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The Ubyssey Jan 19, 1973

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Array Senate OKs student reps
By VAUGHN PALMER
The UBC senate voted
Wednesday to accept in
principle voting representation for students at all
faculty levels, excepting
committees concerned with
hiring, firing, and promotion of
teachers, scholarships and
business and finance.
The. principle, contained in a
report by an ad hoc senate
committee commissioned in
1970, also provides that in all
cases involving student
representation   faculty   shall
have an "appropriate"
majority.
The report includes two
amendments, one providing
representation extensions to
the department, school and
teaching institute level and
the other that student
representation include voting
powers.
Commerce dean Phil
White, the committee chairman, said the report was
submitted without the
amendments, which he personally   supported,   to   allow
senate to resolve the issue
without further wasting of
time.
"We must get on with the
job," White said. "This is the
first report submitted on the
issue in the two and a half
years since the committee was
formed."
White, who succeeded to the
committee chairmanship last
November, said he wanted
senate to clarify its position on
the issue to allow his committee to get on with its next
task — implementation.
THS UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 28 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1973
48     228-2301
Although the amendments
and the report passed easily,
strong objections were expressed by some faculty
members.
Classics head Malcolm
McGregor said students
should not be given voting
privileges because university
legal counsel had interpreted
the Universities Act as forbidding it.
White said the act is ambiguous on the subject. "The
issue is a red herring," he said.
Grad student senator Stan
Persky said the legal issue was
immaterial because the report
approves voting representation in principle not in
practice. "By granting approval senate will be showing
where it stands," he said.
"Then when voting is actually implemented the act will
be interpreted. I understand
this is the correct legal
procedure in cases like this."
Persky said without a vote,
student representation would
be a sham. "Representation
without a vote is a contradiction. History shows us
when people ask for
representation they obviously
want a vote."
Although White indicated
some members of his committee opposed voting
representation for students,
members present declined an
invitation by student senator
Svend Robinson to state their
views.
Commerce prof Noel Hall
said senate doesn't have to
uebate the rationale behind
student representation. "The
reason for representation
clearly relates to the added
perspective students would
bring to any discussion.
"I don't see how senate can
approve the principle of
student membership at this
level without extending it to
lower levels as well," Hall
said.
Education prof Roland Gray
said those opposed to student
representation were wasting
time making assumptions on
the basis of knowledge they
didn't have.
"Students have had voting
representation in the education
faculty since 1969 and it has
been very successful," he said.
Former federal justice
minister Davie Fulton, a
convocation member of senate,
said he did not see how student
representation could not be
fruitful.
"We must not forget what a
university is all about. It is not
for the advancement of faculty
or even of research. It is for
advancement of the education
of the students, and by
allowing them to participate in
the direction of their education
they will be learning," Fulton
said.
Some faculty members
objected to the report claiming
it violated departmental
autonomy.
"Senate should not break the
general agreement that
departments shall be
autonomous, which has always
been accepted," McGregor
said.
French department head
Larry Bongie and economics
prof Peter Pearse said the
report would conflict with the
numerous different situations
in the many departments of
such large faculties as arts.
Economics prof Gideon
Rosenbluth moved an
amendment changing the
statement students "shall" be
given representation to
students "may".
White said the committee
had considered such a wording
change but rejected it. "Approval of this report does not-
impose anything — it is merely
approval in principle. It would
be nice if faculties and
departments could have acted
autonomously on this but we've
been waiting two-and-a-half
years."
Robinson said he did not see
why senate could not set
minimum standards for
departments to follow.
Fulton said he wondered why
some senators seemed to be
opposed to student
representation at the departmental level.
Fulton said he wondered why
some'senators seemed to be
opposed to student
representation at the departmental level.
Pearse and others said they
were not opposed to student
representation, just to the
principle being imposed on the
departments.
"Sorry, but I guess I've
misinterpreted Rosenbluth's
motion," Fulton said.
Rosenbluth's" motion failed
as did other attempts to soften
the report.
The report will now be
returned to White's committee
to discuss implementation.
White said Thursday he
favored the committee
proposing several formulas for
voting representation then
allowing senate to decide.
"That speeds things up,"
White said.
"In any case we'll be,
proceeding as quickly as we
can."
—larry evans photo
TAKING A BREATHER in their respective corners heavyweight scrappers applied science dean W. D.
Finn, arts dean Doug Kenny and classics head Malcolm McGregor take in the action at Wednesday
evening's senate Battle Royal.
Aldridge turns
deaf ear
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Alma Mater Society president Doug Aldridge told council
Wednesday it could pass whatever it wanted but he would not
abide by the decision.
Aldridge was commenting on a motion about the student
position on the provincial government's proposed five-member
review commission on post-secondary education in B.C.
The motion asked him and external affairs officer Terri
Ball to take the names of Stan Persky, Svend Robinson and
Penny Newman to the B.C. Association of Student Union
meeting on Saturday as preferred candidates from UBC.
One or more students from B.C. post-secondary institutions
will be selected at the meeting for recommendation to education
minister Eileen Dailly as student representatives on the
commission.
After Aldridge decided he wasn't going to listen to council's
See Page 2: MOTION Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1973
UBC still uses DES
UBC health services are still
dispensing diethylstilbestrol
(DES), a synthetic estrogen,
commonly called the 'morning
after' pill, although the
University of Toronto health
service has temporarily
banned DES.
Dr. Dorothy Goresky freely
prescribed the pill Thursday
tollowing a Ubyssey story
Tuesday that the pill may be
cancer causing.
"There was no questionnaire
regarding my present state of
health, inquiries about other
drugs I might be taking or
questions about history of
cancer in my family," said The
Ubyssey' reporter who asked
for the pill.
Dr. Goresky did ask if any
precaution had been used and
suggested the woman might
want to discuss other contraception Pleasures.
The reporter was told DES
had been a successful treatment for women in drying up
their milk after freast feeding.
"You will not get cancer
from this temporary application of the drug," said the
doctor.
Vaginal cancer has been
found in teenage girls whose
mothers took the pill for other
causes for a prolonged period
during their pregnancies.
The doctor advised after
effects might occur but
refrained from outlining these
effects saying: "We find these
effects usually occur if we tell
the patient about them."
These   after   effects   are
nausea, diarrhea, depression
and fainting.
A prolonged exposure to this
drug is dangerous.
"A single application is not,"
said Dr. Goresky.
Dr. A. N. Johnson, director
of student health services,
advised The Ubyssey students
requesting the 'morning after'
pill are warned DES may
cause cancer.
Other students asking for
DES have confirmed they were
offered no such information.
DES has been found to alter
fetal vaginal cells in the
uterus.
Dr. Johnson said Tuesday he
wouldn't knowingly administer
a carcenogenic drug.
Why are UBC health services
still dispensing this drug when
its safety is highly suspect?
'Lower standard of living'
By DEBORAH MacNEILL
Canada can ease out of
foreign economic controls by
accepting a drop in living
standards, economics
professor Peter Pearse said
Thursday.
In a talk sponsored by the
UBC student Liberals, Pearse
and his colleague, professor
Dale Orr, said, however, they
could not predict what the
costs of eliminating foreign
influences would have for
Canadian social, cultural and
political life.
Motion dropped
From Page 1
advice even if it was given, council decided it would be useless
to pass the motion supporting Persky, Robinson and Newmann
over the other UBC candidates.
Robinson told The Ubyssey Thursday he felt Aldridge's
conduct at the meeting was "incredible".
"I can't believe how arrogant he has become," Robinson
said.
"I hope Dailly also considers the recommendation of the
arts undergraduate society because they are in the forefront of
the struggle for student democratization," Robinson said.-
Ball said 11 applications had been received by the BCASU to
date, six of which are from UBC. The UBC applicants are
Persky and Robinson, student senators; Newman, chairwoman
of the speakers and education committee, Grant Burnyeat,
former AMS president; Mike Doyle, AMS external affairs officer in 1968-69   and Roger Mattiussi, arts 3.
The other five applicants are John Maffet, Simon Fraser
University Student Society president; Bob Kissner and Peter
Doherty, SFU student senators; Mike Warsh, SFU student and
B.C. representative on the National Union of Students steering
committee and Mary Griffith, Capilano College student
president.
After heated discussion, council tabled a motion to pay for
Aldridge's return flight from Portland after he was kidnapped
and taken there on a mechanical engineering club field trip in
late November.
Aldridge, however, used AMS money for the return plane
ticket and said he does not intend to repay it.
Chevron
NOW
YOU CAN SAVE ON
• GAS AT THE SELF SERVICE ISLAND
IT COSTS LESS
• ALSO FULL SERVICE
AT THE
VILLAGE CHEVRON SERVICE
(CHARLTON & CHARLTON LTD.)
Your nearest service station on campus!
2190 Western Parkway
(Behind the Village)
Ph. 224-1226 or 224-1713
Pearce and Orr agreed that
it is necessary for Canada to
attain economic autonomy.
This can be done by exacting
high taxes, lowering the
standard of living.
Orr said the result would be a
three per cent decrease in
Canada's   economic   growth.
Pearse said one-quarter of
Canada's economic assets are
foreign-owned and 40 per cent
of Canada's profits leave the
country. This is very high by
international standards, he
added.
Foreign ownership results in
foreign control of Canadian
foreign policy. In 1971
Canada's surcharge tax was
disrupted by the U.S., said
Pearse.
Canada has a very open
economy. One-half of the goods
consumed in Canada are
imported, most particularly
from the U.S., he said. To
combat this dependency the
government has developed
tariffs to protect Canadian
industries and has encouraged
monetary investment, Orr
said.
^
#
%
^
4*
TARTUFFE >
by Moliere
Monday, January 22
Tuesday, January 23
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $1.00
BOX OFFICE  -   ROOM 207   -  FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
NEXT   WEEK   AT   HILLEL
MONDAY, JAN. 22 - 12:30
The  Jewish   Woman,   Speaks   on
her   own   perspectives
TUESDAY, JAN. 23 - 12:30
The   Lonely  Man   of  Faith:
A   Philosophy   of  Halakah
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24 - 12:30
Mysticism   of  the   Exile:
the   Zohar
Seymour   Levitan
MONDAY    WEDNESDAY - 12:30 - BET CAFE
TODAY FRIDAY NOON JANUARY 19
in the SUB ballroom
Listen to the sounds of the
CALIFORNIA LUTHERAN
CONCERT CHOIR
79 piece choir and symphonette
singing and playing the sounds of
today's church and symphony sounds
FREE!
Sponsored by Speakers and Education Committee. Friday, January 19, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Arts committee status uncertain
By GARY COULL
Senate's approval in principle of student voting
representation at all faculty
levels has put the status of the
arts faculty committee on the
subject into confusion.
The senate's action contradicts an earlier motion by
the faculty refusing students
representation on departmental and institute committees.
Margret Prang, chairman of
the faculty committee said,
however, her committee has
been prepared to work independent of the senate report.
"At the faculty meeting Dec.
13 we knew about the senate
report but decided not to wait
for it," she said Thursday.
The student committee vying
for representation will meet
with the faculty committee for
the first time Monday noon in
Bu. 154. Students will urge the
faculty committee to follow the
guidelines set by senate and
ask that open meetings of the
committees be held,
spokesmen said.
Students will also ask for
voting rights on the faculty
committee.
Prang said the inclusion of
students on the committee
would be a violation of the
mandate given them by the
arts faculty.
"The dean didn't appoint
students to the committee. As I
understood the motion we were
to consult students — but this
does not preclude some other
arrangement  being  made  in
the future."
She declined, however, to
outline what other
arrangements were possible.
Grad studies senator Stan
Persky said he predicted
earlier that students would win
and his prediction has been
borne out.
"The publicity of the arts
struggle combined with good
organizing among the student
senators gave us the vote. It
was through our presentation
we picked up the uncommitted
vote."
Arts undergraduate society
president Brian Loomes said
he was surprised and very
pleased to hear the result of the
senate motion.
"This will give the student
committee a very good
precedent."
Loomes said the AUS will
now move toward implementation of the senate's
action.
"We will begin to organize
departments to decide what
representation is needed and
the method by which it will be
determined."
The AUS newsletter which
has kept students- informed of
events between editions of The
Ubyssey, is expanding its
production to include creative
works and any other material
relevant to students.
Any students interested in
helping out are asked to come
to a meeting Sunday, 7:30 p.m.
at 2241 W. 7th.
—bordey photo
REFINED AGGIES chug-a-lug beer out of cups Thursday on SUB mall during boat race. Event is part
of Aggie Week which ends Saturday with Farmers' Frolic.
The last few issues of The Ubyssey
have really alarmed me.
I am referring to the several letters about crabs on your crotch
recently published by The Ubyssey.
No shit, they have got me so paranoid
about crabs that I feel I should pass on
a few tips on how to avoid getting
them.
The most important thing you have
to learn about hygiene in public
washrooms is NEVER WASH YOUR
HANDS! Think about it — some guy
who has crabs has just used the
facilities and he has touched his infected areas.
To wash his hands he has to touch
the tap whereupon the crabs jump
onto the sink while he is holding open
the spring loaded faucet.
Of course, the little buggers
cleverly lurk there, waiting for a new
victim to come and wash his hands,
mistakenly believing that he is
protecting his good health.
Another danger is men's urinals.
Usually the ceramic basin is located
at just the right height for crabs (who
have previously jumped off some
infected person) to do a double gainer
onto some poor unsuspecting guy's
outstretched offering.
Prevention, naturally, is the best
cure and I have worked out the
following techniques for avoiding
them:
When you have to urinate, stand
back about three feet from the urinal
Muck-
VAC war demo Saturday
The Vietnam action committee is organizing an anti-war
demonstration 3 p.m. Saturday at the Pacific Centre Plaza, to
coincide with Richard Nixon's second term inauguration.
The rally will march on the U.S. consulate and there read a
statement calling for the immediate and unconditional withdrawal or all American troops, planes and war material from
Indochina.
The Vancouver event will coincide with demonstrations
across the U.S. protesting the massive loss of life and
destruction which the U.S. has caused during recent bombing
raids over Hanoi and Haiphong.
to do so. It may take a little bit of
practice before your perfect your
trajectory, but this is a good
preventive technique because you will
be somewhat out of a crab's jumping
range.
This gives rise to a couple of
complications because, as your
bladder empties you will find that you
don't have the necessary pressure to
achieve that distance.
Ballistic experts will tell you that a
45-degree angle gives maximum
range but even so, you may find that
you have to take a couple of short
paces toward the urinal to compensate for the decrease in pressure.
Waterproof footwear is recommended, but don't use this technique
if an employee of the janitorial services is in the washroom.
Ladies, you will have to use your
own ingenuity to beat the problem,
but I can pass on a few hints I have
gleaned while defecating (Latin for
'taking a shit').
When you are squatting with your
nether regions exposed you are
particularly vulnerable to the devilish
little bastards. They will swarm off
the seat onto you by the score and if
you have a hairy ass you've had it!
Contrary to popular opinion tissue
paper toilet seat covers are not
adequate protection. For one thing,
they have a bad habit of sliding off the
seat into the toilet bowl.
Also, if you're like me and have a
phobia about getting crabs, your ass
may be so clammy from fear that the
paper instantly becomes a soggy
mess which disintegrates at the
slightest movement, or sticks to your
arse when you stand up, giving the
crabs ample opportunity to jump
from the paper onto you.
The best method by far is to again
maintain a safe distance between
yourself and the crabs. I manage to
accomplish this by putting one foot on
each side of the edge of the toilet bowl
so as to assume a squatting position
about 18 inches above the suspected
seat.
It helps if you are a skier because
you'll have already developed the
muscles in the back of your legs which
you need to maintain this position for
any length of time. My first attempt
at this position had disastrous results
because I was wearing shoes with
smooth leather soles.
I had one hell of a time at West-
brook Hospital trying to explain how" I
sprained my ankle in a full toilet bowl.
Since then I have worn heavy logger's
boots with steel caulks set in the soles.
I also suggest Vibram type soles.
Both are non-slip and you shouldn't
have any problems unless you're
drunk or have a poor sense of balance.
This method has its complications,
too, and to avoid being soaked by the
little geysers of water that splash up
as each fece (Latin for 'turd') strikes
bottom put on a pair of rainpants
before entering the stall.
As an extra precaution try not to
touch the doorhandles on thev stall
with your hands. I manage to* open
them now using my elbows but this
can be a problem on some of the
modern round locks that you have to
turn to open.
Now that big cuffs are coming
back into fashion, it's also a good idea
to fill your cuffs with DDT powder or
something similarly deadly to crabs.
Before I finish I would like to
remind you that crabs are not the only
vermin lying in wait in public
washrooms.
There is a similar more voracious
little species of parasite less well
known to science. They each have
eight legs and two huge mandibles.
Under the microscope they resemble
a giant coal shovel — the type used in
strip mines to load dump trucks.
Their eight legs enable them to
scuttle very rapidly about your pubes
and laymen fondly refer to them as
"dodgers" because of their tendency
to 'dodge' up your anus to safety when
you try to pick them off.
They are quite a bit more athletic
than crabs and although you can use
the preventive techniques described
above it is wise to be. doubly careful
when standing near toilet bowls,
urinals or sinks.
That's it for today — maybe more
on worms next week . . . until then,
good luck in the fight for survival
against UBC crabs.
Mike Fox
Science 4 Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1973
Gosh ! The 6uys
WHO WRITE THE TOIK&
HAVE A LOT OF FUNU
ALL THEY DO  IS DRINK
AND BEKT EACH OTHER
UP AND  SCRW/ &IWL$W
I BET THEY \
HAVE WAY MORE       ^
FUN THAN ME.
Boy-LOOKIT THOSE DIRTY
10KE5! AND THOSE PICTURES-1
YES SIR'.THEY KNOW
. HOW TO UVB'-i FREE
A.ND EASY, THATS
THE LIFE OF AN
ENGINEER'   BoYoH
BOY THATS fOK
ME-'    YESSlR.	
Hey BAOyH   wanna
Have some FUN WITH
,  A REAL MAM f
vtee hee hee 0- 5
DROPDEA^jCREEP!.'
HEE HEE HEB | j
HA HA HA!!
6NTHE    OTHERN
HAND   T DO HAVE j
THAT    MATH TEST    J
TOMORROW^
Sexism
The following letter was sent to Penny Newman,
chairwoman of speakers committee. Her reply is below.
Dear Penny:
As you know, every year us engineers have a Lady
Gadiva (sic) ride. This year we would like you to be our
Lady of Honour. The ride will be held on Tuesday,
February 30, at noon and will be a short 15 minute ride
around campus in the nude.
Harold Cunliffe,
EUS president
Anger
Mr. Cunliffe:
I received your letter on the evening of Wednesday
January 17, sealed and delivered by someone other than
yourself.
When I read your letter, I was struck both with
anger, frustration and hurt.
I am angry Mr. Cunliffe for reasons obvious to
myself but seemingly not so obvious to you or to the
society which you supposedly represent.
I am angry Mr. Cunliffe because this type of blatant
sexism, this exploitation, this degradation of women has
for too long been condoned and endorsed by your
society. It is apparent in your letter, as in all your
publications ie: The Red Rag, that you are* indeed
insensitive or ignorant of the type of racism which you
have and are presently perpetuating. I say racism Mr.
Cunliffe because this is exactly what it is! You are
engaging in actions similar to those which the engineering society of last year was condemned for but, instead
of degrading and making "cute" jokes about Jewish or
Chinese people, you have chosen women as your scapegoat.
I am angry Mr. Cunliffe because you are ignorant
and your bigotry does more than just degrade my
person, it de-personalizes me. I am an individual Mr.
Cunliffe with feelings, opinions, intellect and pride! This
Letters
is however not simply a condemnation for something
which has been directed at me personally, it is a
condemnation, a cry of anger, for the types of things
directed at all women on and off this campus. It is
anger for the fact that this type of attitude can still be
seen as funny, can be seen as the kind of situation
which any "normal" woman should laugh off and
pretend did not happen. Well Mr. Cunliffe I will not be
"normal", I am sick of you getting your laughs at mine
and other women's expense!
We are human beings, not objects of ridicule and
contempt!
Your attitudes and ignorance indeed leave me frustrated, for so many others like you, in differing ways,
carry the same kinds of stereotypic prejudices and racist
outlook. A word, a joke at our expense, this must really
satisfy you Mr. Cunliffe!
Well I reject your sexism Mr. Cunliffe and your
idiocy just as I reject the other racist attributes of which
your society has long been noted for.
So Mr. Cunliffe do strike another one up in your
long line of "funnies", but remember, this time your
sexism, your blatant racist tactics did not leave your
victim cowaring in a corner, as it did not leave the
victims of last year's pogrom silent but instead, has shed
more light upon the autrociously bigoted and cruel
antics of a society well known for just such acts.
I realize however that not everyone within the
engineering undergraduate society is to blame and I do
not wish to make such a generalization. I do however
feel that this society, especially its selected representatives, all to often show this type of narrow mindedness.
I wonder also as I write this, about the feelings of
those few women who are presently in the engineering
faculty. Is this the kind of shit which is displayed to
them and if so, I marvel at their courage to continue in
the face of just such a situation.
I also wonder at you Mr. Cunliffe and I have asked
myself over and over since I received your letter, just
how you can be so ignorant and blind. I have on many
occasions throughout the year had personal, intelligent
and friendly discussions with you. You have obviously
chosen to negate those encounters and to treat me as
something other than a person.
This type of dehumanization it seems is so often
the case for those who are unwilling to reject or
recognize their own bigoted stereotypes.
Finally, Mr. Cunliffe I think that a written apology
from you and the executive of the engineering undergraduate society in Tuesday's Ubyssey would be appropriate. Also, although I realize my action will not put a
stop to the sexism and exploitation exhibited in the
riding of Lady Godiva nor the ride itself, I hope that
this letter will illustrate the absurdity and destructive-
ness of your act and perhaps provide incentive for
others to condemn this constantly repeated bigotry on
the part of the EUS society.
Penny Newman
arts 3
THS WSSEY
JANUARY 19, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
writer and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in
room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305;
advertising, 228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Gosh and grumble, the poet mumbled. Not enough lines
for all my rhymes. In other words, these are our turds: Josie
Bannerman, Sucha Singh, Deborah MacNeill, Steve Brown,
Jan O'Brien, Mike Sasges, Sandy Kass, Gary Coull, Vaughn
Palmer, John Andersen, Sondra Marshall Smith, David
Schmidt, Lorri Rudland, Len Johnson, Ryon Guedes, Forrest
Nelson, Phil Magnall, Larry Evans and Kent (lam so married)
Spencer. I asked him to prove it at the weekend
seminar-cum-party at the address on the door.  Poetry
Songs and chants
Bill Bissett, flu-struck and unable,
appeared in the spirit only Sunday afternoon at the big library downtown.
Scheduled to read his poems as part of the
Sunday afternoon poetry series, he didn't,
but his buddies in the Poem Company did
and staged a satisfactory reading from his
works.
Poets, as everyone knows, are society's
outcasts and this probably accounted for
the readers' varying degree of reading
ability. Selections from Bissett's record
punctuated the reading and these poems
ranged from rather attractive airport,
factory and computerized noises drowning
out somebody talking, to highly comprehensible poem/chants similar in spirit
to those of west-coast aborigines.
His poems range from impressionistic
llowings to the highly articulate political
commentary entitled, in nova scotia th
pcopul call shit houses housus of parliment.
. .   work our guts out in amerikan plants
amerikan
evry thing mines blah blah blah in our
own
country nd th peopul cant be unified if th
amerikans control our own resources
food culture ideas media th pigs in th big
shit house in Ottawa say we they say we
who
we
they   got   a   sause   calld   houses   of
parliament
too for yr meat at th tabul, h p sauce it
sure tastes shitty too."
Poets, with their overwhelming concern
for an aesthetic integrity and truthful
rendering of a deep emotional experience
rarely have time for mere mechanics of
spelling. Perhaps Bissett's out to change
liderchure, or something. More than likely
though, Bissett, a poet concerned to a great
extent with sounds, is trying to emphasize
this aspect of the poetic whole.
Jim Carter reads on Sunday followed by
Gerry Gilbert on Jan. 28. The series runs
for eight more weeks. All readings at 2:30
in the Vancouver Public Library
auditorium. Admission is, of course, free.
Ed Cepka
PNE Autos
Machismo for sale
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cars
and more
By now the hoariest of
traditionalists will have
admitted that even if the
automobile is not here to
stay, it certainly has had
great effect on our age.
Actually, our dependence
is complete; at UBC one
can view acres of
pastures eaten up by
grazing cars, monstrous
buses disgorge humans,
and lines of hitch-hikers
wave their thumbs at
ears.
Appreciative of the
dependence, auto makers
produce a vehicle for
almost every type of use
or user. Students have
favourites; Volkswagens
for the frugal, Volvos for
the Nader-conscious, and
for the aspiring intellectual Austin Cam-
bridges or Morris Oxfords.
The importance of cars
is shown by the Auto
Show, combining
elements of the old-
fashioned Agricultural
Fair and the folk-mass.
The Pacific Auto Show is
being held in three
buildings at the PNE
grounds. It affords the
congregation the spectacle of hundreds of
shining, squat, metallic
beasts. This show is
frankly commercial, not
like the high-art Salons of
Turin   or    Geneva    or
Montreal, yet the cult of
the car shines forth. For a
non car-freak, such a
show sounds absurd. But
consider, for a minute,
the importance of such an
event.
Cars seem to have two
magical effects on
people. One is the wish-
fulfillment, extension-of-
the-personality interest.
All those cars we cannot
afford or could not use
beckon like sirens.
Porsches or Jaguars are
not useful for trips to the
dentist or even the yearly
junket to Manitoba;
Ferraris and the Rolls
Royce are beyond our
ken. Yet who would deny
that life would be sweeter
with one. Such fantasy is
used even to sell us the
vulgar tincans we can
afford.
But besides the fantasy
world, automobiles are a
part of the mechanical
fascinations of men. Talk
of trouble-free motoring
and gas mileage, of overhead valves and disc
brakes permeates the
serious car talk. Auto
show visitors, only the
males, for their girls are
not interested in such
complicated things, poke
under hoods and gawk at
technical displays with
the usual air of experts,
be they professors or
cowboys.
The same impetus that
moves men to water their
autos on Saturdays or
tinker with them seems to
have a wider significance
as one surveys this
mechanical age. From
automatic can-openers to
automatic car-tops the
fascination animates.
A feature of this display
of products from many
lands is a tobacco firm's
collection of old cars, a
big drawing-card. These
old cars remind one
subtly that not so long ago
cars were not produced
by huge corporations.
In the centre of the
show was the result of a
contest to produce an
environmentally - sound
vehicle, that is one which
was safer, more efficient
and much cheaper than
today's cars. The
University of Western
Ontario's electric car and
UBC's contest-winner,
the Wally-Wagon, were
but curiosities among the
real fantasy-producing,
purchasable blobs. Yet if
the car is to have a future
as appliance or adornment, the modern
dinosaurs must be
replaced by a higher
species. In the meantime,
the monsters rule. It all
sounds rather silly until
one realizes our dependence.
Barry Ferguson
mm
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Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1973 Dra
ma
Godot: funny, full of life
Samuel Becket is now "established." He won
the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1970 (true to
form, he didn't reject it as Sartre did, but he didn't
accept it either). His plays are performed all over
the world and he is no doubt comfortable financially. And critics have quickly piled up a
mountain of interpretive articles and books. In
short, Beckett's bleak, mind-boggling vision of the
human condition has now become a commonplace
to the educated.
All this began when Waiting for Godot was first
performed at the Babylon Theatre in Paris in 1952.
The normally cool Parisienne audiences were
astounded and delighted at what they saw. How
could anyone who saw mankind so harshly stand
to go on living? How could a play that sees human
life as a desperate, endless wait for a fulfillment
that never comes be funny?
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett,
designed and directed by Don Briard, starring
Matt Walker, Allan Gray, Buzz Bense, Rodger
Bartom and Christopher Crane. Until
Saturday at Dorothy Somerset Studio.
Don Briard's current production of Waiting for
Godot at Dorothy Somerset has the vitality too
many Beckett stagings lack. Many directors get
caught up in the heavy trip of Beckett — the
characters wallow in despair, they do nothing,
they talk in circles, nothing happens. Thus the
main accent is on the "nothing to be done" lines.
This makes for dull theatre and turns Beckett into
a boring prophet of doom.
Briard's Waiting is Beckett as it should be:
witty, earthy, intelligent, sardonic, profound and
moving. He never lets the gloom of the play
overpower its joy; nor does he let the humor bury
the seriousness. He has accomplished the near-
impossible — a successful tragicomedy. We
laugh at the characters while we are repelled and
Allen Gray, Buzz Bense, Matt Walker. .. moving human drama.
shocked by them; but when each day (act) ends,
we feel the pure tragedy of their lives.
Briard has exploited the potential of the script
to the full. In doing so he destroys the common
notion that the play is lifeless. Every word has
reverberations that echo throughout. Every line
signifies a change in attitude, mood or outlook.
Vladimir and Estragon are not dry characters,
like those found in Elliot's Hollow Men. They are
lively, capable men who are doing their best with
a bad situation.
The situation is indeed bad. Life is an endless
repetition of meaningless cycles. Time has no
meaning because nothing really changes. But
there is no comfort in constancy because nothing
has any value. Man can find no meaning in his life,
so he is sustained only by a bitter, ever-thwarted
hope: his waiting for Godot.
Beckett has taken all philosophies, religions
and credos to their ultimate extension. Vladimir
and Estragon are the product of the defeat of all
beliefs. Estragon suggests at one point, "We could
turn resolutely toward Nature." Vladimir answers, "We've tried that." They have tried
everything. So Godot is not "god" in any simple
sense; Godot is something necessarily un-
nameable, because all things with names have
failed to alleviate man's condition.
The marvellous thing about Beckett is that he
continues to affirm human life under such conditions. Done properly, Waiting for Godot is a
funny and captivating play. Briard's production is
well done. He breathes life into the sparse script.
This is done in several ways:
The character's moods are constantly
changing, and there are many one-liners that in
themselves contain an entire conversation. These
are performed with great care so that very few
are lost.
The second major device Briard uses to keep
the play alive is movement. The play has several
vaudeville routines that enliven the talk of the
characters. Briard uses all of these, and has invented a few of his own.
The most original aspect of this production is
the differentiation of character between Estragon
and Vladimir. In the two other stagings of the play
I have seen, they were played with Tweedle-Dee
and Tweedle-Dum similarity. Briard portrays
Estragon as a blunt, roguish clown-pessimist and
Vladimir as a more serious, gentle and thoughtful
optimist. Giving the two main characters different personalities lends a needed fullness to the
play. Briard has made the play a moving experience by convincing us that Vladimir and
Estragon are as human as we are.
The acting is excellent. Matt Walker is a funny
and personable Estragon. Allan Gray handles the
slightly more difficult role of Vladimir with
sensitivity and care. His role is the key to the
success of this production, yet he brings it off with
apparent ease. Roger Barton and Buzz Bense are
suitably grotesque as Pozzo and Lucky. Barton
does an especially fine job with the difficult role of
Pozzo.
My one criticism of the production is that like
many directors of Beckett, Briard has not always
taken the care necessary to make all of the lines
audible. It seems to me that Beckett stands or
falls on his dialogue. We must hear all of it in
order to get the full effect. Unfortunately, two or
three passages are lost because the character's
antics make them impossible to hear; and worse,
Lucky's speech is again treated as gibberish. It
may be incomprehensible, but it is a fascinating
and essential part of the play. We are cheated
when it is performed in a way that prevents us
from hearing the words.
I would recommend this production to anyone.
It is the best performance of Beckett I have ever
seen.
David MacKinlay
Friday, January 19, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 For your listening
Winchester, man and music
Jesse Winchester's recorded work comprises
only two albums, but it is enough to establish him
as one of (he two or three pre-eminent singer/-
songwriters around. Winchester's albums cut
across established boundaries at will, standing up
well in any number of different categories, but it is
only recently that he has begun to receive the
public attention he deserves. Jesse Winchester
has it all, and in such quantity that all but the best
competition merely pales beside him.
Jesse Winchester, Ampex Records, A-10104.
Jesse Winchester, Third Down, 110 to Go,
Bearsville Records, BR2102.     	
Winchester's first album was released in the
late spring of 1970, at a time when student dissent
over the Vietnam war was widespread in the
United States. Winchester was not a participant,
however, as he had already opted for Canada
rather than the American war machine. Instead of
containing tirades against the war, the songs on
the album evidence Winchester's love of the land,
particularly the south, he had left. It is this ability
to evoke a feeling of time and place that permeate
both of Winchester's albums and makes them
almost mood pieces. The southern aura with
which Winchester infused his first album is
densely atmospheric and inescapable. The album
is among the handful of 'best ever' released in the
field of rock, and contains at least one
unquestionable masterpiece, "Yankee Lady".
The song is the story of a love affair between
himself and an older woman, and the emotional
content is direct and believable.
"An autumn walk on a country road/ and a
million flaming trees/ I was feeling uneasy/
'cause there was winter in the breeze/ and she
said Oh Jesse, look over there/ the birds are
southward bound/ Oh Jesse, I'm so afraid/ to lose
the love we found."
In "Black Dog", Winchester captures the dark
underside of the south which always seems to be
lurking in the background. The cut is dense and
foreboding, with a perceptible gloominess created
by the organ and slapping drums.
While the composition is uniformly excellent so
is the level of musicianship. The musicians are
mostly unknowns but they join together to become
a single entity acting as the musical extension of
Winchester's art. The sound of the album comes
out of the same ethos as the early Band, and there
are vintage Robbie Robertson touches one is sure
to recognize.
Winchester's transition from an American
frame of mind to a Canadian one becomes apparent in the cut "Snow" from the first album but
it is in Third Down, 11© to Go that it is fully
developed. While none of the sons is explicitly
Canadian there is a feel to the record which at
least for me, ideally suits the Canadian fall and
winter.
The main difference between the two records is
in the structure of the songs. On the first album
each song is a fully developed piece, telling a story
or painting a picture. The songs on the new album
are shorter and sketchier. There are thirteen of
these vignettes and they do much to expose for us
the inner thoughts of Jesse Winchester. Not that
they are all serious and introspective, for the
range of the compositions is vast. The album runs
the gamut from rockers, "Midnight Bus", "God's
Own Jukebox"; to love songs "Silly Heart", "The
Easy Way"; to nursery songs "Lullaby for the
First Born", "Doo La Lay"; to expositions of
Winchester's philosophy; "Isn't That So" and "Do
It has been suggested by Stephen Davis in
Rolling Stone that Winchester is frustrated by his
inability to return to the United States. The whole
of Third Down would seem to me to refute this.
The pictures of Winchester on the cover of the new
album show a mellower person than the gaunt
visage of the fugitive on the first album. Similarly
the songs on the new album bespeak a sense of
contentment, of family. To me the title Third
Down, no To Go indicates a complete adoption of
Canadian rules rather than frustration at having
to play by them.
There seems to me to be two recurrent themes
in Winchester's work, one dealing with the
necessity of enjoying life, of having a good time,
and the second dealing with a fear of God's
displeasure, and the grand ennui experienced
when pleasure is not present. With Winchester,
wine is often metaphorically representative of
fun, as can be seen in "Payday", from the first
album, when Jesse, on a wine-induced binge, says,
"I think I feel like dancing the night away."
We have all experienced the cathartic
depression of the lines "I've a sadness too sad to
be true". Everyone enjoys feeling sorry for
himself now and then but the trick to it is in containment, to not reach the abject despair Winchester describes in "Quiet About It", "I have this
notion/ Call it my fear/ That I will die alone". In
"Glory to the Day" one gets the feeling that Jesse
Winchester has achieved a sort of self-communion
in discovering his inner self. Cloaked in an
ethereal Todd Rundgren arrangement we get a
touching description of a personal religious experience : "Have you ever stood at a real old water
well/ And dropped a rock and listened while it fell/
. . . The real old water well that's your soul/ So
silent and deep inside its hole/ Its answer is so
very far away."
Jesse Winchester is a singer /songwriter at a
time when there is a proliferation within the
genre. In the midst of the confusion Winchester
has carved out a distinctive niche. He is above
comparison with the James Taylor/Cat Stevens
school and is different from the other worthies
working in the same vein. Where Randy Newman
is sardonic, Winchester is merely teasing, where
Loudon Wainwright III is cute, Winchester is
humerous. Pete Townsend espouses Mener Baba;
Winchester's religion is unspecified but universal.
There are many similarities between Winchester
and Jackson Browne; both are rock lyricists of
surpassing power and great personal sensitivity.
The main difference is one of age and origin.
Browne is young, mainly from California but also
from New York. Winchester is older and married,
from Montreal by way of Memphis. The crowd
which should be eating up Jesse Winchester,
though, belongs to Gordon Lightfoot, who works
out of the same stylistic stance as Winchester,
only with infinitely less talent. Jesse Winchester's
machismo is very real and in the mass appeal
market that commodity is not peanuts.
A passage from Juan Rodriguez's description
of Jesse's wedding in the October 1972 issue of Oui
attributes Winchester's sources and perfectly
captures the feel of a Jesse Winchester album, "In
time there was a call for music, and so out came
the amp, the guitars, the conga drum, the cowbell
and the tambourine. All the songs were sung, from
Jerry Lee Lewis to "Travelin' Man" by Ricky
Nelson, even a few old Beatles' songs. . . "Goin'
to the chapel and I'm gonna get ma-a-aried. . ."
"Hats off to Larry" ran into "Runaway", and
Little Richard, Chuck Berry, and Hank Williams,
let the music play, let your spirit fly . . . by the
end of it they were singing Dixie. . ."
People are finally discovering Jesse Winchester, and he is well worth the time and attention. Winchester should be around for a long
time, so climb aboard early. As James Dimitri
puts it in his expose of the Mafia, Matresses I have
Known, "Dis is a hit!" Mike Biggs
All-star performance
D'Arcy ... at the beginning
Tommy is already an established rock
composition, so much so in fact that the
Who grew to dislike playing it, having
played it so repetitiously since its first
recording in July of '69. As Keith Moon said
in a recent Rolling Stone article, "yeah, it
started becoming a bit of a bore.
Everywhere we'd go we'd do our little show
and it became so we were doing it in our
sleep. Toward the end we got bored. We
played it 18 months nonstop. All the
spontaneity was gone."
Tommy, London Symphony Orchestra
and chamber choir with the Who, Ringo
Starr, Richie Havens, Merry Clayton
and Rod Stewart.
In spite of all this Tommy is back in a
brand new format. Performed by the
London Symphony Orchestra and Chambre
Choir with noted guest soloists we are
presented with a thoroughly competent
version that sparkles with virtuosity. From
the Who, Peter Townshend, Roger Daltrey,
and John Entwistle give appearances as
the narrator, Tommy, and Cousin Kevin
respectively. Ringo Starr is a ridiculously
funny Uncle Ernie, and Richie Havens is
the Hawker. Both sing their parts in a
totally unique manner. Merry Clayton
sings a soulful Acid Queen, and Rod
Stewart sings Rod Stewart in "Pinball
Wizard". Regardless of the soloists'
reputations on other records, they
somehow seem to lose their magical aura
which surrounds them and they become an
integral part of the composition. They fit
and make Tommy a cohesive whole and no
just a series of guest solos.
The idea of using a symphony orchestr,
as the musical source is not new; th
Moody Blues' Days of Future Past ir
corporated the London Festival Orchestr,
with such success that the record is still i
great demand after almost five years. Bu
Tommy is more than a rock group backe*
up by an orchestra; it is something mor
traditional, an orchestra augmented wit:
the best of rock personalities. It is an al
tempt to make the much touted rock oper,
into a "genuine" piece of serious music. A
long as one doesn't take the attempt to
seriously, the composition is immensel;
enjoyable, enjoyable in its own right an
not for any pretences instilled in us b;
others for whatever reason. And th
London Symphony does perform well
although it seems sometimes a little weak
One gets the impression that the com
position was not scored for the full range c
instruments at the orchestra's commanc
The Underture especially seems stuntec
perhaps because I am used to the guitar o:
the original recording, and the Overtur
has lost its characteristic French horns
replaced instead with slide trombones
However these are not serious faults, an
the orchestra is fully into its own o
"Sparks", I'm Free", and of cours
"Pinball Wizard", the most powerful cut o
the album.
The record is especially suited fo
listening to, instead of listening at, and i
available from any competitive recor
store for about eight bucks.
David Pierce
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1973 pleasure
Listening or dancing,
good strong sounds
There are three major types of record
that one can choose from to put on one's
turntable — listening ones, dancing ones
and plain old mind-blowing ones. This new
release by D'Arcy is the perfect record to
listen to after a hard day of frustrating
classes. It is gentle, but reviving rather
than depressing, and it relaxes and pacifies
the listener without sending him to sleep.
Back At The Beginning, D'Arcy. Ab-
solv. ABS33001.
All the cuts were written by D'Arcy, who
also co-arranged and co-produced the
album.
The album begins well with Prison Song,
which opens gently with the piano of
Graeme Lennox and D'Arcy's acoustic
guitar. D'Arcy has a soft gentle voice which
blends well with this arrangement, as it
does all the others. This cut has a dual
tempo, with a more spirited wave following
the slower, gentler phrase.
Are You Coming is quicker in pace, and
the style is reminiscent of James Taylor. It
is the shortest track on the album but one of
the better ones.
Long Way Down seems divided into
sections, and is the longest cut on the
album. It follows the same formula used
almost throughout the album, of D'Arcy's
clear gentle acoustic introduction followed
by the joining in of the piano and drums.
D'Arcy's relaxed vocals round out a very
pleasant song to listen to.
Forest is concerned with the merits of
living out in the country as opposed to
existence in the filthy big city, and stands
out from all the others in having more
interesting lyrics and a danceable beat.
D'Arcy's acoustic guitar marks out the
rhythm, and the twang of Rayburn Blake's
lead guitar dominates where D'Arcy's dual
vocals leave off.
Have A New Life and Fly To The Sky
both feature the sliding steel guitar, giving
them a slight country flavor, with some fine
piano and acoustic finger picking on the
latter.
In Sunflower, Graeme Lennox takes the
honors on piano with some very fine finger
work. Back at the Beginning and One Free
Dream rouhd out a very pleasant 40
minutes listening.
If D'Arcy is to listen to, then Julio Finn
is definitely to dance to. This nine man
band, which features Julio Finn on harp,
shares out the lead vocals between four of
the members, with the remainder oc-
casionally supporting.	
Deal For Service,  Julio  Finn  Blues
Band. Barclay 90018.
Although the Julio Finn Blues Band is
not, to my mind, one of the greatest blues
bands in the world, they offer some good
raunchy blues on this album, which is ideal
to put on in the wee small hours, when the
party is beginning to thin out a little.
The opener, Shakey Jake, has a slowish,
thumping beat strong enough to rouse the
tiredest drunk back to his feet again. Mike
McEwan's fine blues guitar laces all the
way through, accompanied by Finn's
whining harp.
The slow, swinging tempo of the
following track, Public Schoolboy, displays
some fine piano tinkling by Andy Bown.
The persistent harp complements well the
growling sax of Jimmey Conley, which first
supports before taking the long solo interlude. It is almost a talking blues and
makes a fine smooching number for the tail
end of any party.
Leiber & Stoller's familiar Young Blood
hardly needs any introduction. Eddie
Tuleja takes the lead vocal of this very
danceable thing, supported by everyone in
the studio for the chorus.
Bad Boy, written by Eric Clapton and
Delaney Bramlett, has a medium slow
swing tempo and features some delicious
piano and harp combinations.
Other lively up tempo numbers which
are great to dance to are Rain, Rain Go
Away, Alaska, and Living on the Highway,
which all feature the lighter, smoother
vocals of Mike McEwan; and also Nefario,
which is a saxophone-dominated talking
blues.
Julio Finn's howling harp takes the
spotlight in the medium slow thumper,
Mama's Baby, Daddy's Maybe. Rounding
out the album is the mid tempo Can't Be
Satisfied.
All in all, 36-1/2 minutes of good, dirty,
sweaty party music.
Bob Mitchinson
Graeme Lennox ... D'Arcy keyboard man
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Friday, January 19, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Drama
Dead end street
Derek Ralston, Walter Marsh, Marti Maraden ... in drama of 1919 Winnipeg strike
The winter of 1918 was not a peaceful
one in Canada. In Winnipeg two thousand
workers walked off their jobs after their
employer refused to meet demands of an
.85 an hour wage and a 44 hour work week.
The Winnipeg Trades and Labor Council, in
a motion of solidarity, asked all workers for
support. Thirty thousand men left their
jobs in response. Everything ground to a
halt. Lulu Street is a street with a
dilapidated boarding house in the Winnipeg
of 1919.
Life was barren and demanding at that
time, and it exacted a special strain of
strength and tenacity in a man to survive.
There's Mat Alexander  (Walter Marsh),
Lulu Street by Ann Henry. Directed by
Robert Clothier. At the Playhouse.
the owner of the boarding house, former
preacher and the driving force behind the
workers. There's his daughter Elly (Marti
Maraden), an independent capable woman
of 18 whose adolescence was denied her.
Derek Ralston as soldier of fortune Ernest
McTavish or Wayne Robson's portrayal of
Jimmy McTaggart typify Henry's hard-
drinkin', hard-cursin' image of the prairie
man. These characters have the potential
for rich characterization and colorful
drama. Unfortunately, the potential eluded
Henry's grasp.   ,
The major criticism to be levelled at the
play is its uneveness. It is not a cohesive
dramatic presentation, its focus shifts and
wanders, and the play's events resemble
patches carelessly stitched into a faded
quilt.
The Winnipeg strike is only a
background, functioning as the sole
motivating force behind the characters.
However, the audience is treated to
monologues of political propaganda. One
feels that the strike situation has been
imposed upon the characters, and they
must grudgingly talk about it to maintain
the atmosphere. The result is superficiality. An analogy is the characters'
numerous referrals to the heat. It takes
more than talking about a hot summer day
to convince the audience; the actors must
be the summer heat in every motion.
The drama of the strike, in Chekhovian
style, is offstage. Henry maintains the
audience's attention with the personal
conflicts resulting from the boarders.
Henry, however, flits from character to
character; problems are sketchily
presented then forgotten, or vaguely intimated at with little depth. Resolutions are
quick and contrived, and one feels cheated
after witnessing these unrelated incomplete events.
The superficial handling of the
characters seriously undermines the play's
emotional depth. Maraden and Marsh
appear as the only "real" characters.
Furthermore, the actors' valiant attempts
to preserve the Scottish accents cause
more harm than good.
Clothier fails to get it together. He loses
control of the production, allowing dangling
ends to dangle even more. The situation
nears absurdity when, in the beginning of
the second act, the play becomes a
vaudeville show of singing, dancing and
bagpipes.
"We're waiting for the golden
dawning," Ernie says. At the play's conclusion, he packs his bag and sets off;
unrewarded and still waiting. So were we.
Steve Morris
Do Something For Someone —
TWO-WEEK UBC
BLOOD DRIVE
Starts Monday, Jan. 22
BROCK HALL — 8:30- 4:30 Continuous
DON'T DELAY — COME TODAY!
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS - CHARBROILED STEAKS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS-MON. to THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
,FRI. &SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.,
UBC's Musical Theatre Society Mussoc
presents
PROMISES,
PROMISES
FEBRUARY 1 — 10
CURTAIN: 8:30 p.m.
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM
STUDENT PERFORMANCES FEB. 5, 6/8:30
FEB, 8/12:30 p.m.
TICKETS 1.00/1.50 - THUNDERBIRD SHOP (SUB)
BETTER BUY BOOKS
pays  GASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY PAPERBACKS, ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - COLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. 10th Ave. 224-4144; Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
SUB FILMSOC""
PRESENTS
George C. Scott
in
The Arthur Hitler
production
HOSPITAL
with
Diana Rigg, Barnard
Hughes, Nancy Marchand
Tonight
Sat.
Sun.
7:00 & 9:30
7:00 & 9:30
7:00
SUB AUD. 50c
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1973 Movies
Women's Liberation comes of age
Up the Sandbox is a
funny and valuable film
about a woman's struggle
with her roles as wife,
mother and person.
Barbra Streisand is the
wife of a university
professor. They live, with
their two children, in the
urban semi-nightmare of
New York's upper East
Side.    .
Up the Sandbox directed by Irvin Ker-1
shner, screenplay by
Paul Zindel, based on
the novel by Anne
Richardson Roiphe,
starring Barbra
Streisand and David
Selby. At the Stanley.
They are the typical
early-thirties couple. The
wife is stuck with the
tedious, menial chores of
kids and apartment; the
husband is sympathetic
and understanding, but
the family circumstances
prevent him from being
really helpful.
If used carelessly, this
device can easily make a
film superficial. Director
Kershner, however, takes
care to make each fantasy meaningful in terms
of Barbra's development.
Each gives us an insight
into a facet of her
problem. She places
herself in the various
imaginary   roles   to   try
them out, and to
rediscover who she really
is. Her self got lost
somewhere between the
playpen and the laundry
room and the film
documents her search for
it.
Surprisingly it is a very
good   movie.    At    the
Barbara Streisand ... down but not out
beginning of the film
Barbra discovers she is
again pregnant. This
brings her face to face
with the dilemma that
has been bothering her
for a long time. Should
she submit to becoming a
middle-class mother and
retire   to   the   suburbs?
Should she go on trying to
keep up with her
husband's world while
bringing up three
children in a hostile
urban environment? Or
should she have an
abortion and try to
refashion her life through
a career?
The film proceeds to
tackle her problem with
skill, depth and subtlety.
Barbra works out her
crisis through a series of
obviously significant
fantasies :
o She blatantly confronts
a career woman who she
suspects is having an
affair with her husband;
o She boldly argues the
need for the more human
female perspective in
world affairs at a news
conference;
o She shoves her mother's
head   in   a   silver   anniversary cake;
o She blows up the Statue
of Liberty;
o She enters the hospital
to have her abortion.
Women's Lib is typed in
the same cliches, simplifications and crap that
any movement must put
up with. God knows other
movements have been
more exploited than
represented in films. It is
heartening that at least
two films have been
made recently about
women's liberation that
are not mockeries. Carrie
Snodgrass was captivating in Diary of a Mad
Housewife; and now
Barbra Streisand is funny
and rewarding in Up the
Sandbox.
David MacKinlay
t OPERATION ±
DOORSTEP T
FREE TB SKIN TESTS
Operation Doorstep mobile clinics will be located at the
University of British Columbia to offer free tuberculin skin tests
to all students, faculty members and staff.
Positive reactors — those showing the presence of tubercle bacilli
— will be given a chest x-ray to determine if any active infection
is present.
CLINICS WILL BE LOCATED AT
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Monday, January 22nd
Tuesday, January 23rd
Wednesday, January 24th
9:30-11:30 & 12:30-4:30
9:30-11:30 & 12:30-4:30
9:30-11:30 & 12:30-4:30
CHRISTMAS SEALS
FIGHT
RESPIRATORY
DISEASES
-ffl) PIONEER-
More
than you expect
for less than you
expected.
Stereo systems in the $400 price range, while
not unpleasant to listen to, have not as a rule
provided that last bit of musical accuracy
for those who take their listening very seriously. Our $398.00 Pioneer/Altec-
Lansing/Garrard/Shure stereo system has
changed all that, as many of our critical and
satisfied customers who own it will testify.
The Altec/Lansing 409-B drivers combine
high-efficiency with a degree of quality reproduction seldom found in a speaker of this
price. Enclosed in a cabinet custom built by
Commercial Electronics, they provide
accurate reproduction with little tonal colouration. The Pioneer SX424 AM/FM stereo
receiver provides sufficient power (over 28
RMS watts of it) to handle the most tortuous
musical passages in the average living
room, and its sensitive tuner will capture
your favorite radio stations with clarity. The
Garrard SL65B automatic turntable with a
Shure M93E cartridge and diamond stylus
will treat your records gently and add no unpleasant sounds of its own.
Together, these remarkable components
cost just $398.00. If you've thought that a
stereo system in this price range couldn't
provide quite enough sonic satisfaction, we
invite you to visit Commercial Electronics
and learn otherwise.
Creative Soud by -B Commercial Electronics ltd
1305 Burrard
685-0345
(Free Parking at Rear)
555 West Broadway
876-4414
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1973 Movies
Auteur cultists
fooled again
If you are the type of person who says
"Let's go to see the latest Fellini film,"
instead of "Let's go to see Roma", then
congratulations, you are a member of the
'Auteur' film cult.
The Auteur cult is based on the concept
of the film director as the author of the total
cinematic experience, or, to put it simply,
the idea that the film is the sole responsibility and brainchild of the director.
Obviously this applies more to some
directors than others, depending on the
degree to which the director exercises his
The Getaway Directed by Sam
Peckinpah. With Steve McQueen and
Ali MacGraw. Written by Walter Hill.
At the Capitol.
control over the picture. It is for this reason
that Sam Peckinpah, a veritable tyrant on
the set, is a particular darling among the
cultists.
However, Peckinpah's latest film, The '
Getaway, seems not to have profited from
his iron hand. Indeed, it may well be interpreted as distinguished only by its
lacklustre. Certainly the performances of
the 'actors', the unimaginative camera
work, the emotionally neutral setting, and
the boring script give us no evidence to
contradict this viewpoint.
The plot line is as follows: the hero
(played by Steve McQueen) who is doing a
stretch in jail, manages to swing an early
parole with a corrupt parole officer (played
not too badly by Ben Johnson), using his
wife (the lovely Ali Macgraw) as a go-
between. The condition is, yes, you guessed
it, that he rob a bank, and give his patron
half of the proceeds. After the most uninteresting robbery ever put on celluloid,
comes the inevitable botch-up and double-
cross.
Peckinpah's obsession with violence is
common knowledge. Although this love of
the bloody has resulted in some incredibly
bad cinema (i.e. The Wild Bunch), it has
also been responsible for brilliant pieces of
film like Straw Dogs.
Perhaps the film-going audience's
sensitivities are jaded by constant exposure to graphic violence on the silver
screen, or- perhaps   (in fact,  probably)
Peckinpah has lost his touch. In any case,
his scenes of bloodshed no longer retain
their shock value.
Also offensively pointless is his use of
the wild automobile chases that became a
cliche even before The French Connection
was made.
Let us not, however, heap too much of
the blame on Peckinpah.
True, having borne most of the
responsibility for the picture, he should
bear the brunt of the blame. True, the film
is clumsily directed. But there are other
aspects that deserve as much attention.
The incredible performances of the
film's stars, Ali MacGraw and Steve
McQueen, deserve special mention.
Dissolving any feeling or emotion that may
have existed in Walter Hill's anemic
screenplay, MacGraw and McQueen play
their scenes together as if someone off
camera were writing the dialogue and
whispering it to them as they went along.
Steve McQueen, laconic at this best,
seems cursed with the inability to muster
more than three facial expressions:
1) no expression at all, which he
wears for 90 per cent of his presence
onscreen.
2) a grimace, which he uses to
assimilate pain and/or pleasure.
3) a scowl
The lovely Ali MacGraw, who is best
known for her portrayal of a head of lettuce
in Love Story, has apparently only one
expression in her repertoire. Against the
picture's arid, colourless setting,
(somewhere in southern Texas) both she
and McQueen blend in like chameleons.
Perhaps the most insufferable scene in
the entire picture is when Peckinpah's
directing skill is paired with McQueen's
and MacGraw's acting.
Huddled in a dimly-lit garage or barn,
McQueen, MacGraw and two accomplices
run over the plans for the robbery. Ali
glances furtively at Steve. Steve scowls,
says something to the others. The others
nod solemnly; one of them says something
to Steve. Ali scowls, Steve grimaces. All of
them, trying to fill in the holes in the
dialogue, looking as mysterious as they
possibly can; the camera cuts, pans back
and forth, looking for something important,
but unable to find it.
Ryon Guedes
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
"Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to
students in Fourth Year Arts, Fine Arts, Music, Commerce,
Science, Elementary Education and Fifth Year Secondary
Education. Application cards are available in the Faculty
Offices of all other Faculties. For students in Graduate Studies
Programmes the Graduate Adviser will have application cards.
All students who expect to graduate this Spring are requested
to complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office
(Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but no later than February 15,
1973.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in the
Office of the Registrar and any student in the above
graduating years who does not receive cards in the mail should
check with the Registrar's Office to confirm that his local
mailing address is correct.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to make
application for his degree. The list of candidates for graduation
to be presented to the Faculty and to the Senate for approval
is compiled from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
"A SURE FIRE CANDIDATE \LfaUor
^NEOFTHEBESTMatthau
CLYDEGILMOUR     	
TORONTO STAR
/     Cared
Burnett
Vogue
91o uKANVlLLc
685-5434
"PetewTillic"
All about love and marrioge!
SHOWTIMES: 12:25, 2:35
4:45, 6:50, 9:05
"An enjoyable and moving story —
everyone should see it." —les wedman, sun
Odeon
881   GRANVILLE
682-7448
"SOUNDER"
GENERAL
SHOWTIMES:  12:00,  1:45, 3:45,
        5:45, 7:45, 9:45
COLOR
"The Mechanic," is a rapid-
paced story of a hired assassin who
has a hundred ways to kill—and
they all work_
SHOW TIMES:
12:25, 4:05, 6:00,
8:00, 10:00
Coronet
BRONSON
in A MICHAEL WINNER Film
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828 MATURE
MECHANIC
"The most enjoyable
Fellini in a dozen years.
—NEW YORK TIMES
Varsitu
224-3730* .
4375 W. 10th
SHOW TIMES:
7:30, 9:30
FELLINIS
ROMA
WARNING:     Coarse    language    and
some religious ridicule.
    r. w. Mcdonald. b.c. Dir.
Man oP la Mane ha
EH
CAMBIE.t latk
876-2747
PETER O'TOOLE - SOPHIA LOREN
ALL SEATS RESERVED — CALL 688-2308
Sun. through Fri. 8 p.m.—$3.50
Sat. 7 p.m., 10 p.m.—$3.50 Matinees Wed. 2 p.m.—42.50
Sat. 2 p.m.—$2.50Sun. 1:30 p.m. & 5 p.m -r$3 50   	
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario
BACHELOR OF EDUCATION
DEGREE
University graduates are invited to apply for admission to the
eight-month program leading to the Bachelor of Education degree
and Ontario teacher certification for elementary or secondary
schools. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree or be
eligible for graduation by September, 1973.
FEATURES
The Faculty of Education occupies a new
academic-residential complex, Duncan McArthur Hall.
The Faculty of Education's forward-looking program, in line
with current and emergent educational needs, emphasizes the
human dimension in education. The students have many options
in course selections where, consistent with the importance of
personal and professional development, evaluations are based on
continuous assessment, not term examinations alone.
The students participate fully in the administration and
planning of the Faculty of Education.
INFORMATION
For further information and application forms, telephone
613-547-6280 or write to:
The Registrar,
Faculty of Education,
Duncan McArthur Hall,
Queen's University,
Kingston, Ontario
Friday, January 19, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Friday, January 19, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
FOUR  SEASONS General Manager TERRY KELLY SAYS:
up to   . *
Ifs Vancouver's Znd ANNUM
SKIATHOM
^§§fc
JR. PACKAGE
MINI STAR SKI
TYROLIA STEP-IN
BINDINGS.
CHALET POLES.
Safety Straps
& installation
size 120-160 cm.
M.S.L. $61.50
SRFATHOM
BEGINNERS
PACKAGE
SUPER STAR SKI
FIBREGLASS CONSTRUCTION.
ONE PIECE EDGE.
P-TEX BASE
AND
TYROLIA STEP-IN
BINDINGS
M.S.L $84.95
SRIATHOM
ASTROGLASS
FOAM-CORE
FIBREGLASS
SKIS
Reg. Special $66.88
SKIATHOM
180-205 CM.
JUNIOR
(.88
150 CM.
ANKA
LEATHER
SKI MITTS
LADIES ALL SIZES
Manufacturer's
Suggested List $8.00
SKIATHON
$2.39
pr.
reara?
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SKIS
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CARAVELLE
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PR.
NO DOWN PAYMENT • CHARGEX • NO INTEREST LAY AWAY
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WOOL
SKIATHOM
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100% NYLON
MFG. SUGG. LIST $35.00
SKrATHOM
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OPEN 9-9 WEEKDAYS and SATURDAYS 9-6
"DEAL WITH US AND BANK THE DIFFERENCE" *
FOUR SEASONS LEISURE WORLD
'Seasons]
1503 KINGSWAY, VANCOUVER
873-2481 Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1973
Hot flashes
Ubyssey needs
ragrunner
The Ubyssey is in desperate
need of a copyrunner with a car
to run copy three days a week.
The job involves five runs
spread over Monday, Wednesday
and Thursday at a $1.50 a run to
College Printers, 12th and Maple.
See Mike Sasges or one of the
editors in the office, SUB 241-K
Monday. Please!
Frontier College
Interviews and information regarding summer jobs with Frontier College will be available
today, noon, in Buch. 104.
Tween
classes
TODAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Vanguard forum, 8 p.m., 1208
Granville, film Les Miserables.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
MLA Daisey Webster with Karl,
noon, SUB Ul.
GRAD CLASS
Council meeting, noon, SUB council chambers.
SIMS
Transcendental meditation introduction, noon, Bu. 3201.
SPEAKERS AND
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
California Lutheran College choir
will perform, noon, SUB ballroom.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Discussion of report, noon, SUB
215.
SATURDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Clubs sailing and training, 10 a.m.,
Kitsilano Yacht Club.
STUDENT  MOBILIZATION
COMMITTEE
Anti-war demonstration, 3 P.m.,
Pacific Centre Mall, Georgia at
Granvtlie.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Worship with   folk music and holy
community,   10:30 a.m.,  Lutheran
centre.  Jim   Berger speaks.at   9:30
a.m.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General      meeting,     noon,      SUB
105-B.
ALPHA OMEGA
Special    meeting,   7:30   p.m.,   SUB
213.
UBC CONSERVATIVES
General   meeting,  noon, SUB  211. ;
TUESDAY
AUCM
Eucharist  and  soup, noon,  Luther- |
an centre.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Political Action — A Women's Ministry, 7:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
Still time to register for course or
25 cents at door.
CHARISMATIC
(CAMPUS MINISTRIES)
Free film on Israel, noon, Bu. 202.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS  MINISTRY
Eucharist  and  soup,  noon, Lutheran centre. German  dinner with artist Fred Peter, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY
GERMAN-MUSIC
LIBRARY DEPARTMENT
German opera film The Marriage of
Figaro, noon, Bu. 202.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Instrumental group The Royal
Heirs, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran campus
centre.
The college is interested in
men and women to act as
worker-teachers in isolated parts
of Canada.
'Nam petition
Mayor Art Phillips, alderman
Harry Rankin and NDP Vancou-
ver-Burrard MLA Rosemary
Brown have sponsored a petition
calling on U.S. president Richard
Nixon to sign the nine-point
peace agreement to end the Vietnam War.
Representatives will meet at
noon today at the CP-CN telegraph office (Abbott and Cordova)
to send the telegram. Names and
money are still accepted.
Contact June Dunlop at
224-3842 or Irene Foulks at
228-9557 for further information.
Do-gooders
Persons interested in doing
community work as journalists or
volunteers in a children's show
program in the Mount Pleasant
area are asked to call Tom or
Margaret Vanlumpkin at
876-5000.
Volunteers to work with a
transportation program for handicapped persons are also needed
to help in the community project.
Moot cloy
The law faculty's annual moot
court, in which two law students
argue a case of current interest
will be held 2 p.m., Jan. 27, at
the law school building.
The Allan S. Gregory $200
memorial award will be divided
between students following the
event which is open to the public.
Rehab keeps $6
Students in the rehabilitation
medicine undergraduate society
have voted 85 per cent in favor
of retaining the $6 Alma Mater
Society fee levy.
Under the RMUS constitution,
referendums about the levy are
required annually.
DON'T MISS THE
FARMERS' FROLIC
BAND "WILD ROOT"
DRESS HARD TYMES FULL FACILITIES
TOMORROW NIGHT
JAN. 20 - SUB CAFE - 9 - 1 a.m.
$3.50/ Couple Tickets at AMS Office
WHITE TOWER PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
*Steaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatorefi
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4 p.m. - 3 am.
Sun.
4p.rn.-1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS _oft  «eo#l
HOME DELIVERY    738-9520
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway'
(at Dunbad
738-1113'
A killer patient loose in a
hospital? Determined to avenge
by killing the staff. This weekend
S.U.B. AUD. 50<
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe
688-2481
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
NOMINATIONS
for the following AMS
Executive & Senate positions
are open as of Jan. 24, 1973:
President
Co-Ordinator
Internal Affairs Officer
Secretary
and
3 Three Senators At Large
Deadline for Executive nominations is 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, February 1, 1973. Deadline for Senate is 12:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, February 7, 1973.
For eligibility forms and information would you please
come to the office of AMS Secretary, Sally Clark, SUB 250. I
am most likely to be there Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday afternoons. I would appreciate meeting all the
candidates before the closing nomination day.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ath are nut accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance Deadline is I]:.10 a.m.. Ihe dav before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241 S.U.B., UBC. Van. H.B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
COME TO THE GREATEST SHOW
on "earth": The Farmer's Frolic,
Jan. 20th, 9-1 a.m. SUB Cafe.
Band " Wildroot". Tickets: AMS
Office, Agr. Undergraduate Office
(MCML) $3.50 /couple. Full facilities.
Lost & Found
13
LOST BLACK CHEQUE BOOK ON
Jan. 5/73, name, address inside.
Please return.
LOST: WHITE GOLD RING PART
of interlocking wedding set between
gym E and education building.
Phone  988-9559.
Rides & Car Pools
14
AM LOOKING FOR CAR POOL FOR
8.30 classes, Tues., Wed., Fri. Call
Steve, 263-8969, from 62nd and
Kerr.
Special Notices
15
RENT WHISTLER SKI CABIN
near gondola — day/week. Phone
224-0657 before 8 a.m. weekdays.
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
MISS CLASSES BUT DON'T MISS
the Farmer's Frolic, Jan. 20th,
SUB Cafe Tickets at AMS Office
or from your friendly Aggie on
campus.
FREE!!! THE B.B.C. (BUNDOLO
Broadcasting Corporation) presents
Doctor Bundolo's Pandemonium
Medicine Show, Friday, Jan. 19,
12:30 in SUB movie theatre. It's
Free!!!
CAPTAIN VANCOUVER CLUB
gives two for the price of one.
Dinners, theatre, ski package plus.
On sale Speakeasy 12:00 noon-l:30.
Special Events
15A
THE POPPY FAMILY WITH PAPA
Bear is coming on Friday, Feb. 9,
8:30 p.m. War Memorial Gym.
Tickets only $2.00. Poppy Family,
Poppy Family, Poppy Family,
Poppy Family, Poppy Family.
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY1
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPEDITION ACROSS THE
Sahara leaving March. 1942 Mc-
Nicoll Ave. 733-6707 after 6 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'68 MUSTANG A.T. V8, 6 NEW
tires. Best offer to $1800. Phone
after  5  p.m.   980-1543.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
\Utbt JLtnti anb gutter
M-''-     Cameras;
NEW!
NEW!
AGFACHR0ME SOS
Professional  Color Slide  Film
Now Available — For The
First   Time   in   Vancouver
BEAUTIFUL, VIVID COLORS !
3010  W.   Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
ANY AGGIE IS OUTSTANDING IN
his field. So is the Farmers' Frolic
this Sat. with "Wildroot". They
play good country and western,
rock,  etc., etc.
DAN, GEORGE, CHRIS WHERE
are you when "we need you under
water hockey.
"NOBODY WILL BE SEATED
after the end of the Show." Doctor
Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine
Show, Friday., Jan. 19, 12:30 in SUB
movie theatre. It's FREE!!!
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
ESSAYS TYPED. NEAT ACCURATE
work. 35c per typed page. 325-9976.
If I'm out leave your phone number.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
WANTED: FEMALE MODELS FOR
photo work, preferably with dancing or modelling experience. Call
732-0381.
MALE WITH ACTING ABILITY
for part time employment. Send
resume and time available to Skilled Personnel, 310-837 West Hastings,  Van.  1.
COUPLE FOR PART-TIME MAN-
aging, 13 unit West End apartment block. % rent credit for 2
B.R. manager's suite. Children welcome. Telephone 327-1554 after 6:00.
Special Classes
62
Film Making Techniques
Workshop
Starts Jan. 27
16 mm. Workshop in
Shooting  and   Editing
PLUS
PRINCIPLES OF CINEMATOGRAPHY
Covers  All   Basic   Knowledge
Needed  for   Serious   Film-Making
Vancouver School of
Cinema (1972) Ltd.
872-2851   Eves.  & Weekends
736-6711   Days
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
QUEEN SIZE SEARS ROYALE
mattress & box spring. Near new.
Excellent condition $115.00. 731-
9080 after 6 p.m.
FURNITURE FOR SALE. CHEAP.
733-8042 evenings.
JAPANESE POTTER'S WHEEL —
$40. 266-6457. Used only once!
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR RENT. LARGEST ON
the campus. $60 p.m. 2280 Wesbrook
Crescent. Come and see, or contact
Gord at 224-9986.
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, $50.
Kitchen, etc., $90/couple. Phone
Frank, 224-9549. Visit 5745 Agronomy Road.
CAMPUS — DOUBLE ROOMS IN
former frat. house. Beautiful place
— only $60/month. Phone Frank —
224-9549.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity
House, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Reasonable rates, colour T.V., laundry
facilities. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:30
for details.
ROOM/BOARD ON CAMPUS. 224-
9620. $99 month. 5725 Agronomy.
Good food, T.V. Ask for Bob or
John.
Furnished Apts.
83
4TH YEAR OR GRAD STUDENT,
share three bedroom apt. with two
others.  Call Cheryl,  224-4850.
Unf. Apts.
84
DUNBAR: LOWER FLOOR NEW
house. Self-contained, two bedroom,
fireplace, free carport & utilities.
$135.   263-5158  evenings,  weekends. Friday, January 19, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Score card
Tonight
BASKETBALL
UBC Invitational
Women's Basketbal Tournament
4:30 p.m. — PE Complex
UBC Jayvees vs
Black Student Union
8 p.m. War Memorial gym
Saturday
BASKETNALL
UBC Invitational
Women's Basketball Tournament
9:30 a.m. — PE Complex
Finals at 9 p.m.
SOCCER
Thunderbirds vs North Shore United
2 p.m. Kinsmen Stadium
Monday
BASKETBALL
UBC vs. SFU
8 p.m. Pacific Coliseum
INTERCOLLEGIATE CURLING
PLAYOFFS
Entry Deadline — Feb. 2
See Gord Blanstein
AMS Office
INTRAMURALS  — OFFICE   AT
WAR MEMORIAL GYM 308
CURLING
Jan. 27, 28 — $4 entry fee
BASKETBALL
Super-Tourney — Feb. 26-March 2
UNIT MANAGERS' MEETING
Jan. 30 at "Suds House"
In soccer;
3rd spot at stake
UBC Thunderbirds face an aggressive opponent in North
Shore United when they play 2 p.m. Saturday at Kinsmen
Stadium. The Birds won against North Shore on an opponents
goal in their last encounter with the North Shore club.
The teams are one point apart in the league standings with
UBC having one game in hand.
North Shore have three players in their line-up that are
previous UBC players; Rick Gunn, Jim Sator and Robin Elliot
are attending UBC as students at present. Gunn and Sator occupied positions on UBC team last year and will use their
knowledge of the Birds players, to advantage if possible in the
coming game.
Buchanan Trophy - 6th Annual
BASKETBALL
CLASSIC
UBC 'Thunderbirds' vs.
Simon Fraser 'Clansmen'
PACIFIC COLISEUM
Monday. Jan. 22 8 p.m.
Junior Varsity Preliminary — 6:00 P.M.
TICKETS - Athletic Office - Memorial Gym
Students $1.00 - Gen. Adm. $2.00
FEE REFERENDUM RESULTS
AGRICULTURE U.S. $3
FEE REFERENDUM
Held Jan. 16,1973
86 IN FAVOUR
11 AGAINST
MEDICAL U.S. $15.00
FEE REFERENDUM
For 3rd & 4th Yr. Students
Held Jan. 17, 1973
PASSED BY 2/3 MAJORITY
ENGINEERING U.S. $3.00
FEE REFERENDUM
Held Jan. 17, 1973
88%% IN FAVOUR
PHARMACY U.S. $6.00
FEE REFERENDUM
Held Jan. 16,1973
132 IN FAVOUR
6 AGAINST
LIBRARY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION $5.00
FEE REFERENDUM
Held Jan. 17,1973
53 IN FAVOUR     11 AGAINST
RECREATION U.S. $3.00
FEE REFERENDUM
Held Jan. 16, 1973
74% IN FAVOUR 126% AGAINST
57% Turnout
NO, THIS ISNTa rape in a dark alley. It's an action scenario from Thursday's wrestling meet with SFU
held at War Memorial gymnasium. UBC lost several close matches in the lower weight classes.
SFU lightweights
aAxluta£
1220 CLARK DR.
AT
WILLIAMS
TELEPHONE
254-8194
MANUFACTURERS OF
rule supreme
By FORREST NELSON
The UBC wrestling team gave too much ground in the lower
weights Thursday and were beaten by Simon Fraser University
30-24. SFU forfeited two bouts in heavyweight divisions.
Steve Wiles of SFU and Dennis Tazumi grappled, Tazumi
was pinned.
SFU's Kim Anthony looked the duplicate of Wiles, only
bigger. Naturally enough the result was similar to Tazumi's
match; John Cipolato of UBC suffered a fall. Anthony was
cautioned before the pin — a caution awards a point to the opponent and means that the ref thinks either an illegal hold,
unnecessary roughness, or stalling has occurred. Anthony got
away with more than he was caught for.
Bill Hedderson, Peter Galdant, and Bill Duncan of UBC had
close matches, but here is where the team was beaten. Hedderson looked to be an even match against Craig Lockhead, but
was pinned. Galdant seemed to be lured into losing some points,
when SFU's Coatta feigned slowness on some of Galdant's attempted double leg takedowns. Duncan appeared to be the more
intelligent wrestler in his bout against Bob Hodgins, however
Duncan pooped out. *
Bruce Grist went with the speed and eagerness of the young
man trying to take the experienced gunslinger against Steve
Martin, the Canadian National Champ, in the 158-pound weight
class. Grist wore Martin down, but whether he could have kept
it up is a moot question. Martin seemed to fake a pained
shoulder in order to gain his breath — the ref fell for it. After his
rest, he vigorously attacked Grist again and quickly got a pin.
From then on UBC had lost the match even though the rest
of the bouts were won.
Bob Ormond in the 167 pound division again seemed to show
the lack of UBC conditioning. It was as though Ormond wanted
nothing to happen in the first period — a smart move if the
opponent seems in better shape to take nine minutes strenuous
wrestling. Against a tough opponent he brought UBC its first
win by a fall.
Taras Hryb won a fall against SFU in the 190-pound
bracket. Vic Tyson and Brian Wastall won the forfeits.
UBC has another go at SFU Feb. 9.
George C. Scott in
HOSPITAL
JAN. 18-21 SUB. AUD. 50°
TAE   KWON   DO
• SELF-DEFENCE
• PHYSICAL FITNESS   '
• WEIGHT CONTROL
• MENTAL DISCIPLINE
• CO-ORDINATION OF
MIND AND BODY
SPECIAL   RATES
FOR   STUDENTS
MASTER C. K. CHOI
(6th  DEGREE  BLACK BELT)
MASTER K. J. CHOI
(6th  DEGREE  BLACK BELT)
• Vancouver: 2422 Main St. .
• North Van.: 131 W. 16th St.
• New West.: 70-8th St.(2nd FI.)
• UBC • SFU
CHOI TAE KWON  DO SCHOOL
876-0841
* CLUB JACKETS
* BASEBALL UNIFORMS
* TEAM CRESTS
* SOCCER UNIFORMS
LARGEST A THLETIC UNIFORM MANUFACTURER
IN WESTERN CANADA
COMPETITIVE PRICES-QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER OR CONTACT US DIRECT!
burke's
world wide travel
Your special university branch
offers:
ABC charter seats to Europe
Excursion youth fares to Europe
Eurail pass
Britrail pass
Coachmaster tickets
Car rentals
HOLIDAYS IN THE SUN:    Easter in Hawaii
Easter in Mexico
We're In "THE VILLAGE"
5700 UNIVERSITY BLVD. Phone 224-4391 Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1973
Climbers erode Point Grey cliffs
By LEN JOHNSON
People who climb up and
down the cliffs on the Point
Grey foreshore are a major
cause of erosion, deputy
president William Armstrong
said at a UBC press conference
Tuesday.
At the press conference, in
which architect Arthur
Erickson unveiled the plans for
the proposed Museum of Man,
Armstrong suggested that a
hedge of thorny vegetation be
placed along the clifftop to
inhibit use of the area and
prevent erosion.
Although the museum will be
built 250 feet from the cliff
face, park board chairman Art
Cowie, was concerned about
the possible erosive effects the
construction might have.
Erickson said: "The steps
that will be taken to control
cliff erosion both above and
below the cliffs will be such
that there will be much less
chance of erosion after the
museum is completed than
there is today."
The steps include the
planned vegetation, a controlled drainage system to be
incorporated in the museum,
and a government-sponsored
plan, to help shore up the cliff
base with a sand and gravel fill
above the high tide line.
The museum will house the
university's famed 100,000
piece collection of northwest
Coast Indian art. Also on
display will be 90,000 items
from the prehistoric period of
B.C. Indian history, an additional 10,000 artifacts which
make up collections of the
Asian, classical and tribal
worlds, and the Walter
Koerner collection of tribal art.
Construction is due to start
April 1, and the museum is
scheduled to be open to the
public by April 1, 1975.
Struggle
There will be a meeting of all
Ubyssey staff, past, present
and future, 1:30 p.m. Saturday
at 4248 West 10th.
The meeting will include
discussion of the sports pages,
Page Friday, typesetting, the
CUP conference.
—sucha singh photo
SUB LOUNGE, somewhat extended to the dismay of reading room freaks, opens Monday two weeks
after scheduled finishing date. The cost including, new maintenance   room under lounge, was $68,718.
SUB lounge opens
two weeks over date
SUB's expanded lounge area will be open Monday, two
weeks later than was earlier scheduled, Alma Mater Society coordinator Bob Angus said Thursday.
"The original contract with Stanzl Construction was to have
the lounge completed by Jan. 5," Angus said. "But because of a
delay in an independent contract, the carpeting was not completed until this week."
Angus also said the new listening lounge is still being wired
by UBC electricians and should be open to students by the end of
next week.
Total cost of the project was $68,718, Angus said, which includes a $14,000 allotment for a maintenance machine room
underneath the lounge to service the new Pit in the SUB
basement.
The cost also included $900 for carpets and about $4,500 for
the listening lounge, Angus said.
Canada, UBC ruins Burau's illusions
By KARL BURAU
Eighteen years ago I came to
Canada with great illusions about the
wonderfulness of Western democracy:
especially about fairness, open-*
mindedness and sound youthful vigor
in Canada. And I was convinced that
with my different background and
experience, including survival in a
Hitler concentration camp, I would
have an opportunity to make some
useful contribution to a common
Western front of sane society against
the communist dictatorship of the
East. I am returning to Germany after
doing penance for my illusions by 18
years of utter frustration and
disillusionment. I did not find any
chance of contributing anything, since
minds are closed — especially at
the universities. As a foreigner I am
expected only to flatter and so to serve
the wrong feeling of security and
superiority of people fanatically intent
on remaining blind.
As a teacher in B.C. I was twice
fired for alleged incompetence because
I refused to give undeserved good
marks to the kids of the local big shots
(trustees, etc.). I could not take the
superintendent of schools to court for
perjury because he is the Crown and
can do No Wrong — and this law is still
valid in B.C. today. I went back to
university (UBC) naively believing
that I could make students ashamed of
the backwardness of B.C. and
Canadian law, and the unfairness of
their society, but I found the students
morally corrupt and interested only in
their material advantages, no matter
how unfair, convinced that only an
imbecile crackpot can have "ideals,"
or escaping altogether from reality by
cowardly drug addiction — often
connected with infantile dreams of a
Burau, Experimental College president and man about campus for a
number of years, is leaving UBC
soon for his native Germany. The
following is his farewell plea to
students and faculty.
great world revolution with themselves
as the leaders.
Faculty by aria1 large hate any non-
lackeying outsider who might know
something. Canadian universities have
become the most anti-intellectual
places in the country, corrupted by the
sickly selfishness of an overprotected,
overpampered faculty. Therefore most
students leave university more corrupt
morally and more immature intellectually than they entered it. For
what they do learn in regard to
professional skills is more than
counterbalanced by increased
nationalistic bigotry and personal self-
conceit.
Even in a student newspaper I was
never allowed to mention that
Canadians have only five persons per
square mile in a country extremely
rich in natural resources and facing no
real problems except their own incompetence, unlimited greed, and a
cowardice of astronomic proportions —
as compared to some other countries
with up to 1,000 people per square mile,
with hardly any natural resources and
with great real problems; that
Canadians therefore ought not always
to be whining that the world owes them
a living — they rather ought to consider
what they owe to the world.
Two great dangers to the survival
of mankind are generally recognized:
uncontrolled aggression, i.e. the Bomb,
and poisoning of all life by the pollution
arising from our absurd way of life. I
seem to be the only one who sees the
third and greatest danger (at least in
our Western world) — that our type of
education by its hedonistic corruption
leads to total loss of all vitality, of the
will to a full life, and therefore to a
rapidly decreasing quality in our
population and in the end to extinction
simply from this lack of a will to accept
the full responsibility, hardships and
pain that go together with a full life and
with real achievements. The senility of
Canadian youth, their cowardice, their
incapacity for any real enthusiasm and
any sacrifice of material advantages or
their own pleasure has been my
greatest disappointment in Canada.
My basic advice for educators:
Stop feeding the illusions of the young
about themselves by dishonest flatteries — in order to be popular and to
get raises in your salaries — instead,
try to make them self-critical by giving
them a good example in this and in
your own willingness to make
sacrifices of material advantages and
pleasure in order to achieve a common
good. For our personal life can find real
fulfilment only in service for the future
of the community.
Well, how great a failure have I
been? At least I admit failure. In all
these years I have never succeeded in
making any student do anything really
brave and noble — but who has? And I
have contributed only very little to a
more mature awareness in the
academic community or the community at large. Though I did receive
some kind of support from a very few
students and some faculty — out of
24,000 students I could always find 12 to
form a student club and to give me, as
their "Honorary President," a legal
base for holding my forums twice a
week at the UBC. Except for these few,
I have always been hated for trying to
open the eyes, or — worse — been
regarded as a mere crackpot for not
making any money. Indeed I am not
smart— for 12 years I have lived solely
from my own savings, spending about
$70 per month. I never got one cent
from the university, Canada Council,
Local Initiative, etc., but was always
cynically given the runaround, or at
least made to understand that I am a
dirty immigrant who ought to be thankful for being allowed to be in Canada.
This summer I took my last money
to revisit Germany. At the age of 61 I
had to sleep behind bushes, wash and
shave first at the toilets of the
ministries I had to visit — always
feeling ashamed of Canada and trying
to.hide the fact that after so many
years in that rich country nobody had
any money or any position for me.
(I ought to point out that due to the
pollution in a country of 700 per square
mile, with a high standard of living
derived from industrial export, one can
hardly find a river or lake fit to swim
in. This makes it extremely hard to
travel without some financial means
and to remain somehow properly
dressed.)
Only now, for two months, I have
received welfare.
Now all the great men tell me how
sorry they are to hear that I am
leaving. What a loss for UBC, for
Canada! If I say that I intend to come
back after about two years, hoping that
then they will have an opening for me,
they are shocked, and quickly try to
explain that it will probably be best for
me — even if bad for them — if I do not
come back. If I say that after all I did
commit myself only for six months of
teaching in Germany and that I am still
waiting for the final confirmation of my
appointment by the ministry, they
grow pale. What a university, what a
country!

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