be one.
MORE MEREDITH MEETS MATE
This is the way the world is,
and if the world is such that
either one nation or another
has to dominate it I certainly
want to be a part of the one
that dominates.
pf: In that sense there is
nothing morally wrong with
the white man's exploitation
of the Negro in America
either.
Mer.: I don't really see that
there is. It is pretty under-
(from pf 2)
standable to me, the exploitation which has taken place.
pf: Do you think it is unjust?
Mer.: Justice is a relative
thing, always relative.
pf: You would not use the
word injustice to describe the
white attitude toward the
Negro?
Mer.: At this point it definitely is injustice.
pf: If no justice really ex
ists, how can anything be unjust?
Mer.: You said you were
going to be nice.
pf: In other words, in all
that you say you would disagree with most Civil Rights
.leaders who talk about immorality and injustice and
who say that America participates in it. You disagree
with King, with Lewis, with
Carmichael?
Mer.: Yes  definitely.
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Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 23, 1966 Universe solved:
= god
The three theories which
attempt to solve the problem
of the origin of the universe
are all eventually concerned
with the nature of time.
The Bondi - Gold - Hoyle
theory which holds that matter is constantly created at
some point and the total
density of matter in unchanging, for example,
works only if we suppose the
universe's existence is restricted to an unlimited set
of   finite   time   intervals.
Richard Schlegel, a professor of physics at Michigan
State University, in 1964 demonstrated that the steady-
state cosmology, existing for
an infinite time, would end
up with infinite number of
atoms.
And the trouble with that,
Schlegel points out in his
paper, is the order of the
infinity.
The number of atoms you
get is not a countable infinity, but an infinity equal
to the number of points in
the universe.
Since it is clearly impossible to have one atom for
each point, Schlegel uses a
universe limited in past time
to an unlimited, but not infinite, number of time units.
What he means is that
the steady-state universe
must have a limited past
ime span — once, it did not
exist.
Schlegel's proof, published in Philosophy of Science,
January, 1965, shows first
that an infinite past time
produces a second order infinity of atoms.
If each atom in the steady-
Earlier this century,
George Cantor defined the
first order of infinity as the
number of natural numbers,
1, 2, 3, 4, .   . .
This number is equal to
the total of all rational numbers, but is is less than the
number of real numbers or
the number of points on a
line.
Real numbers included
the natural and rational
numbers along with those
which cannot be expressed
as pi or e.
Pi  is  a  non-repeating  de-
Each atom can be represented by an infinite series
of 1  and 2.
Writing these series in a
matrix, Schlegel proves you
can always write a new series by drawing a diagonal
through the matrix and using for each term in your
new series the number which
is not the number the diagonal crosses.
This is isomorphic with
Cantor's proof of the existence of the second order infinity.
The   result   is   a    second
1 — k
1
1         1
1
1
•    •
2 — 2 ^2^
2     2
2
2
•    •    •
3 — 2
1 ^2^   1
2
1
•    •   •
4 — 1
2
1  N,
2
2
•    •    •
5 — 2
1
1     2^2
1
^1
•   •
6 — 2
2
1      1
1
•    •    •
2
1
1     2
1
2
•    ■    •
DESIGNATE EACH
PRODUCT  o*
a   doublin
g   atom   space
with   a   1   or   a  2
so   each   spnce   is
represented   by   an
infinite series of  1
and
2.  In the same wa
y Cantor con-
structed   his   secon
d   order   infin
ity:
^ou   can   show   the
number  of  atoms
after
infiniti
time
is  a
second   order
infinity.
cimal which begins 3.1417
. . . and carries on to an infinite number of decimal
places.
It cannot be expressed as
a rational number.
Cantor shows that if you
pair each of the natural and
rational numbers with a real
number, you can always
write another  real number.
The number of real numbers is the second order of
infinity.
Cantor also shows that
any number, greater than 1,
raised to the first order of
infinity is equal  at least to
1
2
3
4
5
6
— 0 8
— 0.5
— 0.3
— 0.8
— 0.5
0.5
0.7 v.4
3
\
\
0
4
2
4     0
8 ^4
1
9
GEORG CANTOR, THE INFINITY MAN, showed that however many real numbers you wrote down and match up
to the natural numbers, you could always generate a
new real number by drawing a diagonal through the
matrix and choosing terms not on the diagonal. So we
get 0. 5 (not 7) 7 (not 3) 5 (not 9) and so on. The number
at the bottom is the new one.
the second order of infinity.
Schlegel uses an isomorphic proof to prove his
thesis.
When an atom space
doubles, he says, its doubling
can be represented as a combination of two paths, designated 1 and 2.
Thus the first atom space
becomes two spaces, designed as space 1 and space 2.
Space 1 doubles to become
11 and 12.
Suppose this doubling continues an infinite number of
times.
density universe occupies
one atom space, then the
number of atom spaces is an
increasing exponential function of the time.
If you like, we can say the
number of atom spaces
which, now exist equals 2
raised to the power of the
number of time intervals
which have elapsed since the
beginning df time.
Now, for an infinitely old
universe, the number of
atom spaces will be 2 raised
to the power of at least the
first order df infinity.
Friday, September 23,  1966
order infinity of atom-
spaces, and therefore a number of atoms equal to a number of points in the universe.
Schlegel, in attempting to
resolve this contradiction,
uses the model of the universe developed by Michigan State mathematics professor Paul Axt.
The Axt model supposes
that there are a first order
of infinity atoms in the universe.
Counting back into time,
and halving this number for
each time interval, never
leaves a less than infinite
number of atoms.
But a first order infinity of
atoms, though inconceivable,
is theoretically possible.
It is a second order infinity of atoms produced by the
infinite past time assumption, which is impossible.
There are, says Schlegel,
we must conclude that the
number of past time units
though unlimited, is not infinite.
The steady-state theory is
usually regarded as a nice
way out of explaining the
creation of the universe.
But Schlegel's proof shows
the steady-state cosmos cannot be infinitely old, but
must at some point have entered time already created, or
have been created at some
point in time.
If it was, how can there be
an infinite amount of matter
now?
Schlegel leaves the question  open.
"It would seem that the
answer to 'this problem must
lie either in reference to
some domain or being that is
properly outside of time, or
in acceptance of an essentially subjective origin for the
concept of time."
THE       UBYSSEY
NOTICE TO STUDENTS
FROM YOUR UBC BOOKSTORE-
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BUY ALL TEXT BOOKS
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Pharmarcy
Social   Work
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By JUDY BING
When I first became interested in hallucinogens at sixteen after reading Coleridge's Kubla Khan, information on the subject was
limited and had to be sought
in the more obscure corners
of the library.
•    •     •
Since that time literature
on hallucinogens, and on LSD
in particular, has grown
faster than on any other
topic. No newspaper or
magazine has been without
a major feature on the drug
scene.
It is in one of these magazine stories that the latest
book on the subject originates.
For    Lawrence    Schiller,
the photographer responsible for Life magazine's
cover story on LSD, there
came that time in journalism when a story takes over
the life of its creator.
He approached Richard
Alpert and Sidney Cohen,
two authorities on LSD representing different attitudes
towards it.
•    •     •
The result is a highly
readable book, LSD.
Alpert and Cohen each
give their answers to such
questions as "Is the freedom
to take LSD an inalienable
right of man?", "What are
the implications for religion
if a chemical religious experience is possible?", "Who
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should have LSD?" and
"What is your estimate of
the future of psychedelics?".
•    •     •
Neither author saw the
other's answers until they
were finished. There are no
arguments, only a "bilateral presentation of facts"
illustrated by Schiller's
sensitive photography,
from which the reader can
draw his own conclusion.
This is an excellent format, or would have been if
an editor had kept the two
writers in parallel. As it is,
they often interpret identical questions so differently
that comparison of their
views becomes difficult.
But on the basic Issues
Alpert and Cohen are un-
mistakeably opposed. Who
should have LSD? According to Alpert anybody that
wants it. According to Cohen the ones that want it are
usually the least capable of
dealing with it.
LSD, a forum on the phsy-
chedelic by Alpert, Cohen,
and Schiller is on sale in
the bookstore for $2.50.
Who should give LSD?
"It is nobody's to give; LSD
should only be taken," says
Alpert.
Cohen thinks distribution
should be controlled by "a
group of behavioral scientists and philosophers, pharmacologists and historians,
anthropologists, and, yes,
administrators."
Cohen stresses the danger
—one in six admissions to
the Neuropsychiatric Institute at UCLA last year are
attributed to LSD. Alpert
points to the 'beauty—"it is
like a shower on the inside."
Does the value of the latter outweigh the former?
Despite Cohen, Alpert and
Schiller's remarkable book,
the question is still open.
IfepM
TIRED OF REGISTRATION & FIRST WEEK
LINE-UPS ???...
DANCE TO THE
NOCTURNALS
FIRST & BIGGEST MIXER OF THE YEAR
U.B.C. ARMOURIES
FRIDA Y, SEPTEMBER 23
Page  10
Time: 8:30 - 1:00 a.m.
THE     UBYSSEY
Ladies $1.00
Males & Others $1.50
Friday, September 23, 1966 ANCIENT
ART
Confronts modern hangups
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
By IAN WALLACE
The UBC Fine Arts Gallery is currently exhibiting
an excellent collection of
Japanese graphs by Bishop
Kojo Sakamoto.
Every morning the ninety-
two year old bishop contemplates on chants and sacred
writings.
By concentrating upon
peace,   beauty,   happines,
~ $5$
MUM**. 9
truth, he is able to manifest
these states of mind through
the hand and brush to the
character symbol — an interaction between the spiritual and physical realm. Here
we have private thoughts
transformed into symbols so
that the public may be aware
of the moral questions engendered by the meditations.
The Calligraphic scroll is
more than just a poster. It is
not the symbol per se that
contains the essence of
thought, but rather the personal quality of the brushstrokes.
It is only when one "trips
out" on the sensitivity and
beauty of the graphs, bearing
in mind their meanings, that
one becomes aware of the
uniqueness of the message.
To western eyes, this is a
completely * foreign way of
understanding words, but it is
the nature of the character
itself, (the Oriental word —
symbol or word icon), deriving   its  form   from   picture-
Ss-w ■ ;v.'. - . '     . * «?.___;
Friday, September 23,   1966
symbols, that makes it far
more visually powerful than
the western counterpart.
When we contemplate the
visual qualities of the Japanese symbol for "peace" we
realize that the calligraphic
symbol is "peace" itself. The
idea or feeling of "peace",
becomes a physical entity before us as our eyes caress the
form of the idea.
The western alphabetical
symbol requires that we read
the word, understand what it
means, then contemplate the
thought abstracted from the
visual symbol. It is this hangup that we must overcome if
we are to receive the full
sensual and spiritual flavour
of the Bishop's calligraphy.
Repetition is another essential quality of the calligraphy. The Bishop repeats
the same symbol over and
over because he feels that the
more the message is repeated
and seen, the closer we will
come to the truth. This contrasts with Western positivist
notions of clock time and progress which have conditioned
us to resent repetition as
leading to boredom instead of
enlightenment.
Our concept of originality
is really based upon the desire for novelty to relieve the
boredom of life ,but for the
Bishop everything is original
because every moment in
time is different and therefore original.
In calligraphy, mutation
(as in the chance brushstroke)
spirals around a centre, the
symbol) while for us mutation is a linear progress
through time.
We are always moving
away from ourselves, seeking
diversions, while the Bishop
is   constantly   looking   into
himself and into involvement
in' the spiritual and physical
world.
It is interesting to note
that this exhibition should
come during a surge of interest in LSD which denies
clock time and forces one to
contemplate his state of being
and clears the debris from his
consciousness.
Are we calling off some of
the more unfortunate shackles of western culture? For
those who are eager to do so
the Bishop's calligraphy is an
essential guidepost.
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UNIVERSITY DETACHMENT
RECRUITING
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th
7:30 P.M., U.B.C. ARMOURIES
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
Nominations are now toeing received for the position
of Second Vice-President of the Alma Mater Society
Student Council. Eligibility and nomination forms
are available at the A.M.S. office (S. Brock). These
forms are to be submitted to the Secretary, Box 54,
Brock Hall. Nominations will close Thursday, September 29th, 1966.
CHARTER FLIGHT DIRECTOR:
Applications are now 'being accepted for the position
of Charter Flight Director for the A.M.S. Charter
Flight which will leave for Europe May 11, 1967 and
return August 25th, 1967. All applications and inquiries should be directed to Peter Braund, President, Student Council, Box 50, Brock Hall.
COMMITTEE MEMBERS:
Applications are  now  being  accepted  for positions
on the following Committees:
Elections Committee
Eligibility Committee
All applications should be directed to the Secretary,
Student Council, Brock Hall, Box 54.
RETURNING OFFICER:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Returning Officer. Applications should be directed
to the Secretary, Student Council, Box 54, Brock
Hall. Eligibility forms are available in the A.M.S.
Office (S. Brock).
STUDENT UNION
BUILDING COMMITTEE:
Vice-Chairman — Mature student, experienced in
student affairs with an ability to assume major responsibilities, write final reports, etc. Applicants
should be prepared to. sit on the committee for the
next two years of construction with the possible
eventuality of assuming the chairmanship.
3 MEMBERS AT LARGE:
3 Members at Large — To sit on the committee and
assume specific responsibilities and assignments. A
willingness to work steadily on the project throughout the year is required. Preference will be given
to applicants able to serve on the committee over
the next two years until completion of construction.
Please apply in writing to the Secretary Box 54 by
4:00  p.m.. Friday,  Sept.  23.
ASSISTANT TREASURER:
Applications are requested for the position of Assistant Treasurer. This position offers valuable experience in a variety of tasks assigned by the treasurer including a seat on the Finance Committee.
Experience in student affairs and a knowledge of
of accounting fundamentals are helpful, but not
essential Please submit applications to the Treasurer,
Box 53, Brock Hall by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 23rd.
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  11 Poet enters
twilight zone
By MAX VEHDICCHIO
To review "The Struggle"
by Greydon Moore is indeed
a struggle.
The first reading is, at least.
The poem is centered on
the struggle of a man to
achieve individuality. But he
finds it unbearable to maintain and prefers to blend into
a group which he dislikes.
This is a cyclic poem furnished with its own epilogue.
The main  theme revolves
and repeats almost infinitely. The character in the poem
undergoes a spiritual re-birth
which carries him from infancy to adolescence throughout the length of the poem.
Hopelessness and dissatisfaction re-set him in the same
manner as he started. Hence,
with all probability he will
feel again the urge to plunge
into the pond of time hoping
for a better end.
This cyclic aspect of the
poem then justifies, if not demands, that the poem be read
over and over and over.
The structure of the poem
is unusual in that it retains
the normal contemporary
way of exposition, but the
margin of the pages are filled with the author's remarks,
background setting, explanations and hopeless, unanswerable whys.
This device enables the
poet to be objective in his
exposition and saves the
reader from being interrupted in his struggle by affected
and irrelevant remarks.
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University Boulevard
Sunday Evenings
7:00 to  8:00
Death of Christendom
- Sept. 25
Death of Religion
- Oct.    2
Death of the Church
- Oct.    9
Death   of   Morality
- Oct.  16
Death of Prayer
Death of God
- Oct. 23
- Oct. 30
Short adress  followed   by   questions
and   comments  from   the   congregation,   concluding   by   8:00   p.m.
Coffee  Hour  follows  for  those
interested in further discussions
VERSATILE folk-singer Stan
Wilson and six-string guitar
appear in Brock Monday at
noon.
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Friday, September 23, 1966 Friday, September 23,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  13
V. A
;|*|«;; Jlff8!-
^*%s,,:^     '^
— derek webb photo
UNWILLING EUS. MEMBER gets forceful persuasion to join
redshirt flock from head engineer shepherd  Eric Newell.
Amused bystanders could  be destined  for  library pond.
Ex-minister
confronts
the sharpies
The man who has staked his
political career on economic
nationalism will speak at UBC
Monday.
Walter Gordon, former Liberal finance minister, joins a
panel discussion with members
of the economic and political
science departments.
His book, A Choice For Canada, is a required text for Political Science 101.
Place and time of Gordon's
speech have not been decided.
Following the debate Gordon
meets with student Liberals in
Mildred Brock room, Brock
Hall, from 1:30 to 3:30.
VOLKSWAGEN
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New co-op housing
planned at Halifax
HLALIFAX (CUP) — Construction will begin on a
married students' co-op at Dalhousie University as soon as
the Halifax student housing committee receives confirmation of its loan from Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation.
The committee expects to receive the go-ahead early next
week.
Dalhousie is not alone in its
plans for a student-owned, student financed housing project.
Co-ops are now operating at
the Universities of Toronto and
Waterloo.
The chronic student housing
shortage at the University of
B.C. has prompted the student
council to begin planning the
first student co-op in the west.
The architectural design for
the $1.5 million Dalhousie complex has been  completed.
To toe located within walking
distance of the campus, the 15-
storey co-op will also have two
underground parking areas.
The dream of a co-op became reality when the federal
government ann ounced a
change in the law governing
mortgage lending in 1966.
Student residences are now
elegible for 90 per cent of the
mortgage from Central Mortgage and Housing.
Divided equally between one
and two-bedroom apartments,
the 113, units will range in
price from $120 to $135.
Stoves, fridges, breakfast
nooks and perhaps a built-in
vanity will be provided for
every apartment.
Laundromats will be installed on each floor; common
rooms, study areas and a supervised nursery will also be
available.
Priority for these apartments
will probably be established on
the basis of need.
The number of children a
couple has, the possession of
a car—all will be taken into
consideration.
Tentative completion date
for the complex is September,
1967.
Phi Kappa Sigma
IS BUILDING A NEW $100,000
FRATERNITY HOUSE ON CAMPUS
with: — Dining  Room
— T.V.
— Sauna Bath
— Spacious Rooms
— Pool Table
— And many other extras
2nd and-3rd year students are invited to rush and have
an opportunity to become members in this international
organization.
TODAY
TODAY
TODAY
TODAY
TODAY
TODAY
TODAY
TODAY'S the
LAST DAY
TO REGISTER FOR
FALL RUSH
Men in 2nd Year or Above
GO
TO THE AMS
OFFICE AND
REGISTER
NOW Page  14
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 23, .1966
Coach hopes four stars
mean quality soccer
JV attack honed
to strike back
By GEORGE ROBERTS
Is the Junior Varsity football team ready to score ?
The answer will be available for the curious at 2 p.m.,,
Saturday at Wolfson Field when the Jayvees battle the
Everett, Wash. Wildcats.
Last week the Jayvees yielded 14 points to the Olympic
Junior College team in Bremerton, Washington, and were too
polite to ask for any in return.
The last time they played the
Olympic JC's the Jayvees lost
86-0.
The defensive squad did exceptionally well considering
the quality  of  the  opposition.
In practice this week, the emphasis was on improving the
offensive teams. Coach Ross
Hetherington hopes to have a
very effective series of running
plays.
Hetherington is confident of
his brood's potential this year
and predicts a much better season than last when they lost all
seven games.
Bob Hurly and Bob MacDonald are back on the defensive line-up along with two
outstanding rookie linebackers,
Bob MacKenzie and Ken Reid.
Gordon Hardy, a promising
quarterback, can count on Jim
Blair, whom Hetherington calls
an 'exceptional" guard, to give
him time to complete his long
bombs.
Puffs, pants
for those
in shorts
UBC's volleyball players will
start to sweat around the net
Tuesday.
First practice for the team
is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in Memorial Gym.
The volleyballers' schedule
opens Nov. 26 with the B.C.
Junior championships here.
Highlights of UBC's schedule,
which lasts into March, are the
Western Canadian junior championships at Winnipeg in December and the Canadian-American and B.C. open tournament
here beginning Feb. 11.
UBC will also compete in
Canada's Winter Games in mid-
February and in the western
Canada senior men's tourney
at Simon Fraser later in the
month.
BILL STONIER
(Class of '65)
Has Been Appointed
Campus Representative
Also Clearing  1966 Models at Big Discounts
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UBC soccer coach Joe Johnson is relying on four championship players to lead his
Thunderbirds into first place
in the Pacific Coast Soccer
League.
Bruce Ballam, Jim Berry,
Russ Hillman and Kirby Carter played on the B.C. team
that won the Canadian amateur championship at Winnipeg this summer.
And they'll all be in the
starting lineup Saturday when
the Birds open their fall
PCSL season against Burnaby
Villa.
Burnaby held tough league
champion Firefighters to a 1-1
tie last week, so the Birds are
ibraced for a struggle.
Game time is 2 p.m. at
Varsity Stadium.
LEAD AT STAKE
Winner of the Bird-Villa
contest will take over the
league lead, as all other opening games ended in ties.
Johnson said Thursday he
expects two new Thunderbirds
to  help the   cause noticeably.
Bill Sinclair, up from the
Junior Varsity, and John New-
bolt, from New Westminster,
are the men Johnson is counting on.
UBC veterans who will see
action are Ash Valdai, Harry
and Len Lendvoy, Harvey
Thorn, John Humphries and
Gene Ross.
MOSHER GONE
Outstanding regulars lost
through graduation are Dick
Mosher, John Haar and Paul
Beckow.
The Thunderbirds had a 10
won, one lost, 10 tied record
in the PCSL last season, placing them second.
In addition, they won three
intercollegiate games in California.
—powell hargrave photo
HARD AT IT are these two members of the Thunderbird
field hockey team in practice session Thursday on Wolfson
Field. Inside left Jamie Wright, left, puts on the brakes in
an attempt to stop speeding centre forward Warren Bell.
SFA grid formula:
brains  plus  brawn
Simon Fraser Academy
football players have two new
carrots dangling before their
eyes.
Scholarships of $800 and
$250 from local donors are
available to players who demonstrate satisfactory scholastic achievement and athletic development.
The $800 award was donatr
ed by C. B. Harmon, while the
$250 scholarship came from
William Adshead.
Simon Fraser athletic director and head football coach
Lome Davies expressed gratitude.
"Support such as this shows
we have community backing
in our attempt to develop
Canada's finest athletic program."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
"it's* ■..>.-;, .*-/• *•&*» -
0/c/ pro bosses
UBC linemen
EMERY BARNES
.  . bearded  giant
The UBC football
Thunderbirds have a
lion-sized line coach
this year.
Emery Barnes, former B.C. Lion tackle and
a UBC grad, has replaced Harvey Scott as
line coach.
Presently a director
of the Gordon Neighbourhood House in
downtown Vancouver,
the 6-5, bearded Barnes
is on the faculty of the
school of physical education andl recreation
at UBC. He is not lacking in experience, having coached the Sir
Winston Churchill high
school team and the
Meralomas and CYO
Red Raiders in the Junior B Big Four league.
An outstanding track
athlete, Barnes signed
with the Green Bay
Packers after being
named an all-coast end
while playing for the
University  of  Oregon.
Birds  fly south
minus  a halfback
By VINCE HOWLETT
The UBC football Thunderbirds face possibly
their biggest test of the year this weekend when
they take on Humboldt State College without
first-string halfback Ron Kincade.
Kincade, who carried the ball 106 times in
UBC's nine games last season, is out with a
shoulder injury.
He will be replaced Saturday by Victor Iwata,
who showed promise in last Saturday's game
against Western Washington.
As if a weakened team doesn't hurt enough,
the Birds will be facing the tough California team
that dealt them a 21-13 defeat last year.
Head coach Frank Gnup hopes to use this game
as a gauge for the team's performance this season,
as last Saturday's scoreless tie against Western
Washington proved only that good defensive football can be played in near impossible conditions.
Dinosaurs
trample
Huskies
CALGARY (CUP) — The
University of Calgary Dinosaurs have served notice they
won't be the patsies of Western Canada intercollegiate
football this season.
The Dinos, who had won
only one of 12 previous WCIAA football contests, trampled
the University of Saskatchewan Huskies 15-6 last week in
Calgary.
Quarterback Don Green
threw two touchdown passes
to end Wayne Davis. Dennis
Daniels converted one major
and punter Don Cooper kicked two singles.
Green's performance will be
nothing new to western coaches. He led the University of
Alberta Golden Bears to the
championship of the West in
1964. Out of school last year,
he coached the Edmonton junior Huskies to the national
junior title.
UBC fans will be able to
assess the Dinosaur's resurgence Nov. 5 when they visit
Varsity Stadium for a WCIAA
conference game with the
Thunderbirds.
In other college action,
Queen's University annihilated
Carleton University 58-2, and
the University of Western
Ontario Mustangs smothered
the University of Ottawa 42-3.
Both games were non-conference clashes.
Think you
can manage?
Students interested in football but lacking time or ability
to play can still be a part of
UBC's program.
Teams require managers
who like travel and want to
help. Head manager Bob Mc
Ginn (261-1878) has details.
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
9.95
49.50
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PRESCRIPTION
Contact Lenses
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NOW 2 LOCATIONS DOWNTOWN ONLY
677 Granville, opposite The Bay Phone 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rite Park
New  Westminster
675 Columbia, Opposite Army and Navy
Phone LA 1-0751
Women's InterColl. Athletic Practice Sched.
Turn Out For Your
Sport !
Sport
Regular Practice
Times & Place
Starting Date
Badminton
Mon. Eve. — W.  G.
Wed.  Eve. — Van.
Lawn  Tennis   Club
T.B.A.
Basketball
Sr.—Mon.-7:00-9:00
—W.   G.   Thurs.—
4:30-6:30—M. G.
J.V.—Thurs. 5:30-
7:00—W.  G.
Mon., Sept 26—6:30-
8:00 — W. G.
Mon., Sept. 26—6:30-
8:00 — W. G.
Curling
Wed.   8:30   p.m.—
Arena Sat. 12:45
p.m.—Arena
Wed., Oct. 12, 8:30—
Arena
Field-Hockey
Fig.-Skating
Varsity — Thurs.
12:45-2:15   &   one
other noon  hr.
U.B.C.—same as
varsity
Thurs. 6:15-8:15
Arena. Sun. 5:00-6:00
Thurs.. Sept. 22
Thurs.. Sept. 22
Thurs.,   Oct.   16
Golf
Details    to    be    announced.   If interested call Marilyn Palmer  at   261-0017.
Gymnastics
Tues.  12:30-1:15 App
Gym.   Thurs.   12:30-
Tues.,  Sept.  27
Skiing
2:15  M.   G.
Tues &   Thurs.   6:30-
8:00—App.  Gym.
Meeting —  12:30
Mon.,  Sept.   26—
W.  G.
Swimming
(Syn'd.)
Thurs. 1:00-2:00 CYC
Pool. Sun.  11:30-1:00
YMCA
Thurs.,   Sept. 29
Swimming
(Speed)
T.B.A.   If   interested
call Marie Bourhis at
985-3861.
Track &
Field
Volleyball
Meeting—Sept. 27 at
12:30 Rm. 211—M.G.
Tues. 7:00-8:30
— M. G. Thurs. 1:00-
2:15 — W. G.
Tues., Oct.  4
6:30-9:00 — F. N.
Tues.,  Sept. 27 —
M. G.
T.B.A. — to be anounced      M.G.  —  Memorial  Gym
W.G. —  Women's Gym App. G. — Apparatus Gym
F.H. — Field House
Sign Up Lists are posted, in W.G. for both
Intramural & Intercollegiate  Athletic  Teams
NOTE: Women students Who wish to play for non-university  teams must apply  for  an  athletic  release. Application  forms  are  available  at the office  of  the Women's
Athletic  Director — No. 2,  Women's  Gymnasium.
Qintoitfs    ;
THE WESTERN LOOK
The style factor in
casual jackets shown with
pile lining in a wide variety of materials. Includ-
in colours of forest
green, moca, faded blue,
ruby, taupe, rust, bone
white and chocolate
brown.
— Block  checks  $29.95
— Scrub denim $79.95
— Corduroy $24 JL to
39.95
— Split cowhides 39.95
— Suedes $79.95 & 89.95
Clinton's
mEirs wear
Clothing for campus and dress-up occasions
742 Granville MU 1-5625 Page  16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 23, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Golfer Billy preaches
DESERET CLUB
See and hear Billy Casper
at the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints, Sunday,
4 p.m.
• •    •
U.C.C.
General meeting noon Monday, Bu. 202. Attendance compulsory.
•k   -k   -k
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting Monday,
noon, in Bu. 225. For Ukrainian Varsity students.
• •    •
EUS
Campus-wide mixer Friday.
Dance    to    the    Nocturnals.
Ladies $1, Men's $1.50. Armory,
8:30 to 1 a.m.
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Testimony meeting noon
every Friday Hut 0-12 behind
education building. Everyone
welcome.
• •    •
SOCREDS
Richmond MLA Ernie Le
Cours speaks Monday noon,
Bu. 104.
• •    •
CONSERVATIVES
Organization meeting noon
Monday Bu. 214 for Clubs Day.
All members and those interested are invited to attend.
• *    •
JUDO
Organization meeting noon
Tuesday, Math 100. Regular
practise Tuesday and Thursday,
7 p.m.  apparatus gym.
• *    •
IH
Talent show and dance at
International House tonight, 8
p.m. Admission free and everyone welcome.
• *   •
VCF
Dr. I. Rennie speaks on Research for Faith noon in Ang.
110. All welcome. Hayride and
corn roast tonight. Meet at
Brock 6 p.m. Minimal charge.
Frosh free.
• •    •
LUTHERAN   STUDENTS
General meeting Monday
noon in Lutheran Campus
Centre. Coffee and doughnuts.
All welcome.
• •    •
EL  CIRCULO
General meeting for election
of new president, Bu. 204.
• *    *
UBC   PIPEBAND
Meeting 12:30 Monday, Bu.
220.  All   interested.
Clubs head
wants seat
University Clubs committee
president Mike Coleman wants
a seat for the UCC on AMS
council.
Coleman said Wednesday
the UCC will circulate a petition for a referendum on the
council seat.
He said <half the campus
suffers from under-representa-
tion on council because of
council's structure.
He said the 83 clubs, an increase of 23 in the past four
years, include 31 per cent of
students.
In the past four years, he
said, the budgeted AMS grant
for UCC has dropped from
$4,870 to $4,525.
NEW  DEMOCRATS
Executive meeting Monday
in Bu. Ext. 2205.
• •    •
LIBERALS
Hon. Walter L. Gordon will
appear at a coffee-reception,
Mildred Brock Monday from
2:30 - 3:30 p.m. Open to all and
free.
• •   •
SKI TEAM
All interested in trying out
for the Men's ski team meet
for workouts in the Apparatus
Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays,
Red tape bag
must cover
goodies sold
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
If you want to sell cheese
sandwiches to UBC students you
need a license.
Director of information,
Ralph Daly, revealed it's illegal
for unauthorized persons to advertise or sell food without
permission of the board of governors.
They must also have a license
endorsed by the University Endowment Lands, he said.
"The. university is legally responsible for what goes on on
the campus," he said. "And for
public protection licensing must
be enforced."
"Main consideration was for
good continuity of service, using the proper equipment and
sanitary conditions."
Daly said the university doesn't set the prices.
"However, any major changes
in prices, quality, or policy of
food service is subject to the
final approval of the board of
governors."
Daly made the comments
following the sale of cheese
sandwiches in Brock Hall by
Ubyssey  reporters Tuesday.
click!
with a Sports Car from
Western Canada's Sports
Car  Specialist
Clarke  Simpkins
1967 TRIUMPHS
HERE NOW-PRICED
FROM   $2249
Quality Used
66 MG Midget $1935
65 Honda    Cycle ___ $145
60 Fiat $399
62 TR 3 $1299
62 Morgan $1465
62 Rapier Comet  $685
Clarke Simpkins
Burrard at Broadway
Phone 736-4282
6:30   p.m.   and   Saturday  1:30
p.m.
VOLUNTEER  SOC
Urgent! Volunteers needed
to work in community centers,
clubs. Phone 731-7781 for appointment.
Add Spiritual Enrichment
to Intellectual Improvement
WORSHIP EVERY SUNDAY
DUNBAR HEIGHTS BAPTIST CHURCH
WELCOMES YOUI
9:45 & 11:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
West 17th Ave. at Crown
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND. ONE PAIR GLASSES —
one lens broken. Claim at Ubys-
sey   Office.	
LOST GREEN SHEAFFER'S
Fountain Pen in vicinity of Buchanan Building. Finder please
phone Rick,  TR 6-8302.
HELP! REWARD OFFERED FOR
return of foreign-made wallet;
driver's licence, money! etc. 224-
9972.   Joyce,   Room   116.	
FOUND IN SEDGEWICK ON
Tuesday. Man's ring — contact
Barry CR 8-6354.
FOUND IN THE HEBB BLDG.
Cor. on Sept. 16. Three psychology
textbooks; found in Hebb Theatre
Sept. 21. Two paper backs. Pick-
up  in  Hebb II.
TOTE BAG, LOOKS LEFT IN
wrong car. Please phone Janis at
733-9292.
LOST:   TAN   WALLET   TUES.   OR
Wed.   Reward.   263-3397.
Coming Dances
12A
THE "MOTOWN SOUND" OF THE
Vancouver Accents Featuring
"Derek Cave" and the "Soul Sisters" this Saturday night in
Brock.
HERE'S THE BIG DANCE NEWS
for next weekend! (and remember
— all this for only $1.50 each).
Three   (3 !)   big  bands:
JASON   HOOVER   &   THE   EPICS!
THE   CENTAURS!
THE   SHOCKERS!
Plus    three    gorgeous    A    Go-Go
girls    —    Headlined    by    19-yr-old
SUSY  LAUDER — Miss  Vancouver  of   1965 !
Date:  Sat., Oct. 1
Time:  8:30 p.m. — 1:00 a.m.
Place U.B.C. Armouries. IT WILL
BE     THE     BEST     DANCE     ON
CAMPUS THIS FALL!
DANCE WITH SUS AND THE
Fabulous ACCENTS this Saturday
night 8:30 to 12:30 In Brock
Lounge. Men $1.00, Women .75.
Everyone  Welcome.	
FRUSTRATED BY FIRST WEEK
line-ups? Relieve your tensions.
Attend the first big bash of the
year. Dance to the "Nocturnals"
Friday, Sept. 23 in the Armouries,
8:30-1:00 a.m. The first of all
mixers.
BACK ON CAMPUS BIGGER AND
better Don't miss them this Sat.
night in Brock! The dynamic Vancouver Accents featuring "Derek
Cave" and the Motown Sound of
the   "Soul   Sisters".
Special  Notices
13
• • ALL CHEM. 101 STUDENTS * •
Now on sale, "Complete Guide to
Chem. 101 labs." Limited supply.
Only $1.95 at College Shop, Brock
Ext.
WATCH FOR  THE  PHANTOM.
BTLLY CASPER, WINNER OF
IT.S. Open, speaking at the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints, Sunday, Sept. 25 at 4:00
p.m. All welcome and admission
FREE. 	
TALK   BACK   AT   ST.   ANSELM'S
Church.  Sunday,   7:00   p.m.   	
GIRLS! GIRLS! RECEIVE A 10%
discount on your new fall shoes.
Visit a wonderful world of fash-
innwise footwear. The Pump
Room.   548 Granville. 	
UNIVERSITY ECONOMICS MA-
Jor in Japan wishes a U.B.C. Correspondent. For further information   phone  YU   8-2548.
JOIN THE FISH! LEARN TO
Scuba Dive at U.B.C. on Tuesday
evenings.   Phone   AM   6-0587
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quallify for our good driving
ates.   Phone   Ted  Elliott,   224-6707.
ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM 1967 —
A committee is now being formed
Students from all faculties if interested leave name and phone
No. at AMS, Box 2.        	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents —Publications   office   in   Brock.
Transportation
14
RIDE FROM UBC LEAVING 4:30
to vicinity Marine and Hudson.
Phone 261-4481.
RIDE   WANTED   4100   BLOCK   W.
13th.  Phone  Gary,   CA4-5813.
RIDE     WANTED     FROM     WEST
Van. Phone Max 926-1208.
RIDE WANTED VICINITY REN-
frew and Parker for 8:30'a Monday thru Friday. Phone Vicki
255-0428  any   time.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:30
classes Mon. to Fri. from Richmond. (Brighouse area) nhone
John   277-9338.
RIDE WANTED TO U.B.C. FROM
S.W. Marine Dr. 8:30 classes.
Phone   Diane   263-4815.
RIDERS WANTED; FROM VICIN-
ity of 20th Ave. to Kingsway
along Victoria. Phone Pete at
TR   2-2263.
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY
16th & Burrard. Can drive 1 day.
Phone  733-4620. 	
RIDE wanted from 12th & Granville
M-W-F for 9:30's, returning at
3:30 -^ Phone RE 6-0989 after 9:30.
RIDE WANTED FOR 9:30 CLAS-
ses from vicinity of 4th & Macdonald also 5:30 return. Phone
Barry   731-2563   after   7.	
RIDE OR RIDERS LEAVING
from 6th and Lonsdale, that stays
out several nights a week. Please
call   Brigitte,   985-5114.	
RIDE WANTED VICINITY OF
10th and McBride, Newwest. Ph.
526-2149.
RIDE WANTED FROM 33rd AND
Marguerite for 8:30's, M to F.
Call Marg.   733-7758.   ■	
RIDE NEEDED 8:30 MON. - FRI.
1200 W. 22nd St., N. Van. YU 8-
3279.   —   Ken
RIDE WANTED. 33rd AND MAC-
kenzie. 7:45 a.m. (approx.) and
5:00 p.m. Please phone B & G
switchboard (2171) or Melanie 266-
9989  after  6:00   p.m.	
PASSENGERS WANTED TO UBC
6 day week. Vicinity 49th and
Granville. Peter AM 1-7696.    	
CAR POOL WANTED VICINITY
of Broadway and Clark. Phone
876-3693. 	
RIDE WANTED FROM HASTINGS
& Victoria for 8:30 classes.
Phone 253-8939, Rita.	
RIDE WANTED! FROM NAN-
aimo and Kingsway for 9:30's
M. to F. Phone HE1-3842 after
6   p.m.	
WANTED RIDE FROM WEST
End, New Westminster. Mon. to
Fri.   Phone  Klaus,   622-9395,
TWO DRIVERS WANTED FOB
carpool from New Westminster,
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-4:30. Phone Phil,
LA1-3262
RIDE FROM NORGATE PARK,  N.
Van.   Phone   985-4501.
RIDE WANTED FROM VICINITY
of Broadway and Nanaimo, Monday through Friday. 8:30s on
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.
Phone Terry, AL 3-6456 after 6
p.m.
Wanted
15
WANTED: SEWING MACHINE,
good condition for basic home
sewing. Will pay about $40. Mrs.
Assimakos.   RE   1-4961.
Travel Opportunities
16
WANTED BY TWO CHARMING
girls. Ride to Calgary, Friday,
October 7th. Will pay for gas.
Phone Cathy 224-9982 after 6:00
p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 RILEY 1.5, 33,000 mi., 30 M.P.G.
Economy, radio, needs minor body
work to cover rust marks, best
offer.   CY   8-2862.
1960 MGA 1600. REAL LEATHER.
Int'r. Mech. Good cond., had new
clutch and brakes. Here is your
chance to freeze through the winter real cheaply. Eves phone: RE
1 8503, Early  a.m.   or   eves.	
60 FURY V-8 AUTO 2 DR. HT.
2 spkr. radio. Body & Engine per-
fect  condition.   $1095.   327-5056.
1958 FORD FOUR DOOR 6-CYL.
Standard. Excellent condition.
$450.   LA  1-2150.	
CAR INSURANCE TOO HIGH?
Maybe one of our 60 companies
can provide lower and better coverage. Phone J. Enright, MU 2-
1474 or 922-6936.
1956 CHEV. V8. BLUE AND
white. $350. 224-4814 or 731-6921.
Bill  Phillips.	
RECON. '52 MORRIS MINOR. RE-
built A40 motor and trans. Phone
Dave,   876-3197.
•58 STD. 2 DR. PLYMOUTH. GOOD
cond. City tested. Low mileage.
Best   offer   takes.    874-9709.
VW 1965 DELUXE, RADIO, GREY.
$1,495.00. Phone George, CA 4-9900
5-6:30  p.m.
AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE
LEAVING COUNTRY. MUST SELL
two cars. 1965 Rambler Classic.
770 Hardtop. Fully equipped, 7,800
miles. $2695. 1965 Isuzu Bellet Deluxe. 8,000 miles, $1,695. Telephone
228-8577.
1958 SUNBEAM RAPIER HDTP.
Excellent cond. New w.w's, exhaust. Comrilete repair record.
$595.   Neil,   224-3510   eves.
Motorcycles
27
FOR SALE — 1954 SUNBEAM S8
500c.c. Best offer takes. Phone
CA 4-3591 after 6 p.m.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Typewriters  8e  Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
O L YM PIC PORTABLE TYPE-
writers. Excellent condition. Reasonable price. 228-2856 or 291-2561.
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
43
ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY
students. Summer Essays typed.
(Summer Essay Specifications
maintained) ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED. 70th & Granville.   263-4530.
Help  Wanted
51
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED FOR
UBC Alumni Chronicle. Retainer
paid for regular services. Apply
with samples of work to Alumni
offce,  252 Brock Hall.
WAITERESS WANTED — SAT.,
Sun. and Mon. nights. Must be
neat, pleasant and hard working.
Apply The Friar, CA 4-0833 evenings,   4423   West   10th  Ave.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
WOMAN'S BIKE. EXC. COND. $30
or best offer. Phone Mary at 224-
1264.    C.C.M.    3   speed.	
SKIS 1 PR. KASTLE, 1 PR. ALUs 60, 1 pr. VR 7, 2 pr. buckle
boots.   733-2495.
FOR SALE
NOTE Publishing Business, Now
well established at U.B.C, Gross
Sales $2,400.00 ANNUALLY; Ideal
for Commerce or Business-minded
Student; Terms available; reply
to Box 255, Postal Station "A"
Vancouver 1, or RE 8-9661 (after
6 p.m.).	
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock Hall.
PURE COCONUT OIL — UPPER
Tenth Barbers & Toiletries. 4574
W.   10th.
GRASS MATTING, IDEAL FLOOR
covering, 9' x 19', 15c per sq. ft.
224-9143.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM  FOR   RENT:   2823  WATER-
loo.   MU   2-6902,   MU   1-8008.
AVAILABLE—FURNISHED ROOM
for' women only. Mrs. Anderson—
3548 West  38th  Ave.
SLEEPING ROOM — MALE—$45.00
month. Coffee & Laundry included.   4th   &  Larch.  Phone  738-7474.
AVAILABLE 2 ROOMS FOR MAN
or woman at 4547 West 16th. Call
Chris  Maude.
AVAILABLE — ROOM AT 3336
West 2nd for one girl. Phone 738-
1696.
AVAILABLE—Apartment   to   share.
Phone   Marlene   Allen  —  662-8580.
Women Only.	
PRIV.    ROOM.    SHARE    KITCHEN
with   2   others.   2737   W.   3rd.   $10
week.   RE   8-0086.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
S.C. BASEMENT SUITE. TWO
Senior students. Separate entrance. Alma & 11th Ave. $80.
Tel.   738-0574.
FOURTH YEAR FEMALE STU-
dent wishes to share fully furnished apartment with same. Reasonable  rent.   Ph.   738-1408.	
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE
Apartment. Close. Reasonable.
Phone   Carol   736-4829.

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