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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 17, 1981

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Array Feds force $400 fee hike
By CRAIG BROOKS
The federal government's new
budget will force tuition fees to rise
at least 60 per cent next year, provincial finance minister Hugh Curtis said Thursday.
Each B.C. post-secondary student will have to pay $370 more in
tuition next year, in addition to
already planned increases, Curtis
said.
"Post-secondary education and
health care in B.C. and in the other
provinces have been hard hit as a
result of the federal budget," he
said.
The federal government will
remove   $5.7   billion   of   federal
transfer payments to provinces for
post-secondary education ' and
health care over the next five years.
The provinces were given additional
taxation powers in the budget,
which will reduce the provincial
shortfall to $1.9 billion.
UBC students already face a
minimum 15 per cent increase for
next year, to conform to the UBC
board of governors policy to have
tuition fees represent at least 10 per
cent of the university's operating
budget.
The federal move will cost B.C.
$91 million during the next fiscal
year, and $600 million over the next
five years, Curtis said.
Students for an Accessible
Education spokesperson Paul
Yaskowich said Monday the tuition
increase could go even higher if the
Socred government decides to put a
different spending priority on its
new taxation ability.
"There's no indication the present government has changed its
priorities," he said.
"The (potential) increase implies
Curtis will make students pay for
the federal shortfall," Yaskowich
said. "The Socreds have a general
user-pay attitude, and that's
wrong."
James Hollis, Alma Mater Society external affairs coordinator said
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 26
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 17,1981 *$IS&mh      228-2301
— craig yuill photo
"HERE'S LOOKING at you, kid," Ubyssey photog thinks to himself as he snaps last self-portrait. Intent on focusing on himself, unfortunate artist failed to notice Ladner's last erection (clock tower seen in background just as
downward descent begins) falling on his head. Photog survived, but doctors say his picture-taking days are over.
This final appearance on front page is our way of paying tribute to another staffer wounded in action.
As UBC sleeps, ofhers fighf
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
As students across the country fight back against
crippling cutbacks in post-secondary education funding, UBC is dormant.
B.C. Students' Federation spokesperson Gordon
Moore said Monday the Alma Mater Society refused
to participate in the week long protest against cutbacks
organized by the federation.
"You might actually say that UBC is having a sleep-
in," said Moore who added the AMS refused because
they say there is no forum on campus to organize such
events. Moore disagrees:
"The Students For an Accessible Education will try
and wake up the AMS. (The AMS refusal) does tell us
the student representatives at UBC do not view the
fiscal crisis as important enough to get organized
about."
Moore warned unless students get involved in
fighting cutbacks they will see an even greater decrease
in the quality of education.
"I guess what it really comes down to is if students
don't get involved they are going to have no one to
blame but themselves for the creation of overcrowded
classes, and increased competition for places in universities."
Moore said colleges and universities across the province will be involved in protest action this week and
the students at Okanagan College in Kelowna "have
every intention of occupying the administration
building."
Kwantlin College in Surrey will have an information
rally Nov. 26 and a public protest on Nov. 27. Simon
Fraser University will hold a public meeting on Thursday with administration president George Pederson,
BCSF representatives and the SFU student society.
There will be a rally at the University of Victoria, a
public meeting and classroom speaking at Douglas
College, an open meeting at Cariboo and Camosun
Colleges and a protest to the board of governors at
Capilano College.
And at UBC, not a sausage.
"At UBC it's really ironic that the AMS has not
been able to respond to cutbacks in education programs when more than half of the colleges in B.C.
have organized teams to keep students informed about
the effects of underfunding," said Moore.
Meanwhile, students across the country have recently launched a series of protests against underfunding
and cutbacks in post-secondary education.
In Quebec earlier this month, more than 60,000
students staged walkouts and joined in demonstrations
across the province to protest government underfunding of post-secondary education.
Chanting, "Education and health are rights not
privileges," about 1,000 students marched to the Montreal offices of the education ministry to demonstrate
against the cutbacks.
The Parti Quebecois promised students free tuition
during the 1976 provincial election campaign and it has
been recently rumored premier Levesque will allow tuition fees to double, next year. The move would increase tuition fees to about $1,200 a year.
See page 3: PROTEST
Thursday, "The increase in next
year's tuition boggles the imagination. The effects will be
devastating."
"If the Socreds don't come up
with extra funding (to match the
federal shortfall), they would effectively be abandoning the system,"
he said.
Yaskowich said students should
be concerned about the increases
and write letters to their MPs and
MLAs about their concerns.
"If tuition goes up, it will be too
late (to do anything)," he said.
AMS president Marlea Haugen
said Monday, "I find it absolutely
amazing that a country that is worried about its technological future
can withhold money from the only
vehicle that allows them to maintain
that technology."
Administration president Doug
Kenny said last week it is regrettable
the federal government refuses to
fully recognize the importance of
post-secondary education.
Haugen said she is convinced the
provincial government will lump an
increased financial burden on the
university. She cited the recent example of the Socred government ignoring UBC's request for relief of a
$9 million budget shortfall.
Haugen charged the increase will
make UBC an elitist institution.
"Perhaps when some worker
realizes that his child can't attend
university because of the elitist attitudes of the Liberal government;
we may see a new government."
But science undergraduate society president Dave Frank questioned
Monday how many students were
really concerned about tuition increases. "Many students consider it
a non-issue," he said.
Frank said he would be talking to
science classes, asking people to
write letters if they are concerned.
The number of letters will indicate
how many students are concerned
he said.
Exec rejects
admin offer
By ARNOLD HEDSTKOM
A teaching assistant strike vote
appears likely as contract negotiations between TAs and the administration break down.
The TA union«tecutive is recommending its members reject the university's latest contract offer.
"If it is rejected, the course of action will be to call a strike vote for
the first week of December or certainly before the eleventh," said
TAU president Jonathon Katz
Monday.
The union meets Thursday noon
to discuss the university's offer and
the possibility of a strike.
Administration employee relations director Robert Grant said
Monday that he told TAU negotiators "It will come to a stage where
you'll have to accept our offer or
consider shutting this place down."
But Katz charged the university
was issuing the union a challenge.
"They don't think we have the
strength or inclination to do anything about wages and conditions,"
Katz said.
"I am disappointed in them," he
added. "They have refused to move
a bit. We were more than flexible."
Katz said the executive is recommending a strike vote based on
three outstanding items.
The union proposed a security
clause which includes automatic
membership in the union. Those
would be an opting out procedure
within a specified period of time for
those who did not wish to belong to
the union.
The university rejected the item
because they said it is inappropriate
in an academic environment.
"We will not force anyone to join
or not join a union," Grant said.
Grant added the university hires
teaching assistants to help them get
through their programs. "Their objective is to get their education and
get on with.their careers," he said.
On wages, Grant said the university is prepared to offer 15 per cent
or the same increase as other campus unions received in 1981/82.
But the union is rejecting the proposal. "The university has not
budged. We have brought our offer
down," Katz said. He added they
were close on this item but refused
to discuss specifics until after consulting the union membership.
The third unresolved issue is
quality of education. The university
agreed to provide training for new
teaching assistants and allow concerns about the quality of education
including class size and crowding to
be formally expressed in writing according to Grant.
But the university would not
agree to a clause which states "The
university therefore agrees to cooperate with the union in maintaining
and improving the quality of educa-
See page 7: ADMIN
Autonomy threatened
By BRIAN JONES
UBC is rapidly losing its autonomy because the provincial government and the Universities Council
of B.C. is telling the university how
to spend its money, administration
president Doug Kenny said Monday.
"The government is not happy
with the priorities chosen by the
university on which to spend
money," Kenny told about 100 education faculty members.
Kenny said in the past the government gave money to universities to
spend as they saw fit, but the government is no longer happy with the
priorities universities are setting.
The government and UCBC are
currently reassessing university programs, Kenny said. "They may or
may not whisk money out.'"
Kenny said lack of government
funding seriously affects UBC.
"We as a university have never
come close to receiving our accumulated request for funds from the
government. Such massive shortfalls cannot continue without academic damage," he said.
Since 1975, the difference between funding requested and funding received at UBC is $90 million,
according to Kenny.
If such funding shortfalls continue, "the scope and size of the
university may have to be reduced,
and that would include student admissions," he said. "This university
will have no alternative but to retract its size."
UBC's estimated $7.4 million
shortfall "is the dimension of the
problem," said Kenny. "I do not
pretend that the solution will be
easy. I'm sure (hat we will continue
to hear squabbles about money,
See page 3: TUITION Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1981
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WHEN CANADA GETS TOGETHER OVER A BEER. Tuesday, November 17,1981
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 3
Irish fight to oust British
By BRIAN JONES
The real terrorists in Northern
Ireland are the British, an IRA hunger strike campaign representative
charged Friday.
"What the British do in Ireland is
terrorism, because they are terrorizing people who want the British
Trent budget
pared, future
is bleak
PETERBOROUGH (CUP) — In
an attempt to eliminate a $1.5 mil-'
lion deficit at Trent University, a
management consultant's report
has recommended the university implement a series of major cutbacks.
Included in the recommendations
of the Hanson group report are a
cutback in library hours, the laying
off of 35 support staff, centralization of the college system, and the
laying off of faculty members over
the next three years.
According to Jim English, Trent
public information officer, the university's b.udget has "already been
pared to the bone." English said he
was unsure how the cutbacks would
affect Trent future enrolment. He
added the university has been
lobbying the provincial government
for increased funding for a decade,
but now "has no other option"
than to implement further cuts.
According to Sandy MacDonald,
Trent student union president, the
university administration is not being forceful enough in its dealings
with the provincial government. He
said the university is worried about
being placed in receivership.
A coalition of students, staff and
faculty has called for a boycott of
classes today. The board of governors will decide on the implementation of the report Nov. 27.
UEL elections
start Saturday
for locals
Voting for the University Endowment Lands representatives on the
Greater Vancouver Regional District takes place Saturday.
The two candidates are incumbent Iva Mann, and Ray Cantillon.
Cantillon is supported by the NDP
while Mann stresses that she is not
connected with any political party.
Voting is from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday at either University Hill
elementary school at 5395 Chancellor Boulevard, or at the GVRD
offices at 2215 West 10th. Canadian
citizens 19 and over who have lived
on the endowment lands for at least
three months are eligible to vote.
Contact the GVRD at 731-1155
for inquiries about the voters' list.
out of Ireland. The real terrorists in
Ireland are the British army," Michael Quigley told about 100 people
in Fishermen's Hall, 138 East Cordova St.
"The gangsters, the killers, the
bandits, wear the uniforms of the
crown — the British army, the
Royal Ulster Constabulary, and all
the goons the Orange forces have
been able to muster. That is who the
terrorists are," Quigley said.
The problem in Northern Ireland, he said, stems from colonial
conflict. "What is going on in Ireland is an anti-colonial war, a war
by the Irish people to end British
colonial rule," said Quigley. "The
ones wearing the British uniform
have no right to be in Ireland, they
never have and never will. The real
enemy is British imperialism — they
divided the country and ereCted the
false state of Northern Ireland," he
added.
The Irish people are fighting to
end their domination by Britain,
Quigley said. "The Irish people
want to be free, they want the British out of Ireland."
The Ireland's liberation movement is succeeding, he said. "The
Irish republican movement is strong
and has international support," he
said, and added support is found
even in Britain. "In the last five or
six years the British people, when
they have been asked, have always
said that they want the British
forces to withdraw from Ireland.
The English people are not happy
with their colonial war across the
water."
The IRA hunger strike, which
ended Oct. 3, played a major role in
achieving this international support, and gave the IRA a propaganda victory, Quigley said. "The
names of Bobby Sands and Francis
Hughes are known and respected
throughout the world. They are certainly more respected than Margaret Thatcher."
Even the media has been won
over, and this is proof of growing
support for the republican movement, said Quigley. "The press is
now less prone to refer to the IRA
as terrorists — they are now called
guerrillas or nationalists.
"The British have lost on the political front, on the prison front, in
the propaganda campaign, and cannot possibly win on the military
front." The hunger strike campaign
has strengthened the IRA, he said.
"Since Bobby Sands gave his life,
the IRA has been turning away volunteers. What the hunger strikers
achieved was a turning point in the
struggle against British imperialism."
-craig yulll photo
DOGGEDLY DESCENDING into depths of divine despair, student stoicly
struggles down Sedgewick stairs to study depressing drudgery in library
dungeon. Somehow sustaining semblance of sanity, Lynn Garter (arts 2)
grimly grins and bears brunt of brain bruising homework designed to drive
students to depression (or drinking) during entire school year. Wryly wink
ing while walking, woman is followed by other frantic flunkies, freaking at
possibility of perturbing failure. Serious studying has started in earnest
with Christmas finals approaching with sickeningly sadistic abruptness.
After a while alliteration almost becomes boring. So blaring banner
"Books, books, books," won't be mentioned.
Canadian students protest
From page 1
Demonstration speakers charged
the PQ has only increased post-secondary funding about seven per
cent this year which is significantly
less than the rate of inflation. There
were also walkouts at 12 colleges
across the province with a demon-
Tuition thorny issue
From page 1
academic priorities, and the like."
"If faculty layoffs become necessary it will not be done quickly or
easily," he said.
Kenny said untenured faculty positions are already being lost due to
attrition.
During the question period several education professors expressed
concern that students are not contributing enough through tuition
fees.
"Tuition is the thorniest issue in
university funding," Kenny said.
He added there is no doubt fees
will increase.
"Accessibility to university is not
the government's goal," he said.
"Ultimately, I think the government is out of step."
One faculty member condemned
tuition fee hikes, saying "I don't
think the problem lies with fees, it
lies with the way the university is
funded by the government."
Kenny is touring all UBC's faculties in response to recent faculty
criticism of his tactics for handling
UBC's financial crisis.
stration against the PQ member for
the national assembly in Rouyn.
In Quebec City more than 250
students demonstrated before the
national assembly. And in Saskatoon, more than 1,000 students
showed up Nov. 4 at the biggest
demonstration at the University of
Saskatchewan in a decade.
Students there stayed for a six
hour teach-in and protest against
cutbacks anticipated in the Nov. 12
federal budget, while university
president Leo Kristjanson said the
cutbacks from the provincial government since 1976 have been detrimental.
Kristjanson added that "besides
phasing out three departments, the
quality of learning is going down at
this university."
Donald Savage, Canadian Association of University Teachers
spokesperson said the federal Established Programs Financing
(EPF) cost sharing agreement "was
originally adopted to allow for flex
ibility in the provincial budgets, but
now it seems to effectuate under-
funding."
On Oct. 29 the Ontario Federation of Students' day of protest
drew more than 2,000 students
from across the province to a University of Toronto hall to witness
the mock wedding of Pierre Trudeau and premier Bill Davis as partners in reducing education funding.
At Queen's university i:n Kingston, more than 60 students; held an
all-night "study-in" at their library
and another 1,500 joined them in
the morning for a demonstration.
Library study sessions were also
held in Toronto colleges and universities, at Carleton University in
Ottawa and Trent University in
Peterborough.
About 9,000 Guelph, London
and Ottawa students marched on
parliament hill where they greeted
secretary of state Gerald Regan's
denial  that  the  government  had
plans to "drastically reduce its support for post-secondary education"
with cries of "bullshit, bullshit."
During late September students
in the Atlantic organized a day of
protest with 5,000 students marching through Halifax with 1,500 ending up at the legislature chanting
and parading through the halls.
Protests followed in New Brunswick and St. John's and Prince Edward Island where students took
their frustrations to their provincial
education ministers for answers.
A major march on parliament hill
is planned for Nov. 21 by Quebec's
two student organizations.
The University of Regina will
stage a cutbacks conference about
Nov. 26.
The Federation of Alberta Students will coordinate a provincial
day of action the same day, including forums, teach-ins, rallies and
panels on its eight member campuses. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17,1981
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PLAYING  AT A UNIVERSITY   NEAR YOU
Passing bucks?
The Liberals in Ottawa are smart. They are so smart they convinced the
provinces to sign a cost-sharing agreement for education and health funding and are now backing out.
This agreement is the Established Programs Financing (EPF) which was
originally adopted in 1977 to allow the provinces greater flexibility in their
budgets.
But it is now 1981, the economy is in a slump and the provinces, who
have always welcomed post-secondary education funding like Nixon welcomed the press, now know the Liberals want to get rid of the payments.
The provinces will be left holding the bag.
In fact, last Thursday night finance minister Allan MacEachen announced that the federal government would cut the transfer payments to the provinces.
And B.C. finance minister Hugh Curtis estimated Thursday this will
amount to $91 million or an extra $370 more from each student at a post-
secondary institution in this province.
It is frightening to think of the damage already caused by the $8 million
shortfall — cutbacks of teaching assistants, larger classes, fewer courses
offered, rumors of tenured faculty being let go, a hiring freeze, no replacement of classroom equipment. And the list goes on.
Because EPF did not require the provinces to spend federal funds on
post-secondary education or health care, they took the opportunity to
sharply reduce their contributions to these areas, pushing the federal share
of the costs upward.
Now the future of the university will be left in the hands of the Social
Credit government. They can always point their fingers at EPF when they
slash the education budget ever farther but it has already become increasingly clear that the provincial government is not concerned about their universities and colleges.
The Socreds currently spend more money playing with football stadiums, northeast coal deals, convention centres and exhibitions than they
do on education. Left up to them what possible hope to students have for
an accessible education in this province?
None.
What hope does the Social Credit government offer that the money sliced out of health care will be replaced?
None.
And what can you say about a government that considers pet projects
more important than health care and education?
Not much.
Creation critic's article shoots wide of mark
The Oct. 30 Perspectives article
was disturbing. The headline Christians 'want indoctrination schools'
was misleading and inflammatory.
The article did not suggest that
"Christians" wanted indoctrination schools, but that fundamentalist creationists did. Saying that
Christians 'want indoctrination
schools' is like saying Women want
abortion or Germans seek to exterminate Jews.
One suspects that you will stoop
to any level to attract readers to
your articles, suggesting that perhaps your editorial standards are
too low, or that you enjoy bad-
mouthing Christians.
The article itself shot wide of the
mark in a couple of areas. For example, "These two theories (evolutionism and creationism) are addressing two different questions,
one of which is scientific and one of
which is metaphysical. Evolution is
a scientific theory which offers a
mechanism for the origin of life.
Theories of creation are metaphysi
cal theories which offer a reason or
purpose for the origin of life."
The writer (Gary Marchant) has
missed the point by saying that creationism is metaphysical as opposed
to scientific, and that it addresses a
separate problem. One purpose of
creationism is to point out some of
the grave weaknesses in the "scientific" theory of evolution, such as
the lack of transitional forms, the
frequent inversion of the fossil sequence, and the tacit denial of the
second law of thermodynamics.
Old anti-choice arguments
In her letter dated Oct. 23, Name
Withheld has tossed in a few insults
as might be expected . . . after all, it
is a time-honored device to perk up
a weak argument with a dash of
venom. I do not intend to follow
suit but I should like to comment
upon some parts of her letter.
Firstly, in the matter of equal responsibility I must agree that all too
often the girl is left to face all the
consequences of love making. This
is not a new situation and is unlikely
to change while males are encouraged in their irresponsibility by those
who suffer most from it. Abortion
has become a great cop-out for such
males — it avoids the consequences
at no physical or emotional cost to
them and enables them to carry on
in the same irresponsible way, the
females having forfeited any to expect future, responsible behavior
from them.
I note that Name Withheld brings
up the old pro-abortionist argument
about rape pregnancies. As she used
statistics herself, I shall offer some
also — as a statistic, rape pregnancies are almost non-existent. At a
THE UBYSSEY
November 17,1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Being harvest time and alt, the Ubyssey types decided to have themselves some fun. Barn Jones
suggest some kind of dinner with a meeting for alt the folk and they agreed, happier than hogs in mud
for free edibles. Arnold Haystrom brought great dishes of ham hocks and some foreign viddles, pasta
or something. Anyhow, it was good eating. Crag Yunung, Maryell Draayhorse and Scooter McDonald
all brought their fiddles and really kicked up a storm, folks down Seattle way are still feelin' the effects
of it. Babbling Brooks brought some moonshine. Jewel Feelallright brought some kind of magic tobacco in her corncob pipe and we all had a real hooter. Course some, like old man Seed McClure just
didn't take to the merriment and just sat himseff in the corner drooiin' and talking about how great
things used to be when he was running the county. Then there's the team of Gleam Sunshine and
Corncob Wong who sang some great old songs about reaping the rewards of leading a hard working
life. Sonny-boy Boyle left early and lots of folks never showed their faces, but a good time at the staff
meeting, was truly had by all.
survey done in Czechoslovakia, of
86,000 abortions performed only 22
(or 0.025 per cent) were because the
pregnancy had resulted from rape.
Of 19,000 babies born at a midwest-
ern hospital in the U.S.A., not one
was from a rape pregnancy. Yet
rape pregnancy is one of the main
planks used to justify abortion. In
Canada last year there were 65,000
abortions — although no survey of
these has been done it is unlikely
that more than a dozen were because of rape. Besides, it is "a twisted logic that would kill an innocent
unborn baby for the crime of the
father."
With regard to Name Withheld's
final remark that "we will continue
to control our own reproductive
systems," I would comment that
such control — if exercised before
conception — is to be preferred to
the sort of control that abortion is!
Secondly, I would comment that an
embryo has a completely different
genetic code from the cells of the
mother's body and is therefore not
a part of that body. The mother has
no more right to deprive the child of
life before birth than she has after
the birth.
Finally, I should like to reassure
Name Withheld that I do possess
eyes, ears and brain cells (as she
does). I also have a heart and a conscience.
Stephen Parker
commerce 2
Whether these weaknesses are
real or merely perceived is a scientific question indeed.
As far as mechanisms of origin
go, the creationist mechanism (creation) cannot, of course, be defined,
since no one was around when it
happened, and it was presumably
an unique occurrence. A problem
exists also with evolution, there being several proposed mechanisms,
such as Lamarckianism, neo-Dar-
winism, and the "hopeful
monster." Which of these.is to be
taught in schools, I wonder?
Evolutionism implies that metaphysical forces are not important in .
the physical world, since it attempts
to explain origins and thus the universe in purely naturalistic terms. If
the supernatural intrudes" at all into
the process of evolution, then the
whole concept of evolution by natural means must be thrown out the
window and the mechanism is no
longer "scientific." Creationism,
on the other hand, implies that the
metaphysical and the physical are
combined and cannot be separated
utterly.
The suggestion by CAUSE that a
comparative Human Belief Systems
course be part of the curriculum is
interesting. While such a course
would certainly lead to the enlightenment of our high school students
(provided it is fairly presented and
of reasonably high academic standards), it would also relegate creationism and the questions it asks
about the validity of the theory of
evolution to a second or third class
position while the "real" mechanism of origin, evolution, continues
to be the doctrine presented in the
science classes. Such a dichotomy in
the classroom between "science"
and "metaphysics" would only
support the already existing teaching of evolutionism as a world view
and not bring about the kind of
change that the creationists want.
Marchant also says that the creationists want religious indoctrination in the schools. The creationists
would contend that the evolutionists already have it.
Andrew Labun
engineering 1
Park policy nonsensical
It seems strange to me, that while many departments and organizations of the university are, in some way, trying to reduce or stop the
number of rapes that occur on campus, the traffic department isn't.
For many years now women have been forced to walk from B lot to
Gage or Vanier while students who live off campus get preferential
parking in R, L, and Gage lot. Something is definitely wrong.
I've talked to many girls in Vanier who have resorted to parking in
lots close to the residence after hours, then getting up early in the
morning to move their cars back onto Marine Drive (where parking is
not permitted during the night). They do this day after day, when
they can. If they can't get there in time, they risk fines and/or expensive towing just because no one is helping them protect themselves.
Even if spaces do become vacated in the above lots, they are put in a
lottery for anyone who wants a spot.
Where is the difficulty in giving the women parking close to their
residences? The problem can't be monetary because the lots will still
be filled and most girls would be more than willing to pay the extra
few dollars for the extra security.
We can't fight rapists on our own but as it stands, often we have
to. Liz Matthew
science 2 Tuesday, November 17,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Grace browned off bv critical letter writer
'.•4.i.a'^.".'?'j8'i
-.-_._      jifljiBwi "*» 'Mk*-
s* I «tt «* fife «me *9*tar. Ita* «$*• stuff'--
t p.iilk.1 cf TimKk |fa-uc.(p«t«a« fc«iicnii>|«r-'
tltfrnpoMlliatyrtaftu*. .
Recently your paper printed a letter from Rosemary Brown stating
that the ministry of human resources' GAIN regulation changes
are unfair to middle-aged and older
people who are unable to work.
I would like to remind the writer
that the changes in benefit rates and
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
If your letter is not published
right away, it may be because it
wasn't typed, triple-spaced, on a 70
space line. Typewriters are available
in The Ubyssey office for this purpose.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included in
the letter for our information only.
>NOV. 15,
16 & 17
8 P.M.
THEATRE
BALLET CLOSE-UP
Waterfront Theatre
On Granville Island
•6.0O (Child. M.SO)
RES:
application periods apply only to
employable clients of the ministry.
Under the revised GAIN regulations, an employable person is one
who is not prevented from accepting employment because he or she
suffers from a physical or mental
infirmity rendering that person incapable of working.
It is likely that the majority of
those in the three groups highlighted by Mrs. Brown would be classed
as unemployable under the new
regulations and would, therefore,
not be affected at all. I would also
like to point out that, of the 93 per
cent of the B.C. work force employed, a significant number are aged 45
to 59 and are experiencing difficulties like those described by Mrs.
Brown. Yet these people do not
consider welfare as an alternative.
I trust this will clear up any misplaced concern both on the part of
the public and clients of the ministry.
Grace McCarthy
minister of human resources
rrice
TA/ater
T      T   CANADA
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That's right! This coupon
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to keep for life. Think about
it-at P.J. Burger & Sons.
15 classic burgers and other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 days
a week, it's yummy. 2966
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nee	
titerhouse
CANADA
Accounting students interested
in applying for summer employment in our Vancouver, Burnaby
and Kamloops offices should
forward their U.C.P.A. forms to
the Canada Employment Centre
on campus, Room 214 Brock
Hall, by December 15, 1981.
Interviews will be held in our
Vancouver office prior to
January 15, 1982.
JEANS!
JEANS!
JEANS
SAVE 20-30%
On sale in the SUB Main
Concourse.
Blouses, shirts
and sweaters!
Men's shirts,
sweaters and jeans!
FOR APPOINTMENT
228-1471
5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(Next to Lucky Dollar Store)
FOR
WOMEN and MEN
TRY ONE OF OUR HAIRCUTTERS
ken hippert
hair company ltd.
Student discount with presentation of ad by Terry, Karin and Debbie
Expires Dec. 10, 1981. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1981
Tween
ch
asses
]
TODAY
LAW STUDENTS' LEGAL AID PROGRAM
FrM legal aeeietance and referencee for legal ad-
vice given by law atudenta, noon to 2 p.m., SUB
111.
ROYAL BANK
Career information preeentation for commerce
studenta, Henry Angus 323.
ADVENTIST CHRISTIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
Discussion on I Corinthians — bask Christien
principles applied to daily lives. All welcome,
noon, SUB 213.
BC PIRG
Steering committee meeting, sH welcome, noon,
SUB 126.
UBC SOCREDS CLUB
Gueet speaker today, noon, SUB 208.
QAY UBC
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 237b.
Radio show — Out ... on campus, 3 p.m.,
CITR cable fm 100.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
George' MacDonald praeents slids lecture on
Northwest Coast Indian Art: The Renetsssnce
Period, no time mentioned, MOA theatre.
UBC JAPAN CLUB
Language tutorial, noon, SUB 212.
CITR
Airstege: Drama for tha radio, specially written
for CITR, 9 p.m., cable fm 100.
Thunderbird   Sports   Report:   Brands   Hughes
highlights the CIAU nstional field hockey championships and other sports sction at UBC, 5
p.m., cable fm 100.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, skippers' lists availabls, noon,
SUB 212.
VOC
Genersl meeting snd slids show on ski touring in
B.C. and the Rockies, noon, Chem. 260.
WEDNESDAY
ISMAIU STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Anyone interested in participating in racquet
and/or teem sports et his/her leisure, register
noon, SUB 117.
UBC PEACE AND DISARMAMENT GROUP
Orgsnizing masting for a campua group to deal
whh the problema of militariam, all welcome,
noon, Angus 214.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
INTRAMURALS
Finel registration for women's broombeH and
men's Buchanan badminton, round II, 4 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
Tot
Flashes
Peace gets
inaugurated
News of a new and wonderful
club on campus was brought to
The Ubyssey's attention by a white
dove carrying an olive branch with a
piece of parchment wrapped
around it.
The scroll wished to inform the
world of an organizational meeting
for a campus group to deal with the
problems of militarism. All are welcome at the inaugural meeting of
the UBC peace and disarmament
group Wednesday at noon in Angus 214.
All firearms must be checked at
the door.
Be a clone
Be a clown, be a clown. All the
world ever needs is a clown. And if
you don't know how to paint your
face be a politician and live in disgrace. Be a clone. Be a clone. All
the world really needs is senator
Ray Perrault, leader of the government in senate to speak at SUB 207
this Friday at noon.
The UBC student Liberals are exposing everyone's favorite pretend
cabinet minister to a barrage of
questions about government funding of universities and why we
should sell our clothes to pay for
tuition.
Poetry pleases
The time ticked slowly by as the
ice cube melted lazily along the vast
expanse of pure sandy beach. A
muskrat humbly warbled a tune
about the meaning of vague gro-
tesqueries and shouted at the images of a reflected shadow. Fortunately for the world this is not an
example of poetry. However, Rona
Murray author of such poetry collections as The Enchanted Adder
and The Power of the Dog will be in
the Buchanan building penthouse
today at noon giving a free poetry
reading. Don't miss the boat as it
fades into the shimmering twilight.
Wine and cheese party, 91 general admission,
free for members, 4 to 7 p.m., SUB 212.
Dr. Mank speaka on graduate studies in biochemistry, noon, Meda 4210.
BALLET UBC
General meeting, aH members urged to attend,
noon, SUB 216.
UBC BRIDGE CLUB
Informal bridge night, boredom — er — fun for
all, 7 p.m., Lethe.
CAMPUS PRO UFE
Debete on euthanaaia: The meaning of the
iasuee, noon, SUB 216.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study on PhWppiena, noon, SUB 211.
CITR
Still Ain't Satiafted: women in contemporary
society, cable fm 100.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE
Issue and policy meeting to discuss what to do
about that disgusting Liberal budget, noon, SUB
232.
ISMAIU STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Jamaikhana ceremoniee in simple terminology,
noon, SUB 119.
THURSDAY
CSA
Noon hour lecture series, professor Overmeyer:
Optimism and hope in Chinese thought, noon,
Buch. 104.
WARGAMERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
QAY UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 207/209.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer meeting, noon, SUB 113.
TA UNION
Membership vote on UBC's final contract offer
— extremely important. Memberships available
at door, nooo, Grad Centre ballroom.
CYCUNG CLUB
General meeting, noon. Biology 2449.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec   volleyball   drop-in,   7:30   p.m.,   War
Memorial.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
J. Voris speeks on dental hygiene, noon, IRC
Woodwerd 1.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
General meeting, noon, St. Mark's College.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Slide-tape show on the propoeed arte C dam on
the Peace River, noon, Buch. 221.
UBC CRIME PREVENTION PROJECT
Will be engraving calculators, bikes, etc., with
social insurance numbers, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,
SOB main floor.
BC PIRG
Organizing committee meeting re: poll, January
timeline, noon, SUB 125.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Women in law — panel discussion, noon Law
1S7.
UBC SOCREDS CLUB
General meeting to diacuee resolutions for convention, noon, SUB 206.
POSTNATAL ABORTION CUNIC
Discussion of various radical campua organization and uneucceaeful assassination sttempts,
noon, SUB 311.
CSA
Roller skating party fundraising for United Way,
6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Richmond Stardust.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Panel diacuaaion Sharing Christ with your
friends, noon, SUB 111.
IVCF
Campbell Henderson speeks on Faith and work,
noon, Chem. 250.
CITR
Croea Currents — a look at environmental and
consumer issuss, 3 p.m., cable fm 100.
Thunderbird Report — Phil Keeber highlights the
WIFL final between UBC and the U of A among
other sporting action at UBC, 5 p.m., cable fm
100.
FRIDAY
WARGAMERS
Bzzr/gamee night, 7 to 12 p.m., SUB 212, 212a.
EIG
Video showing: Hunger (Cannes Film Festival
award winner. National Film Board); Urban
Growth and Land Uee; diacuaaion afterward, aH
welcome, noon. Library Processing centre, 3rd
floor.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Weekend retreat them — How is religion relevant in our school and work? Rosemary Heights,
Whits Rock. Call 224-3311 for time.
MUSUM STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Juma (Friday prayers). All Muslims required to
attend, noon. International House lower lounge.
BSA
General meeting, logo contest results, new
members welcome, noon, IRC B75.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Senator Ray Perrault, leader of the government
in the senate, speaks, noon, SUB 207.
HISTORY ASSOCIATION
Organizational meeting, noon, Buch. 203.
CITR
Dateline International — north-south dialogue
with the International Youth Assembly. Empha-
aia on the Cancun conference, 3 p.m., cable fm
100.
SATURDAY
CITR
Behind Four Walls — fraternity houses as a
housing alternative. Jane Kokan reporting, 3
p.m., cable fm 100.
Making Waves — Joe Msrch looks into funding
problems at the university, 4:X p.m., cable fm
100.
MONDAY
CVC
Roller skating party, all tickets sold in advance at
SUB 216a, 6 to 8 p.m.. North Van Stardust.
/"
Hairlines gives
students a break!
1f\0/    OFF our regular prices
1/ /0 Monday - Wednesday only
s
(Student I D   required)
Combining top professional hairstylists
with a very comfortable atmosphere.
Cuts -   Men S15 00     Women S22.00
Perms       Men S35 00     Women S40 00 and up
Streaks, color, hennas and conditioners also competitively priced
2529 Alma St. at Broadway Mon.-Fri. — 9:00-7:30
elephone   224-2332 Sat. — 9:00-5
\i
s#
The School of
Physical Education
and Recreation
Presents
"DANCE FOR
THE FUN OF IT"
Date: Nov. 18th
Place: SUB Aud.
Time: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Program:    S.F.U. Students, UBC Students
and Mountain Dance
Theatre Co.
Admission: $2.00 at the door
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run for
election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (five at-large
and one from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00p.m. on Tuesday, December22, 1981.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 Unas, 1 day ♦2.00; additional Nnaa, We.
Commercial - 3 Him*. 1 day W.83; additional line*
66c. Additional day* *3.30 and 60o.
Classified ads are not accept** t>Y telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:3Oa.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Boom 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2AS
5 — Coming Events
60 — Rides
THE YOUNG
ALUMNI CLUB
Every Thursday 8-12 p.m.
• ENTERTAINMENT
• SPECIAL EVENTS
•  LICENSED PREMISES
6251 Cecil Green Park,
Campus
AIRFARE Vancouver-Ottawa return, 21 Dec.
to 5 Jan. Call 732-5970.
66 — Scandals
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hairstyl-
ing. Student hairstyle, $8. Body wave, $15
to $25. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11 - For Sale — Private	
LEAVING COUNTRY. Must sell urgently,
Pontiac s/w, good condition $860; Norco
10-speed, new $350; portable stereo
recorder (Pioneer) $225; new men's ski
jacket, only $55 ($100 if new). Call Robert,
228-0753.
CALCULATOR HP33E still under guarantee,
no defects. Best offer accepted. 228-0410
evenings.
15 — Found
86 — Typing
20 — Housing
WORDING GROUND FLOOR 2 bdrm. of
house. Rent $250. Call 732-5154 after 5.
ROOM AND BOARD available immediately.
Psi Upsilon Fraternity House, 2260
Wesbrook Mall. Ask for Rick Grey or
Steve, 224-1421, 228-8943.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.	
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. Close to
campus. 266-5053.
TYPING ON CAMPUS. Fast and accurate.
Papers under 50 pages. $8.50 an hour or
$1.25 per page. Phone 224-6604.
90 - Wanted
25 — Instruction
INVESTOR DESIRES to meet electrical
engineer on revolutionary concept to form
company. Mr. Pelman, 669-7848.
99 — Miscellaneous
30 — Jobs
DEPENDABLE, confident students to handle
Imported Giftware. Commission basis with
bonus. Interested please phone 270-7884
for details.
36 — Lost
LOST  an   opal   ring   of  great  sentimental
value. Reward. Ph. 263-1229 (Joanne).
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
For Fast Results
Advertise
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Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, November 17,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Admin reluctant
From page 1
tion rendered by teaching assistants."
The university is reluctant to cooperate because in the future, if
quality declines, the union might
grieve conditions, Katz said.
According to Grant the quality of
education and course content are
the responsibility of the senate and
the faculty under the universities act
and are therefore not negotiable.
The executive is asking its members to accept the proposal to have
a strike vote over the unresolved issues.
"The strike vote means the mem- ''/
bership is unwilling to accept the of-     / {
fer," Katz said. i
Coopers
& Lybrand
chartered accountants providing
the full range of financial and
business services in 21 Canadian
cities, and 90 countries around
the world through Coopers & Lybrand
(International).
In SUB
Basement
a  Varieties of Sandwiches
a  Hot Snacks
(Including Samosas)
a  Pastries
o Cheeses
a  Juices, Milk, Yogurt
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Gorilla
wrestling
Yes, it's a very popular sport
in the small emerging
African nation of Heywhats-
happeninman? But you won't
find it at P J. Burger & Sons.
Nope. Just 15 incredible
burgers; huge salads; chicken
and other great stuff.
Open 7 days a week from
11:30 a.m. till really late.
Furs optional.
ERE'S
STILL
TIME
LEFT!
pick up your tree tickets
for a taping of
THE NEW BUNDOLO SHOW
riday, November 20 at 7:30 p.m.
BC Building. 700 Hamilton Street.
tickets at the Sub Box Office
<sA«U    CBC
<¥LGif'   British Columbia
'««'    2 Cable 3
WE'RE LOOKING FOR
SUCCESSORS
Canada's largest bank oilers varied and challenging careers lor university,
community college and C.E.G.H.l'. graduates. We are interested in individuals
with backgrounds in accounting, finance, business administration, and related
Melds.
Royal Bank recruiters are also interested in meeting with M.B.A. student--
who have had some working experience, tor assignments in our domestic
and  nternational areas.
Ask your campus placement otticer tor details about our next scheduled
visit or write directly to the Manager, Personnel at the most convenient address.
When you succeed . . . we succeed.
&s
ROYAL BANK
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1055 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E3S5
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A representative of the Royal Bank will be making a
Career Information Presentation on November 17th —
Henry Angus Building, Room 323 at 12:30
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I
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I
Ombuds Office
Problems???
Complaints!!!
Come See Us
Room 100-A (Main Floor) S.U.B.
Phone 228 4846
I
J
I
I
I
THIS SPECIAL
WEEK A T HILLEL
TUESDAY, 17 NOVEMBER
11:30-2:00 SHEFFA BUFFET LUNCH
12:30 "Abortion: Social and Political
implications". Guest speaker is
Helen Pinsky, Vancouver
lawyer.
WEDNESDAY, 18 NOVEMBER
11:30-2:00 SHEFA BUFFET LUNCH
12:30 "Career   Opportunities   in   the
Jewish Community". Guest
speaker is Rabbi Robert Wexler
of the University of Judaism in
Los Angele.
THURSDAY, 19 NOVEMBER
11:30-2:00 SHEFA BUFFET LUNCH
Network Zionist Seminar
12:30 "Archeology,   Restoration  and
Torah". A report on a new project in the city of Sifat, Israel.
Special guest is Rabbi Yosil
Rosenzwerg, composer, musician and founder of this program.
DO YOU HAVE TROUBLE
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FOR INFORMATION ON
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CLASS Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17,1981
Only Shrum Bowl left now
By JOHN BOYLE
A second half UBC fumble
scooped up by the University of Alberta led to a touchdown and the
margin of victory as Alberta beat
UBC 11-8 in the Western Intercollegiate Football League final Friday night.
The loss eliminates the UBC
Thunderbirds from further postseason play and ends their Cinderella quest for their first ever College
Bowl title. Two thousand fans witnessed the game at the Thunderbird
stadium.
The Alberta Golden Bears now
play the University of Western Ontario in the Western bowl and the
winner advances to the Canadian
College Bowl.
Glen Steele, who made the fatal
fumble, is still nursing an ankle injury suffered two weeks ago against
the University of Calgary. Steele,
Canada's top yard gainer, saw only
limited action in Friday's contest.
The 'Birds' running back was delivered a jarring tackle on the fumble play, one of the many hard hits
in a game which saw several players
shaken up.
The 'Birds' defence did an excel
lent job all night, holding the Bears
to just 43 yards rushing and effectively shutting down quarterback
Jamie Crawford, who had only
eight completions on 26 passing attempts.
But in Friday's tight battle, the
Alberta defence was equally efficient. UBC quarterbacks Jay Gard
and Sheldon Petri combined for only 13 completions on 39 attempts,
while the rushing game had 116
yards, well below the average.
"Our defence played well, but
unfortunately so did theirs," said
'Bird coach Frank Smith.
Apart from the Alberta touchdown, kicking accounted for all
other scoring. UBC's Ken Munro
and the Bears' Greg Gilmour traded
second quarter field goals as the
half ended in a 3-3 deadlock.
In the third quarter, minutes after the Alberta major, UBC appeared ready to strike when defensive linebacker Greg Kitchen recovered a fumble in Bears' territory,
but another Munro field goal was
all the 'Birds could manage.
Mike Emery punted a single early
in the fourth quarter and UBC had
a chance to tie the game minutes
later after defensive back Bruce
Barnett intercepted a Bear pass to
set up yet another Munro field goal
attempt. But this one went wide for
a single, UBC's last point.
Alberta closed out the scoring
with a late single off a punt into the
end zone.
The atmosphere was solemn in
the UBC coaches' dressing room,
but Smith had only praise for the
Thunderbirds.  "Our boys played
-craig brooks photo
ONE POINT. That is all scoring that UBC's defence allowed in 11-8 loss to Alberta. Other 10 came off of fumbles
by offence. Unfortunately Alberta's defence also played well.
'Birdwatch
Hockey
After getting blown out two
weeks ago in Edmonton, the UBC
men's ice hockey team rebounded
and split a pair of weekend games
with the University of Alberta.
Friday night in the Winter Sports
complex UBC got goals from four
different players to defeat Alberta
4-3. Dave Brounly, Kevin Artue,
Bill Holowaty and former pro Terry
McDonald scored for UBC. In the
Saturday game Alberta won 3-1
with Greg Cockrill getting the
UBC's lone goal.
When these teams played in Edmonton two weeks ago, Alberta
won 13-2 and 10-5. UBC coach
Jack Moores said the main difference between the games was the
conditioning. In the Edmonton
games UBC was lost in the third periods while here the 'Birds dominated them.
Another area Moores worked on
was penalty killing. Alberta scored
eight power play goals in Edmonton. At UBC they only connected
on one.
The split gives UBC a 1-3 record
on the season while Alberta goes to
3-1. The 'Birds next games are this
Friday and Saturday when the University of Saskatchewan will be at
the Winter Sports complex.
Volleyball
The UBC men's team defeated
the M.A.C. club of Portland in the
final of the fall invitational tournament held at UBC over the weekend.
The 'Birds downed the Portland
club 15-2, 18-16. In the tournament
.semi-final, UBC beat their Canada
West league rival, the University of
Victoria Vikings, 15-10, 7-15,
15-11.
The Vikings are one of the teams
UBC must catch if the 'Birds are to
finish in top spot in league play.
With the change to five tournaments from four this year only first
place advances to the nationals.
UBC will be at Edmonton for the
second tournament this weekend.
Coach Dale Ohman said he expects
to improve on the 3-2 record from
the first tournament.
The women will also be in Edmonton to compete in their second
tournament. The women have a
similar 3-2 record.
The Ubyssey made a mistake last
week when we said the women's
team would play on the weekend.
Well they did not play, but we
only get our information from the
athletic department. UBC coach
Sandy Silver was upset at our mistake and yelled at me, so I'm quitting. Goodbye.
Rugby
The UBC varsity rugby team lost
30-6 to the Vancouver Island Crimson Tide in its first game of the McKechnie Cup Wednesday.
The game in Victoria, on a wet
and wind-torn field, was controlled
by UBC in the first half. However
the Tide scored nine points on its
only two drives.
The McKechnie Cup, which highlights the rugby season in the first
term for UBC, is a competition between four teams: the Vancouver
Rugby Union reps, the Fraser Valley Rugby Union reps, the Vancouver Island Rugby Union reps,
and UBC.
Each team plays six games, a
home and home series against the
other three teams.
UBC is plagued with injuries this
year. The 'Birds are defending
champions of the cup, having tied
the round robin series last year and
winning it the year before that.
The next game for the 'Birds is
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., at Thunderbird stadium against Fraser Valley.
Coach Donn Spence said he was
not upset over the team's loss to
Victoria because of the number of
games in the tournament, but he
added that losing Wednesday's
game would put them in a hole. "It
is a big game for us."
their best. You can't ask for more
than that. Alberta is a fine team and
it just happens that they beat us tonight."
UBC had beaten the Bears twice
during the regular season in close
games and Smith said he had expected things to be even more difficult this time around. He was right.
The season has not been without
its rewards for the Thunderbirds.
Under Smith, named Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
coach of the year, UBC compiled
an impressive 7-1 regular season
record, good for first place in the
WIFL. The 'Birds emerged as an
unexpected power this year and
their aggressive defence and explosive offence thrilled those fans who
made the worthwhile trek to
Thunderbird stadium.
And, as Smith is quick to point
out, the season's not over yet. The
'Birds play the Simon Fraser University Clansmen in the annual
Shrum Bowl classic Nov. 28 at Empire stadium.
Hoop up, down
By SCOTT McDONALD
Peter Mullins did not have much
to say. He dropped his head to one
side, half threw his arms up and
said, "I just don't know."
Mullins is the UBC men's basketball coach and he was trying to explain why his team can play its
worst basketball of the year one
night get blown out 77-42, and
then, on the next night, put on its
best shooting performance of the
season and win 67-64.
Mullin and UBC were at Simon
Fraser University on the weekend to
compete in the Tipoff tournament.
In the first game the 'Birds shot a
dismal 29 per cent from the floor
and lost to the current Canadian national champion University of Victoria Vikings.
In the second game, a complete
reversal of the first, UBC hit on 52
per cent of its shots and with 27
points from forward Bob Forsythe
defeated Trinity Western College.
Forsythe also hauled down eight
of UBC's 20 rebounds. Ross Marshall and Pat West were the other
high scorers for UBC with 15 points
each.
Forsythe and Jamie Boyle were
the top scorers in the Friday loss
with eight points, as no UBC player
hit double figures.
Mullins said the play against Victoria was embarrassing. He added
he is at a loss to figure out why his
team will go so flat. In the Buchanan Classic UBC went eight min
utes without scoring. The differences between the weekend games
are staggering. In the Saturday win,
UBC actually took one less shot
than on Friday night, yet scored 23
points more.
UBC will start its Canada West
league play this Saturday at 8:30
p.m. when it hosts the University of
Calgary at War Memorial. The second game will be on Sunday at 2:45
p.m.
The women's basketball team
was in Edmonton on the weekend
and lost 79-45 on Friday night and
54-46 on Saturday. UBC coach
Jack Pomfret said his team only
played badly the first half of the
first game. After that point UBC
played strong basketball and almost
pulled out a win in the second
game.
UBC was led by Cathy Bultitude
who scored 18 points in the second
game.
Pomfret said that with the improvement so far this year, UBC
should have no problem improving
on last year's record.
The next games for the women
are this Saturday and Sunday
against the University of Calgary.
Both games are at War Memorial
with the first starting at 6:45 p.m.
and the second at 1 p.m.
The junior men and women were
also in action this past weekend.
The men lost to Vancouver Community College 95-65 and the women also lost to VCC 37-36.
PANEL DISCUSSION
ON
WOMEN IN
LAW
Are you thinking of a career in law?
Are you wondering what it's really like to be a lawyer?
Come and meet women working in this field!
Thursday, November 19, 1981
12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
LAW BUILDING, ROOM 157
Co-sponsored by the Women
Students' Office and
The Women's Committee in Law
Enquiries: 228-2415

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