UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 13, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128506.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128506.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128506-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128506-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128506-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128506-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128506-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128506-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128506-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128506.ris

Full Text

Array 2014 AMS
ELECTIONS
BEGIN
o
CUT-RATE
CUISINE
Inside Dine Out
Vancouver, a culinary
festival where frugal
foodies can sample
local gourmet fare
on the cheap // Page 2
MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 20
WHAT'S ON // THIS WEEK, MAY WE
MONDAY /13
CLOTHING SWAP
11:30 A.M.-215 P.M. ©GLOBAL LOUNGE
The Jewish Students Association is
hosting a clothing swap to celebrate
Tu b'Shvat, the holiday celebrating
the first trees grown in Israel. Stop by
with clothes and get a free lunch.
Free
OUR CAMPUS//
TUESDAY ' 14
SNACKS
WITH CANDIDATES
11:30 A.M.-3 P.M. @ 1KB CONCOURSE
Can you believe it's already time
for AMS elections? Stop by this
networking event to kick off the
campaigning period and get to
know the future leaders of your
student society. Free snacks and
hackery provided.
Free
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
WEDNESDAY' 15
CURRYOKE NIGHT
7 P.M.-9 P.M. @ GLOBAL LOUNGE
Need we say more? UBC
Intercultural Alliance is bringing
together people from all backgrounds to discuss how to make
UBC more inclusive. Also, nothing
sounds betterthan starting off a
Wednesday night with free curry.
Free
THE
COVER
Pictured from left to right on the cover are Harsev Oshan, Winnie Code and Tanner
Bokor, three ofthe four candidates running for president. The fourth candidate, Jackson Chen, left halfway through the all-candidates meeting, pictured above. Photo by
Carter Brundage.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
^|THE UBYSSEY
/*-
JANUARY 13, 2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXXXI
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
Mehryar Maalem, Jack Hauen
Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
Nikos Wright
BUSINESS
Business
Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@
jbyssey.ca
604.822.668l
Ad Sales
MarkSha
advertising®
jbyssey.ca
604.822.1654
Ad Sales
Tiffany Tsao
webadvertisinc
@ubyssey.ca ~
604.822.1658
Accounts
Graham
McDonald
accounts®
jbyssey.ca
Editorial Office:
3UB24
SO 4.822.2301
Business Office:
3UB23
Student Union Buildinc
6138 SUB Boulevard ~
Vancouver. BCV6T1Z1
Web: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University/ of Rrirish Cn-
umbia. It is publishe
andThursdaybyTheUujMcj ruuin.a-
tions Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
Dpinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
editsubmlss ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society fails to
aublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
aaid for the ad. The UPS sfial not be
•esponsible for sight charges or ty-
aographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
^HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
AMS elections are in
Roddy Lai's hands
Ming Wong
Managing Editor, Print
Student politics hijinks become
front and centre during student government elections. It's
therefore up to the elections
administrator (EA) to both police
and promote during this period —
making sure candidates run a fair
campaign that's free of slating,
smearing and sidestepping over
the election rules, and getting the
word out to students, whether
they are apathetic, indifferent or
just uninformed.
This year's EA is Roddy Lai,
a fourth-year psych major with
a minor in commerce. After
graduating in May, he will enter
the diploma of accounting program at UBC.
He got his first taste of the
hustle of AMS elections in
September during the VP aca
demic byelection, after Kiran
Mahal stepped down. Lai, who
commutes from Richmond and
gets up two hours before class
to be sure he gets there on time,
prefers the behind-the-scenes
admin work to being in the
public eye and running in the
elections himself.
Before this year, he admitted
that he did not care very much
about the elections. Now, he
sees their importance. "It really
hits on me that students should
really care about elections because we all pay the student fees
— a lot of it too."
He says that some students
might see the AMS as just
another high school student
council — all talk and no action
— but now older, he recognizes
that they have power and control over what happens to the
school.
In terms of policing, Lai says
he's not aware of all the controversies, but has some knowledge
of how candidates in previous
years have broken election
rules. He doesn't feel burdened
by doling out punishments for
candidates caught trying to rig
the election. "You break the rules,
you have to face the consequences."
He does feel the pressure to
match the voter turnout of last
year. 22,405 students voted in 2013,
one ofthe highest voter turnouts
the AMS has ever seen. Lai knows
that a majority of those students
only voted to ensure the return
ofthe U-Pass. Without a U-Pass
referendum question this year, Lai
knows the numbers will go down,
but will wait to see what the referendum questions will be this year.
"It's going to be a very hectic
month." XI
Who's the most interesting person on campus? Is it a student leader? Is
it your roommate who speaks 12 languages including Whale? We want
to find out what makes them tick. Email printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
Volunteer for The Ubyssey
What are you interested in?
Design,
layout,
Pusheen cats
email editor
MingWong
printeditor@
ubyssey.ca
Arts,
entertainment,
sophistry
email editor
Rhys Edwards
culture®
ubyssey.ca
^
Lights,
camera,                ^
rc|5p
Toope,
AMS elections,
current events
selfies                  \
email editor
Carter Brundage
photo ©ubyssey.ca
\ ■^^%^'
\ email editors
IWillMcDonaldanc
* Sarah Bigam
news@ubyssey.ca
Investigative pieces,     ^^r
lonaform journalism. „^^V
Varsity sports,
athletic reviews,
milkshakes
pizza
email editor
NatalieScadder
sports ©ubyssey.ca
email editor
Arno Rosenfeld
features©
ubyssey.ca // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
MONDAY, JANU
WEED»
The Hempology Club hopes to establish a vapour lounge in the SUB.
Hempology club has high hopes for SUB
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
UBC's Hempology Club usually
holds its meetings outside the
SUB, but last week, the club
booked a room in the SUB and
brought a vaporizer.
The meeting was a joint event
staged in conjunction with the
Brewery Club, which is working
on infusing beer with marijuana.
However, the highlight of the
reunion wasn't the beer syrup or
the early stages of pot-infused
alcohol, but rather the use of a
marijuana vaporizer in the SUB.
The reunion was a success. At
one point, there were at least 25
people in SUB room 211. Outside
the room, a colourful sign read:
"Stay dry, get high." Inside, a
scrunched-up towel was placed
under the door to keep the
fumes in.
NEWS BRIEFS
Become a walking cell phone
charger with new research
UBC was awarded $9 million in
research funding from the National
Sciences and Engineering Research
Council of Canada on Thursday.
The funding will go towards 10
different projects researching fish
ecology, oil sands, energy efficient
buildings, clean water and wearable electronics, such as clothes
that could charge cell phones with
woven-insolarcells.
"We are extremely proud of the
UBC researchers who have been
awarded grants in these highly
competitive programs," said UBC
President Stephen Toope. "These
projects involve complex and rigorous inquiries, close collaboration
with industry and other partners,
with a sharp focus on concrete solutions for real-world issues."
A boost in boosters
Canada has identified half a million
additional influenza vaccine doses
it could purchase to try to meet
increasing demand.
"The key here is that this is a
normal flu season," said Gregory
Taylor, Canada's deputy chief
public health officer. "This issue is
not because of increased disease.
This issue is because of increased
demand."
B.C. bought 1.417 million doses
of the vaccine this year. As of
Thursday, only 3,000 remained.
These doses were of nasal spray,
designed for children but usable
on those up to 59 year of age. xi
"This is the first time that
we've ever done anything in the
confines ofthe SUB," said club
treasurer Corbin Manson, a
second-year Forestry student who
used to canvas for SensibleBC, a
group that supports the referendum to decriminalize marijuana
consumption in B.C.
"The [AMS] probably don't
know we have a vaporizer in here,
but if you can break the barrier,
that's the first step to any ofthe
progress that we're trying to talk
about here," said club president
Jared Barney, a second-year
Forestry student.
The progress Barney is talking
about is convincing the AMS to
open a vapour lounge in the SUB.
"The plan is happening right
now. We would love to get a
vaporizer [from the AMS]. It's
healthier, less polluting [and]
if you smoke with it indoors it
STUDENT POLITICS »
Candidates
confirmed
for 2014 AMS
elections
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
The AMS has confirmed the candidates in its upcoming elections.
AMS VP External Tanner
Bokor, AUS President Harsev
Oshan and joke candidates Winnie
Code and Jackson Chen will be
running for the top position of
AMS president.
Incumbent Joaquin Acevedo
will face off AUS VP Finance
Mateusz Miadlikowski and joke
candidate Paul Bucci for the VP
finance position.
Two candidates, incumbent
Anne Kessler and SUS Science
student senator Mona Maleki
are running for VP academic and
university affairs.
The VP administration race includes SUS VP External and AMS
student rep Serena Ng and AUS VP
Internal Ava Nasiri.
Associate VP External Affairs
Bahareh Jokar will run against
joke candidate Philip He (running
under the name Jon Snow) for the
VP external role.
AMS President Caroline Wong
will face off against Philip Edg-
cumbe, Nina Karimi, liana Shecter,
Chris Roach and Spencer Keys for
two student representative spots
on the UBC Board of Governors.
doesn't leave any residues," said
Manson. "And it's better than
being outside in the cold and the
rain."
But the AMS had no idea the
club was using a vaporizer in
the SUB, or even that the group
smoked marijuana. "From my
understanding, [the Hempology
Club] is about awareness, but
again, we do not condone illegal
behaviour within our facility,
which is the SUB," said AMS
President Caroline Wong.
The AMS is not enthusiastic
about the creation of a vapour
lounge. "As per our handbook,
any illegal behaviour is subject to
potential expulsion," said Wong.
"The usage of marijuana and
cannabis is illegal unless it's for
medicinal reasons."
The club members, however,
remain hopeful. "I think that in
the long term, having an AMS
vapour lounge would be a huge
boon for the student body,"
said Manson.
"It all starts with getting a
room here and having the AMS
be aware of what we're doing,"
added Barney.
According to Manson, the club
made all the arrangements by the
book. "We just got all our members together, did some marketing, booked a room through the
AMS and it was as simple as that."
The AMS is aware, but at
this moment it doesn't look like
they'll get a vapour lounge any
time soon. "To my knowledge, we
have never considered opening
a vapour lounge in the SUB,"
said Wong.
Wong said she emailed Campus
Security and the Student Administration Commission asking them
to do an immediate investigation
ofthe Hempology Club. XI
Left to right: presidential candidate Harsev
presidential candidate Tanner Bokor.
Saba Mohebpour, Philip Edg-
cumbe, Armin Rezaiean-Asel,
Anne Kessler, Nina Karimi,
Andrew Lavers, Eric Zhao, Jason
Kim, Pavani Gunandasa, Graham
Beales, Mona Maleki, Umang
Khandelwal and Chris Roach will
vie for the five seats on the UBC
Senate this year.
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Oshan, joke candidate Winnie Code and
Janzen Lee, Navi Purewal,
Joseph Gorman, Aaron Sihota,
Dawei Ji and Jordan Stewart
will be running unopposed
for seats on the Student Legal
Fund Society.
The campaign period will
begin on Jan. 14. Voting runs
from Jan. 27 to Jan. 31. XI
MOORE NO MORE »
AMS VP Admin
Derek Moore hands
in resignation
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON3THE UBYSSEY
Soon-to-be-former VP Admin Derek Moore.
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The AMS announced the resignation of Vice-President Administration Derek Moore on Thursday. His resignation takes effect
on Jan. 24; he would have had a
month left in his term.
Moore, who spent the winter
break in Kenya, sent an email
to the AMS earlier in the week
saying that he was resigning for
personal reasons.
"It has been an honour to work
with my fellow executives, students and staff at the AMS and I
have sincerely enjoyed my time
with the Society," said Moore in
an AMS press release. "The New
SUB has been a passion project of
mine for the past two years and I
am excited to watch the building
progress through its final stages.
I have no doubt the AMS will
continue to grow and develop
as a new group of dedicated students are elected."
Responsibilities ofthe VP
admin include the administration
of AMS clubs, constituencies and
resources groups; regulation of
bookings in the SUB and AMS
Art Gallery; and management
ofthe use, maintenance and
conditions ofthe old SUB, as well
as monitoring the progress ofthe
New SUB.
AMS council will elect an
interim VP admin at their Jan.
22 meeting. The interim VP will
work 20 hours a week, with the
rest of Moore's projects temporarily split up amongst the other
executives.
Moore will work to transition
this individual, who will serve
until a new VP admin is chosen
in the annual elections at the
end of January. The VP admin
for 2014-2015 will take office on
March 3.
This is the second time since
the beginning ofthe academic
year that an AMS executive has
resigned. Kiran Mahal, elected in
January 2013 as the VP academic,
resigned from her post on Sept.
12 of 2013. She was replaced by
Anne Kessler on Oct. 12.
Moore did not respond to multiple requests for comment. XI 4    I    NEWS    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 13,2014
CONSTRUCTION »
Students and faculty have expressed concerns and complaints, but UBC insists the Geography Building is safe and the loudest work is done.
Geography Building users worried about asbestos, noise, air quality
Milica Palinic
Contributor
Students and staff raised concerns
regarding the safety ofthe Geography Building at a town hall meeting on Friday. The past nine months
have seen ongoing construction on
the building for renovations.
Attendees voiced concerns about
air quality, mould, asbestos, noise,
seismic safety and foul language by
the construction workers.
John Metras, managing director
of infrastructure development, said
that the building is safe.
Metras also said asbestos exposure does not pose any threat.
"There is asbestos in this building.
It's encapsulated and perfectly safe,"
said Metras. "When we start cutting
into it, we have to use proper work
procedures. Those procedures were
followed through the course of this
process."
However, not everyone was
assured. "It's very disconcerting
when you read a memo that there's
asbestos in the walls and you can't
even put a thumbtack in the wall,
and then you're sitting in your office
and a saw blade comes through and
your whole office fills up with dust,"
said a professor.
"Tests that are done, can we not
have those numbers shared with
us?" asked one student, who has had
trouble obtaining information about
the situation in the building. "It's
really frustrating when they tell me
that this is a public institution and
these things should be shared and
then when we try really hard to get
them shared and then they're not."
The noise has prevented some
students from studying and one
student even feels as if her education
"has been taken away from [her]."
"All you can do is laugh and
cancel class because you cannot
actually teach," said Brett Eaton,
an associate professor of geography. Eaton was the one who
proposed having the meeting in a
letter sent to the administration
this fall.
As a solution, Catherine Alken-
brack, associate director of facilities
planning at Campus and Community Planning, said she would look
into moving classes to the Swing
Space building, which is close to
Geography.
A graduate student said she
wished there could have been more
effort to relocate classes earlier in
the construction process.
"I think it's fair to say that there
are significant challenges and
perhaps it's even fair to say that it
hasn't gone as well as we all had
hoped," said Gerald Vanderwoude,
incoming assistant dean of facilities
and human resources in the Faculty
of Arts.
The Geography Building was
built in 1925 and is one ofthe oldest
buildings on campus. Metras said
they are looking at replacing the
building entirely, but that this would
cost over $30 million. "The building
is on UBC's capital priority list for
the long term but it is entirely dependent on fundraising," he said.
Metras said they had hoped to
complete the renovations before this
term started, but they now hope to
finish by February. According to
Metras, most ofthe noisiest work is
now finished, a
SALE»
lona Building to be sold
to UBC econ school
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
The School of Economics will take up residence in this castle in September 2015.
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
The Vancouver School of Theology's
lona Building will soon belong to
the School of Economics.
Following a review, VST's governing board decided the building
was no longer fit for its purpose and
approached UBC for a sale in 2012.
The agreed purchasing price was
$28 million.
The purchase will be made
through UBC's endowment fund.
Michael Devereux, director ofthe
School of Economics, predicted that
these funds would be recovered over
the next 30 years through fund-
raising campaigns and sources of
revenue from the lona Building, in
particular the residences that are to
remain a part ofthe building.
The property will be 87 years into
its 999-year lease from UBC when
the university takes possession of
the building this July. In September
2015, the building will become a hub
for the School of Economics.
Richard Topping, principal of
VST, said that since their student
body is increasingly distance based
and part time, the "excessive resources" ofthe 100,000 square-foot
buildingwere no longer necessary
for the work the School of Theology
was aiming to accomplish.
"Lots of our money was invested
purely in the infrastructure ofthe
building," said Topping. "We were
asset rich, but perhaps poorer in
relaying our message. Now we will
have more resources to hire first-
rate faculty, invest in training and be
more mission conscious."
According to Devereux, the size
ofthe building is the aspect ofthe
move which most appeals to the
department, which was previously
based in Buchanan Tower.
"We are really happy to offer
something so worthwhile to the
undergraduate students," Devereux
said. "There's access to computer
space, lounge space and informal
learning spaces... we'll be adding
around an extra third of room for
our department. Being under one
roof will be a key defining aspect of
the UBC economics program."
Topping did not take offence to
the secularization ofthe formerly
Christian building.
"Both economics and Christianity are in the interest of human
flourishing. There are both good
and bad faiths, the same as economics."
Topping said the school will now
likely bebasedinthe two other
buildings they own in the area, the
Epiphany Chapel and the residence
Somerville House. XI
date
JAN. 15-17
place
S.U.B. -
1ST FLOOR
hours
9-7
last day
► Fine Art
Fantasy <
Wildlife <*
► Giant-Sized Posters
Music
9-5
Frames & Hangers <
Photography
Film
► 1000s of Posters
THE
I I\/1A<31l\lUS
UV!
POSTER
SALE II National
DRUGS»
Supervised injection sites come to Montreal
Jill Bachelder
The McGill Daily
MONTREAL (NUW) - Montreal will soon be home to four
supervised injection sites. The
sites, announced in December
2013, will include three permanent locations in already existing
clinics across the city, as well
as one mobile clinic to serve the
Montreal area.
The news comes after a decade-long struggle between the
Canadian federal government and
the Quebec-based organizations
that have been advocating for
supervised injection sites (SIS) in
Montreal ever since the first site,
Insite Vancouver, was established
in2003.
SISs are places where injection-drug users can go to obtain
clean needles and dispose of
used ones. Additionally, social
workers and on-site emergency
medical attention are available
to users if needed. These sites
are part of an approach known as
harm reduction, which involves
programs that provide safe spaces
and medical services for drug
users in a nonjudgmental and
non-coercive manner.
Since its inception, Insite has
operated under an exemption to
the Controlled Drug and Substances Act, allowing it to legally
provide help to drug users.
Inspired by Insite, Montreal-based organizations, such
as Association pour la Defense
des Droits et l'Inclusion des
personnes qui Consomment des
drogues du Quebec (ADDICQ)
and CACTUS Montreal, began
campaigning for SISs in 2003.
However, they were unable to obtain the same exemption that Insite was given, and thus had little
hope of creating the sites. In 2011,
the Supreme Court ruled that
Insite was a necessary service,
said Sylvain Cote of ADDICQ, a
community-based organization
that provides support for injection
drug users.
"It was a decision that said
that Insite should be not only
implemented but continued as an
essential service for drug addicts
that saves lives and that could
prevent overdoses and HIV," said
Carole Morissette, public health
doctor for Montreal Public
Health. "For us, in Montreal,
that judgement was a real boost
in this situation and then gave
us an opening." This decision
fueled a huge campaign for SISs
in Montreal.
"We campaign," said Cote, "we
did some protestfs], we wrote letters ... we demand to be included
on the committee that was working on SISs, such as the public
health committee of Montreal."
Cote noted that such sites are
important because they create
services for drug users that allow
them to perform injections in a
safe space, dispose of their used
needles properly and obtain medical services if needed. Both they
and the surrounding community
benefit, with lower instances of
both common diseases in users
and drug usage in public.
LLUSTRATION ROBERTSMITH3THE MCGILL DAILY
Montreal will soon be home to four supervised injection sites.
"What we see is that... people
who would use the safer injection sites are people who have no
place to go to inject themselves
safely," said Amelie Panneton,
community organizer with CACTUS Montreal. "[This] means
that usually they consume the
drugs in the street, in the public
domain, which is dangerous for
them because we know there
are lots and lots of overdoses in
public spaces."
One important aspect of SISs is
that they provide on-site access to
medical care and give users access
to a social worker if they decide
that they want to stop using, or
need support.
"We have lots of evaluations
and research projects that can
demonstrate the efficacy of safer
injection sites to prevent death to
prevent overdoses, and to prevent
HIV ... and that help drug users
to be related to the rest ofthe
health network and have access
to other services they need,"
said Morissette.
"The main obstacle is from the
Conservative government," said
Cote, "but public health departments from major cities ... are
really supporting the idea."
The federal government's policy
on drug prevention does not favour
supervised injection sites, Cote
noted. They have instead chosen to
focus more on increasing funding
for law enforcement and preventative education, while decreasing
spending on harm reduction.
"They simply consider drugs as
evil — people who use drugs as
criminals," Cote said.
Some opposed to SISs argue
that sites like these promote illicit
behaviour and can lead to increases in crime and drug use in the
area, a major reason behind the
Conservative tabling of Bill C-65
(also known as the Respect for
Communities Act) this summer
that sought to make it harder to
have such sites.
Panneton noted that the sites are
awaiting the go-ahead for funding
from the Ministere de la Sante et
des Services sociaux (MSSS), a process whose length CACTUS cannot
fully predict. Additionally, the sites
would have to receive an exception
from the federal Controlled Drugs
and Substances Act, as Insite did
in Vancouver.
For organizations like CACTUS,
the creation of these sites is a step
towards reducing the harm caused
by illicit drug use in Montreal.
"We've been giving out material,"
said Panneton. "We've been doing
intervention with these people,
trying the best we can. But we see
that we would really need a safe
injection site to help even more,
that's why we find it really really
important to have multiple sites in
Montreal."
WILDLIFE »
Low salmon returns make for hormonal bears
Hungry bears produce stress hormones like testosterone that may make them more aggressive
Adam Hayman
The Martlet
VICTORIA (NUW) - A recent
study has uncovered that coastal
grizzly bears are more prone to
hostile behaviour when salmon
numbers are low.
The study, conducted by
the University of Victoria, the
University of Calgary and the
Raincoast Conservation Foundation, traced stress hormones in
bears' fur during periods when
the expected salmon run was
lower than average. Less salmon
means greater competition for
food, and the higher competition
means grizzly bears could be a
greater risk.
The main hormone that
experienced change during
periods of greater competition
was testosterone. Testosterone is
mainly thought of as a reproductive hormone; however, according
to the study, it also "facilitates
behavioural and physical traits
necessary to win social conflicts
in fitness-enhancing situations."
"Testosterone, which we often
think of as a male sex hormone,
is also affected by the social
competitive environment," said
Heather Bryan, one ofthe researchers, in an email. The study
found it higher in both male and
female coastal bears, as compared to other bears. Bryan said
this "suggests that coastal bears
have to compete more heavily for
access to important resources
such as salmon."
Another hormone tested in
the coastal bears was Cortisol.
A decrease in salmon means that bears are more prone to hostile behaviour.
Cortisol is a hormone that helps
with long-term stress, recovery
from stress and coping with
change. Although salmon has
high amounts of glucocorticoids,
a class of steroid hormones to
which Cortisol belongs, coastal bears did not have a higher
amount of Cortisol in their
fur samples.
The fur samples were collected
on a 5,000-square-kilometre grid
consisting of 73 area cells. Each
cell was seven square kilometres.
In each cell, researchers erected
a barbed wire enclosure with
a 25-metre perimeter. Inside
the enclosure, the researchers
placed some fish oil. This is
called non-reward bait. Although
bears are hopelessly attracted to
the scent, when they arrive and
there is nothing to eat or defend.
Within a few short moments,
the bears leave the enclosure.
When bears pass under the
barbed wire, small tufts of hair
are pulled loose, and from those
samples the researchers were
able to find the information they
were looking for.
People are reminded time and
time again that bears are not
the kind of animal that would
ever attack a human for sport or
snack, but a starved bear can be
dangerous. With loss of habitat
and food, it could mean life or
death for the bear. In November,
two residents of Churchill, Man.
LLUSTRATION BETH MAY3THEMARTLLT
were attacked by a starved polar
bear on the way home from a
party. Another man in Quebec
barely survived a bear attack
while on a wilderness excursion sometime in August. These
occurrences aren't common, but
bears do attack out of a sense
of necessity.
Salmon numbers are known
to fluctuate. Pink, coho and Chinook salmon were plentiful this
year along B.C.'s coasts, but this
isn't always the case. As Bryan
points out, there "has been a ...
downward trend in the last 60
years with several dramatically
low returns in the last decade on
the central coast." While interior
bears live off of a diet of mainly
plants, the study points out, "salmon allows bears to meet their
energetic requirements more
efficiently than a diet of plants
alone."
[There] has been an
overall downward
trend in the last 60
years with several
dramatically low
returns in the last
decade on the central
coast.
Heather Bryan
University of Victoria researcher
When asked what could be
done to increase the numbers of
salmon available to the coastal bears, Bryan said, "Setting
appropriate commercial fisheries
so that salmon are shared among
people and wildlife is important, but one ofthe challenges
is that the exact number varies
over space and time. Currently,
fisheries quotas are determined
based only on the needs of
people, and do not consider the
needs of wildlife."
There is a national strategy
called the Wild Salmon Policy
that recognizes there are other
species besides humans that have
needs for salmon, but Bryan said
"there isn't a lot of information
on exactly how much salmon
other species need, which makes
it difficult to implement the
strategy." // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
MONDAY, JANUARY 13,2C
BASKETBALL»
T-Birds can't slow Bears, but bounce back to take Huskies
Brylle Kamen looks strong after elbow surgery, leads UBC with 2 double-double performances
Casey Watamaniuk
Contributor
Despite a dominant individual
effort from Brylle Kamen, the
UBC Thunderbirds men's basketball team simply couldn't slow
down the University of Alberta
Golden Bears in Friday night's
77-61 loss. The Bears, who have
lost just once in 11 games this
season, broke out for 40 points in
the paint and 14 on the fast break
after UBC gave up 29 turnovers.
After a collective total of five
team fouls in as many minutes,
the game began with a frantic
energy that had free throws as
first points recorded for both
teams. The boys were clearly
excited to be back after the break
and their training in Hawaii.
Points tumbled for 'Birds and
Bears alike in the first quarter
despite a multitude of turnovers
and fouls for both sides maxing
out early.
A storm of breakaways saw the
players flying down the court,
scoring quick baskets on both
sides. The high tempo continued
into the half with both teams
keeping the score tight at a two-
point halftime advantage for
the Bears.
Serious power was displayed
in defensive and offensive boards
made by T-Bird forward Brylle
Kamen as he denied the Golden
Bears many opportunities to
follow through to the basket.
Tommy Nixon aided Kamen in
concrete inside defence, holding
Alberta's relentless offence back.
Jordan Jensen-Whyte and Isaiah
Solomon also showed impressive
hustle in the second half of the
game. The guard duo con
sistently fed their forwards and
increased the UBC score with a
few three-pointers.
Near the end ofthe third quarter, steals lead to breakaways
and had the Bears pulling ahead.
Alberta's hot streak continued
throughout much of the fourth
quarter and the Thunderbirds
responded with a tight full court
press. Near the end ofthe game,
the 'Birds were again able to
take advantage ofthe Bears'
maxed team fouls and gain some
free throw points, but it wasn't
nearly enough.
Despite the loss, the silver
lining for UBC was the resurgence of Kamen, who has been
playing through injuries this
season and underwent elbow
surgery over winter break. His
game-high 25 points were the
most he's scored all season, and
he also nabbed 13 rebounds for
the double-double.
Kamen and UBC bounced back
on Saturday night to hand the
CIS No. 7 Saskatchewan Huskies
their third loss ofthe year, taking
the game by a score of 93-88. The
T-Birds were firing on all cylinders offensively, shooting 54 per
cent from the field with five guys
finishing in double digit points:
Tonner Jackson (23), Kamen (20),
Nixon (18), David Wagner (12),
and McGuinness (11). Kamen also
added 10 rebounds for another
double-double.
With upcoming weekend
series' against Mount Royal (6-6)
and UNBC (4-8), UBC (5-7) now
has a good opportunity to rack
up some wins and put themselves
back in the playoff hunt.
—With files from Natalie Scadden
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC3THE UBYSSEY
UBC's Brylle Kamen totalled 45 points and 23 rebounds this weekend with two double-double performances against top teams.
Women's basketball drops first home games of 2014
Dramatic late comeback falls short against Canada West-leading Huskies
VSAIE
10
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC3THE UBYSSEY
Kris Young had 24 points, seven rebounds and seven steals on Saturday night, but UBC
fell 55-53 to the conference-leading Saskatchewan Huskies.
Bailey Ramsay
StaffWriter
The first home games of 2014
for the UBC women's basketball
team didn't quite go according
to plan.
Hoping to get some revenge
against the Alberta Pandas, who
returned to War Memorial Gym
for the first time since knocking UBC out ofthe playoffs last
February, the Thunderbirds deteriorated in the fourth quarter,
eventually dropping what was
largely a close contest 56-47. Alberta's strong defense proved to
be too much — UBC would finish
the game shooting just 35 per
cent from the field.
"I thought we got a lot of
good looks and we just weren't
finishing," said UBC assistant
coach Carrie Watts, a former
UBC guard who captained the
Thunderbirds to a national title
in 2004. "Basketball games are
a lot easier when the ball goes
through the hoop, and tonight
the ball just wasn't dropping."
A scoreless game lingered
for the first few minutes until
Harleen Sidhu gave UBC a lead
as her layup earned the first two
points. Both teams appeared to
be evenly matched and pushed
each early on. With Alberta holding a one-point advantage in the
last minute ofthe first quarter,
UBC's Maggie Sundberg drib
bled through the key and hit a
well-timed jump shot, giving the
T-Birds a small 14-13 lead.
The second quarter saw both
teams unable to gain a substantial lead over the other. UBC took
a four-point lead towards the end
of the half only to have Alberta
snag it back.
Alberta began the second half
on a 12-2 run, but UBC was able
to bounce back somewhat, keeping the Pandas within reach with
the score 44-38 heading into
the fourth.
At that point, what was a
close game fell apart offensively
for the T-Birds as Alberta went
on another 12-2 run to start
the fourth.
"I think the physical play got
to us a little bit and we didn't
respond with enough power or
strength," said Watts. "I think
the looks we had in the first and
second half were pretty similar and the difference was they
were dropping in the first half
and [in] the second half they just
weren't."
The 12-point streak raised
the score from 40-44 to 40-56.
UBC's offence couldn't find the
basket, while Alberta's strong
offense consistently created difficulties for the T-Birds' defensive strategies towards the end
of an otherwise close game. In
the final minute, UBC's Sundberg
sunk a three-pointer and Cherub
Lum hit a jumper that finished
the game off at the final score of
56-47 for the Pandas.
"Any time we hold a team in
the 50s defensively is a good
defensive effort on our part,"
said Watts.
Kris Young, currently seventh
in the Canada West scoring race,
was the leading scorer for UBC
with 14 points. Harleen Sidhu
was close behind with 11. Alberta
took a big advantage when it
came to bench points, outscoring
UBC's bench 25-4.
UBC was back in action on
Saturday night to face the Canada West-leading University of
Saskatchewan Huskies.
Trailing by as many as nine
points late in the fourth quarter,
a dramatic comeback by UBC fell
short. Down 55-50 with eight
seconds remaining, Cassandra
Knievel drained a three-ball to
pull UBC within a bucket with
four seconds left. She then stole
Saskatchewan's inbounds pass,
but her last second heave fell
short at the final buzzer.
Young once again led UBC
with 24 points, seven rebounds
and seven steals.
With the two losses, UBC falls
to 7-5 this season and will head
to Calgary this weekend for two
games against the Mount Royal
Cougars (1-11). tJ
—With files from Natalie Scadden MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014    |   SPORTS + REC    |   7
HOCKEY»
Rafter powers UBC women's hockey
with record-breaking performance
T-Birds lead Canada West with 16-3-1 record, need 2 more wins to top last year's historic season total
Jenny Tang
StaffWriter
There's no stopping Tatiana Rafter and the UBC women's hockey
team, who came away with two
more victories this weekend to
increase their lead on the rest
of Canada West. Rafter's five
points — a hat trick and two assists — on Friday night sealed her
place in UBC's record books for
both the most points in a single
game and the most in a season
(29 and counting). Additionally,
with eight regular-season games
remaining, UBC needs just two
more victories to surpass their all-
time best win total in a season — a
record they set during last year's
historic season.
In their first home series of
2014, the 'Birds continued their
win streak and showed off their
skills with solid offense and
defense, capitalizing on their
powerplays on Friday night and
then coming up big in a shootout
on Saturday.
On Friday night, UBC scored on
four out of their nine power plays.
Rafter opened the scoring in the
first powerplay nine minutes in,
assisted by Nicole Saxvik and
Stephanie Payne. Cougar Kendra
Finch had tipped an equalizing
goal past Danielle Dube with four
minutes remaining in the first
period.
Thirty seconds into the second
period, Rafter again put UBC up
by a goal, scoring off Saxvik's pass
from behind the net. Rebecca
Unrau later passed a mid-air
shot to Rafter, who tipped it into
the top ofthe net to complete
her hat trick — her 15th goal of
the season.
Harheet Parhar increased the
'Birds' lead with her first goal of
the season, a weave from Sarah
Casorso and Christi Capozzi to
make the score 4-1 by the end of
the second period.
In the third period, a five-
on-three power play resulted in
Hannah Heisler redirecting the
puck to the back ofthe net for
UBC's fifth goal ofthe night. The
final goal went to Casorso in the
middle of another powerplay, and
UBC walked away victorious at
6-1.
UBC head coach Graham
Thomas was very pleased with the
outcome. "[I'm] definitely really
BIRD
DROPPINGS
Women's hockey (16-3-1)
Friday vs. REG: 6-1 \.
Saturday vs. REG: 2-1W (SO)
Men's hockey (7-10-1)
Friday® REG:4-2W
Saturday® REG: 4-3 W (SO)
Women's basketball (7-5)
Friday vs. ALB: 56-471
Saturdayvs.SASK:55-53l
Men's basketball (5-7)
Friday vs. ALB: 77-61
Saturday vs.SASK: 93-88 W
Women's volleyball (14-0)
Friday® UBCO:3-1W
Saturday® UBCO: 3-0 W
Men's volleyball (9-3)
Friday® UBCO:3-0L
Saturday® UBCO: 3-2
UBC's Tatiana Rafter had a hat trick and two assists on Friday night against Regina.
=ILE PHOTO JOSH CURRAN3THE UBYSSEY
happy and really impressed with
the team effort. We were really
solid, we were all at our best."
On Saturday, the game changed
quite quickly as Regina fought
back. "We [have] to give Regina a
lot of credit," said Thomas. "They
pushed back and made a solid
game and we didn't play as strong,
especially in the first half of the
game."
UBC opened the scoring with
a wide pass from Capozzi, which
enabled rookie Melissa Goodwin
to slot the puck into the back of
the net six minutes into the game.
However, Regina bit back a few
minutes later as Brooklyn Mos-
kowy slipped the puck between
Danielle Lemon's legs with UBC
struggling on the penalty kill.
Despite some excellent chances
for both sides, the goalies held
their own and the 1-1 tie remained
through to the end ofthe third
period, sending the game into
overtime. With the score still
deadlocked, it all came down to a
shootout.
Regina's Kendra Finch was
the first to tally a goal, but UBC
followed with a goal from Kathleen Kahoon. A save by Lemon
allowed Rafter to put the game
away for UBC.
Saturday's win was Lemon's
first shootout victory ofthe
season and her fourth in total.
She made 22 much needed-saves,
particularly in overtime when it
could have been anyone's game.
Lemon was satisfied with the
win, seeing as she lost against
Regina last semester, also in
shootouts. "I let in a couple of
goals to Regina last time we
played them, so [stopping] the
shootout shots and getting the
win was really satisfying tonight."
With the weekend sweep, UBC
currently stand in first place in
the Canada West Conference
with 16 wins. They'll look to
extend their lead next week
when they face the University
of Alberta Pandas (12-5-3) in
Edmonton on Friday. XI
(&)  CANADA WEST WOMEN'S HOCKEY
iiBf LEADING SCORERS
PLAYER                                                     GOALS
ASSISTS
TOTAL
O    Tatiana Rafter, UBC
15
14
29
©    CamiWooster.SASK
14
9
12
©    Kyleigh Palmer, MAN
9
7
19
O    Sarah Casorso, UBC
12
13
19
O    MeaganVestby, MAN
6
13
18
0    JaydenSkoye.ALB
5
6
16
©    Nicole Saxvik, UBC
10
9
16
©    Stephanie Schaupmeyer, UBC
7
9
16
©    KaitlinWilloughby.SASK
7
9
16
©    Maggie Litchfield-Medd, MAN
7
8
15
LOOKING FOR
THE MOST EPIC
SUMMER JOB?
Apply Now!
parkscanada.gc.ca/youthambassadors
ffacebook.com/
OMGParksCan
.'OMGParksCan
CHERC
L'EMPLOI D'ETE
^LUS EPIOUE ?
ez mamte
.ca/jeunesambassadc
ffacebook.cor
ParcsCanOMG
©ParcsCanOMG
Parks        Pares
Canada     Canada
Canada II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
PROCRASTINATION      H ■ H
STATION
BAD DOGE
Will wacky Bitcoin spinoffs
ever become valuable?
Move over, Liz — we want a new face on
our currency.
Spinoffs of the open-source crypto-
currency Litecoin have been generating
attention in the media as of late, and it's
no surprise; they are the first currencies
in human history to be rooted in viral
pop culture. Although artists have been
riffing on money and its associated
imagery foryears, Dogecoin, Coinye
and RonPaulCoin are among the first
populist currencies that can actually be
exchanged for goods and services —
theoretically, at least.
The popularity of these Litecoin derivatives has peaked in recent weeks due
to a couple of Bitcoin-centred headlines:
on Christmas day, a hacker managed to
make off with several million Dogecoin
(about $12,000 U.S.) by rewiring all
transactions on the Dogecoin network
to a single address; and last Friday, the
developers of Coinye announced that,
after being sent a cease-and-desist letter
from Kanye West's lawyers, they had
redesigned their currency so as to avoid
explicitly referencing the rapper, instead
replacing him with a "half-man-half-fish
hybrid who is wearing sunglasses."
Whimsy aside, the ascendance of
these currencies represents something
more profound: the re-appropriation of
currency itself. Whereas over the past
several centuries global currencies
were manufactured and monitored by
centralized governmental treasuries and
banks, Bitcoin, Litecoin and its fecund
spinoffs were created by enthusiastic
programmers outside the purview
of institutions. They can be used by
virtually anyone with access to the
Internet, and they require no agreements, oversight, credit history or home
address; every transaction is completely
transparent. In this sense, they are truly
democratic currencies.
Economists have major reservations
about them, however.
"They are quite limited in use," said
Werner Antweiler, professor of economics at the Sauder School of Business
and cryptocurrency specialist. "They
are essentially traded among the users
of those popular websites or platforms,
in which they are usable and can be
exchanged between the participants.
So in that sense, they're only really useful
within the very nearest scope of their
committed users, and they're not really
fungible across a much wider group
of users.
"What's pop culture today isn't going
to be what's pop culture tomorrow. And
so if people invest into one pop culture
currency and then the pop culture changes, and that particular item disappears,
then the value of all these currencies is
going to disappear, because you can't
exchange them to another currency."
Herein, then, lies the peculiar crux
of these cryptocurrency spinoffs. They
are a double-edged sword: the massive
popularity of their source imagery, and
the open-source platform on which they
are based, has the potential to stimulate
market interest far beyond that of conventional currencies, or even Bitcoin; but
the transient nature of this imagery ultimately ensures the devaluation of these
currencies. In the long term, the flooding
of the market with wacky currency could
even damage the market potential of
cryptocurrency altogether. By permitting
free range access to its software, the
developers of Litecoin may have shot
themselves in the foot.
Such dilemma. Very problem. Wow. tJ
-Rhys Edwards,
Culture Editor
FOOD)}
Full stomachs, full wallets
Dine Out Vancouver festival offers premium quality
cuisine and special menus for students on a budget
Dine Out allows UBC students to sample some ofthe best cuisine in the city on the cheap-
LLUSTRATION INDIANAJOEL3THE UBYSSEY
- but for some of us, it's really more a matter of pragmatism.
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Students are accustomed to pressure-cooker situations, but the heat will
be turned up extra high on student chefs
participating in the inaugural Chef Soup
Experiment this Friday.
Fifty top chefs from around the city
will each contribute one ingredient to the
soup before the public can taste samples at 12:30 p.m. on Granville Island as
part of Tourism Vancouver's Dine Out
Vancouver. This year, 263 restaurants
are participating in the 11th annual food
festival, which offers three-course meals
for $18, $28 and $38.
Negar Amiri, member and sponsor
relations associate with Tourism Vancouver, graduated with a marketing degree
from UBC in May 2013. She says a need
for balance as a university student was
the reason she ended up volunteering
for Tourism Vancouver during the 2010
Winter Olympics before eventually working for the company.
"That's why I started volunteering: to
get out ofthe school scene, to do something off-campus," Amiri said.
Like many students, Amiri lived on
campus for one year and experienced
"limited" food options at UBC. She
encourages students to take advantage
ofthe affordable cuisine around the city
during Dine Out.
Lucas Pavan, who graduated from the
Commerce program at UBC in 1994, is
the festival coordinator, the "big cheese"
of Dine Out Vancouver. Pavan, who majored in transportation and logistics, said
apart from the special restaurant deals,
Dine Out has become a more widespread
affair over the last five years.
"I've certainly changed the way the
festival runs," Pavan said. "Previously it
was just a restaurant promotion, and now
we've added the event component and
it's certainly grown and taken on a life of
its own."
After graduating from UBC, Pavan
worked as a bike tour guide in Europe.
He said this relationship-building work
contributed to his eventual success in
event planning, including the launch of
Vancouver's original street food festival.
This year, Street Food City III will
include a rotation of 23 food trucks at the
Vancouver Art Gallery.
"One ofthe greatest achievement for
me is really seeing tens of thousands of
people that are congregating on the steps
ofthe Art Gallery," Pavan said. "Seeing it
being attended by that number of people
is really fulfilling." tl
Dine Out Vancouver runs from Jan.17 to
Feb. 2 at various locations around the city,
and will run contests through social media
during the festiva I.
DINE OUT OPTIONS FOR UBC STUDENTS
Restaurants near campus serving three-course meals for $18 include:
Maria's Taverna O, at West Fourth and Vine, is an intimate Greek
family-run restaurant, where entrees alone usually range from $15-$22.
Romer's Burger Bar ©, on West Fourth near Cypress, is one of three
Vancouver area Romer's, created by the executive chef of Milestones.
Burgers run $12-$15 here on a regular day.
On campus, the Point Grill © at Marine Drive Residence and
Mahony's ©on University Boulevard are also participating in the three-
course $18 special menus.
' y        I R
^■jBjjt-.-
■
PHOTOS BY CARTER BRUNDAGE AND GEOFF LISTER; ADDITIONAL PHOTOS VIAGOOGLE MAPS
Clockwise from top left: Mahony's (5990 University Blvd.), the Point Grill (2205 Lower Mall),
Romer's Burger Bar (1873 West Fourth Ave.), Maria's Taverna (2324 West Fourth Ave.). MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2014    |    CULTURE
THEATRE»
BZZR»
Ten years on the edge
PuSh festival returns to provoke Vancouver
Pit Pub switches brew partner
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
Ten years ago, Vancouver's PuSh
festival was just a series of three
performances. This year, the
festival's program includes 20
main stage performances, plus
a club venue on Granville Island
with 12 shows, alongwith youth
programs, conversation series'
and films.
"[PuSh] is a performing arts
festival that takes place over
three weeks in January that
presents theatre, dance, music,
multimedia and everything in
between," said associate curator
Joyce Rosario.
Rosario graduated from UBC's
theatre department in 2003,
which means she was at school
when the festival's first ever
performance was happening. The
first PuSh performance Rosario
saw was K at UBC's Frederic
Wood Theatre in 2004.
"Our program is about pushing
artistic boundaries and taking
risks," she said.
The shows take place in
different venues across the city,
such as the Dance Centre, the
Vancouver Playhouse, the Frederic Wood Theatre at UBC and
many more.
"Every year, we add new
venues to the roster. This year,
one ofthe new venues is the Fox
Cabaret, which is on Main Street
— an adult theatre cinema that
has been converted into a cabaret," said Rosario.
Some ofthe shows are also
site-specific. This year, two of
them are taking place at the Vancouver Art Gallery: the Human
Library, which was a success last
year at the Vancouver Public Library, and The Quiet Volume.
In The Quiet Volume, the
performers are audience members who are instructed through
headphones to interact with a
series of books.
The festival has grown
exponentially in the last five
years, not only in the number
of performances, but also in
terms of audience and budget.
Rosario estimates that roughly 35,000 people attended last
year's festival.
"It won't be quite as big this
year, just because we have different venues with different capacities at play. But it will be close to
that I imagine," she said.
One ofthe new additions this
year is a youth program available
to anyone between the ages of
16 and 24. It will include a youth
passport that will provide young
people with the opportunity to see
some shows for as cheap as $5.
Club PuSh is another noteworthy addition to the festival,
something of a festival inside a
festival. "It's the hub," said Rosario. "It's where people meet. It's
our venue for more experimental
performances."
The festival also has a series
of shows that focus on contemporary aboriginal artists. This
year's program includes a show
at Club PuSh called Huff which
is about residential schools. Another highlight is a screening of
Nanook ofthe North, which will
feature the famous Tanya Tagaq's
vocal talents as well as violinist
Jesse Zubot and drummer Jean
Martin in a rendition of Derek
Charke's original film score
to this well-known silent film
directed by Robert Flaherty.
"It's super exciting to be
screening that film ... and [to be]
seeing it in a different light then
what the filmmaker had originally done," added Rosario.
Nanook ofthe North is at
the top ofthe list of shows you
shouldn't miss this year, along
with any performance at the York
Theatre, one ofthe city's brand
new venues. Also in the list is
Kitchen, a take on Andy Warhol
films and the '60s. "It is a blow-
your-mind kind of experience
that incorporates film and live
theatre as well as very unique
elements of audience participation," Rosario said.
Along with Kitchen, shows
like The Quiet Volume and Super
Night Shot prove that audience
participation is an important element of this year's program.
But if participation is not your
thing, check out Inheritor Album
by Vancouver's own 605 Collective. "It's the first time we're presenting a dance company that's
locally based," said Rosario. 31
The PuSh Performing Arts festival
runs from Jan. 14 to Feb. 2.
=HOTO COURTESY PUSH FILM FESTIVAL
Super Night Shot is a project by the Berlin-based Gob Arts Collective. Every Super Night Shot film is shot 60 minutes before it is screened.
The Vancouver screening will open the PuSh festival at the Vancouver Playhouse on Jan. 14.
CULTURE VULTURE
Art
Made in Taiwan, an exhibit featuring both historical
and contemporary artworks inspired by traditional
Taiwanese culture, is currently on exhibt at Irving K.
Barber Centre. Designed to dispel preconceptions
about Taiwan, the exhibit includes artworks from the aboriginal peoples of Taiwan as well as historical porcelain
items, jewellery and other objets d'art. The collection
was organized by the Taiwanese Cultural Society and
the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office. It is on display
until Jan. 28.
Sexy geeks
On Jan. 18 at 6:30 p.m., the Cellar Nightclub (1006
Granville St.) will host Nightmare After Christmas, a live
burlesque show themed around Tim Burton's popular
cult Aim. There will be a trivia contest and visitors are encouraged to dress as their favourite Burton character, xi
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
The Pit hopes that the new brews will help attract students, though Molson is still available.
Rhys Edwards
Culture Editor
After over 40 years in business,
the Pit Pub is switching its brewing partner in an effort to reignite
student attendance.
Since the Pit first opened in
1973, Molson-Coors was the pub's
primary supplier. However, in the
face of flagging visitor numbers
over the past year — due to construction on the New SUB and increased local competition, among
other factors — Gary Carlson, the
new manager ofthe campus staple,
decided that a switch was in
order. For its last semester in the
current SUB, and for the indefinite
future, the Pit will partner with
Labatt Breweries.
"It was felt that Labatt had a
really strong understanding ofthe
demographic at UBC and the types
of products that would go over
really well in the pub," said Carlson, who took over management of
the Pit in October last year. "They
were willing to put a lot of time
and energy and money behind
promotions and giveaways."
Alongwith plans for increased
promotional offers and events
over the next semester, the switch
comes with a new roster.
"I've been hearing from the
students that they wanted a
change in some of the draughts,
and I thought the second term
was a good chance to do so,"
said Carlson.
The Pit's primary house beer,
which has been reduced in price, is
now T-Bird Lager. Other offerings
include Kokanee, Shock Top (a
Belgian-style wheat ale), Alexander Keith's Amber Ale, and two
local craft beers, R &B Brewing's
Raven Cream Ale and Parallel 49's
Gypsy Tears. But Carlson notes
that Molson products are still
on offer.
"We never do anything exclusive," he said. "It's just that we
wanted to change our primary
draught supplier in the pub.
"It's always good to change and
keep things fresh." 31
MM PA
Master of Management
& Professional Accounting
Institute for Management & Innovation
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
• Designed primarily for non-business undergraduates
• For careers in Management, Finance and Accounting
• Extremely high co-op and permanent placement
To learn more about the MMPA Program, attend our information :
Friday, January 14, 2014 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Room Council Chambers, Student Union Building, The University of British Columbia
www.utoronto.ca/mmpa II Opinions
LLUSTRATION INDIANAJOEL3THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
HIGH-MINDED PROTEST
A LITTLE MISGUIDED
UBC's Hempology Club staged
a protest of sorts in the SUB
last week — a vape-in, if you
will. Marijuana should be
legal, no question, just like
the government shouldn't ban
people from drinking alcohol or
smoking cigarettes.
However, the reality is this
is hardly a courageous battle. If
you want to get high at UBC, you
can get high at UBC. But if you
want to go behind the back ofthe
AMS — which oversees the SUB
— and break the law to prove a
point that doesn't need proving,
you're going to come off as petty
and childish.
The club wants to set up a vape
lounge in the SUB, which seems
fair enough given that there
are already two bars. But they
shouldn't alienate the people
who control the SUB in their
quest to do so.
IONA BUILDING SALE
HAPPY AND SAD
The sale ofthe historic lona
Building from the Vancouver
School of Theology to UBC is a
somewhat exciting, if partially
sad piece of news. The exciting
part is that starting next year,
economics students and many
other Arts students will get to
attend class in one ofthe most
beautiful campus buildings,
which up until now had been
limited to use by a dwindling
number of theology students.
One ofthe best parts of UBC
is its campus, and the acquisition
of the building will allow the
university to convert more of
Point Grey's architectural beauty
into a functional part of our
academic experience. The price
UBC paid — nearly $30 million
— will also help VST, which has
been struggling with financial
and enrollment issues in recent
years, to continue to fulfill their
educational mission.
The sad part is that the VST
will be losing the crown jewel of
their campus. The lona Building
is an icon, and it's always sad to
see institutions forced to sell of
their landmarks. There is also
the irony of a school of religion
being converted to a school
of capitalism.
Still, one academic institution
selling to another seems far preferable to the VST being forced
to turn to private developers or
other buyers to improve their
financial standing.
DEREK MOORE
RESIGNATION TOO
LITTLE, TOO LATE
AMS VP Admin Derek Moore announced that he will be resigning
at the end ofthe month. He will
be resigning just weeks before
the end of his term, which is a
rather absurd thing to do.
The odd action suggests
Moore, who has been the subject
of internal rumblings within the
AMS for months, was pressured
to resign. If that's the case, it
was clearly too little and far too
late — why would he be allowed
to perform his job so poorly that
he would be called on to resign
just before the newly elected VP
external will take his place?
In the event he was not pressured to resign, it still makes
little sense that he would announce that he would be stepping
down effective at the end ofthe
month. If this is in fact a case of
Moore needing to step down for
personal reasons because he is
unable to continue in his current
role, he should step down sooner
than the end ofthe month.
If whatever the issue is can
in fact wait until the end ofthe
month, Moore or the AMS should
have had him continue through
the regular transition process
to maintain stability within the
student society.
GET PAID TO BLOG! BUT
ACTUALLY
Although the AMS has done
little to advertise it so far, they
have a pot of $1,000 to give
out to students who run AMS
election blogs.
In the first year ofthe AMS's
Voter-Funded Media (VFM) program, 13 blogs participated, and
were paid anywhere from $500
to $1,500 each.
Last year, only two blogs vied
for a measly $1,000.
The money has shrunk significantly over the years, but there's
still cash up for grabs, and there
seems to be little competition.
We try to cover the AMS elections as thoroughly and accurately as possible, but it's nice to have
other media to keep us in check
and students informed. We hope
more students will take advantage of VFM this year. You can
apply until 5 p.m. Monday. 31
Why education
is not a right
MICHAEL SULLIVAN
Op-Ed
ST. JOHN'S - To say that tuition
is too low is an unthinkable offense to "student movement" fundamentalists, for surely "education
is a right." However, despite my
own immediate interests and an
excess of Canadian Federation of
Students posters dangling around
the Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) campus, I have
come to a different conclusion. I
have come to believe that tuition
fees should not be lowered. Rather,
they should be raised.
Low-tuition advocates claim
that higher fees constitute a
barrier to education for students
from low-income backgrounds
and deter them from studying
at post-secondary institutions.
Although this claim seems
compelling, there is no empirical
evidence to support it.
In 2007, for example, high-tuition jurisdictions Nova Scotia
and Ontario had high rates of
university participation for youth
from lower-income families at
42.7 per cent and 42.5 per cent
respectively. In Manitoba and
Newfoundland and Labrador,
low-tuition provinces, only 36.7
per cent and (a shockingly low)
30.1 per cent of such youth are
students. However, participation
rates for the top three quartiles
are highest in our province.
With provisions in place for
student loans and grants, tuition
is not a significant deterrent to
education. In fact, raising tuition
would allow the university to
take more of wealthier students'
money, which could be used to
pay for aid programs and other
investments that could improve
our education.
It is also unfair to keep tuition
rates too low. In Canada, high
school graduates earn just over
half of what university graduates
do on average; that is, university
students benefit tremendously
from their degrees. Furthermore,
they are the prime beneficiaries
of their own educations.
An investment in a degree
benefits the recipient more than
anyone else; graduates are in a
position to eventually pay for
their degrees; and the alternatives
to a tuition hike are: i) no new
funding for MUN, ii) more debt
or iii) higher taxes. Thus, it is
reasonable to expect students to
pay more.
Like low-tuition advocates,
I believe MUN could do better
with more funding. I merely also
believe the best way to get this
funding is from its direct beneficiaries in the case that they
can pay.
Weighing a tax increase against
a tuition increase is particularly
interesting as it raises the question: should the general public be
forced to pay for degrees that will
likely make their recipients better
off than average? The common
sense answer is no — to suggest
yes is to endorse an upward redistribution of wealth.
But even if raising tuition fees
provides a net benefit, do people
have some inviolable right to
education? Of course not. Rights
are things that government can't
take away from you without first
unreasonably violating your person, not things they have to give
you. So, while access to education
is a right, having tuition paid for
is not.
Furthermore, subsidized
education is not a constitutionally
enshrined right in Canada. And
the International Covenant on
Economic, Social and Cultural
Rights does not compel signatories to axe tuition. By dogmatically
suggesting that education is a
right, the Canadian Federation
of Students' prevents dialogue
on pragmatic reforms to Canadian education—dialogues that
don't always start and end with
tuition elimination.
As a student, it is not in my immediate interest to be arguing for
higher tuition. But the interests
of society as indicated by reason,
and general principles of justice,
should come above crude calculations of immediate self-interest.
Public investments in education
are essential. But in finding the
right balances, open-mindedness
and willingness to consider a
variety of alternatives is essential. In this case, it seems as
though a policy unthinkable to
many is one that could be beneficial for most.
This article originally appeared in
The Muse and won the John H.
MacDonald award for best opinion
writing in Canadian student journalism at the Canadian University
Press National Conference this
weekend.
=HOTO COURTESY KICK_START/FLICKR II Scene
/ERSITY EXPERIENCE
By the numbers: who's running in this
year's AMS elections
The Ubyssey conducted a survey to get to know this year's AMS
election candidates a little better. Here are some of their answers.
CIYEAWAT
THE UBYSSEY HAS
COMPLIMENTARY
TICKETS TO AN ADVANCED
SCREENING OF
JACK RYAN:
SHADOW
RECRUIT
WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 15,h
7p.m.
SCOTIABANK THEATRE
IN THEATRES
JANUARY 17th!
ShadowRecruitMovie.com
'
STOP BY OUR OFFICE IN SUB 23 TO CLAIM TICKETS. LIMITED
SUPPLY AVAILABLE. NON OPT-OUT STUDENTS ONLY
New Ubyssey staff
meeting times!
Wednesdays @ noon
Learn how to do journalism at
your campus rag! 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 13,2014
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
3
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
IS
19
20
|21
|22
|23
24
25
26
27
28
■ 29
30
31
32
33
|34
35
36
37
38
|33
43
40
41
|42
|44
|45
46
47
48
|49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
GO
Gl
SUDOKU
9
8
3
1
7
3
8
8
2
3
4
7
9
4
5
2
5
1
4
9
7
3
4
6
2
7
4
1
5
1
5
2
9
3
8
7
=UZZLE COURTESY KRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.
THEATRE AT UBC PRESENTS
=UZZLECOURTESY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
ACROSS
1- Dept. of Labor div.
5-Feudal estate
10-CommediadeH'_
14-Blame
15-All together
16-Antlered animal
17-In spite of
20-Type of ballot
21- Matters
22-
-X
23-Dance move
24-Easy gallop
28-Burst of laughter
29-Brillo rival
32-The end of	
33- Brockovich
34-Drug-yielding plant
35-Divide up
38-Gather, harvest
39-Expectant desire
40-One on track?
41-Building annex
42-Skills
43-Emphasis
44-Nice notion
45- Thor Heyerdahl craft
46-Stupid
49-Anticlimax
54- Arterial plaque deposit
56-Draft classification
57-Clock faces
58-Actress Turner
59- Marine mammal, secure something
60- Brewer's need
61- A wedding cake may have three
ofthese
DOWN
1-Mrs. Chaplin
2-Highbrow
3-Rude dwellings
4-Even speak...
5- Something that occupies space
6-Gray
7- Centrepiece ofthe human face
8-Canadian prov.
9- Catalyst's counterpart
10-Make sense
11-Bridle strap
12-Portable shelter
13-Energy units
18-Ready to roll
19-Christmas
23-Riverthat flows through Paris
24-Training group
25-Slippery as	
26-Sherpa'shome
27-Snare
28-Gets ready
29-Pizzeria order
30-Seeps
31- Prophets
33-Ham it up
34- Banned apple spray
36-Dirge
37-Morebohemian
42-Purim month
43-Most reasonable
44-Model
45-Tumbles
46-Neighbor of Cambodia
47- Magazine founder Eric
48- Perlman of Cheers
49-Final Four org.
50-Electrical unit
51-Actor Morales
52-Baseball team
53- Nicholas II was the last Russian
one
55-Sprechen       Deutsch?;
D
U
*D
E
'r
V
't
*s
1
SA
"r.
A
't
A
N
N
A
E
T
A
T
L
A
R
A
Y
E
A
R
D
R
U
N | K
A
N
A
T
H
L
E
E
T II
M
B
1
B
E
w
A
L
L
E
Y
L Hi'
L
E
A 1
A
V
1
A
T
E Ic
E
L
L
M
A
T
E
L
1
S
P
3 II
L
E
E
A
W
0
L
L
A
T |
A
N
E
N
T
|a
R
T
0
R
E
M
T
E
A
3 H'3
P
1
R
0
P
Y
R
0
S
T
A
T Hi
1
s
T
E
N
|ll
E
E
D I'd
A
T
Y 1
S
Y
S
T
E
M H'A
N
D
c
L
0
Y
L
0
C
H
5P \R
1
E
D
H
0
M
0
A
G
A
L
T
0
N
N
E
1
S
A
Y
C
A
E
Y
1
T
0
R
c
E
R
0
STILL WINNING AWARDS AT 95
This past week, The Ubyssey picked up three John H.
McDonald Awards for excellence in student journalism at the
76th annual conference ofthe Canadain University Press in
Edmonton. Congratulations to this year's winners:
Graphic Design: "Behind the building" by
Indiana Joel
Best Front Page: "UBC's copyright crusade" by
Kai Jacobson, Jeff Aschkinasi and Indiana Joel
Multimedia: "8 a.m. party bus to UBC" by Lu
Zhang and Nick Grossman
The Seagull
by Anton Chekhov
TRANSLATED BY    Pet8T GUI
Kathleen Duborg
Jan 23-Feb 8,2014
TELUS Studio Theatre
$7 Preview, Wed, Jan 22
Tickets: $22 | $15 | $10
(+ service charge)
Box Office: 604-822-2678
www.theatre. u bc.ca      they're
(0

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128506/manifest

Comment

Related Items