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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1987

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Array the Ubyssey
Canucks
Crash
Campus
Pages
ABOUT 200 PEOPLE marched through downtown Vancouver Saturday to protest Bill 34, the so-called "quarantine" bill that gives health officers increased legal power to detain
and isolate people with AIDS and other communicable diseases. The bill would also give more legal clout to provincial medical officers requesting research and private patient
information on people with communicable diseases. While the proposed legislation only clarifies the legal procedures for powers already outlined in the health act, a coalition of
community and civil rights groups fears the changes will drive people with AIDS, or those who think they may have the disease, underground. mike gordon photo
Ministry sees students as commodity
By MIKE GORDON
BURNABY (CUP) — Students are
being streamlined into the job
market at the expense of a more
rounded education, said delegates
to the weekend B.C. forum on post-
secondary education.
"The message of the ministry
(of advanced education and job
training) to students is 'you are a
commodity,' and how to best capitalize on that commodity," said
Paul Keet, student president of
the Langara Campus of Vancouver Community College. "That's
not appropriate for discussion."
The emphasis on technical
training over liberal arts was a hot
issue for the more than 100 repre
sentatives from faculty, administration, student, government and
business groups who gathered at
Simon Fraser University.
For some, the debate overshadowed issues ranging from
accessibility to research and post-
secondary funding, and raised
concerns about the priorities facing the roughly 600 participants in
the national forum to be held in
Saskatoon in late October.
NDP advanced education
critic, Darlene Marzari, says that
the tension between advocates of
traditional education, and those
who favour more specific, technical training, threatens to break
down the whole forum.
Proposed honorarium
hike riles ad hoc member
By ROSS McLAREN
The AMS director of finance
did not consult the ad hoc committee on. honoraria: before bringing new figures to council last
Wednesday, said a disgruntled
committee member.
Rob Cook said the proposed
$2,750 honorarium levels for the
president and director of finance
were a "surpri se to everyone on the
committee but Don (Isaak)" when
introduced at council.
Cook said the committee let
Don Isaak, director of finance and
a non-voting member on the
committee, figure out the increase
in the president's and the director
of finance's honorarium based on a
1.5 times increase.
According to Cook, "Don
interpreted (the increases) in a
different way than what the
committee intended. The president and DoF honarariums may
have increased 1.5 times but the
figures Don started with were
alien to me."
But Isaak said that "when we
(ad hoc committee) went through
it (the proposal) exact dollar fig
ures were not discussed."
"The ad hoc committee agreed
to increases in spirit but not officially," Isaak said.
The old honorarium figures
for the president and DoF were a
combination of paid tuition and
$1,000 cash.
Isaak said he planned to increase both by 1.5 times but that
he forgot to tell the ad hoc committee about increasing the tuition
portion of the honorarium.
"At budget committee I fixed
up the mistake of not including the
tuition. I based the tuition on nine
units and increased it 1.5 times,"
Isaak said.
Gary Mark, Senate representative on council, said Isaak did
nothing wrong.
"Don was preparing recommendations of the ad hoc committee for the budget committee. Don
wrote the recommendations out
and explained them," said Mark.
But according to Cook, Isaak's
proposal "created a vast difference
between those two positions
(president and DoF) and the other
executive positions."
Much of the debate was
kicked off by opening remarks
from speaker Richard Allen, chief
economist of the B.C. Central
Credit Union.
"We have to treat national
education as an investment — an
investment in human capital?
said Allen, adding that a balance
between liberal arts and applied,
technical post-secondary training
is critical for Canada to meet
changing global business and industrial needs.
Many delegates found the
Tinman capital' metaphor distasteful.
"Let us recognize that human
resources does not just mean job
training to meet specific needs of
the corporate sector? said Nick
Witheford, a national delegate
from the SFU students' society.
Witheford, along with
dlelgates from the Canadian Federation of Students (Pacific Region) criticized the provincial
government's bias towards more
technical and entrepreneurial
programs   through   'targeted
funds.'
"I get worried when education
priorities are determined to turning out workers," said UBC sociology professor Patricia Marchak,
adding that universities should be
addressing larger questions like
the threat of nuclear war, and
damage to the environment.
"I'm worried, due to the nature of the federal government,
that business will be very represented (at the national forum) and
we will have to defend liberal
arts? said James Tate, a national
student delegate from the University of Victoria.
"General training has been
de-valued," said Paul Ramsay,
president of the College-Institute
Educator's Association. Ramsay
said general academic courses
were in highest demand and shortest supply in this year, while many
career-oriented' courses were
empty.
But some delegates denied
any distinction between general
and specific academic learning.
"Academic   training   is  job
training," said Bill Sch-
ermbrucker, a former faculty executive at Capilano College.
Others, like George Morfitt, a
business representative from the
University Advisory Council, believe technical and professional
schools such as law and medicine
should be taken from the university umbrella, and set up as separate institutions, following the the
polytechnical model in countries
like Sweden.
But Witheford said the idea of
separating the two types of education by institution is dangerous,
because it divides the system further between those who can afford
a liberal arts education, and those
forced to seek direct job training
through technical programs.
"We should rather be building
an emancipatory system that encourages critical thinking and
awarness of social and intellectual
issues along with career training?
said Witheford.
BC will be sending 44 delegates to the national forum, to be
held next month in Saskatoon.
New funding saves UBC daycare
By CELIA HENSLOWE
UBC daycare will survive the
imminent demise of its present
buildings, thanks to proposed university funding.
The university will match
donations to a total of $500,000 for
the development of new facilities,
K.D. Srivastava, UBC's vice-president student services recently
announced.
The AMS has had $350,000
earmarked for the project for the
past three years, said Don Holu-
bitsky, daycare co-ordinator for
the AMS capital projects acquisition committee.
The official cost estimate for
the daycare is $1.1 million.
"The federal government has
offered to match provincial contributions under a social services line
item expenditure. Unfortunately,
the provincial government has
been solicited several times in the
past few years and has declined to
offer funding for daycare," Holu-
bitsky said.
There are encouraging signs
from a number of philanthropic
organizations which have indicated that they will match other
contributors," said Michael
Kingsmill, a staff member for
CPAC.
The daycare has until April 1,
1988 to come up with the funds
and plans for new facilities.
The current premises have
been condemned by the fire department because they do not
meet existing national fire codes.
The university currently provides the twelve autonomous
daycare units in Acadia camp with
rent free huts.  The  WWII army
huts have been used as temporary
buildings for nearly forty years.
The details of the building
plans, site and continued university maintenance are being discussed but will not be finalized
until the levels of available funding are known.
The proposed complex will
also house the Child Study Centre,
currently located in Kitchener
Annex School. Both programs will
remain independent.
UBC daycare director Mab
Oloman said the move would benefit both the daycares and the Child
Study Centre.
"By combining planning and
development we will save money,
and we will give each other the
additional benefit of a closer relationship between professionals in
the field? Oloman said. BETWEEN
CLASSES
TODAY
U.B.C. SKI CLUB
General Meeting
12:30 pm, SUB 212
At this general meeting our door
prize will be
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
General meeting and short lecture
on volunteering
12:30 - 1:30 pm, IRC Building
Wood#l
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Introductory clinic. All welcome.
Swimsuit mandatory. $1.00
7 pm, UBC Aquatic Centre
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wine and cheese party. 4:30pm -
9:30pm. SUB room 212.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Informal worship. All welcome.
Noon. Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Annual general "welcoming*
meeting. 12:30pm. Buchanan
B230.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
General meeting. 12:30pm. SUB
Plaza Xorth (Lower Ixjvel).
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Court times begin (today and tomorrow). All welcome. 7:15pm -
9:30pm. Winter Sports Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Co-op supper. 6pm. Lutheran
Campus Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Informal worship. All welcome.
Noon. Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER
CLUB
General meeting. All interested
show up. 12:30pm.
SUB 207/209.
WEDNESDAY
UBC STUDENTS FOR CHOICE
Organizational Meeting - All new
members and interested parties
welcome. Please note room change.
(to 213)
12:30 pm, SUB 213 (moved from
224)
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General Meeting. 12:30pm Chem
150
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night. 3:30pm. Gallery
Lounge.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
Video and discussion on Mozambique. Everyone welcome.
12:30pm. Grad Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Table Talk"- a time for discussion.
Bring a bag lunch. All welcome.
Noon. SUB room 212A.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Evening program and fellowship.
All welcome. 7pm. Lutheran
Campus Centre.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT'S
ASSOCIATION
Content lecture on psychology grad
schools by Dr. Linden. 12:30pm.
Kenny 2510 - Lounge.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Mike Harcourt, leader of the B.C.
New Democrats will be giving a
lecture/speech followed by a
question period. 12:30pm. SUB
Auditorium.
THURSDAY
MUSSOC - THE MUSIC
THEATRE SOCIETY
October 1-3. The Music theatre
Society of UBC will be holding
auditions for its Feb. production of
"Merrily We Roll Along"
Times: Th 5-9pm SUB 207/9. F 5-
10pm St. Jame's Church on 10th
Ave. Sat. l-4pm St. James Church.
INTER - VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Join us for a Manuscript Bible
Study of Ephesians 6. Tickets will
be on sale for the Tahiti night
cruise on the Malibou Princess Sat.
night.
Time: 12:30 noon, Chem 250
THE FIRST YEAR
STUDENTS'COMMITTEE
Invites all Froshes to attend this
informational meeting. Find out
what the FYSC is all about and
what positions are available.
12:30pm. SUB Room 212.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Organizational meeting. 12:30pm
-1:30pm. Asian Studies Building,
Auditorium.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
General welcoming meeting.
12:30pm. Scarfe Room 209.
SUCCESS
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SUCCESSFUL FIRM
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• With DUNWOODY, you are involved with tax and audit planning, not just tax returns and
"ticking and bopping".
SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS
• In 1986, DUNWOODY Vancouver office had a 100% pass rate on the Uniform Final Exam!
• From our National staff intro course through to our UFE prep course in Toronto, we
support your efforts to complete your program as fast as possible.
• DUNWOODY salary, benefits and working conditions let you know that we value you
highly from the moment you start with us!
AT DUNWOODY THERE IS A DIFFERENCE
If you are interested in a team approach instead of being a "junior" cog in the machine, we
want to interview you! Together we can unlock your door to success.
SIGN UP to interview with DUNWOODY & COMPANY or call 688-5421 and talk to our
recruiting team:   Dennis Cessna, Partner Dale Harper, Manager
Chartered Accountants
Management Advisors
Insolvency Services
step ahead
9A
Members,
Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
THE CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders-3
lines, $3.00, additional lines,
60 cents, Commercial - 3 lines,
$5.00, additional lines, 75
cents. (10% DISCOUNT ON
25 ISSUES OR MORE)
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 4:00 p.m. 2 days before
publication. Publications Room 266,
S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
'82 KAWASAKI 650 CSR
17,000, windshield, trunk -
$1,100, phone evenings 687-2238
'78 CHEVETTE, 4-speed, save gas,
well maintained, v. good, great price
must see $1050 obo 263-9078 morninEB
PERFECT STUDENT CAR! '76 Toyota Corolla SR5 New Carb. & Brakes,
No rust, exc. Running cond. $1795
OBO Phone 434-1900
HIDE-A-BED, brown & white, very
good condition. $125.
732-0635.
NORCO SASQUATCH MOUNTAIN
BIKE 23". Much too much to list!
Has EVERYTHING CHEAP!  $590.
Leaving country. 873-6753.
15 - FOUND
JADE EARING
found near Main Library
phone 261-4565
20 - HOUSING
4 BEDROOM HOME FOR RENT - Close
to UBC. November 1 or 15, $1 000 per mo.
876-3628, Leave message.  Lease Available
NEWLY COMPLETED BASEMENT
ROOMS - 3 at $250; from Oct 1. Near 12 at
Trimble.  Phone 224-2551
25 - INSTRUCTION
NANNY for Jr. High School student.
$30/day, one woek/mo. Dunbar area,
live-in, call Lynn 731-0926.
PIANO LESSONS By Judy Alexander -
Grad of Julliard School of Music & Member
BC Reg. Music Teachers Assoc.
321-4809, Oakridge
30 - JOBS
ACNE? BALDNESS? CELLULITE?
WRINKLES? We have the solution!
Money back guarantee. Helsinki
method. "Images" personal care products. Great growth potential for f/t, p/t
distributor. For products & info, call
929-5053.
35 - LOST
LOST COOL SHADES - Rayban May-
fair
Lost on Sept. 8 Tues.
Place: enroute between Angus & Buto.
Contact: Sean 737-0486
Emotionally attached, Cash reward.
70 - SERVICES
FUND RAISER WITH expertise in
Indian Act & Canadian Granting
Agencies etc. Can obtain commissioned freelance Assoc, with a native
group. Call McCoy, 580-3483
70 - SERVICES
TEAMS! CLUBS!
INDIVIDUALS!
SAY IT IN STITCHES
Monikers Custom computerized
Embroidery. Puts Logos, Names, &
Initials Onto Sportswear, Athletic
Bags, Umbrellas... and More.
Close to UBC
MONIKERS
2615 West 16th Ave.
(1 block east of MacKonald)
736-4515
M-F -10 - 5:30 Sat. 10 - 4:00
75 - WANTED
SAMI'S is looking for delivery people who
understand the hospitality business & have
their own trans.
Apply at 2200 Cornwall Ave. 737-7777
HAIRIS HAIRDESIGNrequires models for
hairstyling colour, perm workshops (Hair
must be in good cond.)
please, call Rebecca 879-5435
80 - TUTORING
WANT A 1ST CLASS GRADE?
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CALL A&A TUTORIAL SERVICE
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85 - TYPING
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Student discounts. 222-2661
NEED ESSAYS TYPED?   Need Resumes
Typed? For all typing needs call Paula
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EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   AVAILABLE.
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FAST ACCURATE, reliable typing of es-
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exp. word proc. & IBM typewriter.
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a specialty! Discount rates, min. notice. Kits area-June - 738-1378.
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TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM NOTICE SERVICE essays & resumes,
scripts, proofreading, writing/research help. 327-0425
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: STUDENT DISCOUNTS. User & letter
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UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
September 29, 1987 Superpowers want perpetual war
Seven year Iran - Iraq conflict may go on forever
By JOHN RICHMOND
Both the United States and
the Soviet Union want to prolong
the seven year old Gulf war, said
Middle East expert Bernard Reich
in a UBC lecture yesterday.
"If the Iraqis win they will be
free to threaten Israel, and if Iran
wins they will be free to threaten
other Arab countries, and that
concerns both the Soviets and
ourselves? said Reich, a political
scientist from George Washington
University in Washington, D.C.
Both superpowers are hoping
the war will be "either prolonged
indefinitely or come to a peaceful
end without a victor," he said.
Reich said the victor in a military exchange between Iran and
the U.S. would be the Soviets, and
the Americans should be afraid of
Soviet advances in the region.
"Let's face it, Afghanistan
was the Soviet's first foot in the
door (in the Middle East)? Reich
said.
He said the U.S. vision of regional stability in the gulf does not
allow for any Soviet presence,
which he thinks is an unrealistic
expectation.
Reich said one way to prevent
Soviet hegemony was to continue
re-flagging Kuwaiti oil tankers.
"We must continue to defend
the tankers as long as the Soviets
wants to act without prior congressional restrictions against the
Soviet and Iranian threat."
Reich would not rule out further exchanges in the gulf and said
"anything could happen," but conceded that he thought the Soviet
and U.S. navies would avoid any
clashes.
Reich finished by telling a
"...all the ensuing problems could have been avoided
if only the Shah had killed all the people behind
Khomeini?'
are willing to do it if we don't,"
Reich said.
And Reich said he fears President Reagan will act in the gulf
without congressional approval,
because   "the   administration
student in the audience that the
Iranian revolution and "all the
ensuing problems could have been
avoided if only the Shah (of Iran)
had killed all the people behind
Khomeini?
Expo statue
rates as an
expensive gift
ESCAPED CONVICT DEMANDS woman's pants for use as makeshift sail...memories of summer
katherine monk photo
After spending $7,000 relocating an Expo sculpture to UBC,
the administration may be forced
to send the statue back if it is
unable to insure the piece.
"If we can't resolve the liability and insurance problems, we
may have to forgo the project," said
Sheldon Cherry, chair of the
president's committe on university art.
The statue, which stood 50
feet off the ground on the Expo
site, has moving parts which are
contributing to the liability problems, said Cherry.
"It's not like a normal statue
that stands on the ground, that's
the stumbling block," said secretary to the committee, June Bink-
ert.
The sculpture was transferred to the university grounds
from the Expo site last fall, but has
sat in a "disassembled mode" in
the physical plant for the past
year.
The statue, called 'Rowingjbr-
idge', is an aluminum colored
sculpture by Geoff Smedley, a
professor of fine arts at UBC.
r
Campbell supports general education
By JENNIFER LYALL
On Friday The Ubyssey interviewed Point Grey's NDP MLA Darlene Marzari
about her views on the direction of BC's advanced education policies and philosophies. Now it's the Social Credit's turn as we talk to Kim Campbell, the riding's
other MLA.
Socred MLA Kim Campbell
understands that advanced education must be an important concern for a politician from a university riding like Point Grey.
She believes education in the
eighties must continue to serve
the purpose it always has: "to provide people with the kind of intellectual development and skills
that make them able to function in
the world."
A successful university education gives students "the ability
to think intelligently, to work independently, to read between the
lines, to express yourself? she
said.
"Growing mentally is the key
to a university education," said
Campbell. "You forget a lot of what
you learn but what you take with
you is something much more fundamental."
While she acknowledges the
necessity of job training, Campbell
rejects the notion that career
preparation is the most important
role of modern education.
"Directing yourself towards
taking on a specific role" can only
limit future choices, she said. "It's
very hard to predict what you need
to know."
And she said the possibility of
getting a job when you graduate
need not be jeopardized by acquiring a liberal arts degree. "There
are many people in the employer
community who will vouch for the
fact that well educated generalists
are very employable."
Campbell supports general
education programs that encourage students to be flexible and
capable of meeting the challenges
of an increasingly complex society.
She offers the AIDS epidemic as
an example: "How do we deal with
those kinds of situations as a
humane people? Those are really
tough challenges and they require
wisdom."
And she dismisses commonly
expressed fears that BC's advanced education system is neglecting general academic
courses. "I think the students are
voting with their feet for liberal
arts programs."
But she doesn't agree with
those who want to see professional
training programs, like engineering, law or medicine, relegated to
their own technical institutions;
she thinks the university community benefits by incorporating a
variety of disciplines. And students in job-oriented programs
should also have "the opportunity
to take elective courses to broaden
their perspective," she said.
Campbell agrees with her
political opponents that accessib-
lity to education is still a problem
in BC, but claims that "it is not a
function of money."
"Increasing student aid
doesn't always lead to increased
participation," she said.
Rather, "there are a lot of
structural barriers (to
accessibility...the universities
were built on the expectation that
our students would be young and
full-time. That's not true any
more?
Campbell said the current
university system presents special obstacles to the physically
handicapped and to part time students. As a possible "short-term"
solution to the problem she suggested allowing some interior colleges, operating in association
with the universities, to grant
some degrees.
The bottom line is that education is crucial to the development
of our society, said Campbell.
"It's important to
remember...that we all have a
vested interest in a high quality
education system."
KIM CAMPBELL...grows mentally
September 29,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Big bucks for small kaon particles
By TIM McGRADY
UBC's Triumf facility is the
proposed site of a kaon factory
which will further enhance UBC's
reputation for "world class physics," says Kim Campbell, Socred
MLA for Point Grey.
The provincial cabinet has
pledged $87 million of the total
cost of building the accelerator
tunnels and research complex.
"The purpose of kaon production is to study the forces that hold
matter together," says Michael
Craddock, Triumf division head.
Kaons are subatomic particles produced by a high velocity
collision of a beam of protons with
target nuclei.
The scheme would have
"many practical spinoffs," said
Campbell, notably for the cancer
treatment capabilities of subatomic particles.
Craddock says that while only
a limited number of kaons could be
produced to treat cancer they are
more effective than the particles
currently used and "more patients
could be treated."
The provincial government
pledge still leaves Triumf $350
million short, a figure which
dwarfs   its   annual   operating
budget of $30 million.
Craddock said the extra
money could come from either foreign investment or a federal grant.
A joint Federal-Provincial
commission has set up a team to
approach foreign governments
who would also benefit from
Triumf s enhanced research capabilities. In addition, an "economic
benefits study" is being done to
study feasibility of federal monies
for the scheme.
Craddock said there is "high
employment potential for the
scheme," with every direct job producing  another  four jobs  indi
rectly.
Campbell said it is unlikely
the federal government would
okay the canvassing of foreign
nations for funds unless they, too,
would help with funding.
She hopes the money will
come through. "If we don't build
[the accelerator] someone else
will."
r \
State slow to enrich
daycare: educator
Professor says claims of
illiteracy are exaggerated
By JENNIFER WONG and
JUDY MAH
Recent claims that many university students are illiterate are
exaggerated, according to a UBC
professor of education administrator.
The Southam Literacy Survey reported two weeks ago that
"one in twelve (respondents) who
claimed to be university graduates
still tested as functionally illiterate."
But John Dennison said the
figures are misleading because
they don't allow for special cases,
such as foreign students.
"English as a Second Language students do well in math
physics, etc., but can't pass
English...they have to know tech
nical language, like understanding computer programs, but they
don't have to write."
The survey estimated that
about five million Canadians, one
third of whom are high school
graduates, are functionally illiterate.
Dennison said the problem is
partly a result of Canada's public
education system. "Education is
geared for the large group in the
middle and kids on the fringes get
left out."
"School is frustrating to those
who can't progress at a reasonable
rate. ..young kids don't get support
for what they do in school because
they return to a home where English is not spoken," he said.
Dennison   said   schools   are
failing to address the problem of
illiterate students responsibly.
"Schools give some students * social promotions' which pass the
older students on, hoping that
something miraculous will happen."
Large class sizes and low
funding for adult education and
ESL programs also contribute to
Canada's illiteracy problem, he
said.
Dennison said typically high
failure rates on UBC's English
Composition Test don't necessarily indicate that students are illiterate.
"If you don't pass the ECT you
are not considered illiterate, because many intelligent literates
can't even pass it," said Dennison.
Delays in the implementation of a federal daycare
program are an illustration of
the government's dilemma
between increasing pressure
for a comprehensive daycare
program and the high cost pf
such a program, according to
the dean of UBC's school of
social work.
Glenn Drover, speaking at
Robson Square last week, predicted that because of budgetary restraints the minister of
health and welfare will not
announce the long expected
program until November at
the earliest.
The Tories' proposed
daycare program is leading
Canada in the right direction,
but at far too slow a pace, said
Drover.
Drover sees the Tories selecting a shared responsibility
program that admits some
governmental intervention in
childcare but attempts to stay
as neutral as possible. Health
and welfare minister Jake Epp
has called for a reasonably
comprehensive plan providing tax credits to families
with children under six, an
extension of maternity leave
to 26 weeks, differential funding for the poorer provinces, a
child development fund for
special needs families, and
incentives for private donations to daycare.
Epp's proposed program
would require a budget of
$1.5 billion by 1992. The program has received the support of a parliamentay
committee and the prime
minister, but seems unlikely
to get past finance minister
Michael Wilson's budget
trimming, said Drover.
Because of a lack of
proper facilities there are
currently over one million
children in Canada who are
either unsupervised or only
casually cared for, said
Drover.
He said parents that do
find daycare for their children often face costs as high'
as $5,000 per year per child.
SUR
»]§
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Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
September 29,1987 Free trade poses danger
to Canadian sovereignty
By STEPHAN WEAVER
Free trade with the United
States would mean a loss of Canadian sovereignty, according to the
chair of The Council of Canadians.
"There is no such thing as free
trade, just as there is no such thing
as a free lunch," said Mel Hurtig at
Robson Square Tuesday.
"There should be an excellent
trade relationship with the U.S.,
but that certainly doesn't include
free trade."
The essential problem with the
American concept of free trade is
that it would compromise "the
ability of Canadians to have a
country...and the freedom of
choice? said Hurtig. "American
economic priorities are certainly
not Canadian priorities."
"Canada, it just so happens, is
not the U.S. - it's a different country. It is bigger, but with a smaller
population. We have a heritage of
doing.things differently in this
country...we have more crown corporations, more of a mixed economy. We often do sit down and
target various sectors."
Hurtig identified four areas in
which Canada would lose its control under free trade: jobs, especially in the service sector; restrictions on company takeovers by US
companies; restrictions on access
to natural resources; and govern-
Canucks
play
Canucks
By BRENT LYMER
Last Thursday night the
U.B.C. Winter Sports Complex
hosted the Vancouver Canuck's
annual black and gold game.
The game, which is held annually
to support the Father David
Bauer hockey scholarship program, allowed fans a first hand
view of this year's roster.
The game took a number of
plays to hit full flight. This initial
wait sparked criticism from a
number of eager fans, who had
hoped to witness the Canuck's
highly publicized "tough new attitude" .
However, vetern defenseman
Garth Butcher stated that "things
are quite loose and easy during an
intersquad game. You don't want
to hurt a starter during pre-season
play".
With this attitude the Canuck's
concentrated on their skating
rather than checking.
The freewheeling attitude allowed the black line of Tony Tanti,
Dave Lowry, and newly aquired
ment   economic   incentives   and
subsidies.
Certain jobs would be lost, said
Hurtig, because they would no
longer be required to be done in
Canada. He gave the example of
data processing, which until recently was done exclusively in
Canada, but is now being done in
the US following deregulation.
This caused the loss of 18,000 jobs,
he said.
Other sectors which would be
hard hit by free trade included the
trucking, railway, and financial
services sectors, all of which were
characterized as being "inherently
less competitive...than their U.S.
counterparts."
Hurtig also focused on the issue
of unrestricted takeovers by U.S.
companies. He said there have
been about 2000 U.S. takeovers of
Canadian firms since the Mulroney government took office in
1984.
That statistic would become even
more "disgraceful" under free
trade, because the U.S. wants "no
more silly nonsense about ownerships," he said.
Regarding Canada's resources,
Hurtig said "you shouldn't sell
your whole country to non-citizens. When you say you want to
have a little bit of control for future
generations...you shouldn't sell
control of your national resources."
Under free trade, the U.S. would
have free access to Canadian resources, including oil, gas, timber,
and fresh water. And "Canada
wouldn't even be able to establish
prices for its own natural resources," he said.
Hurtig also warned that as part
of free trade, "the U.S. wants
Canada to get rid of Canadian
subsidies ... efforts to manage the
distribution of production, research & development, and jobs
through administrative protection would be ended."
Business grants, small business
loans, Crown corporations, the
Ontario Development Corporation, and the Canadian Wheat
board, would be eliminated under
free trade, and Canada would
have to agree not to bail out any
specific firm or industry, said
Hurtig.
Hurtig"s position is reflected by
the Council's official philosophy:
"Legislative rights are of the very
essence of a modern state ... sovereignty ultimately means the right
of a state or society to determine
its own social, cultural, and military-political policies according to
its own values and priorities."
CANUCK   AFTER puck during intersquad game. Canucks lost 7-5.
New Jersy Devil, Greg Adams to
score at the 10:13 mark of the first
period. This line andreturning
defenseman Doug Lidster were
standouts for the black team, accounting for four of their squad's
five goals.
The gold team quickly responded when moustached center
Brent Peterson hit Michel Petit
with a perfect pass and Petit
streaked to the net and beat goal-
tender Kirk McLean low to the
stick side.
The goalscoring continued to
alternate until the midpoint of the
second period.
Enter black goalkeeper Troy
Gamble,  alias the human  spa
ghetti strainer. Gamble allowed
the gold side to score on three out
of the first four shots directed at
him.
The only thing that saved
Gamble from further embar-
rasment was the awkward play of
rookie first round draft pick, the
gold team's centre, Rob Murphy.
Murphy forced fans to quit
watching Gamble and ogle him
instead.
The game's surprise was the
play of newly signed free-agent,
Ian Kidd. He should fill any defensive holes the Canuck's have suffered in past seasons.
Oh yeah, the gold team won
7-5.
Bucks for pucks
Bv TYRONE WATTE ■
By TYRONE WATTE
The UBC hockey program re-
cieved a financial lift last Thursday night at the UBC Winter
Sports Centre.
The annual Vancouver Canucks
Black/Gold intersquad game was
played before a near-sell-out
crowd, with all proceeds going to
the UBC-Bauer Scholarships.
The Bauer Scholarships, named
in honor of minor hockey pioneer
Father David Bauer, are awarded
annually to first year Thunderbird
hockey players who have come to
university after graduating from
the ranks of tier one junior hockey.
Five  T-Birds  will     recieve   the
$1000 athletic scholarships this
year.
Ex-Spokane Chief, Grant Diel-
court, New West Bruin alumnus,
Gerry Johanson, and Mike Nottingham from the Kamloops Blazers have already been announced
as 1987-88 Bauer winners. Two
other recipients will be named at
the UBC Hockey Alumni dinner
this Friday.
Thunderbird head coach Terry
O'Malley is pleased that the Bauer
scholarships have made i t possi bie
to offer scholarship money to first
year players. O'Malley also expressed gratitude for the Canucks
committment    to    university
hockey.
By donating the proceeds of their
Black/Gold game to UBC scholarships, the Canucks are offering an
incentive for Canadian talent to
remain in Canada instead of being
lured away by lucrative American
college scholarships.
Canuck assistant coach Jack
Mcllhargey expressed his team's
opinion by saying, "It is unfortu- i
nate to lose Canadian kids to !
American schools, and this is one '
way the Canucks; can make an j
effort to aid the CIAU hockey pro- !
gram". '
HOW CAN
TRAIN TICKET?
□ Diet for a month.
Try to get sent as
a parcel.
retend you're
under 12.
Show your student
card.
The train's definitely the smart way to
travel. Even smarter these days with VTA's student
fares. Just show us your student card and you're
on your way, 1/3 richer. Have a relaxing ride. Meet
some new friends. And let the good trains roll!
For more information and reservations,
call your Travel Agent or VIA Rail. VIA's student
fares are available to full time students. Some
conditions apply regarding times and dates of travel.
Ask for details.
Next time,
choose VTA.
cyfi-
jt*<"°-y
ACTA'
VSggfgt
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September 29. 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 That m why it sounds too weak to say that it was wrong of him to4o what he did.
It suggests that be had a reason not to act as he did and we feel that any man who
could have done what Hitler did must be the sort of man who would not have had
a reason not to do it Such a man is evil rather than wromg.
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Waters sings about fish
By BARRY DAVIS
For those of you who have not
heard the latest hype, Roger Waters has been involved in a recent
conflict with his former band, Pink
Floyd. Both parties are touring
this fall, and have released albums
this year.
ALBUM
Roger Waters:
Radio Waves
"CBS Records", 1987.
The easiest way to identify
this album's artist as Waters is to
examine the storyline. Billy, the
brother of a coal miner who was
driven to murder, has the ability to
receive and transmit radio waves
through a cordless phone. He
converses with the radio station
"KAOS" between tracks on the
album. Eventually, he logs onto
the defence computers of the
"powers that be", and simulates a
Billy, the brother of a coal
miner who was driven to
murder, has the ability to
recieve and transmit radio waves through a cordless phone.
nuclear attack. Who but Waters
could ever think of such a bizarre
theme for a record?
The lines that most intrigued
me are: "Shell fish, guppy, salmon,
shrimp and crab and lobster. I
hate fish, but I think most of all I
hate fresh fish, like trout. My least
hated, favourite fish wouldbe sole.
That way you don't have to see the
eyes. Sole has no eyes?
The album cover is a rather
cheap effort in comparison to Pink
Floyd albums. I was amazed to see
the incredible abundance of lyrics
(many of which are misspelled).
Even a fast singer such as Jello
Biafra (Dead Kennedys) would
have difficulty singing all of the
lyrics and still leaving time for a
typical Pink Floyd instrumental.
It is these instrumental that the
Waters album lacks.
For those of you who have
liked Roger Waters in the past,
including The Wall and The Final
Cut, you should definitely buy this
record. If you are an older Pink
Floyd fan, buy the Pink Floyd record instead.
Pink Floyd:
Still going strong on new album
By BARRY DAVIS
Original members David
Gilmour, Nick Mason and Richard
Wright join forces with Bob Ezrin,
the producer and songwriting collaborator of The Wall and some
early Floyd albums, to create ten
tracks of classic material.
ALBUM
Pink Floyd
A Monemtary Lapse of Reason
CBS Records
The record opens with an instrumental track called "Signs of
Life", which combines the sounds
of rowing boats, distant talking,
scary bass synthesizers and
heavy, reverberating guitar. The
ominous feeling one gets from listening to this may create all sorts
of visions.
The second track, "Learning
to Fly", is more radio single oriented; that is, there are more lyrics and more of a beat to the music.
Gilmour's vocals lack the energy
and top end of ex-Floyd vocalist
Roger Waters', but are still more
than adequate. Of course, with a
band such as Pink Floyd, one is
tempted to ask "Vocals? Did they
ever write songs with vocals?"
The album contains the long
and original instrumentals that
are such a positive feature of Pink
Floyd, and are so lacking in Roger
Waters' most recent project, Radio
Waves.
There is a saxophone solo -
rare and impressive for Floyd - in
the songs "A New Machine Part I"
and "Yet Another Movie". The
latter track includes a long, loud
solo that accentuates the master
guitar style of David Gilmour. The
talking, in the background adds
the creepy sensation that makes
Pink Floyd so famous.
The song that ties the album
together is "TheDogsof War". This
track combines Gilmour's angry
voice with a very mysterious and
not quite monotonous keyboard
rhythm. The chorus brings the
central theme of the album out:
"One world its a battleground/
One world are we going to smash it
down/ One world...one world."
Most of the songs are shorter
than they could be. Infact, this LP
could be extended to a double
album without adding any tracks.
If you ever thought there was an
album missing between Dark Side
of the Moon and Animals, thisisit.
And it is surely one of the finest
Pink Floyd albums ever produced.
By SANY ZEIN
When Stephen King came up
with the now much publicized
statement, "I have seen the future
of horror and his name is Clive
Barker? I took him seriously. It
was then with a lot of anticipation
that I went to see 'Hellraiser', a
film written and directed by
Barker.
HELLRAISER
Directed by Clive Barker
at the Granville Cinemas
Well, King has a lot to answer
for, but not half as much as
Barker. If this is the future of the
horror movie, film fans are in a lot
of trouble.
If Tlellraiser' is anything to go
by, Barker doesn't even begin to
understand the genre. I can't
remember any other horror film in
which there was such a total lack
of suspense. Barker works on the
theory that the  more  gore and
blood on the screen, the more
frightened the audience will be in
their seats. It doesn't work.
Within three minutes of the
opening credits, flesh is ripped,
blood is poured, internal organs
are left hanging from hooks, and
the audience is treated to a close-
up of a face without ahead. Neat,
ASHLEY LAWRENCE...terrified.
huh? Are we all scared yet? Actually, no. Just disgusted. A horror
scene without a build-up is like a
punchline without a joke.
Things   get   worse.      Very
quickly you have a live skeleton —
the main character of the 'story"—
crawling around the attic demanding victims so that 'it' can
suck their blood. Given blood, this
skeleton will grow back and become human again. You can learn
new things even in the worst
movies.
The ex-passionate lover of the
skeleton (they used to have great
sex before he became a skeleton),
who is also the most unlikable
woman ever to appear in a movie,
then starts picking up men and
bringing them home in the promise of a good time. Instead, they
find themselves unwillingly donating all their blood to Mr. Bones
up in the attic. Chalk one up for
safe sex, but zero for good movies.
Not given any character to
sympathize with (there is a 'good'
man and his 'good' daughter in the
plot somewhere, but you don't give
a damn about them), the viewer is
reduced to passively watching a
succession of let's - make - this - as
- stomach - upsetting - as - possible
scenes.
If you're into special effects,
this film will be paradise. If not,
Sedgewick library offers much
cheaper seats for a 90 minute nap.
I hate to disagree with Stephen
King, and I don't know what the
future of horror is, but this ain't it.
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
September 29,1987 JOEY SHITHEAD...belts out another hit to slam dancing crowd
DOA delivers
By CHRIS VON BORMAN
The tempo was fast and furious when D.O.A. played the SUB
ballroom last Friday night. L.
Kabong opened the gig with a
strong, musical set. The tunes
were interesting and the sax
player was excellent. Unfortunately, weak vocals, lost amidst
the profusion of musical accompaniment diminished the band's
performance.
D.O.A. with L. Kabong
SUB Ballroom, UBC
Friday, Sept. 25
Vocals were not a problem for
the iron-throated Joey Shithead
(AKA Kieghley), who belted out
one sterling D.O.A. hit after another. This band is very consistent: their music is strong and free
despite the age of some of their
material. The line-up included old
favorites like "Disco Sucks", and
"General Strike".
The gig was poorly attended
by a mostly UBC crowd but D.O.A.
was able to fill the empty space
with sound. They ripped through
the set mercilessly, stopping
briefly to scream out a truly
twisted version of "Singing in the
Rain". After that the audience
hung on to their hats as the po wer-
thrusting D.O.A. machine ran
amok.
The travelling cacophony that
call themselves D.O.A. are guaranteed to leave your ears ringing
at the end of the night. This is
truly one of the few bands that can
claim to sound exactly like their
records. When you pay to see
D.O.A. you get D.O.A. and that's
the beauty of it.
Soloist
saves
VSO
By MARTIN DAWES
A large question
mark hung over the Orpheum as the VSO
slogged through American composer Richard
Nanes' inane Concerto
Grosso for Brass Trio and
Orchestra: why did he
write it?
SYMPHONY
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
Mark Zeltser, Piano
Sept.27-29, Orpheum.
Supposedly a theme with 24
variations, it would be more aptly
described as a theme written out
25 times as an exercise by some
deservedly unknown 18th century
composer.
"I believe we need new [!] music
all the time", says Nanes. I
couldn't agree with you more,
Dick.
Rachmaninoffs Variations on
a Theme by Paganini may not be
new, but the great Russian pianist
Mark Zeltser did a convincing job
of resurrecting it.
He is that rare pianist who can
actually get past the piano and
into the music. By denying himself
the pleasure of being physically
manipulated by the music - again
a theme with 24 variations - he
was able to explore with Rachmaninoff the multifarious possibilities inherent in Paganini's
playful theme.
Conductor Barshai evidently
enjoyed sharing the stage with
Zeltser, and the resulting performance - coming right after
Nanes' piece - was a godsend. Once
again, the VSO was bailed out by a
guest soloist.
A rare performance of Danish
composer Carl Nielsen's challenging Fifth Symphony followed the
intermission. Apparently Nielsen
enjoyed irritating his listeners, for
whenever something nice began to
happen it was cruelly disrupted by
a loud snare drum, played obnoxiously well by John Rudolph. The
woodwind soloists also distinguished themselves with wild
runs that sounded like jazz im-
provs.
The orchestra had a good time
with this unusual work, and even
though a few people ran away,
most of the audience seemed to
find it at least interesting.
You can't please everyone,
though, and after hearing the
Toronto Symphony a few days ago,
I think we can safely feel proud of
our VSO - despite Richard Nanes.
This is why it is odd to say that it was wrong of {fitter to have acted as he did but it is not odd to say that -Mei's act
was wrong. The judgment that Hitler's act was wrong and the judgment that it nevr ought to have happened do not imply
that Hitler had a reason not to do what he did. The fact that we feel that Hitler was not the sort of person who could have
had such a reason does not undermine judgments of his act* in the way that it undermines certain judgments about him
At Granada,
students rate
student rates*
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At Granada, we're offering special student rates on a wide assortment
of top-quality home entertainment products. We'll give you our low 12-month
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to top it off, our in-home Granadacover service is yours at no extra charge.
Just clip this ad and take it to your nearest Granada Home Entertainment
Centre today for the complete picture. But hurry, offer expires September 30th.
After all, if you don't have a TV, where will you do all your studying?
STUDENTS RATE STUDENT RATES
GRANJUMfe
41
*__■!
The
'Chronicles'
Gordon thanked -Hie St. He
his trouble "and sent him on his way.
September 29,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 Editorial
A comedy
of errors
Deciding on honoraria after one
Students' Council meeting is stupid.
Already the problems are coming to the
surface. The director of administration,
co-ordinator external affairs and vice-
president watch as the honoraria of
their counter-parts, the president and
director of finance, increase dramatically — yet a comparative review of the
work involved in each job has not been
undertaken for years.
Council's rationale for rushing
through the honoraria is that the
budget must be passed. But when decisions that will last for years are made,
the work should be done right.
Council's ad hoc committee on honoraria decided to spend $15,000 — a
figure based not on what people deserved but on the budget surplus. Expediency rather than merit guided council
on the issue and that is folly. AMS
executives in the future should not
inherit problems that can be solved
today.
Council should take time to attack
the honoraria question in a thorough
and impartial fashion. But AMS executives should not decide what the level of
their own honoraria will be. Although
director of finance Don Isaak has a
habit of ploughing ahead without approval, his failure to inform the ad hoc
committee on honoraria of how he arrived at his own honorarium figure is
wrong. There are other council members who can add.
Council should let them do the job.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 25,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of Brtish Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and not necessarily those of the university administration , or of the sponsor.
The Ubyssey isa member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office
is Rm. 241k of the Student Union
Building. Editorial Department,
phone 228-2301/228-2305;advertis-
ing,228-3977.
This whole masthead began when Corinne
Bjorge put Raffi's hot new album on the stereo.
"Let'sMakeSomeNoise!"shoutedCeliaHenslowe
and Barry Davis, in unison, so Allan Nichols
turned it up. Don Richmond, Lydia Schymansky,
and Elynn Richter felt the urge to boogie.  Sany
Zein,   inspired   by   the   dancing,   gave   Paula
Poykonen a "Teddy Bear Hug". Chris Von Borman
turned into a "Little White Duck" just in time for
Martin Dawes' and Carolyn Sales' "Bathtime".
Victor C. Wong, Wanda Chow, Kathy Chung,
Steve  Chan,  Jennifer  Wong,   and  Judy  Mah
formed an all-oriental circle around the bathtub
and began to chant: "Haru Ga Kita".   Jennifer
Lyall and Brent Lymer felt the onset of a mystical
experience:  "Everything Grows" they intoned,
smiling serenely. In pursuit of enlightenment,
they went in search of "The Little House". * Where
is it?' they asked Dea nne Fisher, "The Brown Girl
in the Ring". She laughed mysteriously and said,
"Ha Ha Thisaway*. The little house appeared out
of the white duck's mouth.. "Just Like the Sun",
said Tim McGrady, rapturously. Just then, everyone got hungry. "Savez-vous Planter des Choux?"
asked Mike Gordon, sincerely,    Grace Aquino,
Tyrone Waite, Jody Woodland, Kranka Cordura-
von Specht, Michael Bryant, Donald Jow, Roger,
Teena Carnegie, and Ken. Kan scoffed at his pastoral vision and went in search of Nachos. Looks
like all that chanting and stuff had worked 'cause
they found a sorceress who gave them some. While
these "Eight Piggies in n Row ' were eating, Ross
McLaren said to Laura Rushcikin, "Better finish
that fuckin masthead or we'll bo here putting this
rag out til "Saturday Morning'
Letters
Gay group
gives good
services
Thank you, Gord Hohensee,
for giving me the opportunity to describe the services
of Gays and Lesbians of
UBC. We are a service organization under the Alma
Mater Society, and as such
we provide services to the
student body following the
guidelines of the AMS. After
more than fifteen years at
UBC, with an excellent record of service as an AMS
club, we were granted status
as a service organization.
Our services include,
but are not limited to, peer
counselling and referal services for all students (many of
those we counsel are referred to us by Speakeasy),
discussion groups, a Speakers' Series and a Speakers'
Bureau. We bring speakers
from all over Canada and
some from the USA, and
offer speakers to speak to
any group, faculty or school.
We sponsor an annual
Gay and Lesbian Week,
which includes speakers,
movies, a representation of
Gay and Lesbians' groups
and services from Vancouver and BC, and a library
accessible to all, which includes some journals and
articles unavailable anywhere else on campus.
But most importantly,
we provide places for Gay
meet one another in an envi-
roment that is positive, supportive and encouraging,
and attempt to educate the
student body about gay and
lesbian issues and remove
old stereotypes and myths
held about gay and lesbian
people.
We find that most students at UBC are not unsup-
portive; far from it. At the
very worst, the general climate at UBC is live and let
live; an attitude of tolerance
that is becoming more and
more accepted. It is very
declasse nowadays to be
bigoted. At best, there are
great numbers of peopie at
Nobel prize awarded unjustly
While Chris Fraser and
Franz Nezul congratulate
themselves for destroying
so-called "stereotypes" (of
their own making) about
Russia, they create a big
stereotype of their own
when they refer to International Physicians for the
Prevention of Nuclear War
(IPPNW) as "Nobel Peace
Prize-winning." The facts
about IPPNW, never reported in the student press,
are alarming.
IPPNW held its first
annual conference in March
1981. The Soviet delegation
was not led by any physician, but by a high-ranking
Communist official, George
Arbatov, who is one of the
principal figures in Soviet
propaganda. In standard
Pravda style, Arbatov
blamed the cold war entirely
on the United States, (it'Si
fundamental principal of
communist propaganda
that the Soviets can be
blamed for nothing.) The
gutless physicians did not
protest this blatant display
of ideology; on the contrary,
according to The Toronto
Star, they welcomed it with
"thundering applause."
At the 1982 IPPNW
conference, communist subversion became more blatant after the earlier success. Who should appear for
the Soviets but General
M.A. Milshtein from mili
tary intelligence. Again, the
physicians voiced no protest. To their shame, few of
the doctors in Canada have
had the courage to tell us
exactly what goes on at their
conferences.
The main American figure in IPPNW is Bernard
Lown, a shallow man who
has never studied Soviet
military writings or political
doctrines. Worse, he feels
no need to do so as long as he
can hide behind sweet-
sounding generalities.
More sinister is the Soviet
leader of IPPNW, Evgenny
Chazov. According to
IPPNWs slick public relations, Chazof is a doctor and
private citizen. In grim fact,
he is nothing of the kind, for
he is a member of the government bureaucracy and
was responsible for the persecution of Dr. Andrei
Sakharov, himself a Nobel
Prize winner.
After the IPPNW'a
leaders received the undeserved prize, the Nobel
committee in Stockholm
took the unusual step of
admitting that it might not
have given the award if it
had first known of Chazov's
unsavory past. However,
once the award was given, it
was too late to withdraw it
after more information arrived.
Greg Lanning
law 1
UBC who support human
rights for all people, the evidence of which can be seen in
the number and kinds of
organizations on campus.
Finally, we receive very
little of your money. The
funding given to GLUBC
comprises less than one percent of the money received in
student levies from gay and
lesbian students alone, let
alone the total monies collected from the student
body.
Again, let me thank you
for the opportunity to once
again let the students know
about   our   services   and
goals.
John Liesch
president
gays and lesbians ubc
GLUBC battles
belligerence
Mr. Hohensee's letter is
a case study in the kind of
attitude which I think justifies student fees funding
this organization. His contention that this portion of
AMS money is supporting a
social club instead of going
to assist students is self-
contradictory. Undoubtably
this club serves as a support
1 group for people who feel alienated from a society in
which attitudes like Mr.
Hohensee's (although hopefully going the way of the
flat-earth theory) are still
far too prevalent.
Leo McKay
MFA creative writing 1
It's not right
for Canada to
stay white
Judge Clyne's remarks that
"Canada should remain
white" are extremely regrettable but understandable.
After all, Mr. J.V. Clyne is
an old man, and conservative if not obstinate in his
beliefs. He is, one would
dare suspect, nostalgic of
the old days when Canada
was predominantly a white
society, (it still is) and
Britain's far-flung empire
was yet to crumble.
As a member of the Immigration Association of
Canada, whose sole exds-
tance is to lobby the federal
government to restrict the
number of non-white immigrants into this country,
Judge Clyne may have secretly and falsely succumbed to the seemingly
true notion that non-white
immigrants by nature are
inferior, and are likely to
become dependant on welfare.
In fact, irrefutable evidence in the past has suggested that an overwhelming majority of immigrants
of any class, color, or religion, are law-abiding, hardworking, and sometimes
exemplary citizens. There
are exceptions, of course,
but one should not forget
that exceptions abound in
nature, even in the esoteric
profession of astrophysics.
In any event, Judge
Clyne owes the public an
apology for his irresponsible
and profoundly disturbing
statement which is extremely lamentable and an
indication of his loss of ethical sense
Hai Le
science 1
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
September 29.1987 Annual tirade
attracts flies
By CHRIS WIESINGER
It was inevitable. Every
year. Year after year after
year. What am I bitching
about? The annual homophobic Christian versus the valiant daefenders of GLUBC Debate — what else?
Each year the same ratty
arguments are trotted out as
though they were fresh, new,
constructive ideas. But they're
not,
guys. Usually fresh ideas and
viewpoints encourage intelligent debate and argument —
This annual tirade, though,
has the same qualities as dung;
it stinks and it attracts flies.
Every year.
aware, Peter, that any time
you make a judgement about
anything, you are implicitly
endorsing some type of value
premise as to what is good or
bad, or right or wrong? But
don't panic — there is nothing
wrong with having values! Indeed, if we didn't have values,
we couldn't make decisions at
all; we'd be paralyzed. But
values, you scream, are subjective! Aaaack!
Have you ever considered
asking yourself if it is reasonable to hold a certain value? As
in: "Is it good to achieve high
grades at university?" Well, do
you value high grades? What
do high grades usually reflect?
■<MB© AWARDS
IMPORTANT REMINDER
UBC BURSARIES
Students are reminded that applications for general bursaries administered by the
University of British Columbia are now available from the Awards Office. The deadline for submission of completed applications is October 1. 1987. Students must
submit an application if they wish to be considered for UBC bursaries.
Bursaries are assigned on the basis of financial need. Since bursary funding is limited,
awards are normally made only after a student has exhausted other sources of aid,
including government student loans and grants. Recipients of bursaries will be
notified by mail in November and December.
The Awards Office is open on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Awards and Financial Aid • Room 50, General Services Administration Building • Telephone: 228-5111_
Perspectives
So. Mr Hohensee, you are
here to get an education? Why
don't you start by reading a
book? No, not The Book —
that's not good enough here.
Concentrate on books (the libraries are full of them) and
don't worry about what is happening in someone else's bedroom, kitchen-cabinet, or dishwasher. For all you know,
GLUBC isn't the only club on
campus within which sexual
perversion is rampant. Think
of the chess club — my God,
what do you think they DO
with those pieces when the
milk, cookies, and cocaine run
out and the lights go off? Or the
war games club — rear flanking maneuvres ??? Disgusting!
Or the Progressive Conservative club? The Liberals —
Hmmmpfh — liberals, liber-
Do they reflect hard work and
achievement? Usually, yes.
Hard work at this institution
usually means that one is gaining knowledge. Is gaining
knowledge good? Oooooh —
heavy question!
Let's keep this short and
take, for the purposes of argument, a stance that looks at the
consequences of a certain
value. It from a base of ignorance that you get a letter like
Gord Hohensee's. It is from enlightened knowledge that you
can challenge crap like that.
So — we value knowledge.
That's why we're here. My
point, Peter, is that you needn't
condemn Hohensee for passing
judgement. You need merely
check and challenge his premises. Then, if you have the time
and energy to waste, you can
Think of the Chess Club--My God, what do you think they do
with those pieces when the milk, cookies, and cocaine run out
and the lights go off?
tines! Sick! And to top it all off,
the AMS has supplied condoms
in the washrooms at SUB.
That's exactly the kind of encouragement that these sickos
need.      "Have   condom,   will
 !"  We could go on, Gord,
but that might make your
mind explode. You need to
expand it a little bit before you
will be able to fathom the
depths of perversion in which
this campus is steeped. So read
a book. And next year, someone will tell you about the dart
club.
And what about the replies
to Gord's little tantrum? Unfortunately, as in the past, they
are equally repetitive. However, Peter MacDougall's reply
encapsulates the usual holier-
than-thou attitude rather
neatly. "How can he [Gord] be
so presumptuous as to pass
judgement as to what is moral
or immoral?" Oh dear. I think
you ought to read a book, too,
Peter. But you're advanced
enough to start in the philosophy section — maybe even take
a philosophy course!  Are you
pass judgement on his ignorance.
The best reply to
Hohensee's little Khomeini-
esque rant is that by Breti and
Banks ["Letter Contravenes
Policy"]. Why did the Ubyssey
publish Hohensee's letter?
To prevent such noise in
future years, may I suggest including an insert with Inside
UBC, which is distributed at
registration, within which the
juiciest homophobic and
counter-homophobic crap from
years gone by could be reprinted for the benefit of those
first and second year students
who might get the bright idea
of writing to the Ubyssey about
the "evil homo hordes." Hopefully this might enlighten
them a little, and save other
students from having to read
the silly little ideas which they
excrete from their silly little
heads.
Chris Wiesinger is a highly enlightened fourth year history
student with a low crap tolerance.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters
should be as short as possible and may be edited for brevity
as well as for sexism, racism and homophobia. Bring them
in person with your ID to the Ubyssey Office, SUB 241k.
THE
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September 29,1987
THE UBYSSEY
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Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
September 29,1987 Soccer men tie and win
By VICTOR CHEW WONG
In two Canada West soccer
games over the weekend the men's
varsity team faced their stiffest,
then their limpest competition of
the season.
The 'Birds managed a 1 -1 tie
with the Universtiy of Alberta
Friday afternoon in Edmonton,
then went on to trounce the University of Saskatchewan 6 - 0 in
Saskatoon Saturday.
Friday's hard hitting game
saw Alberta open the scoring in
the first half.
UBC's goal came 18 minutes
into the second half off of a set play
which saw Kevin Colbov/s corner
kick headed in by Alec Percy.
In rough play in the second
half, the Thunderbirds' veteran
midfielder Joe Pecht was hit hard
and suffered a concussion. Pecht
was sidelined for the rest of
Friday's contest.
In the dying minutes of the
game UBC missed a spendid opportunity to finish off the Golden
Bears.
With less than three minutes to
play midfielder Kenny Moysiuk
beat his man and chipped a perfect
cross to Mike Allina; Allina went
up and narrowly missed the
header that would have given the
'Birds the victory.
"Our team showed a lot of
heart this game," said head coach
Dick Mosher. "We managed to
notch one and just about got the
winner."
Saturday's game against Saskatchewan was little more than a
practice for UBC as they 1 ed 5 - 0 at
the half.
Four of the Thunderbird goals
came off of set plays; two on corner
kicks and two on free kicks.
Fred Torres led the "Birds
with two goals, and Kevin Reilly,
Brian Peterson, Alec Percy, and
Ken Moysiuk each notched one.
The men's soccer team's next
action will be on Wednesday night
against Simon Fraser University
in the Diachem Bowl at Thunderbird Stadium.
UBC RUGBY LADS slam dance with old boys
V-ballers place third
steve chan photo
r
By FRANKA CV SPECHT
The UBC women's varsity
volleyball team took third place in
the Simon Fraser University invitational tournament this weekend with a 4 - 2 record.
In the match for third place
the "Birds scored a convincing
three straight game victory, 15-0,
15 - 9,15 -13, over the SFU Clansmen.
The tournament was UBC's
first action of the season. Head
coach Donna Baydock felt that her
squad had slow starts in several
matches but was pleasantly surprised by the skills of some of the
rookies.
"Sonya Wachowski, the offside
hitter, played more like a veteran
than a rookie," said Baydock.
Wachowski led the team offensively with 21 kills and 17 blocks.
Power hitter Patti Lee Scoet
struck 22 kills and Debbie Lan-
don, a former University of Victoria player, scored 20 kills. Veteran Heather Olafsson led the
team with five service aces.
In the match that decided
third place the 'Birds dominated
SFU in the first two games. In the
third game the "Birds pulled off a
come-back victory after falling
behind early.
The six team tournament was
won by an experienced UVic
Vikettes team who defeated the
University of Puget Sound 15-7,
15-8,15-7.
The highly ranked Vikettes
narrowly edged out the 'Birds, 15 -
12, 21 - 19, in a best-of-three
match played earlier in the tournament.
UVic's success can be attributed to their experience. Nine of
the twelve players were part of
last year's squad that won the
CWUAA championship and
placed fourth at the nationals.
Comparatively, UBC is a
younger team who has only four
players returning from last year's
crew.
Next game for the women
volleyballers is on October ninth
at War Memorial Gym.
Rugby team finishes strong
from page 12
Roy Radu won the ball out of a
loose ruck and fullback Bruce Jordan came into the backline to score
under the posts and kick the convert. Jordan hit five of five conversion attempts on the day.
The forwards continued their
solid play, setting up another try
when Eddie Evans wound out of a
maul,posting the ball for Pierre
Duey to give to the backs. Centre
Jamie Fraser made a clean break,
beating three Red Lion backs and
passing to Owen Walsh for the
score.
The Lions twice failed to clear
UBC kicks out of their zone, and
UBC twice  capitalized.  Wingers
Walsh and Scott Stewart each
notching a score.
The 'Birds have now scored 25
tries in only three games; nearly
half the 57 tries that earned the
UBC Old Boys the scoring title last
year.
In second division play, the
UBC Braves defeated the Red
Lions 29-0 while the UBC Frosh
lost 34-3 to the UBC Old Boys. In
third division, the UBC Totems
beat the Red Lions 15-7.
In rugby action last Wednesday, the UBC club downed the Old
Boys in first, second, and third
division while the Frosh lost to
Meralomas Two.
Soccer
women
tie twice
In varsity women's soccer
play this weekend at OJ Todd
Field the Thunderbirds managed two ties.
Saturday's game saw UBC
pull a 1 -1 tie against the visiting University of Puget Sound.
In a game where the 'Birds
carried most of the play UPS
scored first.
UBC's goal came off of a set
play with Linda Therrien heading in a corner kick. Therrien,
normally a fullback, was
brought forward specifically for
the set play.
On Sunday, the 'Birds
played their second metro-
league game against Coquitlam; last year's provincial
champions. The game ended in
a 2-2 tie.
Christine Pinette and Colleen Koch tallied for the Thunderbirds.
Once again the 'Birds carried the play but could not capitalize on their opportunities.
"I'm encouraged by the fact
that we are creating the opportunities," said UBC head coach
Brian Thomson. "It's the best
I've seen our team play."
Next action for the women's
varsity team is on Wednesday
evening when they will face Simon Fraser Universit} in the
Diachem Bowl at Thunderbird
Stadium. Game time is 5:15.
CAH YOU
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return Policy
COURSEBOOKS
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September 29, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 Football T-Birds soar
By MICHAEL J. BRYANT
While the BC Lions failed
to beat their Saskatchewan rivals
on Sunday, the UBC Thunderbirds football team soared to a 51 -
17 victory over the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies in Western
Intercollegiate Football League
play Saturday afternoon.
After a deplorable offensive
performance the week before in
Manitoba, the 'Birds offense exploded for three touchdowns in a
three and a half minute stretch in
the second quarter. UBC place
kicker Mike Bellefontaine added a
school-record five field goals, scor
ing a game total of 20 points.
Leading 24-1 in the second
quarter, UBC pounced on the
Huskies with touchdowns by running back Matt Pearce, slotback
Craig Keller, and tight end Richard Hudspith.
Pearce benefitted from two
mis-tackles by the shoddy Huskie
defense to ramble in for a 44 yard
major and UBC quarterback Jordan Gagner connected with Keller
on the next possession for a 20
yard touchdown pass. Hudspith's
move from slotback to tight end
paid off, as he pulled in a six yard
strike to add another score less
than two minutes later.
But the 'Birds defense yet
again provided the most spectacular play of the game, as defensive
lineman Mark Nykolaichek stole
the ball from a Saskatchewan
Huskie to run back a 103 yard
interception for a touchdown.
This was the fourth straight
win for the undefeated'Birds, who
rank third in the nation and tops
in the WIFL.
UBC heads for their fourth
straight game on the road next
Saturday in Calgary.
Rugby lads outlast Lions
By DONALD JOW
Despite being outhustled for
much of the game, the UBC Thunderbird rugby squad came on late
to defeat the Red Lions club 30-6
on Saturday at Wolfson Fields.
The 'Birds didn't seem to take
the Red Lions seriously and
struggled to keep the game under
control. The first half featured
sloppy rugby with neither team
able to sustain drives. UBC was
penalized twice deep in their half
early in the game but the Lions'
kicker missed both attempts at
goal.
The only score of the first half
came as a result of UBC's only
sustained drive. The "Birds earned
a five-yard scrum and scored a
penalty try when a Red Lion forward went offside to kick the ball
out of the scrum.
The Red Lions  started the
second half strongly, scoring a
pushover try in the first few minutes to tie the score. The next 20
minutes saw the Lions successfully frustrate UBC's offensive
efforts.
The difference in the end was
fitness; after outworking UBC for
60 minutes, the Red Lions tired
and the 'Birds opened up for four
converted tries.
see page 11: RUGBY
Fieldsters place second
By GLORIA LOREE
In field hockey action this
weekend the women's varsity
team placed second in their "Early
Bird" tournament held at UBC.
The team won one game and
tied two others on Saturday to
finish second in their pool. Inabig
upset on Sunday the 'Birds defeated a favored University of
Victoria team 1-0 in sudden death
overtime.
On Saturday the host UBC
team had their hands full with
three scheduled games and were
also hosting a high school tournament.
Saturday's games for UBC
proved to be frustrating as they
could not pump the ball into the
net. Their first game was against
the Meralomas where the 'Birds
managed one goal for the 1-0 victory.
The lone goal was scored by
the 'Birds top scorer, Leonie
Plunkett, off of a right wing cross
from Jessica Mathers.
UBC then had two scoreless
ties in their afternoon games. The
second place finish in their pool
pitted the 'Birds against UVic in
Sunday's semi-final.
UBC played one of their most
aggressive games of the season
against UVic. The result of the
game was not decided until four
minutes into the overtime period
when the 'Birds were awarded a
penalty corner and Jennifer Van-
stone successfully shot in the winner.
In the finals, despite playing
well, the UBC lost to the tough
first division Doves, 2-0
"I am pleased with the team's
performance? said UBC coach
Gail Wilson. "We are now going
into next week's second Canada
West Tournament with confidence?
Next weekend UBC hosts the
Canada West tournament at Warren and MacGregor fields.
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WBt BOOKSTORE
6200 UNIVERSITY BLVD. 228-4741
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
September 29, 1987

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