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The Ubyssey Oct 7, 1971

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Array Classes yield to streets
By SANDY KASS and
VAUGHN PALMER
Ten thousand Lower Mainland
high school students abandoned
their classes Wednesday to voice
public opposition to the proposed
Amchitka Island nuclear warhead
test.
The students began gathering
outside the U.S. consulate at 1030
West Georgia shortly after 10 a.m.
By 2 p.m., when the
demonstration was scheduled to
begin, over 10,000 had blocked
off Alberni between Burrard and
Thurlow, behind the consulate
offices in the Burrard Building.'
While demonstrators on the
street listened to speakers from a
stage set up in front of the
building, seven student
representatives presented an
official letter of protest to U.S.
consul Robert Huffman.
The letter, from the Student
Action Committee on Amchitka.
is to be forwarded to U.S.
president Richard Nixon.
"The high school students of
greater Vancouver strongly
protest the continuation of
nuclear testing with danger to
human lives and our
environment," it said.
"We call on the United States
as our neighbor, friend and ally to
take the lead in the ending of
nuclear testing through restraint,
example, and negotiation."
Student representative Max
Reimer from Argyle secondary
school in North Vancouver said
Huffman agreed to forward the
letter to Nixon.
"It's pretty sad though, when
all Huffman would say is 'fine and
dandy, thanks for your trouble',"
Reimer said.
Robert Stowe, a grade 12
student at Kitsilano high school,
said he feels the letter will have no
real value unless the U.S. state
department considers it
representative of Canadian public
opinion.
"But because Huffman has
indicated his support for our
move in agreeing to forward the
letter to Nixon, I feel he should
formally resign if Nixon goes
ahead with the test," Stowe said.
Centennial  high school grade
11 student Gail March asked
Huffman if a Canadian student
representative would be allowed
to meet with Nixon in
Washington, D.C. over the
proposed Amchitka test.
" 'Probably not' was his
reply," said March.
The U.S. Atomic Energy
Commission Amchitka test is
tentatively scheduled for October
30, and may be cancelled only at
Nixon's command.
In the street, demonstrators
fought for standing room as
speakers indicated unanimous
protest over the Amchitka test.
"The     Amchitka    blast
WE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIU, No. 11 VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1971      °^§^>48     228-2301
demonstrates the U.S. military-
industrial complex really doesn't
give a damn about the opinions
and welfare of the people of
Canada," said Vancouver and
District Labor Council
secretary-treasurer' Paddy Neale.
"Peace does not come from
building military muscle," said
New Democratic Party MLA
Dennis Cocke.
"The U.S. Atomic Energy
Commission says it is taking a
calculated risk in setting off the
Amchitka blast. I say the
calculated risk is to not set off the
blast, not make more nuclear
weapons, and see if peace breaks
out."
UBC political science professor
Phil Resnick said the main
concern is not the Amchitka blast
itself, but Canadian
defence-sharing agreements with
the U.S.
See page 3: DEMONSTRATION
HIGH SCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY STUDENTS - 10,000 of them - congregate
outside the U.S. consulate to protest the planned Amchitka nuclear test. Many had
—warran mayes photo
approval from parents and teachers.and came from as far away as New Westminster
and the North Shore to add their voice to the increasing protest against the blast.
'Other food service costs jobs'—CUPE
By LAURENCE LEADER
Lyle Osmundson's alternate food service is forcing
UBC food services employees out of jobs, Bill Morrison,
• president of Canadian Union of Public Employees Local
116 said Wednesday.
Shortly after Osmundson, owner and operator of a
new alternate food service on campus, set up a booth
outside SUB cafeteria, he was approached by Morrison
and other CUPE members.
Morrison told Osmundson that UBC food services is
threatening to fire employees because of competition and
charged that the alternate food service is cutting prices
against union rules.
Osmundson is causing campus food services to lose
enough revenue to force a reduction in staff, Morrison
said.
UBC food services just broke even last year and they
still owe $50,000 on a $1,154,497 loan to construct food
facilities in SUB.
Osmundson told Morrison: "The cafeterias are grossly
inefficient and over-staffed.
"1 only want to lower the prices and improve the
quality," he said.
Osmundson said UBC food services "are making too
much profit at their prices."
Osmundson was told CUPE, the certified union for
food services employees at UBC, had been negotiating
with food services administration for six months and that
prices could not be lowered.
Morrison said last year "food being sold independent
of campus food services at International House was
stopped."
Morrison said the union would issue an injunction
against Osmundson as "a last resort".
Meanwhile, Osmundson is going ahead with plans to
expand his operation. He said he hopes to have stalls next
week outside other UBC food services cafeterias.
He said volunteer staff is urgently needed to work on
the extra stalls.
"At present, my overhead is $220 a month," he said.
"And at the present rate of serving 250 customers a day
I'll just breakeven."
Osmundson told Morrison his operation is strictly
non-profit "for the good of the people."
The bus, which previously served as alternate food
service headquarters on campus, will return after it is
licensed to be a mobile food service Osmundson said. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1971
Connections with Schwarz
denied by medical faculty
By JOHN TWIGG
The principal investigator of the Medical
Faculty Research Into Marijuana has consented to
the publication of the following statement to clarify
a situation that may have confused people about
work being done with respect to soft drugs:
"Only one clinical research project dealing with
the effects of marijuana on humans has been
approved and is ongoing in the province of B.C.,
with the full consent and support of UBC and the
necessary provincial and federal agencies.
"This project has been under way at UBC for a
number of months and is being conducted by
investigators in the faculty of medicine.
"The principal investigator of this project
would like to make clear that Dr. Conrad Schwarz
of UBC Health Services is in no way connected with
this project, and any work undertaken by Dr.
Schwarz in the area of soft drugs is his own
independent activity."
The statement was in response to a paragraph in
last Thursday's Ubyssey which said:
Blues concert in SUB
Two of the greatest exponents of black folk blues
will perform in the SUB ballroom Tuesday at 8:30
p.m.
Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee have been a
team since 1939. Their rhythmical blues sound is
created by a unique combination of vocals, harmonica
and steel-stringed guitar.
Admission to the concert is $1.
"Asked about the medical faculty's approval of
his subjective study when the faculty is also doing
an objective study on the use of marijuana, Schwarz
said he is also participating in the faculty study but
the two studies are not related."
The principal investigator of the faculty study
asked that his name not be used because he is trying
to avoid notoriety due to the sensitive nature of
marijuana research.
The controversy arises out of a questionnaire
Schwarz and two assistants began administering to
students during registration week.
The questionnaire asks such things as: "Has
smoking marijuana changed your sex life?", "What
are your friends like?" and "Has this questionnaire
changed your attitude towards marijuana?"
Schwarz neglected to clear the study with the
president's committee on research involving human
subjects and the questionnaire was suspended while
the committee investigated it.
The questionnaire was later approved by the
medicine faculty screening committee and the
human research committee provided the preamble
to the questionnaire was changed to inform students
that personal questions would be asked.
The medicine faculty study referred to in the
statement is a highly complex, scientific study on
the physiological and psychological effects of
marijuana.
It is being conducted by several members of the
medicine faculty with the aid of a federal
government grant.
The researchers are trying to give their study
minimum publicity so as not to jeopardize their
results or make participants in the study feel
uneasy.
AMS Hits food services
over use of disposables
Student coucil has condemned UBC food
services' use of plastic cutlery and other disposable
materials.
At the regular council meeting Wednesday
night, a large majority of councillors supported a
resolution stating that by using disposable plates
and cutlery food services is "wasting precious
natural resources and creating waste disposal
nightmares."
The resolution also stated that the new food
services policy sets a bad example for the rest of the
community.
AMS co-ordinator Sue Kennedy said the
argument that the cost of student theft of the
previous regular dishes and cutlery necessitated the
move to disposables does not stand up, since the
cost of the theft was almost the same as that
involved in buying and later disposing of the plastic
and paper utensils.
The resolution concluded: "Plastic food served
on paper plates, cut with plastic knives and forks,
nurtures plastic people. Bring your own mug."
Council also voted in favor of giving a $1,500
loan to the campus nursery co-op to enable it to
establish a new branch.
The money is to be paid back over an 18-month
period and will be added to the $2,500 already
obtained by the co-op to set up facilities.
All but three councillors — two from education
and one form law — backed the day care loan.
The meeting opened with a lengthy debate over
whether the AMS should organize a protest during
the Oct. 24 visit to Vancouver of U.S.S.R. premier
Alexei Kosygin.
The proposal by law rep grant Burnyeat was
ultimately defeated, 16 votes to nine.
Burnyeat's motion, seconded by engineering
president Doug Aldridge, listed three main issues
which would form the basis of the protest:
The i continuation i of underground nuclear
testing by the U.S.S.R.;
Persecution of Jews and other minority groups
living in the Soviet Union;
And the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia.
The motion also included a reference to Soviet
poets' and writers' lack of freedom of speech.
However, the motion was defeated after the
majority of council argued that it did not reflect an
AMS priority.
In response to questions, AMS president Steve
Garrod said the Oct. 27 referendum on whether the
human government segment of the AMS is to be
retained, will take the form of a secret ballot on the
question: "Do you support the human government
program?"
Council also endorsed a Vietnam teach-in to be
, held Wednesday by the Trotskyist Young Socialists
organization.
Glob cubes mourned
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Newspapers were
flying at half-mast today in this small island rectum
as 15,000 bodoni blorgs mourned the loss of ice
cubes and mixer normally supplied to the island's
only paper, The Times Journal and World Telegraph
Glob.
Production was halted when 10,000 of the
paper's repeaters found that stockpiles of the
volatile cubes had been set to the torch one day
after the fire insurance policy had expired.
Human government lacks humans
Human government needs more people to carry
out its ideas, arts representative Michael Goodman
said Wednesday.
Goodman said there are not enough people
regularly attending caucus meetings to complete
current projects.
These projects include the creation of an
alternate food service selling cheap food and a crafts
co-op through which students can sell their
handicrafts, he said.
"We are working on an FM radio station which
would be open to the community. This would allow
for community issues to be discussed more
thoroughly without pressure from business
interests," said Goodman.
The next scheduled caucus meeting is at 8 p.m.
in the main floor SUB information centre Thursday.
Human government is the broad left coalition
which won a majority of seats on the Alma Mater
Society council last year.
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"Is Where It's Happening"
776 Granville 687-2701
Acropol
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Fri. and Sat.
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Sunday 10 a.m to 10 p.m.
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2946 W. Broadway 733-2412
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Open  Thursday  and  Friday  nites.
C.O.D. orders accepted.
Credit and Chargex Cards honoured
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
* "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd." Thursday, October 7, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students join U de M shutdown
MONTREAL (CUPI) - Students have
fjirown their support behind 950 office
workers and lab technicians who went on
strike Monday at l'Universite de Montreal.
In    an    unprecedented    gesture    of
solidarity, almost all students and faculty
' respected the  strikers' picket Lines  and
more than 50 students joined the picketers.
The university has been effectively shut
Salmon, legends
as Indian Week
down. The Quebec ministry of labor
ordered the union and the administration
to meet at its Montreal office, but the
results of the meeting were not
immediately known. The government can
force a meeting because the strikers are
civil servants.
Both the Syndicat des Professeurs de
l'Universite de Montreal and the usually
continues
Indian week activities continue until
Friday.
The legend tellers will narrate in the
SUB art gallery.
They include Charlie Drainy of the
Shuswap tribe, Baptiste Ritchie of Lillooet
and Louis Miranda, Josephine Charlie and
Dominic Charlie of the Squamish band.
Dominic Charlie is well-known
throughout the Lower Mainland for his
weather predictions.
Carver Douglas Cranmer of the Kwakiutl
band   will   also   display  his   works  until
„ Friday in the gallery.
With him is Robert Davidson, an artist
from the Haida band of the Queen
Charlotte Islands.
Davidson is known in Canada for his
two murals which are on permanent
display in the National Arts Centre in
Ottawa.
At 12:30 and 2:30 p.m. daily in SUB
auditorium six films are presented.
"      Friday at 12:30 p.m. in the SUB art
gallery Jimmy Sewid of the Kwakiutl band
will speak.
Admission to all these events is free.
Josephine and Dominic Charlie are in
charge of a salmon bake, to be held Friday
in the SUB plaza from 3 to 6 p.m.
The salmon will be served on hollow
logs and wood shakes will be used as plates
to add an authentic air to the barbecue.
A small amount will be charged to cover
the price of the salmon.
The Kwakiutl dancers will round up
Indian week with the presentation of The
Animal Kingdom dance.
This is the first time the dance has been
presented outside of Indian ceremonial
occasions. Admission to the dance is $ 1.
Young NDP
gathers here
British Columbia's Young New
Democrats will invade SUB ballroom
Saturday, Sunday and Monday for their
1 lth annual provincial convention.
Several established left-wingers will
speak, including provincial NDP president
Dave Stupich Saturday at 10:30 a.m., a
representative from the B.C. Federation of
Labor Saturday at 4:15 p.m. and NDP
leader Dave Barrett Monday at 10 a.m.
Students sell
cheap posters
Steambubble is a new rival for
Mamooks, the poster people. Two
* architecture students have set up a poster
service that, while not producing the
quantity of the Mamooks organization,
charges much lower rates. John Kula, arch.
3, and Nick Watkins, arch. 2, produce
silk-screened and hand painted graphics on
the third floor of Lasserre.
They also have a photographic service
and, for some sinister reason, also sell
Italian espresso coffee.
Steambubble is open almost constantly
in the lounge area of Lasserre.
conservative Association des Professeurs de
l'Universite de Montreal voted by an 80 per
cent margin last week to respect the picket
lines.
Student associations at the university
have formed a committee to aid the
strikers. Phillips security guards patrolled
the buildings as usual, but they did not
interfere in any way with the picketers.
They only made sure that the strikers left
their placards outside as required by law.
The administration did not formally
suspend classes throughout the university,
but neither professors nor students showed
up. Library workers at the university, who
are not on strike, could not legally refuse
to cross the picket line without losing their
union accreditation. But for once a
technicality operated in favor of the
strikers.
Nearly a thousand picketers in theory
could forcibly prevent the library workers
from crossing the line, but nobody
bothered to try.
Only essential services such as the care
of the laboratory animals were maintained.
Several faculty members who were
working on projects needing constant
attention crossed the picket lines but only
after obtaining permission from the union.
Negotiations between the
administration and Local 1244 of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees
(Quebec Federation of Labor) have
dragged on since April.
The strikers are demanding better wages
and working conditions. Some U de M
employees earn at least $2,500 less than
people holding equivalent jobs at other
Quebec French-language universities.
Local 1244 also wants the seniority of
its members to be taken into consideration.
People who have been working at the
Montreal branch of the Universite du
Quebec for only three years earn more
than employees with 20 years' service at
the Universite de Montreal.
The administration is offering job
security after 18 months of service while
workers at l'Universite de Laval in Quebec
City have job security after six months.
UBC and Japan
exchange students
Psst! Wanna buy a cheap radio next
summer?
For a cost of about $700 including
transportation and room and board 14
UBC students next summer will spend six
weeks with Japanese students at their
universities while living with Japanese
families. After that they will, spend two
weeks travelling or doing what they like.
At the same time in July and August 14
Japanese students from Tokyo and Kyoto
will visit Vancouver.
Sponsor of the exchange is the
UBC-Japan Summer Exchange working in
co-operation with the Nisei Varsity Club.
They need 14 students for the Japan trip,
14 students to act as escorts for the visiting
Japanese students and 14 host families for
the visitors.
Information is available from Maynard
Hogg at 738-0331 or at clubs day in SUB
room 205.
—warran mayas photo
LOVELY DAY FOR A CROWD SHOT, says cop photographer at Wednesday's
anti-Amchitka blast demonstration. Telephoto lens is trade mark of undercover agents
assigned to keep track of local subversives.
Demonstration strategic, legal
From page 1
"Until the Canadian government pulls
out of these agreements, it is as guilty as
the U.S. of promoting international
military structures," Resnick said.
Vancouver alderman Harry Rankin said
if the Amchitka blast is stopped through
peaceful protest, then all nuclear blasts can
be stopped.
"If we must have nuclear power, let it
be used for useful purposes," he added.
B.C. Liberal party leader Pat McGeer
added his opposition to "the Amchitka and
any other nuclear blasts in the future."
Rally organizer Duncan MacLean of
New Westminster secondary called the rally
"100 times more successful" than he had
expected.
David Thompson high school student
Stuart Russell said most school principals
were indifferent to the demonstration,
"but one or two did threaten to expel
students if they were caught out of
classes."
Cloverdale junior secondary student
Cori Bearly said students had planned to
walk out of classes at 10:30 a.m.
"However, when our principal told us
we would be locked inside all day, we just
decided not to show up at all," Bearly said.
The only untoward incident occurred
about 12:30 p.m. when North Vancouver
high school student Clifford Burgess, 14,
fell from atop the Tilden rent-a-car garage
at Alberni and Burrard Street, and crashed
through the roof of an adjoining shed.
He was sent to St. Paul's Hospital in an
ambulance, and was released an hour later
with minor cuts and bruises.
Police sergeant Gordon Dalton said he
was pleased at the peaceful and orderly
conduct of the demonstrators.
He said 50 city policemen had been sent
to close Alberni Street, watch over the
demonstrators and guard entrances to the
Burrard Building, and U.S. consular office.
None were equipped with riot gear, he
said.
"I approve of demonstrations as long as
they're orderly and legal," he added.
The Vancouver Inter-high Council got a
city permit last week to close the street
from 1 to 2 p.m.
Alma Mater Society president Steve
Garrod said Wednesday he was pleased
with the large turnout at the
•demonstration, but added it was held at a
more convenient location than the
AMS-sponsored demonstration Sept. 24 at
four B.C.-Washington border points.
Folksinger Vera Johnson summed up
the crowd's feelings with a song written
especially for the demonstration:
"We don't want our chromosomes
Turning into cancer.
Tell your men to stop the test;
That's the only answer." Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1971
Slinging the mod
Yessir, it's scandals time again on the
old editorial page, featuring the usual array
of graft, corruption and all-round Bad
Things.
We hear that Arnie Myers was more
than a little upset about being called head of
UBC Flack Services in a Ubyssey editorial.
Sorry Arnie, but a flack's a flack, even when
a university administration gives him the
name of director of information services.
It just hurts a little more when you
have some principles.
And while we're on the topic of the
administration ... sources indicate that the
president's committee that evaluated Conrad
Schwarz's drug questionnaire was seriously
divided over approving the project.
As for the student government... it
was interesting to learn that AMS education
reps Carol Sulymka and Vicki Meakes have
been trying to get in touch with AMS law
rep Grant Burnyeat on the subject of
organizing a student council group to oppose
the human government.
Good of the Vancouver Sun and the
Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation to bring
the overrated editor of an overrated
American magazine to UBC to give a tired
lecture on how the future of humanity
depends on the United Nations.
It's sure heartening to know that UBC
chancellor Allan McGavin is involved in the
shady deal surrounding the Socred award of
the  Vancouver Island pipeline contract to
Malaspina Gas Pipeline.
There's no patronage like Socred
patronage.
We hope UBC students are impressed
by the fact that 10,000 high school students
assembled Wednesday to protest the
Amchitka blast. That's 10,000.
We understand the UBC bookstore has
more than one person keeping an eye on
students. Besides the storewalker-in-
residence, the store is using the services of an
agency to supply two additional
storewalkers on a rotating basis. It's a swell
new game: pick the dick.
And last but not least, anthropology
and sociology department head Cyril
Belshaw is apparently fuming over a Ubyssey
story on a tenure rumble in his department.
Opening shot was a letter from Belshaw'
to arts undergrad society president Colin
Portnuff demanding that Portnuff retract a
Ubyssey remark in which he stated that
political considerations will govern some of
the department's tenure decisions; and that
student action could follow if certain profs>
are fired.
Perhaps Belshaw's concern centres on
the fact that an upheaval in his department
could provide the large-scale student protest
that the administration has been quaking
over since the summer.
Welcome to Paranoia U.
Letters
The number of anonymous
letters to The Ubyssey has
reached unmanageable
proportions. As of Monday, the
paper will become more rigid in
carrying out its policy of
respecting anonymity if the
writer's real name is included for
our information, or if valid
reasons for anonymity are given.
With rare exceptions, letters that
do not conform with this policy
will not be published.
Work
I would like to make a few
comments about the human-
government-sponsored jazz-rock
party in SUB on Oct. 1.
The 60 or 70 of us there heard
an exciting performance by a new
Vancouver group called
Headstrong (in my opinion, the
best I've heard on campus this
year).
I feel that the group was done
a great injustice by such a meagre
audience. Perhaps there is some
other explanation of why less
than 100 people turned out for
this event, but it appears to me
that it was simply due to a lack of
good, or even sufficient,
advertising.
The only mention of the event
I myself saw were the few posters
in SUB and a small note in the
'Tween Classes section of the Oct.
1 Ubyssey.
It seems to me that the AMS
special events committee could
make better use of The Ubyssey
and campus-wide advertising — if
the committee truly considers
these events to be "special" it
should make as many people as
possible aware of them.
Something the person selling
tickets at the door said before the
jazz-rock concert should also be
noted:  "I hope these guys (the
band) are good — they're (the
AMS) paying them enough!" I
might add that the tickets were 50
cents.
Obviously, this event lost
money — which, in itself, isn't so
bad. The question is — was it
inevitable or was it because of a
casual approach to promotion?
I wonder if the "human
government'" is more concerned
with its list of "things we have
done" than it is with making its
programs a social and financial
success.
Harry Otto,
Science 3
Thanks for writing. This is the
sort of constructive criticism we
like to print - as opposed to the
hysterical, red-baiting letters that
don't do anyone much good. We
hope more writers will follow
your lead.
Piggery
Re the letter headed Piggery In
The Ubyssey, Oct. 5:
If the person who is
complaining of "an egostistical
self-centred bourgeois pig,
loudmouth fraternity fart who
lives in the British Properties"
ever took his thumb from his
mouth and told the above that he
could kindly take his shit
elsewhere, possibly he would not
have to put up with that type of
thing in seminars.
Certainly the discussion format
leaves open the possibility for
such a scene to occur, but it has
been my experience that the
discussion gr«ap has far more
possibilities for learning anything
at all, compared to a class
monologue between the. prof and
the air.
If you sit listening to bullshit,
say so, right then, don't cry to
The Ubyssey. If you don't say
anything why should anybody
else, except maybe the "frat fart"
whom you dislike so much.
David Fiddler
Arts 3
Hit back
It has become obvious over the
past few years that there is a
growing disregard for the students
of this university on the part of
the faculty, staff, and
administrators. Too many of these
people think they have a right to
be arrogant, abusive, and to play
god with our lives.
None of the tactics tried in the
past have worked because no
matter how unpleasant we make it
here on campus for them they can
always go home to their nice
comfortable homes at 5 p.m.,
while we have to live with their
decisions.
It is suggested that from now
on we carry the battle to them
personally - prevent them from
going home to comfort.
If Leslie Rohringer screws you,
you have to live with it 24 hours a
day. Don't suffer in silence, phone
him up and tell him about it at
3 a.m. It will cost you a dime
- it will cost him his sleep,
especially if your friend calls him
an hour later.
. If  you've  got  indigestion  at
2 a.m. tell Ruth Blair.;
If some TA, prof, or dean gets
abusive or starts to play god —
phone him up; and phone up the
administration president, board of
governors, and senate while you
are at it and tell them the story. If
they don't like being awakened
with complaints they should do
something to remedy it.
Don't bother going to them
while they are here on campus,
they'll  just   hide   behind   their
secretaries and you'll find yourself
taking out your frustrations on a
woman who's only trying to earn
a living.
Other tactics like massive
mail-in campaigns or picketing
their homes could also be tried.
Their neighbors won't like hordes
of dirty students hanging around
their nice suburbs and will put
pressure on them.
I would suggest that The
Ubyssey or student ombudsman
be a clearing house for tactics, and
print their home phone numbers
or at least their names and
addresses.
Let them realize that their acts
have important repercussions on
our careers and future lives. Let
them come to realize that their
arrogance will result in their
personal discomfort.
Name withheld
Garbage
I have travelled to and lived in
many places during my life —
from Tokyo to Vienna and from
Anchorage to Tijuana. I never
knew what indigestion was until I
ate in the UBC SUB cafeteria.
It is the only place I suffer this
ailment.
I am in full support of Art
Smolensky's research operations.
Not only are his gems of
information intolerably funny to
read but they also serve to prick
the conscience of whoever is in
charge of dishing out this garbage.
I, for one, would like to see
Art become a full-time
connoisseur of UBC's food service
— just think, a sniff or a raised
eyebrow on Art's part would send
people scurrying.
A Canadian UBC student
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 7, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Burbling Berton Woodward glower tripped after being appointed assistant
blurb editor and started barking orders at bashful Holly Botham who fled.
Sandy Kass bopped off to the demonstration with Vaughn "kool aid kid"
Palmer who turned into a leg man. Gord Gibson guffawed when Lesley
Krueger lurched into the office, but Sandi Shreve, sober for once, wasn't
amused. Tricia Moore followed Laurence Leader into the darkroom where
they found Warren Mayes worrying about Sue Nicolls. Grumpy Ginny Gait
wondered "Where have all the reporters gone?" and consoled herself with a
bottle of beer. Drooling Dick Betts did up some heads and came to dinner
while Lynn told Pollock jokes to Mike Buck. Cuddly Ken Spencer posed
with Brett Garrett's teddy bear but John Andersen refused to take the
picture. Paul Knox took it because he needed the art and he likes playing
with brownies. Shane McCune shuffled into the den of sin for an
assignment but he was too late. John Twigg joked about dopey chess
players and Leslie Plommer asked: "How did I get messed up with these
creeps?" Thursday, October 7, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Calgary doubts
tenure concept
CALGARY (CUP) - The University of Calgary senate voted
Friday to express dissatisfaction with the concept of tenure as it now
exists.
At a closed session immediately following its regular meeting,
the senate decided that the value of "appointment without definite
term" (known as tenure), had become questionable.
As a substitute to tenure, consideration would be given to
long-term hiring contracts (five or more years).
This would theoretically allow faculty members to have
academic freedom while encouraging them to remain active since they
would now be accountable for their inaction.
Although the senate's decision cannot change university policy,
the fact that the university even considered the issue will have
repercussions across Canada.
The impact of the motion, however, will be cushioned since the
matter will go to committee before the senate can take a more solid
stand.
The role of the senate as outlined in Alberta's Universities Act is
much like that of UBC's "powerless senate.
Concern was expressed by many senators that the lack of
tenured appointments might cause many academics to shy away from
U of C.
At the senate meeting, university president A. W. R. Carrothers
expressed the sentiment that tenure as it stands is unrealistic and that
little can be done with the rules and regulations of the university that
protect tenured faculty.
He expressed the hope that something be done to make the
method of faculty appointments more realistic.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Deformed sources in this tiny
kumquat republic announced the garrotting of Steve Giblet and his
animal anarchy and the abduction of notorious peeler Joan Banana.
The sources immediately denied reports that they had
committed more fuck-ups than a rabbit on thalidomide.
Miss Banana told photographers she is sinking an appeel to the
tail blorg.
Chinese course offered
If you would like to learn basic
Chinese, or even a smattering of
basic Chinese, this week is your
last chance to make your desire
known.
The Asian studies and history
departments have expressed
interest in a proposed Chinese
course but are waiting for some
sign of interest from students.
Planned as a summer course for
15 to 20 sinophiles, the program
would be worth at least three
units for graduate or
undergraduate students.
Cornelius Okoko, arts 4, who
first introduced the idea Sept. 17,
said Monday he has heard from
only five students.
If the necessary 15-20 enrolees
are not heard from by this Friday,
the course will have to be
cancelled. Phone Okoko at
733-2602.
<9?
,«V
r***f
Dtchestra performs ,
***6r
#
lWiilll!mm
Bartok & Co.
I THE MUSIC IS GREAT: BARTOK (his four major concertos)* STRAVINSKY* L
I IVES * BRITTEN * COPLAND * LUKAS FOSS * SHOSTAKOVICH * NORDHEIM*l
I WALTON* PIERRE MERCURE* •
I THE GUEST ARTISTS ARE SUPERB: JOHN OCDON * BELA SIKI * and
1 ELYAKIM TAUSSIG will perform the three Bartok Piano Concertos. MASUKO
I USHIODA, delightful young Japanese violinist will play the Bartok Violin
\ Concerto No.2. LUKAS FOSS and BORIS BROTT will each conduct one
i concert and SIMON STREATFEILD will conduct two concerts.
kTHE PRICES ARE EXTRAORDINARILY LOW:
OMYS9,S12 0RS15i
CONCERT DATES: OCTOBER 13, NOVEMBER 4,
NOVEMBER 19, DECEMBER 17
at 830 in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
For compete programme information call
the Symphony ottice-685-(>161 tor a
brochure.
"***,!* CPAir
i.
ST PLUS
26 WATER ST. ,J^> ^
: •     ■*   ■-■•   ■■*■"
CAMPUS CRAFT
THE POSTER PEOPLE
... a wild and worldly selection of imported handicrafts, decorative accessories, candles, novelties and fun.
Open 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1971
'Tween classes
THURSDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting to organize for clubs day at
12:30 in music room, St. Mark's
College.
UNEMPLOYED TEACHERS'
ASSOCIATION
Unemployed teachers will speak on
teaching situation in B.C. at 12:30
in Education 200.
UBC YOUNG SOCIALISTS,
FRIENDS OF BANGLA DESH I
Speakers Or. Kathleen Aberle, Dr.
Chinma Bannerjee and Hari Sharma
will hold teach-in on Pakistani
refugees at 12:30 in Angus 110.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN ALLIANCE
Speaker   Tom   Fowler at   12:30  in
SUB 215.
PHOTO SOC
Meeting to organize for clubs day,
election of clubs day chairman at
12:30 in SUB 24SA.
HILLEL
Prof. Aryeh Serper will speak on,
Jewish Education — Relevant Or
Not?, in Hlllel House at 12:30.
AYN RAND SOCIETY
General discussion at 12:30 in SUB
130.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Discussions of first jump course and.
Comox competition at 12:30 in
SUB 205.
EMERGENCY COMMITTEE FOR
PAKISTANI RELIEF
General   meeting   12:30   in   Angus
110.
FINE ARTS
Films and slides from 12:30 to 2:30
in Lasserre 104.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
H. Hesse speaks on Psychology of
Puberty at 3:30 in SUB 111.
KUNG FU CLUB
Learn a Chinese style of self-defence
'  in SUB 207 and  209 from 4:30 to
6:30.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Parachute packing lessons at 7 p.m.
in SUB ballroom.
RECREATION UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
General  meeting and beer night at
7:30      p.m      in      upper      lounge.
International House.
NON-FACULTY TEACHERS' UNION
Elections at 8 p.m. in main dining
room, Graduate Student Centre.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Phillip Ney speaks on Love at 12:30
in SUB party room.
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
Manager's meeting at 12:30 in room
211, Memorial gym.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting. All are welcome to
attend at 12:30 in upper lounge,
International House.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
BEER GARDEN
Every Friday 4 to 8 p.m. In upper
lounge, International House. Live
music, all instruments welcome.
SUNDAY
UBC TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Practice led by Mr. Choi. New
members welcome at Gym B, winter
sports centre from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General   meeting   in SUB   105A at
12:30.
PRE-LAW CLUB
Organizational meeting at 12:30 in
Angus 410.
puis
"headquarters
FOR
G.W.G.
H IS
LEVIS
LEES
PANTS PLUS BELTSl
PANTS PLUS TOPS
AND
MANY MORE
j  WITH THIS COUPON!  {
:   10%    :
i   OFF     i
j    FOR ALL STUDENTS    {
|        WITH CARDS i
55 W. Hastings fc---_-.----.--j
2115 W. 41st 2140 Western Parkway
2967 W. Broadway U.B.C. Square
Monday to Friday — 10a.m. to 9p.m. — Saturday 10a.m. to 6p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rotes: Campus — 3 lines,  t   day $1.00; 3 days  $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines,   1   day $1.25;  additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.r the day before pt&tica&m.
Publications Ogee, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Vm. 8, BM.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
FOUND SILVER RING IN Women's washroom, Educ. Bids. Call
Pat. 922-0684.            	
Rides & Car Pools
14
BRITISH PROPERTY CAR POOL,
needs one more driver. Call Cindy,
922-3581; Sandy, 922-2922; Cheri,
922-5253.	
NEEDED A RIDE TO VERNON,
Thurs., Oct. 7 or Fri., Oct. 8. Call
Rick at 224-9665.	
WHY BUM A RIDE? SEE THE
Wheeler Dealer at the Cycle Center, 2320 W. 4th, 731-5531.
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00 your cost $125.00.
2-year parts guarantee. Carry
Sony, Sansui, Dual, Akai, A.G.S.,
Warfdale. Phone 732-6769 for sav-
ings.	
UBC BARBER SHOP — OPEN 6
days a week. Hairstyling by Dini
& Richard, 5736 University Blvd.
FOLK SONG SOCIETY GENERAL
meeting, Thursday, October 7,12:30
SUB,   Room    125.   New   members
welcome!	
FREE DRAW — SAT..  OCT.   9
FOR  $500  DIAMOND RING
Drop in and fill out coupon today!
The Diamond Room — Your Campus
Jeweler — 2109 Allison, next to
 World Wide Travel	
DON'T SPOIL YOUR PANTS. USE
CIC lab coats. We have all sizes in
stock now. Only $4.00 at Chem. 162.
Noon.	
WANTED: ATTRACTIVE FEMALE
fibre-glass worker. Must own blue
jeans & be able to drive standard.
Call John. 224-0440.	
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pop art. Also Jokes, Gifts
and 24" x 36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin
Bin, 3209 W. Broadway across
from the Liquor Store. Call 738-
2311.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
1 Factory trained mechanics
h Fully Guaranteed Work
h  Reasonable Rates
P.S. We also now repair
Datsun, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
Motorcycles
Art Services
31
Beauty Parlors
UBC BEAUTY SALON. WIGS &
Hairpieces cleaned & styled. Prof,
service — low prices. 5736 Univ.
Blvd. 228-8942.
Scandals
Typing
Photography
35
ANYONE WHO SAW THE PICKUP
truck hit me at the Sumas border
demonstration please call 224-7326
or leave your name "with AMS
office. I have been charged!
WANTED: BIKE. 3-SPEED OR 10-
speed^ g-ood condition. Phone Mona
or Sheila. 732-5191.	
WANTED — BY VICTORIA SYM-
Dhony violinist, good bow — up to
$150. write Box  834 Totem Park.
1963 ECONOLINE VAN. '68 EN-
gine. transmission. Fully camper-
ized.  Best offer! 738-3438.
1970 MG MIDGET. ONLY 8.500 MI.
Radials. mags, reel, seats, undrct.
tonn. Must sell. Wife is preenant
and can't fit inside. $2,150. Phone
263-9044.	
'55 VW. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Just overhauled. Ready to drive.
Good trans., brakes, tires, radio
hook-up.   738_-6003.	
'59 PORSCHE CONVERT. NEW
motor, trans., clutch. New paint,
seats, silver, red interior. Ph. 261-
7713.
25
'64 VESPA, 125CC, 65 MPH, 100 MPG,
carrier,  2  helmets.   $225.  X4147  or
 941-3836 evenings.	
'63  TRIUMPH 500.  EXCEL.   COND.
Call Douglas, 266-6696.
BUSINESS SERVICES
31A
37
40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745 — Reasonable prices.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.
tfje Hzrut anb gutter
Cameras!
3010 W.  BDWY.
736-7833
Cross-screen (Star)
Filter   $3.15-$3.92
Sakulite S-2
ELECTRONIC FLASH
SPECIAL $10.00
Kodachrome II guide number 25
■ Full selection of 3, 5, and 6
image lenses.
Rip-offs NOT our Specialty!
INSTANT BLO-UP, 8x10, $1.00;
16x20, $3.00. film processing, proofing, while you wait. 4472 W. 10th
Ave. 224-1732.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
HEADS WANTED, SHORT HOURS,
good pay. Apply 4023 Macdonald,
3-5  p.m.,   Wed.,   Thurs.,  Fri.  only.
GRAD STUDENTS: UBC TUTOR-
ing centre needs tutors in all
university subjects, $3.00 per hour.
Register SUB 228 (12:30-2:30).
DEAF-MUTE PARAPLEGIC RE-
quires student to live in his home
to do light cooking and housekeeping in exchange for free room
and board. Interested persons
please call 261-1335/9:00 a.m.-5:00
p.m. Monday to Friday.
Work Wanted
52
BINDING. ALL TYPES OF MAGA-
zines, booklets, etc., permanently
bound. Send for full details, cloth
samples and quotations to: Centennial Bookbinding, P.O. Box 130,
North Vancouver, B.C.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
HAVING PROBLEMS WITH A
course? UBC tutoring centre will
find you a tutor — any subject,
any course. Come and see us, SUB
228 — 12:30-2:30.	
HATHA YOGA CLASSES AT
Shyam Yoga sh ram beginning
week of Oct. 18, 206 E. 6th. 879-3703
 MEDITATION	
GERMAN TUITION AND TRANS-
lations phone 224-7197. Ask for
Gerhard.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
DIAMOND WEDDING & ENGAGE-
ment rings, both for only $79 at
your campus jeweler, The Diamond
Room, 2109 Allison, next door to
World Wide Travel.	
HEAD MASTERS BRAND NEW
top surfaces 210 cm. $75 phone
Dave Turner 738-9813.	
ANSCOM ATIC SLIDE PROJEC-
tor ($50.00) 23 slide trays ($8.00).
Call 688-8822 after 8 p.m.	
FOR SALE: LONG SHINY RED
coat size nine. Heated hair rollers.
224-6113, Mary.	
HEAD COMPETITION G.S. 210 CM.
Good condition. $60.00. Phone 732-
5916 after 6 p.m.
BUDDHIST BOOKS
for further information and
free   catalogue
Write   to:
THE BUDDHIST BOOKSTORE
1710 Octavia Street
San Francisco, Calif., 94109
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ACCOM. 1 ROOM, $50. KETTLE,
toaster, fridge. Non-smokers. Men
only. Mrs. M. Jambresic. 4570 W.
12th Ave. 228-8408.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD $110 MO.
Males. Excellent food, colour TV.
Sauna, 5785 Agronomy Road,
Phone 224-9684.	
BUS.-WOMAN OR SEN. STUDENT
to live with elderly lady. Req'd. to
cook evening meals. Near UBC in
W. Pt. Grey. 224-6364.
Furn. Apts.
83
MATURE MALE STUDENT TO
share 2 bedroom apt. in Kits. $61
per mo. inclusive. Leave message
at 274-3542.
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT SPECIAL
3 Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247 Thursday, October 7, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
Thunderette basketball
should be tops in Canada
Cricketeer
recogni
A UBC student has won the
1971 cricket Wicket Keeping
Trophy.
Brinsley Stewart, a grad
student in French, won the
trophy from the B.C. Cricket
Association for his outstanding
wicket keeping throughout the
year.
BySUENICOLLSand
LYNN POLLOCK
"Women can finally compete
in the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union National
Championships," said
Thunderette basketball coach
Norm Vickery.
"Women have not competed in
this event before because
collegiate basketball for women in
Ontario and Quebec is not well
developed," Vickery said.
Last year the Thunderettes tied
for first place in the Western
Intercollegiate Conference with
the University of Saskatchewan,
Saskatoon. UBC handily beat the
other university teams and lost
only one of two games against
Saskatoon.
This year the Western
Conference  is  divided into two
sections with teams from Alberta
and B.C. in one section and teams
from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and
the Lakehead in the other section.
The winner of each section will
play for the right to enter the
CIAU finals in Saskatoon.
"Saskatoon is not in our
section this year," said
Thunderette manager Heather
Butcher. "But if we wind up
against each other they will be our
best competition."
Playing for the team this year
will be Bev Bland, Lynn Wells,
Peggy Robinson, Linda
McCulloch, Terri McGovern,
Wendy Grant and Joanne
Sargeant. Bland is the only player
in her first year.
Said Butchex, "Some of last
year's players have trained during
the summer and have improved
Volleyball men aim high
The UBC men's volleyball team
has been practicing for two weeks
under the leadership of rookie
coach Dale Ohman.
Ohman has just returned from
eastern Europe and has many new
concepts of training and team
play which should greatly benefit
the team.
The Thunderbirds will compete
in the Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association tournament in
Edmonton with an eye on the
Canadian     Collegiate
Rugby teams
shaping up
The season again looks
promising for the rugby club
which is fielding five teams.
Last year the T'Birds won
every game but one.
The highlight of last weekend
was a 25-0 win by UBC
Tomahawks over Richmond II.
The 'Birds lost 3-0 to the
Trojans having had two tries
called back. The Trojans put over
a penalty in the first few minutes
for their three points.
The 'Birds suffered from lack
of cohesion among the forwards
and have not yet reached last
year's level of conditioning.
The return of five players from
the Canadian team touring Wales
presents a good picture for next
week.
Championships to be held in
Quebec on February 22. They will
participate in the Canadian
National tournaments in May, also
held in Edmonton.
Other major local competitions
will include trips to Portland,
Seattle and Victoria.
Any players with foreign
experience (European or
Oriental), or former high school
players are welcome to the
practices, Tuesday 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday 6:30 p.m., and Sunday
10 a.m. Practices are held in the
War Memorial Gym.
Intramurals
FOOTBALL RESULTS
Division 1: Beta 26, Fort
Camp O; Engineers 15, Arts 2:
D.U. 1, Dekes 1.
Division II: Hillel 13,
Dentistry 0; Education 30, Phi
Delta 0; Recreation 13, Science
0.
lets finish,
off the evening
With 3p\Z2B
frOmjonS whata
beautiful
climax
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAURANT
UBC. Village, 2136 Western Park Way
UPON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
(^S  Gastown  @
W Wax 1
-0
73
%    9 Museum v?
21 WATER STREET,    685-2751
OPEN DAI LY 11 A.M. TO 11 P.M.
m
over last year. Sargeant is a good
defensive player. She's very quick.
Bland is tall, strong and
enthusiastic and has a lot of
potential.
"We have seven players back
from last year. Three of them
have competed internationally.
We lost two good players but with
those we have we'll do as well or
better than last year.
"We're aiming for the national
championships."
Vickery said that SFU will not
be competing against UBC.
"Women have not been active
up there as far as basketball is
concerned?," he said. "I would
like to see them develop a fine
program to offer us some
competition.
"SFU and UBC games always
draw a lot of spectators and
interest."
Vickery and Butcher are very
optimistic about the
Thunderettes.
"We work at conditioning and
endurance," said Butcher. "If we
meet a team with equal skill, we
can outlast them on the court."
"We play aggressive
basketball," she said.
The Thunderettes can look
forward to a good season and a
chance to compete in the CIAU
National Championships.
GESTALT AWARENESS GROUPS
Beginning Sunday Oct. 10
4543 W. 10th Ave.
7:30. P.M.
FOR INFORMATION PHONE
ALLAN COHEN 228-9631
JOHN MATE 731-7971
Oct.8&9- Fri.-Sat.
Hebb Theatre —
7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
'Tom Jones'
only 75c
THE
TOWN
L   PUMP
THE BEST DINING
AND
ENTERTAINMENT
DEAL IN GASTOWN
Full facilities
7 days a week
Dancing to the 'Now
Sound' of the Town
Pumpers — Mon. thru
Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5
p.m. Daily (4 .p.m. to 10
p.m. Sundays)
8 of 9 Entree Items
$2.50 or Less
GROUP PARTIES CAN BE
ARRANGED SUN.-THUR.
CALL 683-6695
INDOOR TENNIS IN THE ARMOURY
Students and members of faculty are invited to join the
University Open Tennis Club. A membership fee of $2.50 for the
academic year 1971-72, or $1.50 per term, entitles the individual
to reserve a court for one hour periods by telephoning 228-4452
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through friday.
Membership cards may be obtained from Mr. H. Tyndall, Room
101, in the Physical Education Building in Thunderbird Park
(South Campus).
THE HOURS FOR OPEN PLAY ARE AS FOLLOWS:
MONDAY
TUESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
9:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
12:00 noon to 3:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
{•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••j
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2745 WEST 4th AVE.
738-6929 738-5033
den
ANNUAL FALL SALE!
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} Aqualung T Tank
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Bac Pac
—OTHER SPECIALS	
Rocket Fins     $16.95
Safety Vest (deluxe) ... $32.95
Super Sport II Suit, 5 zip
with hood, boot & gloves $79.95
Aquanout Mask    $12.75
CapiHary Depth Guage .    $5.95
Big Barrel Snorkels    $4.59
Special     §
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59 I
179
LIFETIME GUARANTEE
SCUBA CLASSES
— year round —
Weekly Boat Diving Trips
Call
738-5033
MBRING THIS AD IN  FOR ONE FREE AIR  FILL—OFFER EXPIRES OCT. 31|< Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1971
York student council backs Texpack strike
—david phillipt photo
YOU COULDN'T WEAR a bathing suit, but Wednesday was warm enough for lunching, lazing students to take
advantage of the Nitobe gardens. No one was about to spoil the scene with studies.
Courses cover varied topics
By IAN LINDSAY
Anybody for racial discrimination, pirates, Indians,
violence, dissidents, films or the Front de Liberation du
Quebec?
UBC's centre for continuing education is offering
these subjects in its fall course program.
Dissent, Violence and Civil Liberties: A Case Study of
The FLQ Crisis is the title of a lecture-discussion series
starting Thursdays at 8 p.m. in the Unitarian Church,
Forty-ninth and Oak.
RCMP car identified
For those of you who haven't noticed, the local cops
(RCMP genus) have a shiny new ghost car this year.
It is a green Dodge with licence plate number
JGJ-158.
The Ubyssey reminds students that getting caught
putting salt or sugar in a cop car's gas tank will probably
get you in trouble.
The series will discuss civil liberties, separatism and
the class structure in Quebec.
An eight-week lecture series, Black and White in
Southern Africa, begins Tuesday at 8 p.m. in Buchanan
332 for people interested in apartheid and
Canadian-South African relations.
A ten-week program on the impact of the Egyptian,
Minoan, Phoenician, Greek, Persian and Roman peoples
in the Mediterranean will start Oct. 13,8 p.m. on campus.
Sometime during the discussion, archaelogist Hanna
Kassis will discuss pirates.
A 10-week course, Film in the Exploration of Social
Life, will begin Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Film as social commentary, art and information will
be covered in the course led by Matthew Speier,
anthropology and sociology professor.
If you're interested in any of these courses call the
centre   at   228-2181,   local   252,   for   information.
TORONTO (CUP) - Council of the York University
Student Federation has pledged $250 to the support of'
strikers in the Texpack strike in Brantford.
In a 9-3 vote Monday, the council defeated objections
that CYSF has neither the right nor the money to get into
off-campus activities.
Calling the strike a fairly clear case of the need for
student involvement in the larger community, CYSF
president Mike Fletcher said: "You can't isolate the
university from real life. You have to work out what your
system of priorities is."
To suggestions that student impact might be greater
through individual letter writing, work on the picket lines
and boycott of Texpack products, he said: "The reality
of the strikers' lives is groceries next week."
He said $250 will buy groceries for ten people for one
week of a cost of about four cents a student.
Texpack workers are striking for higher pay: an
increase of 65 cents an hour over a three-year period from
their present hourly wage of $1.93. Texpack is a branch
plant of American Hospital Supply Corporation.
Meanwhile, the Canadian Textile and Chemical
Union, representing the 200 striking Texpack employees,
accused the rival Textile Workers Union of America of
strikebreaking.
CTCU president Kent Rowley said the TWUA has
filed an application to take over bargaining rights of
employees at Texpack's plant in Rexdale.
The application will come before the Ontario Labor
Relations Board on Oct. 29.
Texpack announced last week that 80 per cent of its
manufacturing operations were being transferred from the
strikebound Brantford plant to Rexdale.
The move to Rexdale is just the latest in
strikebreaking tactics by Texpack in the 12-week dispute.
Earlier they had imported $100-a-day strikebreakers
to drive busloads of scabs into the Brantford plant. This
proved unsuccessful despite arrests and injuries to strikers
and their supporters.
Bangla Deshed up
The Friends of Bangla-Desh and the UBC Young
Socialists are holding a teach-in rally today at noon in
Angus 110.
Speakers will be Dr. Kathleen Aberle, anthropologist
and expert on Pakistan society, plus Simon Fraser
University professor Dr. Chimna Bannerjee, and SFU PSA
department member Hari Sharma.
Friday night, Dr. Ushi Mahejani will speak on
Pakistan, Bangla Desh and the Future of Humanity in
Christ Church Cathedral.
Dr. Mahajani has just returned from a visit to those
countries where she studied first-hand the problems of the
refugees from Bangla Desh (East Pakistan) and conditions
in that country.
"PUBLIC NOTICE"
Every Friday during fall
semester Corky will trim and
style 15,000 budgie birds.
UBC dropouts interested in
budgie apprenticeship are welcome,
P.S. We also trim and style
hair. 731-4717.
NEED FUNDS?
HAVE
KAY-HAN
Productions
Put on a concert for you
Phone: 685-4035
(Ans. Service)
or
WRITE:
No. 3—111 Dunsmuir St.
Vancouver, B.C.
a SUB Film Soc presentation -
"A beautiful and dazzling
piece of film making!"
diary
off a mad
tiousewift
a frank parry film
SUB THEATRE
50c
Friday - 9:30
Saturday - 7:00
8(9:30
Sunday - 7:00
1
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
000
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
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Name-	
Residence
Address	
City-
Phone: Home.....  Office..
Occupation 	
Prov.
Age      Married Q Divorced □      Male □
Separated □  Never Married n Female □
Date first licensed to drive              	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes □ No □ (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?    	
Are you now insured?	
Date current policy expires  	
This  coupon  is  designed  solely to enable non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile...
Make of automobile..
No. of cylinders.. 	
Horsepower-
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
.Days
-Miles-
Yes D No n
Car No. 2
Days
. Miles
Yes n No Q
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Singte
% of Use
Car#l
Car #2
FPR UBC 33
1
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