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The Ubyssey Oct 3, 1969

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Array THEY DID IT IN THE ROAD
6,000 students
blocked the Blaine
border crossing
Wednesday.
Following arethe
collected reports
of Nate Smith,
Jim Davies,
Robin Burgess,
John Andersen,
Brian McWatters
and Sandy Kass.
It was the first Peace Arch
carnival, complete with bands,
barkers and refreshment booths.
Some 6,000 students travelled
south Wednesday to protest the
Amchitka bomb test and spend a
pleasant afternoon in the sunshine
while doing it.
Both the main demonstration
at the Peace Arch and a
breakaway demonstration that
briefly blocked the truck route
crossing two miles to the east
were peaceful.
Other stories, pages 2 and 17.
Pictures page 3.
The students were shuttled to
the border in buses and private
cars. Ubyssey staffers travelling on
the buses reported a general
carnival atmosphere, singing of
protest songs, waving at passing
cars and at least one instance of
dope-smoking.
The crowd began blocking the
northbound road at 2 pun. Before
that they lined the side of the
road, cheering Canadian cars and
booing American cars passing
through.
UNOCCUPIED POLICE CAR stands forlornly amidst student
protesters who broke away from the main group and blocked the
Pacific    Highway    border   entrance.    Breakaway    column    was
condemned by organizers but succeeded in blocking traffic for a
half-hour until main crossing re-opened. Protesters were part of
14,000 demonstrating across Canada.
Once the demonstration began,
U.S. customs officials began
diverting traffic to the Pacific
Highway commercial crossing, one
mile east of the Peace Arch.
Alma Mater Society president
Fraser Hodge told the crowd the
odds were against an earthquake
being caused by the atomic test
but "there is a chance something
may happen."
"We as citizens and students
have a right and a duty to allow
our feelings to be known."
Hodge was referring to a
statement Tuesday by attorney
general Les Peterson that students
taking part in the demonstration
would be guilty of a serious
offence.
"Mr. Peterson said this
morning that his statement
yesterday was so those taking part
would understand full legal
consequences of their actions,"
said Hodge.
"I told Peterson that we did
not intend to destroy property or
cause a riot."
Rev. Herbert O'Driscoll, dean
of Christ Church Cathedral,
described the visit that he and
other representatives of the clergy
made to the American consulate
to present a written protest ofthe
bombing.
"He listened very politely,"
said O'Driscoll, "and I had a
funny feeling'that somehow the
great consuls of the past had
listened to witchdoctors on the
borders of the great empires in
just the same way."
. O'Driscoll said his generation
and the students are united in
opposing the bomb test.
MORAL PROTEST
"We are all characters in a
never-ending series of morality
plays written and directed by
Walter Cronkite," he said.
Former AMS president Dave
Zirnhelt    stressed   the    moral
WE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 8
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1969
•^miee stout photo
"I'M WITH YOU," indicates American visitor as he makes his way slowly through the demonstrators.
Black power salute drew cheers from the crowd.
significance of the protest.
"We will have accomplished
something if we do nothing more
than tell others that we have the
guts to stand up for what we
believe in," he said.
20,000 NEXT TIME
"Our chances of stopping this
one are quite slight," he admitted.
"But next time well have one
month to prepare and 20,000
people at the border.
"The chances of more nuclear
tests off the Aleutians should this
one prove a 'success' are very
likely," said UBC geophysicist
Tadeusz Ulrych told the crowd.
He referred to the tests as an
"experiment" on the part of the
American government.
"They want to see if these sites
can be used for larger blasts up to
five or six megatons," said Ulrych.
The force of Thursday's test
has been officially pegged at 1.2
megatons.
"The Nevada tests were the
same intensity and inhabitants in
Las Vegas felt their houses
shake," said the UBC prof.
UNION SUPPORT
"No one knows what is going
to happen but it is ridiculous to
conduct an explosion in a part of
the world that is so unstable."
Ray Haynes, secretary of the
B.C. Federation of Labor pledged
union support for the protest
movement.
Sun columnist Bob Hunter
said the bomb issue is equal to the
sex habits of North Americans, in
that people are "mission
oriented" and the thrill is in the
accomplishment of that mission.
"The bomb test is the Atomic
Energy Commission's way of
having an orgasm," Hunter said.
DISSENSION
While Hunter was speaking,
some demonstrators set up their
own sound system and began
drawing off part of the crowd.
"Let's stop milling about in
this token demonstration and
stage an effective demonstration,"
said Jim Harding, striking Simon
Fraser University teaching
assistant.
After speaking, Harding said
the mike was available to anyone
who wanted to use it.
Charles  Rowe,  Standard  Oil
agent at Steveston said:
"Although most of you here are
only old enough to be my son or
daughter, I feel that you are very
right in your beliefs and in your
demonstration.
"We are all very concerned
about things that kill, and
demonstrations of this sort show
our concern."
Son Sawyer, a former Michigan
State University student and a
member of the anarcho-syndicalist
IWW, then grabbed the
microphone and urged the
demonstrators into new action.
BREAKAWAY
"This is not an effective
demonstration. We are not
stopping any cars and that's why
we are here. Let's get the hell over
to the other crossing."
People in the crowd responded
with shouts of "Let's go" and
"Shut it down."
Someone asked, "Where do we
go?"
"Straight up that road,"
Sawyer answered.
The crowd split. About
1,000 left the main demonstration
for the other border crossing.
Parade marshals ran about
trying to stop the breakaway
demonstration. But they were
completely ineffective.
The quarter mile long column
marched the mile to the Pacific
border crossing accompanied by
rhythmic hand-clapping.
TRAFFIC BLOCKED
The vanguard arrived at 3 p.m.
and immediately sat down in the
roadway. The others gathered
around the sit-in, completely
blocking north-bound traffic.
They began chanting: "Stop
that bomb, stop that bomb" in
time with hand-clapping and
drumming.
Cars began to back up on the
American side of the border. Fifty
See page 16: ALL WE DO
Rehash border
Another massive rally will be
held at noon Monday in the SUB
plaza to rehash the results of the
border closing.
The rally is being sponsored by
the Industrial Workers of the
World Union and the AMS
Speakers Committee. Anyone
who wishes to speak can do so. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October  3,   1969
14,000 hit border highways, bridges in Canada '
CANADA (CUP)-Numbering
into the thousands, students and
supporters clustered at border
crossings and airport terminals
across the country Wednesday,
picketing, snarling traffic and
occasionally getting arrested or
run over in a spectacular protest
against the UJS.'s scheduled
underground atomic blast in the
Aleutians Thursday.
Mobilized on less than 24 hours
notice, the snowballing protest
involved approximately 14,000
students from at least 24
post-secondary institutes, backed
up by other supporters who
learned of the protest through
news reports.
In Ontario, approximately
2,000 demonstrators blocked U.S.
border crossings or demonstrated
near Sarnia, Windsor, and Niagara
Falls.
DRAGGED 300 FEET
The largest contingent, a group
of 1,000 students from the
University of Western Ontario,
Fanshawe College at London and
the School or Arts and Science at
Sarnia allowed all Canadian cars
free passage across the Blue Water
Bridge near Sarnia, but blocked all
American cars headed north.
David Pettinger, a Fanshawe
College student, was dragged for
300 feet by a car driven by an
American woman who tried to
run through the crowd.
Police are holding her pending
charges. UWO student council
legal commissioner Gray Sheppard
says the council will look into
laying charges itself if the charge
against the woman is not severe
enough.
MAJOR HOLOCAUST
A group of 150 students
gathered at Rainbow bridge at
Niagara Falls did not disrupt
traffic, instead they delivered a
message and a gift to U.S. customs
officials for president Nixon.
The gift was a battered globe.
The message: "One small blast for
man, one major holocaust for
mankind.
The McGill University student
society may bring charges against
the Quebec Provincial Police and a
local trucking firm in connection
with incidents during the blockage
Wednesday.
Society vice president Dave
Young said Thursday the society's
lawyers would be asked to
investigate legal action against the
"It's a wonder five people
weren't killed," said one
eyewitness.
Police arrested four
demonstrators from a group of
350 university of Windsor who
draft resistance counsellor
Benjamin Spock from urging
students to support the blockade
and any other means of forcing
the UJS. to cease atom tests.
"It isn't necessary for the UJS.
to test and we know that some of
these underground tests have
leaked fallout," he said.
"There is danger to everybody
on whom the wind can bring more
fallout."
STUDENTS CROWD SUB north mall, eagerly awaiting buses to
transport them to Peace Arch park. The 14 buses that finally
QPP, who impounded five buses
laden with demonstrators driving
to take part in the national
protest and against a firm
whose vehicle charged through
leafletting demonstrators at the
Champlain, N.Y. border crossing.
The QPP forced
demonstrators —students,
housewives, and children-to walk
the last eight miles to the crossing,
claiming the buses were not
licensed to transport people
"under these circumstances."
The protesters extended their
planned one-hour demonstration
for three hours until
transportation was returned.
"It's fortunate that it didn't
cause a riot," Young said, adding
that police told him they would
arrest anyone who tried to walk
on the highway. No arrests were
made.
The transport truck attempted
to crash the student blockade at
the border, sending students
scrambling out of its path.
blockaded traffic on the
international Ambassador Bridge
to Detroit for more than an hour.
The four were charged with
blocking traffic and obstructing
police.
A determined group of 80
students and three clergymen
drove approximately 150 miles
from Regina to a border crossing
at North Portal, Sask. where they
sat on the road.
Four cameras clicked
incessantly from the U.S. customs
office for an hour during the
demonstration, and customs
officials warned that anyone
participating in the affair would
have trouble ever entering the
U.S.
The protestors placed a placard
reading Remember 1812 over a
peace cairn at the border before
leaving.
The University of Alberta is
more than 400 miles from the
nearest border crossing, but that
didn't   prevent  pediatrician-cum-
Ken Strand locks office,
students occupy building
By JIM DAVIES
Students at Simon Fraser University
reoccupied the administration building for a
half-hour Thursday.
Immediately following an SFU general
meeting 200 students marched over to the
administration building to talk to university
president Kenneth Strand about the current
political science, sociology and anthropology
strike.
Upon their arrival, they found the door to
Strand's office locked, a precaution that had
been taken care of as soon as the general
meeting began.
Fifty students remained in the halls for
half an hour and then quietly left.
Last year, about 200 students occupied the
same administration building from Nov. 20 to
23 protesting the SFU administration's
admission policy.
On the last day of the sit-in, 114 were
arrested.
Meanwhile, several other departments have
voted to go on strike in support of the PSA
department.
A meeting of the English department
faculty and students decided to strike beginning
at noon Monday.
Students of the history department will
begin striking on Monday. The department of
modern languages begins its strike on
Wednesday.   :
SFU vice president Lalit Srivastava said any
students wishing to transfer out of the PSA
department may do so.
At noon today, there will be a teach-in and
rock-in at SFU. This event, sponsored by the
general assembly of striking students is open to
the general public.
There will be no formal speeches—anyone
who wants to speak can get up and do so.
The rock-in features several bands,
including Mock Duck, Black Snake, Blues Band,
and the Hydro Electric Street Car.
These events will last into the night with
informal seminars taking place on Saturday.
appeared were obviously not enough, and students resorted to
cramming into any available vehicle.
AM S execs satisfied
with border protest
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Wednesday's border-closing operation worked, and AMS
executives are satisfied.
AMS president Fraser Hodge called the demonstration "almost
entirely successful."
"Credit has to go to those who carried out the demonstration in
an orderly and peaceful way. They felt strongly enough about the
thing to go to Blaine and carry out the thing in a credible manner,"
Hodge said.
"It was marred by the action of the small group that broke
away." '
Hodge estimated that 95 per cent of the demonstrators were
opposed to the actions of the breakaway group in closing the border
truck route.
He expressed his thanks to all the students who participated in
the demonstration, and said he had received a number of phone calls
from "downtowners" who voiced their approval of the student action.
AMS treasurer,. Chuck Campbell, called the demonstration a
success, and said the student turnout was "almost remarkable
considering the short time available for organization."
"We had every available bus in Vancouver," Campbell said, "but
it's not easy to book transportation on 24 hours' notice."
"This has done something for the whole idea of the legitimacy
of student protests," Campbell stated.
AMS co-ordinator Dave Grahame thought the importance of
the demonstration lay in the number of people who made a
commitment to "symbolically close the border."
"It wasn't what we did, it was what the students did," said AMS
secretary Anne Jacobs.
"The feeling was the best part-the feeling of unity. UBC
students and faculty were involved together," she said.
AMS vice-president, Tony Hodge voiced disappointment over
the television coyerage of the demonstration.
Hodge felt the coverage had emphasized the actions of the
breakaway group, and had therefore given a distorted picture of the
demonstration.
"Violence won't have any effect in stopping violence," he said.
Bleeders needed
There has been an extremely poor turnout for the Red Cross
blood drive which ends today on the second floor of SUB.
Barely 700 people had given blood by noon Thursday.
Last year, the blood donor clinic collected 1,700 pints of blood
in one week at UBC.
1,750 pints of blood per week are needed to supply hospitals in
B.C. said D. W. Mitchell, assistant director of blood donor clinics in
B.C. arid the Yukon.
At least 700 pints of blood are needed today.
For your own comfort, eat something before you give blood,
but get out and give.
The clinic closes at 4:3.0 pjn., so you still have time to report to
the second floor, southeast corner of SUB to give your pint. Friday,  October  3,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Blame mah government, not me.'
6,000 close
border
in protest
against
A-blast
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.    ~  : ^ ^ *■ ^
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The gates that were closed.
6,000 strong.
SFU's   Jim    Harding   calls   for   long-term
protest.
Guerrilla theatre strikes.
"YouVe heard of the Wall of
Jericho ...?"
ll.LLl-Ll^-1-l.l......,******.****^
-photos by Bruce Stout,
Dave Enns, Dirk Visser
and David Bowerman.
*■ ■Li.i.'-'l.tt uitm TTTTT1 Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  3,   1969
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and f ridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the university of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
OCTOBER 3, 1969
Protest what?
In retrospect, the AMS executives and councillors
deserve commendation for Wednesday's border
demonstration—sort of.
On very short notice they managed to get some
4,000 people out to mass on the border and express
their disapproval of the American nuclear test.
Organization was well planned and executed. Buses
operated smoothly, the marshals did their jobs, the
sound system worked, speakers appeared and the return
to Vancouver came off quickly and easily.
For this the demonstration organizers deserve
congratulations.
But the AMS organizers failed to sufficiently
determine for themselves and the demonstrators exactly
what they were doing and trying to accomplish.
Disapproval of one bomb test is not enough.
Focusing attention an Amchitka Island alone is
pointless.
The U.S. will not—indeed, did not—pay any
attention to an isolated demonstration against one
bomb test. It simply doesn't carry enough weight to
make an impression.
What would, carry some weight is a genuine
movement against the U.S. and the way in which that
nation toys with the peoples of the world and their
countries.
And the only way to get such a movement
happening is to understand the whole picture, that one
bomb test is just part of a series, that the bomb test is
meant to make better nuclear warheads for missiles,
that the bomb test is directly connected to American
aggression in Vietnam, American domination of the
Canadian economy and American suppression of dissent
and police state tactics in their own country.
Not until we realize that these facets of the
American character are all manifestations of a national
policy that thrives on aggression; economic bully tactics
and profit from war will we be able to accomplish
anything towards stopping the U.S. world-fuck.
The AMS did not realize this—or if they did, they
chose to forget about it for fear of turning off UBC's
more conservative students or being branded commie
agitators by the downtown press.
And so we ended up with a demonstration that
looked very good but failed to accomplish what it
might. We had a demonstration directed at one bomb
test only-and not at the entire U.S. system.
And even then, the AMS failed to inform the
demonstrators of what the objectives were. People were
under the impression that the border was to be actually
blocked, that traffic was to be stopped and that an
opportunity for dialogue would arise.
Instead, the organizers chose to leave the truck
route two miles away totally free, thus eliminating any
chance for dialogue at the Douglas crossing. No
Americans, no dialogue.
The organizers frown on those protestors who
broke away to block the truck route. But it was the
organizers themselves who caused that dissension in the
ranks. The truck route should have been blocked from
the start, if only to let the demonstrators know that
they were having some effect.
All in all, it wasn't a bad demonstration. But it
wasn't good either.
Birds of a feather
Super-pigs at the border
By JIM DAVIES
It took me 22 years, but I have
finally changed my opinion of
police officers from "our boys in
blue" to "those fascist pigs".
In all fairness, I must say that
my new vision of the police is
almost totally a result of actions
of the American cops at
"Operation Borderclose", and my
new opinion must pertain almost
exclusively to them.
There I was, running around,
trying to get all kinds of neat stuff
to put in The Ubyssey when I
spotted an interesting looking
gnome in a brown uniform and
boy scout hat.
His name was Roy Irwin, a fact
which was rather easy to obtain in
as much as it was monogrammed
in block letters on a piece of fluff
on his left tit.
When I asked old Roy exactly
what he thought of the
demonstration, he began tattooing
my chest with his index finger,
proclaiming, in his own subtle
way, his personal feelings on the
situation.
"These clowns don't even
know what they are doing here,"
he screamed.
"I used to go up there
(Canada) every year on vacation,
but 111 never go up there again."
"I've got a good eye for faces
and if any of these guys try to get
into my park; I'm a parks board
officer, you know; they'll be in a:
lot of trouble."
I left old Roy quickly because
I thought that either he would
burst a blood vessel in his head or
my chest would cave in.
The worst was yet to come.
Our illustrious city editor
collapsed under the peace arch
because the unaccustomed
exercise (walking) was too much
for him and gasped instructions at
me to ask the police if they were
re-routing traffic.
I then raced over to the nearest
American policemen, showing him
my press card. When he did not
immediately break into loud gales
of laughter, I knew I was in big
trouble.
"What do you want?" he said
in a tone slightly reminiscent of
my old grade four teacher
immediately before I got strapped
for the first time.
"Er, sir, could you please tell
me if the traffic is being
re-routed," I ventured.
"Don't ask me," he screamed,
"go   talk   to  the  border  patrol
officer, and be quick about it."
I then sprinted in the direction
of this fellow who was lounging in
the front seat of his police car.
Just as I raced the car, the two
fellows inside the car vaulted out
and dashed in my direction.
I closed my eyes, vowing that
if I got out of this I would go to
church on Sunday. However,
when I opened them the police
were clutching two suspicious
looking (they had long sideburns)
youths.
Police: have you got any I.D.?
Youth: Yes, have you?
Police: Okay you smart ass,
we'll just talk about it down at
the office.
With that, the youths were
grabbed and stuffed into the back
seat of the police car.
The officer then turned to me
and said, "What the hell do you
want?"  I  explained my  pljght,
however he didn't seem to
understand.
"Does it look like I am
directing traffic, you idiot," he
roared.
"Get the hell back on the other
side of the border before I run
you in too."
I started to explain that the
other officer had sent me.
"Alright, wise guy, I'm running
you in," he said. "I was just
leaving," I replied.
As I sprinted away (homeward)
he yelled a couple of words at me,
the second of which we believe was
"off!
He was screaming at the two
American youths so loudly I
thought he would get a double
hernia.
I can remember that as I was
feeling his wrath I kept thinking I
would be hearing my favorite old
Dragnet line: "Stop or I'll shoot!"
LETTERS
Porno
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re Daniel E. Meakes' letter of
objection to "Do you ball to
music?"
When a reader of yours takes
the interest and trouble to write
you a letter, you could have the
courtesy to print it without the
childish, ridicule-ridden
Ed.—notes, that occasionally
follow.
Meakes, as you, obviously has
his own ideas. I cannot agree with
his ideas, however, I do consider
the article to be space-wasting
crap.
Who the hell are you to decide
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't City John Gibbs
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
This is usually reserved for a witty
non-story featuring the names of
staffers who worked on this issue, but
today we had so many staffers there
what will "better students' lives,"
anyway?
BRIAN C. PARKINSON,
arts 2
We  are   the   power and the
glory.-Ed.
Thanks, thief
Young
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
To   the   Anonymous
Alumni Rug Borrowers.
Thank you for returning the
rug to Cecil Green Park on the
weekend. We appreciate being
able to stay open.
ROBERT JOHNSON,
President, Young
Alumni Club.
Isn't room to make it witty. These
worked, some more than others: Robin
Burgess, Elaine Tarzwell, Sandy Kass,
Robert Bennett, Christine Krawczyk,
Jan O'Brien (a sweet girl who handled
Tween Classes), Steve Lucas, Jim
Davies, Phil Barkworth, John Moret,
Murray Kennedy, Dave Keillor, Norm
Gidney, Bill Dodd, Leslie Plommer,
Leslie Minot, Brian McWatters, Sandy
Duke, John Anaersen, Shane McCune
Ginny Gait, Jennifer Jordan and Fran
McGrath.
Photogs were John Morrison, Dave
Bowerman, Dave Enns, Dirk Visser,
Me, Eric Stanton, Barry Narod, Dick
Button and George Mah.
Sports jocks were the usual crowd,
including Tony Gallagher, Bob
Weidman and Sandra Kirby.
There is an informal open houce at
Twigg's place in West Van for the
above-named and their friends tonight. Friday,   October  3,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Tenant power:
You can tell your landlord where to go
By PETER LADNER
So you've finally found a
reasonably cheap furnsihed
apartment with no leaks in the
roof.
But then your landlord tells
you he wants a $100 deposit in
case you bust up the furniture.
You know it's a ridiculous
payment for a few beaten-up
couches and chairs, but you shrug
and pay because you've got no
choice, right?
Wrong, Elmer.,
Starting sometime this month,
you can call up your landlord and
tell him he's coming with you to
city hall to face the Rental
Accommodation Grievance
Board—unless he wants to pay a
$500 fine and/or enjoy three
months of beaten-up beds at
Oakalla.
Under a by-law passed Sept. 9
by city council, it's illegal for a
landlord to hold a deposit of more
than $50 for a furnished suite.
That's only the beginning of a
list of tenants' rights in the
legislation considerered by
Vancouver Tenants' Council
president Bruce Yorke to be "a
very important precedent."
NO SIMILAR LAWS
"As far as we know,
regulations like these do not exist
elsewhere in North America,"
Yorke said in an interview
Wednesday.
The by-law also:
• Limits deposits in
unfurnished premises to $25.
• requires the landlord to
return deposits no later than two
weeks after the tenant checks out.
If the landlord wants to keep the
deposit, he must show the tenant
a detailed statement of alleged
damage.
• requires landlords to keep
their places "in such a state of
decoration and repair as, having
regard to the age, character and
the occupation of a reasonably
minded tenant of the class who
would be likely to rent it."
• forbids landlord to lock out
tenants.
LOCK OUT LANDLORD
• allows tenants to lock out
their landlords unless they're
coming in to repair something, to
check out the premises to see
about known violations of lease
conditions, or to show the pad to
new tenants after the present
occupants have agreed to leave. In
all cases the landlord must inform
the tenant hell be coming for a
visit.
• calls for three months notice
in writing before rents can be
raised or conditions of the lease
changed.
• forces the landlord to seek
out a new tenant if a tenant
decides to leave in the middle of
the month after paying up for the
whole month. The outgoing
tenant then gets paid per day for
each day the new tenant spends in
the premises until the end of the
month.
To back up these regulations,
the rental accommodation
grievance board will be set up
soon to consist of three people
appointed by city council.
Any tenant can appear before
the board—without a lawyer—to
present his beefs.
JAIL POSSIBLE
The board can ultimately fine
the landlord a maximum of $500
and/or sentence him to not more
than three months in jail.
This is only a final resort if the
landlord refuses to comply to the
regulations or to pay the tenant
what the board considers to be
"adequate compensation"—not
more than two months rent.
In spite of the scope of the
regulations, Yorke, whose group
was largely responsible for getting
the by-law through council, says
one fundamental regulation is
missing.
"It's fundamental to get a
provision to take care of eviction
of tenants," he claims.
"It's no damn good having
these regulations if the minute
you start complaining you get
thrown out."
"We want to make eviction
possible under only four
conditions: two months rent in
arrears, gross nuisance, illegal
activity, or if the landlord needs
the suite for his own or immediate
family."
"Not having the right to
complain amounts to a violation
of civil rights,"Yorke contends.
UNBELIEVABLE HASSLES
Yorke, an economist whose
council represents about 1,000
tenants, said the Vancouver
Tenants' Council (VTC) went
though unbelievable hassles to get
the bill passed.
They started a year ago,
appearing before city council to
persuade the city fathers that
tenants had no rights and that the
city had the power to do
something about it.
Only "a very small proportion"
of VTC members are students,
Yorke says, but he considers
old-age pensioners and students as
the two groups of tenants most in
need of protection.
Brian Wallace, a commerce
grad who organized the UBC
meeting last year and now sits on
the VTC executive, said students
don't worry too much about
landlord-tenant problems because
they're usually in one place for
less than a year.
STUDENTS EASY
"The students' main worries
are about getting into a place.
Once they're in, they're usually
willing to put up with
inconveniences," he said.
Aid. Art Phillips, a member of
VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
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A Complete Automotive Service
Government Certified Mechanics
33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANC A
224-7424
the council committee that will
pick the three board members,
said it will probably be about
three weeks before the board is
finally set up and going.
Phillips and Aid. Harry
Ranking have been the strongest
backers of the bill in council.
The delay is nothing new to
Yorke. He has been waiting for
some action ever since the
proposals for the by-law were
approved in principle by council
members last November.
"After the civic elections in
December," Yorke says, "we went
through every conceivable channel
to get them to hear us but they
stalled and stalled, shunting us
from committee to committee,
and we never did get another
formal hearing."
The VTC finally sent
delegations to the homes of
various aldermen to prod them off
their behinds.
DELAYS, DELAYS
It worked, but after council
agreed to set up the board on
April 22, city hall bureaucrats
didn't get around to drawing up
the by-law in proper legal wording
until Aug. 8.
It then took until Sept. 9 for
the by-law to come to council,
and only on Oct. 1 did the mayor
appoint members to the
subcommittee that will pick board
members.
Sooner   or  later,   "legitimate
channels"  will be  available  for    teeth over their landlord's illegal
-tudent   tenants   gnashing   their    action.   ;
SCUBA DIVING
CLASSES
See Classified Section 63
685-6017
PAPERBACKS
NEW ARRIVALS
LIST No. 1 - October 2, 1969
THESE TITLES WILL BE FOUND IN SUBJECT AREA
Assessing  Behavior:   Readings   in   Educational   and   Psychological
Measurement.   Flynn   &   Garber.   Addison-Wesley.   -(Psychology) $ 4.95
Black Sand and Gold. Martinsen. Metropolitan  Press.
(Canadian   Fiction)          330
Bureaucracy in Canadian Government. Kernaghan. Methuen.
(Canadian   History)       2.50
Canadian  Pacific.  McDougall. McGill.   (Canadian   History)         1.75
Castro's Cuba, Cuba's  Fidel.  Lockwood. Vintage.  (Political  Science,
History   of   Latin   America)            3.50
Colour   &   Citizenship:   A   Report   of   British   Race  Relations.   Rose.
Oxford.   (Sociology)           10.50
Comparative    Perspectives    on    Social    Change.    Eisenstadt.    Little,
Brown.   (Sociology)       4.15
Critical Issues in  the Study of Crime.  Dinitz &  Reckless.
Little,   Brown.   (Sociology)          4.15
Drop-Outs, The. Lichter et  al. Free Press. (Education)         3.30
Famine  1975!  Paddock.  Little,  Brown.   (Sociology)          2.85
Geomorphology. Nelson & Chambers. Methuen. (Canadian History) 4.95
Gestalt Therapy Verbatim. Perls. Real People Press. (Psychology) .... 3.80
Human Zoo, The. Morris (author of  "The Naked  Ape").
Clarke   Irwin.   (Counter   Display)            6.95
Molecular   Basis   of   Life,   The.   Readings  from   Scientific   American.
Freeman.    (Biology)       5.35
Narcissus  and   Goldmund.   Hesse.   Noonday.   (Translations)          2.45
New Distionary & Handbook of Aerospace. Marks.  Bantam.
(Physics  &   Table  Display)           1.95
New  Heaven,  New  Earth.  Burridge. Copp Clark.   (Sociology)           3.50
Novel: Modern Essays in Criticism. Davis. Prentice-Hall. (Literature) 4.35
1001   British   Columbia   Place   Names.  Akrigg.   Discovery  Press.
(U.B.C.  Authors,  British   Columbia)            5.70
Person to Person: The Problem of Being Human. Rogers & Stevens.
Real   People   Press.   (Psychology)          3.25
Pollution, Property & Prices. Dales. U. of Toronto.
(Pollution-in   Science   General)    .       2.50
Preserve and Protect. Drury. Eagle Books. (Fiction)        1.25
Resources of the Canadian  Shield. Robinson.  Methuen.
(Canadian  History)    ,       2.50
Run, Computer, Run.  Oettinger.  Harvard.  (Science General)       5.95
Shimoda Story. Statler. Random House.   (Miscellaneous Hardcovers)    16.25
Thirteen  Days.  Kennedy.  Signet.  (Counter Display)          .95
Trial  of Dr.   Spock.  Mitford.  Knopf.  (Miscellaneous  Hardcovers)       6.95
Vertebrate  Adaptations.   Readings  from   Scientific  American.
Freeman.   (Biology)          5.90
UBC BOOKSTORE Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  3,   1969
Ginter says B.C. government
protects big eastern brewers
The great conflict over law and
order in North America will be
aired in a series of six lectures
which will deal with "crime,
corrections, and law". They
start at 8 p.m. Thursday in the
Lutheran  Student Centre.
By SHANE McCUNE
The provincial government
is operating a protection racket
for the benefit of the major
brewers, beer baron Ben Ginter
said Thursday.
Ginter spoke to a capacity
crowd of about 300 potential
junior executives in Ang. 110
Thursday noon.
He made the accusation in
answer to a question from the
floor regarding the cash rebate
on empty cases of canned
Tartan beer.
Ginter said Col. Donald
McGugan, former head of the
Liquor Control Board, raised
the price of Tartan beer by ten
cents per carton without
Ginter's knowledge because his
brand was outselling the big
brewers' products.
The beer was originally
priced 10 cents below other
beers.
Uncle Ben's Tartan contains
not less than 10 per cent
alcohol.
Because he thought he was
making enough profit already,
Ginter said he proposed to
enclose a dime in each carton
of his product as a rebate to
the customer.
The LCB, however, banned
this move because they ruled it
a "sales gimmick", against
regulations.
Ginter's next proposal, the
donation of surplus products
to charity, was also vetoed as a
sales gimmick.
What he is planning now,
despite LCB threats, is to give a
25-cent refund on each case of
empty Tartan cans.
—barry narod photo
SMILING BEERMAN Ben
Ginter autographs Uncle Ben
beer bottles.
Ginter then made reference
to the "protection racket" run
by the B.C. government in the
Kootenays, adding, "but that's
not a sales gimmick."
When asked to explain what
he meant, Ginter said there is a
local chain in the Kootenays
which has virtually exclusive
sales rights.
Ginter, along with others,
must pay a "freight" charge of
between 35 and 55 cents per
dozen on his products. He said,
" 'Protection racket' is the
correct term."
Ginter's address lasted less
than 15 minutes. He
condemned Canadian
marketing techniques, saying:
"We should be much further
ahead in marketing, from the
federal government down."
He described Canadian
consuls abroad as "public
relations men" who lack
enthusiasm in securing markets
for Canadian products. Ginter
cited the prairie wheat
situation as a prime example of
poor marketing.
Ginter attributed his success
to his unwillingness to "be
satisfied with things the way
they are," adding that more
people should adopt a similar
attitude.
"Some of your student
strikes may be necessary to let
your elders know you're
there," he said.
At another point, he
declared himself in favor of
lowering the drinking age to 18
because "If you're old enough
to go to war and get
slaughtered, you should be
mature enough to handle
liquor."
Former UBC students
to fill BoG vacancies
Three UBC graduates were
elected to serve on the university's
board of governors by the senate
at its meeting Sept. 10.
The new members are Mrs.
John M. Lecky and Paul Plant,
both former presidents of the
UBC alumni association, and
David Williams. They were chosen
from a list of six.
Two of the incumbent
governors, Richard Bibbs and
Donovan Miller, will return to the
board for three-year terms. Both
were named by the provincial
cabinet.
Other appointees are chairman
Dr. Walter Koerner, Arthur Fouks
and John Liersch—all for further
three year terms. Other board
members are chancellor Alan
McGavin and president Walter
Gage. *
Mrs. Lecky, wife of Pacific
Press publishing executive John
Lecky, works for Community
Chest, the Children's Foundation
and the Vancouver Girls' Clubs
Association.
Plant is vice-president of the
lumber brokerage of Ralph S.
Plant Ltd. and Williams practices
law in Duncan, where he was
Kiwanis club president and head
of the local chamber of
commerce.
HONG KONG
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Phone  733-4506   (evenings)
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VARIETY OF
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THURS., FRI., SAT.
Where are the leaders?
Anyone will tell you that the Leaders are enjoying the advantages of military training and
university subsidization through the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
If you are a full time male undergraduate
student with a successful academic record you
should know about the opportunities that the
Canadian Armed Forces can offer you as an
ROTP cadet. You will continue your civilian
studies towards a degree at your University.
Enquiries are invited to:
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
684-7341
Pf Gets Serious!
By GERHARD HERZOG
"Riots in Neo-Nazi Election Meeting", "Violent Street Fighting
in Germany" are frequent headlines these days. Who are these so-called
neo-Nazis? Is there a danger of a Nazi comeback in Germany?
Judging from those headlines one might think that Germany will
soon have another Hitler. However the "neo-Nazis", the National
Democratic Party, has virtually no political weight. In the recent
legislative elections they did not get one seat in the parliament.
But then why are there riots in Germany after it has been quiet
for twenty years? They are, in part, due to the political stagnation
which existed until very recently. Since the war the Christian
Democrats have been in the majority and have dominated the political
scene with their rigid conservative doctrines.
Three years ago political dissension appeared. The left
anti-authoritarian student movement and the extreme right (neo-Nazis)
started making headlines. Their confrontation culminated in the violent
clashes of last month's election campaign.
What is the neo-Nazi ideology? Is it just a revival of Hitler's ideas
in 'Mein Kampf ? Adolf von Thadden, the leader ofthe party does not
exactly remind of Hitler, though his methods of organized street fights
are the same as the ones the Nazis used. His program contains
nothing of Hitler's crude antisemitism or his belief in German racial
superiority. But it is still dangerous for Germany.
Moderate liberals claim in this century the Germans were driven
into two wars by the nationalists while Germany became smaller and
smaller. Again today the neo-Nazi nationalists come up with an old
story: "We have to restore Germany to its frontiers of 1914." That
means Germany has to recover the territories she lost in both world
wars.
NEO-NAZI
Their party program doesn't say how to attain these goals
peacefully though, and doesn't consider that Russia and Poland are not
prepared, to peacefully give up East Germany. In the face of this
situation the claims that the NPD makes, mean potential war.
What the NPD has to say about the reunification of Germany is
also very dangerous, a claim that.reunification must be achieved by all
means, with or without the agreement of the Soviet Union.
This aggressive foreign policy concept gives the NPD wide
publicity in socialist countries and also in the Western press. Haunted
by memories of the Third Reich a lot of papers blow up the importance
of these ideas and almost create the impression that Germany is
preparing for another world overthrow.
Apart from the foreign policy the NPD's program has racial
undertones. "Foreign workers go home", is a favourite slogan, directed
against the 1.5 million foreigners from southern Europe that are
employed in Germany. The NPD forgets that without them there would
not have been the economic boom, that Germany is presently
experiencing.
"The racial issue is the key to world history", the NDP claims.
From there it is only one more step to whitewashing the German
conscience with regard to the Nazi crimes. "Hitler was not really all
that bad. He did not kill six million jews—there were "only" 600,000
killed," are some of their favourite sayings. Or they state that Germany
did not start the war, but it was due to mistakes of British diplomacy.
—cont'd on pf5
"Security Through Right and Order."-
election slogan of the Neo-Nazi party.
Col-lom
PAGE FRIDAY
11V2 ems
*6pt*
SENSELESS TRIVIA
PF wanted to take a holiday to
Blaine just like the grotty mobs of
thousands of others, but the Rueb
Tueb had to lay out the paper
while Quig the Wuig occupied
himself between a theatre meeting
and pleasurable pursuits.
Bemystified groans escaped
from the lips of others of the
pfaithful pfew as they slipped into
the office this week.
Cawsey walked in and cursed
and walked out, which prompted
farts of constipated anxiety. K
(period) Tougas (question mark)
arrived with nothing (ampersand)
except a promise of an article
(asterisk) for next week's film
issue (*%t ©$!!>). He slowly
dissolved and faded out. Tim
Wilson trystfully traced some
trevoIutionary trivia.
Jacques-Strap Khouri fondled a
typewriter. Hildegard the
Mountain Girl tooted some hot
poop on her floot.
More anguish came as the hardy
crew made it to supper, forcing
down steaks which weren't fit to
be dead, but all survived, and
belched with great delight as they
forged their way to the printers
through hail, hell, and holocaust
under a truck roof with a silver
Econolining.
Blaine...
A demonstration? Far
out.
WOW there must be
three thousand people in
the park and more coming
in every minute.
It's a beautiful audience
but the performance is the
shits. Hodge seems more
concerned with having a
nice demonstration than
with actually doing
something. There's a priest
speaking who spends most
of his time trying to click
into the audience but the
people dig him. He was
one of the first ones to
protest the bomb.
Bob Hunter starts to
make a speech so we take
a walk through the crowd.
Someone says 'I don't
mind bombs, I just hate
Americans'.   A  humorist.
'Blow our minds not
our country'. So true.
This is getting to be a
drag. It's just not
theatrical enough.
Some people move off
to close the alternate
crossing. It seems that too
many people are patting us
on the back for
demonstrating here but all
the while traffic is still
getting through. We're not
here to close part of the
border, we're here to close
all ofthe border.
We're    home.      Again.
The Regular Officer Training Plan
For University Undergraduates.
RAINCOATS
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Regularly to $29.95
Manufacturers Clearance
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JIM   ABERNETHY,   MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October   3,   1969' PFRECORD
Ailsson
Soulful Nostalgia
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Nilsson's third album, Harry
(RCA Victor LSP-4197), is great.
Don't all ask at once who
Nilsson is. Chances are good that
you've heard either him or his
songs before, He sings the title
song in Midnight Cowboy, Fred
Neil's Everybody's Talkin',
currently featured on Boss Radio.
He also wrote the songs One (a
hit for Three Dog Night some
time ago and featured on Al
Kooper's I Stand Alone), Cuddly
Toy (popularized by The
Monkees), and 1941 (Tom
Northcott).
These songs and others were on
his first two albums,
Pandemonium Shadow Show and
Aerial Ballet, which went mainly
unnoticed. In the States, the first
one was given a pseudopsyche-
delic advertising snow job which
turned off a great number of
people.
His latest effort, though, is the
best album by a solo singer since
Van Dyke Parks' Song Cycle.
Nilsson's latest is mainly a
memory-trip album, containing
songs with lines like "I guess the
Lord must be in New York City,"
"Nobody cares about the railroads
any more," "If only I could have
a puppy I'd call myself so very
lucky," and "Marching down
Broadway again."
These are all written by
Nilsson, though others are by Bill
Martin, Randy Newman, Lennon
and McCartney (Mother Nature's
Son) and Jerry Jeff Walker (Mr.
Boj angles).
The songs all together make up
a synthesis reminiscent of the
Depression and the following
decade. This may relate to
Nilsson's past, in that his
grandparents toured Europe at the
maybe   because   of  the   wierd,
almost  haze-like  effect  of  the
pieces being in 1969 stereo.
Nilsson's voice, a jazz-oriented
crooning tenor influenced
primarily by Ray Charles,
Morgana King, and The Beatles,
adds to the nostalgia as do the
arrangements by George Tipton,
who was responsible for the
backing on the first two albums as
well.
In short, Harry is a masterpiece
oi musical taste and intelligence
which also has a lot of something
called "feeling" or "soul" or
whatever you want to call it. All
of these make this a beautiful
album worth having.
Hot
Poop
NILSSON
Musical boy  wonder deep into a
memory trip with his third album,
Harry.
turn of the century as Nilsson's
Aerial Ballet, and in contrast,
during the Depression, his family's
show business activities were
limited.
The music echoes the past with
jivy little rhythms, a tuba
oompah-ing away like in The
Stones' Something Happened to
me Yesterday, sounds of violins,
banjos, and clarinets.
But then the 1930s-1940s
feeling of the music is distanced,
CUM is coming to UBC. Page
Friday learned through a booking
agency that this revolutionary
rock group will be arriving on
campus sometime in early
December.
Performances by CUM have
been nothing less than
spectacular, let alone sensational.
At one California performance,
the group was arrested and
charged with indecent exposure
(nudity on stage) and public
lewdness (urinating into an
on-stage toilet). The charges were
later thrown out by a judge who
declared that the wording on the
warrants was incorrect.
However, several members of
the audience were arrested for
enthusiastically removing their
clothes at the request of the group
and engaging in various forms of
sexual activity in the aisles.
They all received lengthy jail
sentences.
ipf shveei
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Friday,  October 3,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY iym^mtm^m^mmmm^sm^mmsim
One Over
(and)
Boe
Saturday May 17
Three thousand-mile-days of always
just-too-fast rocking rythm unwinds your
mind. Continuous motion dismantling the
reality of be-long(ing) somewhere.
Emerging from the Morlock world of
trains and tunnels we ask, "Where is
Rochdale?" (the map, WUS, document
908-376-41 A, was wrong). Our third
word inverts his smile, and we follow his
point to a disappointingly normal, grey
highrise.
Enter in and play follow the signs to
room 526 (Countdown Headquarters).
Keys and blanket (one) and sheets and
confusion and smiles-and maybe
pillowcases tomorrow.
"Why is this place so dirty?"
"Is it?" . . . and he was right you
know!
Not even the firecracers from the
upper floor windows, or the mysterious
c an d 1 e-u n de r-1 he-ch i n lit,
wooley-bearded, 3:00 AM visitor could
rouse me that night. (But the door had
been locked!?)
Sunday May 18
The official first day, and therefore
inevitably spent in arriving, relocating,
exploring, meeting, sorting-out,
pre-judging (all wrong), commenting, and
expecting. All this with the thought that
Rochdale has failed to happen. Where is
it, what is it, and where are the 'real'
Rochdalers? Why are we looking like a
typical convention?
The Rochdale building itself is an
abomination. A twenty-story, concrete
high-rise with innumerable small rooms;
endless corridors; and ubiquitous cheap,
smooth, yellow plaster. Four elevators
that operate on their own time, not large
common rooms or areas, and a pervasive
unpleasant smell. Not character but
chaos. Annoying, unnecessarty,
chopped-up space. The architecture of
alienation.
A dull general meeting in the
afternoon, where we are sorted, stacked,
Countdown to 2000      AD: The 196S
:.*-*^.:,:**-*m :>»: ;^^
introduced and harangued (mercifully,
minin mally). Slightly better than usual
outbursts of protest at procedure—"What
if I don't want to be in this group?" "The
idea of this type of structure at a free
university is. . ."-but nobody, including
the WUS secretariat, seems to have a clear
plan.
Freedom shouters are muffled by this
absorptive abiguity.
Strange: intention or incompetance?
At any rate, all is deferred until the
evening plenary.
By seven o'clock nearly all of the
one-hundred and thirty odd
symposiumites, both resource people and
participants, had arrived, and were
gathered in (or rather crammed into) the_
cafeteria. As suspected, the mix covered
the spectrum from the hairy and
liberated, through the intense and
political, to the clean and innocent. And
once again the question: "Intent or
chance?"
Immediately, and of course, the old
familiar debate-debacle about structure
begins. With the fluid rapidity of
familiarity, the chair was besieged with
demands ranging from tri-celled,
reveloutionary, democratic-centralism
(with the proposer at the centre, I
suspect) to unstructured, let-it happen
freedom. As usual, neither resolution nor
revolution occurrred, the 'unstructured'
people thus winning through expediency.
It was not until several days later that a
wise and logical man from the Orient
pointed out that since the universe exists,
all things are necessarily structured—the
choice thus being which, not whether.
On the functional side, the WUS
secretariat told us what they had
prepared. Essentially, it was this: we were
to be visited by a steady stream of
resource people who would hold seminars
in their various fileds; and we had
available for use an impressive amount of
material, including films, projectors,
video-tape equipment, movie camerss,
paints,  mimeographing  machines,   tape
Squalid Rochdale-type building
recorders, and a truck. Anything or
anyone we wanted«twithin reason) they
would try to obtain; and on top of this
some of the usually inaccessible, and all
of the regular resources of Toronto were
open.
The mind failrly boggled at the
possibilities inherent in all this, and in
addition there were all those new people
to know, and the enigma of Rochdale
(which we learned 'happened' in the!
seclusion of the upper three floors) to
unravel. The other side of abundance,
though, was frustration. In two weeks
you just had to miss all kinds of
not-to-be-missed things. Always and
always the agonies of choice, that
curse-blessing of freedom.
WHANG!! BANG! DAMN! 2:00 A.M.!
That bastard with the firecrackers again!
Monday May 19
Today, I, the model student—cautious
by nature, anxious to make a success of
this, product of my university
training—head expectantly for selection
of seminars.
It seemed like the thing to do at the
time.
"If you were looking for a word to
describe it, boring would spring
immediately to mind." Same wretched
thing year after year—talk-listen—sit—
(sore)—yawn. He knows. We know. But
who knows what to do about it?
Same questions, same answers, same
blind alleys, same impasses, same
rationality; insane!
A free university.
Only a few that day had the courage
to walk out.
Tuesday May 20
I felt unsociable, dejected, confused,
challenged and introverted today, so went
to the Royal Ontario Museum instead.
Countless maginficent things there, all
barely able to overcome the drab^
uninspired collectedness of their display.
But a hundred exquisite Japanese
sword-guards put my world back again.
Seminar attendance, I was told, was
rather sparse.
Wednesday May 21
I tried the seminars again today, partly
out of interest in the topics and partly
out of a lingering sense of obligation.
Already, a clear pattern had begun to
emerge. The intense, political types had
found each other, coalesced into groups
around like-minded resource people, and
had begun to go underground. This tactic
enabled them to remain free of
marginally interested ("and therefore
insincere") people, and thus better able
to pursue and discuss the politics of WUS,
revolution, underdevelopment, and the
Women's Liberation Front. This group
comprised the bulk of those for whom
the symposium was primarily an
academic experience.
Thisyear, the World University Se
held its an.iual symposium
Rochdale-by Toronto-Canada's
Free University. The WUS people c
this (controversial) site in order tc
Stimulate a wider interest and influ
than their past Symposia-
overseas-had generated; and (2) Cre
more unstructured environment fin
participants - chosen from va
universities throughout Canada
resource people to exchange energy.
The futuristic—and rather Va,
headline for this symposium
"Countdown to 2000 AD". A tantal
evocation of a Kubrick-style image <
intellectual foray into futurism-v
was no doubt also a successful puh
play.
Barry Buzan is an ex-Poli-Sci iti
from UBC, who is presently travelltni
mentally expanding in Europe. He
among the sixteen students from
campus selected to participate in
symposium. His personal impressioi
the happening are reprinted here in
of a diary form. Which indeed seems
applicable.
The total article could not
reprinted here for lack of space... i
have cut it off in mid-swing. If
appreciate the article, let us at Pfk
and we will print the conclusion
week. Write us, or call personally. I)
don't like the thing, write also, and
criticism. Well probably reprint th
anyway.
By BARRY BUZAN
THE     UBYSSEY
Hairy-creepy Rochdaler
Aside from these, most of the ser
seemed academically beyond
Generally they were ho-hum, yel
introductory lectures saying only "I
know how much you know about
and receiving "yes, will we've all
this before".
And what can he say in an hour?
And you know he can't answer
question adequately.
Friday, October 3,  1969 mmtdawmmmmm®
idale
p*
4our
«c
P*
5ive
VUS Symposium
,^i^mi^m*iemm^:^simmmmm^aKK
And isn't it odd how at least half those
who continued to attend were other
resource people.
Many were embassassingly ignored.
And what if all universities were run
like this—a sort of laissez-faire academic
capitalism with a currency of interest?
Only the artists and the politicians
were successful here. Very successful.
Another useless plenary tonight, so a
few of us decide to sabotage the next
ome. Over laughter and beer we code all
the empty-endless statements that are
sure to be used again. From 'A' for "I'm
somewhat confused by all this, but I'd
just like to say that..." to 'Z' for "It's
all a matter of semantics."
One-hundred copies and a smug-filled
wait until Saturday.
Thursday May 22
A tour of Canadian (American!)
Kodak today. A sort of Super-factory.
Super clean super nice, super secure,
super organized, super friendly, super
cautious. —
But then one of our number suggested
to our guide (according to his badge, he
was Kodak A17-463-really!) that he had
stuck a wad of radium-filled chewing gum
under one of their photographic paper
production belts.
The Huxley vision was shattered!
Today, for the first time, I feel really
here. For the last few days, people seem
to have had the feeling that they were on
the edge of something that they couldn't
find the centre of. A few couldn't stand
the strain of making choices, of knowing
that any failure to experience all this was
a failure of their own initiative. These
have either gone home or lost themselves
in Toronto. (Doing things is easier and
safer than doing people.?"
But a communal sense is developing
here among the participants. Not a
negative "us against" type of feeling, but
rather a positive "we are here" one. My
sense of individual insularity is becoming
irrelevant, because there is no "them"
here.
Collective unfamiliarily creating
collective familiarity.
Friday May 23
Theater is freedom, "For we are all,
after all, actors on the stage of the
world."
Scene 1: a hallway.
-A "ZAP!" (with gestures')"
-B     "ARRRRRRRRGH!"    (dies
extravagantly).
—   (A and C drag the defunct B to the
elevator, dump him in a corner, and
proceed   to   ride   up   and   down,
laughing.)
—second passerby "Bad Trip?"
-A "No, he's dead."
—second passerby "Bad rip?"
—C    (disinterestedly)    "Yea,    another
speed-freak."
Friday,  October 3,   1969
—(B continues to lie in a limp dishevelled
heap  for some time, a passing dog
stopping to lick his face.)
-A to C (with some concern) "Do you
think he's O.K.?"
—C (with growing concern) "Hey B, are
you all right?"
-A Hey! come off it B, it's O.K. now!"
-A and C "Now look B!"
—A to C (worried) "What are we going to
do with him?"
Saturday May 24
Today I walked into a room and asked
"What's happening here?". And
somebody said "Parlez-vous francais?",
and I smiled and said "no", and then I
saw he meant it.
SLAM!
Et maintainent J'apprends francais en
ordre que les cent-milliards repetitions de
cet incident ne pouvent pas m'arriver
encore.
A CX OL I AM EPL
0 J RP V U
INT QV FW ADM
BNK U X
Z!CQD
And that was the last plenary.
Sunday May 25.
This afternoon Hans Morganthau, the
most prestigious of the guest speakers,
drew a large crowd. Discussion
surrounding his lecture went on well into
the evening, and provided a strangely
formal contrast to the preceding days.
For the grand old man, everyone was
polite.
Scene 2: another hallway.
— (a door opens)
— H "Hey man, do you smoke?"
— M "Why? Do you want to borrow
one, or some matches? . .. Sorry, I
don't."
— H "No no man ... Do you smoke?"
— M "Ah! Yes... sorry ...
— H "Well come on in, I've just had a
nickel laid on me ..." •
— (exeunt)
Monday May 26.
A large group of us visited an
under-construction nuclear power plant
near Toronto today. Saw Lake Ontario's
sad, dead-fish beaches; was told that
incredible millions of gallons of hot water
per hour would not unbalance the lake's
ecology; and argued at length with our
guide about the educability-involvement
of the construction workers. He had a
name and a smile that were his own.
This evening I was in the delicatessen
downstairs enjoying one of their endless
variety of coffees. I got talking with a
regular (?) Rochdaler and he told me
about the Rochdale experience:
"Well man it's like ... an experience
in creating a social community. This
building gives us a microcosm of social
powers and responsibilities (they run it as
a residence)—the kind of power that
people like us could normally never get
hold of. So you see, it's not a fact(ory)
like your university, but an experience in
living.
"What we want is a fairly stable
population over a period of several years,
so that we can try to develop a free,
co-operative community that will work.
This building is a bummer, the way it cuts
people off, so we're trying to find
somewhere else. Maybe that's part ofthe
reason we've failed up to now—as you can
see, people are still isolated, possessive
and uncooperative. The only way we've
been able to achieve free cooperation so
is when we're all threatened by the narcs
of the health department. They there's a
big flurry of cleaning up and communal
activity. But otherwise, nobody gives a
shit and the building goes to pot. We just
haven't found a way to create a free, but
functional community yet.
"We're trying now to get rid of all the
speed-freaks, crashers and bikers, and to
run the building more efficiently. But
there's still a good chance we'll be
bankrupt by the autumn, in which case
we'd have to leave here and find another
place.
"What we need now is a boost in
morale, so if you could write something
about what Rochdale has done for
you ...
Tuesday May 27.
Some mad orator holding forth at
3:00 a.m. last night from the second floor
balcony—but I had been too tired to hear.
I asked this guy if he would show me
how to use the video-tape, projection and
filming equipment, and he said "sure".
That was my Tuesday.
Scene 3: the cafeteria; Hairy
Rochdaler and Sweet Young Thing.
- SYT "Well, you must be one of the
real Rochdale people. I'm with the
WUS symposium here - do you know
about it.'—anyway, 1 just think it was a
marvellous idea to have the conference
here. It gives one a chance to meet so
may new, different and interesting people
don't you think' I always think that it's
good to meet people with different points
of view on life and different approaches
to things even ifyou don't agree with the.
Why,    since    I've    been   here    -"
- HR "BLAH! BLAH! BLAH! BLAH!"
(exeunt)
The early morning orator again
tonight, but all I remember was the sound
of someone throwing water at him.
TO BE CONTINUED NEXT WEEK
Neo -Serious
cont'd
The British are also
blamed for having
invented the concentration
camps which Hitler then
imitated.
These statements are
very popular in a Germany
that still suffers from a
collective culpability
complex. Because the
older generation is in a
moral dilemma, not having
any justification for their
silent or enthusiastic
support of Hitler,the NDP
finds popular support,
because it offers precisely
the justification needed.
In Frankfurt at one of
the election meetings
Thadden's SS-like heavily
armed stormtroopers were
spread all through the
audience, helmets on their
heads. Thadden proceeded
to provoke the student
left-wingers, calling them
"animals", and the
meeting degenerated into a
riot on the street. The so
called "protection troops"
attacked citizens, hitting
them over the head with
iron rods, and picked out
leading student radicals
from the crowd and beat
them. The police watched
without interfering.
A    similar    incident
happened in Schwabach
where NPD stormtroopers
attacked a peaceful
demonstration in the open
street using similar
methods and several
demonstrators were
seriously injured.
There are widespread
fears that a confrontation
between right and extreme
left wings will intensify
and cause the government
to crack down severely on
any opposition, seriously
curtailing democratic
freedom of opinion, which
has lately become
noticeable. The recent
elections which gave the
NPD only very few votes
perhaps indicate a certain
moderation on the voters'
part. Hopefully this will
persist and fears of new
violence will be
unfounded.
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By DAVID RISTICH
Cross-legged, in strange-looking
postures; or cross-eyed with
attention firmly fixed on a candle,
Man, in his search for
innner-knowledge has invented
many testy and trying means.
Disciplines, breathing exercises,
self-flagellations, he has left little
in the way of self-torture
unexamined as a method of
reaching enlightenment.
"Mind moves naturally towards
a field of greater happiness," this
is the simple principle which is the
basis of transcendental
meditation. A small white-robed
recluse leaves the Himalayas to
teach, "suffering is not necessary,
joy is the natural inheritance of
man," and within ten years
hundreds of thousands of people
around the world are practising
his technique. Each day they sit
for twenty minutes morning and
night, transcending ordinary levels
of thought, they explore the
subtler and more fascinating levels
of mind. And apparently it is not
just an easy method of
experiencing joy, but has practical
effect in life. Those who practise
the technique regularly report
improved grades, increased clarity
of thought, increased energy and
improved relationships with
friends and lovers.
How could sitting in a chair for
twenty minutes bring such
wide-ranging and basic changes?.
This question naturally springs to
mind. The fact is that meditation
results in a total metabolic
change. The process is a
systematic mental practise; the
results are physiological; the
nervous system remains fully
restful while yet engaged in
effective action. This physical
change results in the subjectively
described effects of improved
health and increased effectiveness.
And these are only by-products of
gaining that experience which the
Buddhists call nirvana, and the
Hindus call Sat-Chit-Ananda.
The Maharishi explains that
through the centuries the teaching
becomes turned upside down, the
path comes to be mistaken for the
goal. The people are instructed to
behave rightly, and eventually
they will experience the Glory
within. Maharishi explains that
the Internal experience of Bliss, is
the  basis of right action. That
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once a person experiences
increased awareness and power, he
will naturally come to live a better
life in the world.
Jerry Jarvis has been in India
with Maharishi many times and is
most familiar with his heart and
mind. He is used to speaking to
overflow audiences at eighty
major American Universities, on
the topic of Transcendental
Meditation.
Today, he speaks in SUB
BALLROOM at noon, admission
free.
M-Baby
By DICK BETTS
Che is supposed to be a movie,
about a revolutionary but turns
into an argument against
humanity.
Castro is portrayed as an
incompetent who needs Che
around to bail him out of tight
situations. Che" himself is a
monster who kills people after the
revolution. In other words,
according to the movie, Cuba
today should be incapable of
continuing, ('nuff said).
Sharif plays Che. At the outset
of the movie he comes on like Dr.
Zhivago in Latin America. After a
highly romanticized account of
Ch&'s role in a raid on a arms base,
the movie turns. Che, once a meek
field surgeon for the guerrilla
army now becomes Che the devil,
the murderer. The picture goes so
far as to say that Che, not Castro
led the Cuban Revolution.
THE     UBYSSEY
Palance as Castro is a piss-pol
of laughs, as Palance usually is. He
blinks through horn-rimmed
glasses, perpetually chews a bi£
cigar, gulps booze like Cuba ii
going to go dry tomorrow anc
orates like a six-year-old
school-boy who has to go to the
bathroom. He effectively play;
the lackey. Che is boss.
As I watched the movie I wa:
sure it was biased but I had n<
proof until I realized that it die
not portray any of the events o
the Bay of Pigs invasion. Afte
that I could rest assured that i
was nothing more that a piece o
imperialist propaganda on the par
of the American movie industry
IpS 6IXHM
Friday, October  3,  196' Books,
By SUNSHINE
2000
I am neither for nor against
apathy—anon.
You can have your cake and eat
it too—dylan.
The New Astrology by Creighton
LaBarr. Belmont Books, 75c.
The adage about not judging a
book by its cover holds more than
ever in an era when paperbacks
are being packaged like soap by
Madison Avenue publishers. The
New Astrology, put out only last
April, is no exception. Inside,
however, is a dedication to Carl
Jung and an introduction to
Astropsychology, .which, the
author tells us is a union of
astrology and psychiatry. Chapter
one offers a simple, astounding
introduction to astrology. LaBarr
asks us: "If a comparatively small
moon, 250,000 miles distant from
the earth, can control the tides
and influence menstruation, why
is it unreasonable to believe that
sun, moon, planets and stars can
have other, far-reaching influences
and effects on our lives and
behavior patterns?" Chapter 2
deals with sex and success, the
"dual drives of mankind" and
along with chapter 3 provides a
launching pad for the rest of the
book which examines each
zodiacal sign in terms of general
characteristics, women, men,
success and creative counsel.
Blasphemy for some;
understanding and release for
others.. .
Zen Flesh, Zen Bones compiled
by Paul Reps. Doubleday Anchor
Books, $1.45.
A bargain at any price, the
book includes: 101 beautiful Zen
stories and parables. 49 koans. (A
koan is a problem or puzzle on
which you can meditate. This
book has really super koans. Here
are two "simple" koans not in the
book: the sound of one hand
clapping; a shoreless sea) 10 Bulls,
steps to understanding, poems,
drawings. Also "centering" which
can open you up to many things
inside you and around you. Four
Dreams, Grooves —**—■■■
original sources for Zen. The nice
thing about Zen is that you can
take is anywhere and as far as you
want to go. As it says in the book
"Zen doesn't make sense, it makes
you."
Mushrooms, Molds and Miracles
by Lucy Kavaler. Signet Books,
75c.
You've probably experienced
that glorious feeling of waking up
one misty autumn morning and
finding the whole world to be one
big mushroom. Mushroom people,
mushroom cars, mushroom
phrases, ideas, songs, colors and
vibrations. Those kind of days are
usually so full that you find
yourself without mushroom for
anything else.
If possible, it would be worth
your while to read Lucy's book.
This book is for those who have
discovered that fungi can be fun
and for those who haven't. Fungi,
fungi everywhere. In cheese, bread
and wine to name a few eatables.
In penicillin and mind drugs (the
best objective history I've seen).
In crops and crop-control, in
industry, in space, in the search
for life. A fantastic bibliography
and index (free). Makes good
sporadic reading for mycologists
and saints.
If your taste leans to earthier
matter   there   is   a   tremendous
variety of books specifically on
mushrooms. The best one to start
with is a pamphlet put out by the
Canada Department of
Agriculture, for 35c, called
"Mushroom Collecting for
Beginners." Available at the
Queen's Printer, it contains
photographs and emphasizes one
rule; "eat only species that you
know to be edible and avoid all
1 others." A reputable book always
distinguishes between poisonous
and edible, with undesirable (?)
side-effects.
The Teachings of Don Juan: A
Yaqui Way of Knowledge by
Carlos Castaheda. Ballantine
Books, 95c.
Castaneda, a grad student at
UCLA met Don Juan, a Mexican
Indian in 1961. He asked him:
"Would you teach me about
peyote, Don Juan?" The "brujo"
wise old medicine man that he
was, saw through the naivete to
the true desire to learn and met
the challenge with his teachings.
At times, Castaneda's lack of
knowledge about drugs is painful
XgSv^H
ready for fall
at
2034 West 41st
KERRISDALE
(EAST ot BOULEVARD)
... but
be patient
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OUR SECOND
GROOVY SHOPPE IN
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*
to the head who thinks drugs
started the day he first took them.
It would be nice to start on a
higher level than the author's,
however, we have the special
advantage of understanding Don
Juan's words. Three quarters of
the book deals with the teachings,
the last part attempting to present
a structural analysis. Don Juan
said that man must face four
enemies: Fear, clarity, power, and
old age. He also said: "For me
there is only the traveling on
paths that have heart, on any path
that may have heart. There I
travel, and the only worth-while
challenge is to traverse its full
length. And there I travel looking,,
breathlessly." Don Juan was an
old man when he taught
Castaneda, are we young enough
to learn?
Paradise is for the blessed, not
for the sex-obsessed.
-if
Blessed are the pure in heart:
for they shall see God.
-matthew 5:8
peace, love and dreams,
—sunshine.
ATI0
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Friday,  October 3,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY VOLKOFFS VOYAGES
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Coed fraternities?
Sounds like a contradiction in terms, but that's
the latest experiment at Stanford University,
California.
But that's not the only strange thing about
Standorf. The bookstore is comprehensible and
well-organized, registration week is livable, food in
the cafeteria is varied, cheap and even tastes good
and most of the 12,000 students love the place.
I spent a day at Stanford a week before the fall
quarter started, wearing myself out wandering
through the mazes of Spanish architecture.
"It's like Eden," one senior commented to me.
"The summer lasts through to November and the
first warm spring days begin in the end of January."
Which is a far cry from walking the soggy distance
between Buchanan and SUB for eight months of
rain.
And why don't students learn to ride bicycles?
At Stanford they are so plentiful they're almost a
menace.
Along with the coed fraternities, which are
filled on a lottery basis to prevent discrimination,
most of the forms are also coed.
As one guy said, "Now you get to see girls
looking their worst as well as their best. But instead
of being turned off, you go over and find out what's
wrong."
And of course, like UBC, Stanford has its very
own, very dominant symbol. This is the Hoover
Memorial Tower which is centrally located, can be
seen for miles and is dearly loved by the students.
Campus politics are very simple: the place is
too beautiful to fight. Besides, most of the students
come from at least the upper-middle class—they
have to in order to pay the fees-and see very little
wrong with what they have.
Naturally there are a number of anarchist,
internationalist and left-oriented groups, but they
are small and unheard. Except for the SDS, that is.
But the only issue they could raise a little
interest which is not directly related to the university.
This is the Stanford Research Institute which the
SDS has censured for its war-related research.
Last spring the SDS raised the support of 10
per cent of the university community with their
April 3 Movement when for nine days they
conducted a sit-in in the Applied Electronics lab. At
that time the administration made a ruling that any
students taking part in any further demonstrations
would be suspended.
Then during the summer 400 students occupied
the administration building (sound familiar?) but
left when police arrived in the morning in two
busloads. Twenty were suspended.
This fall the SDS intends to concentrate
activities on an industrial complex being built on
university lands.
The SDS here is weak, but is heard and can
mobilize quite a bit of support because it has good
issues.
But in general students are happy and their
fight isn't really with the university itself.
As one student told me, "The administration
pretty well gives the students all they want."
Well, it's all yours, baby. All for $2,500 in
annual tuition fees.
FORUM
This space is for comment
and discussion for
PF's readers.
I
Letter
Prophylactic Electric
A contraceptive in time can give peace of mind.
So if peace of mind is what you're after, then make a beeline for
the mens' washrooms in SUB. For two bits, a vending machine will
deposit in your quivering hands a genuine, micro-thin, rubber
prophylactic (Saxon brand).
While these aren't the most expensive around (Ramses are $1.25
for three), neither are they the cheapest (Sheiks are $0.65 for three). A
major drawback, however, is the fact that they're not of the lubricated
variety.
So far, student reaction to their emergence on campus has been
mixed, with no hard issues coming to a head. Sample comments are:
"Okay," said a frosh. "But I won't need them right away. I'm
pretty well fixed."
'Terrific!" said a Law I male.
Another law student didn't like them. "They're too crude," he
said disgustfully.
A frosh appeared stumped. 'Those things you put on your
thumbs?" he asked.
'The receptacle is fantastic!" a student who claimed he1 was in
Drafting V said as he wandered off.
One undergrad in his last year appeared despondent. "Why didn't
they do it years ago?" he cried. "I'd have messed around more."
"Groovy, man," said an Arts III student. "But they should have
more flavours."
While I was in the mens' washroom, I asked the fellow next to me
for his opinion.
"Between you and me," he said, "I prefer to live dangerously."
While some girls were in favor of the vending machines, most
remained noncommittal.
"I haven't given it much thought," said a freshette.
"It's stupid," a first year education student exclaimed.
"Where can you use them here?"
Good question.
One Arts III girl brought up the point that you can get
prophylectics in most downtown stores anyway. However, this reporter
wondered whether their greater availability would change male
aggressiveness at UBC, which has drooped lately to an all time low. (A
few freshettes were even prompted to write to our editor complaining
that UBC wolves aren't.)
When I asked some men why they weren't.so aggressive, one said,
"Now if we should amalgamate the sleeping rooms downstairs . . ."
"They should have pills in the girls' washrooms now," another
replied.
'Two bits each? That's an expensive date," the third said.
A girl in third year education summed up the thoughts of many
others.
"They're sensible," she said. "Though there's something about it
I don't like. But I can't put my finger on it."
I couldn't either.
JACQUES KHOURI
I Editor, Page Friday, Sir:
I
| My reactions to Thursday
| evenings (Sept. 25th) performance
iof Sam and Bella Spewack's Boy
I Meets Girl, is to have doubts
I about the Theatre Department
■ this year. I am not a practised
| critic,—just a guy sitting in the
eighth row, wondering whether
this was really the Freddy Wood
j Theatre or the Spuzzum high
J school. I am amazed that someone
I of Donald Soule's calibre would
I produce a play like this, and in
I such a way. There is the possibility
I point of the whole thing passed
I me by. The play itself offers little
(reason for being put on a stage.
| There is nothing 'theatrical' about
jit—no mime, no illusion, no tricks
j of the trade. On radio it might be
I funny,   but   on   the   stage,   it
* bombed out.
I The subject is one big cliche as
tthe title suggests and the
I personalities are caricatures, and
| not even clever or witty ones. The
| play is advertised as 'a happy
| farce', but the elements of real
j farce just are not there. What
j bothered me most was the over-all
j impression of the production. It
• lacked zip; the actors seemed to
■ be   pushing  their  lines  at  the
■ audience,   and   the   humour
appeared flat and forced. Richard
Kent   Wilcox's   settings   were
unfortunately very obviously
[cardboard and Kurt Wilhelm's
[costumes were not particularly
[authentic. There were obvious
'anachronisms such as telephones
' and intercoms of the variety not
I yet invented in 1935. In my mind,
I the word which best describes the
I effort is mediocre.
Most enjoyable were the
old-time films screened during the
intermissions, and those who
walked out into the overcrowded
lobby, missed the best part.
PAUL E. THIELE
Crane Library
English sub-titles
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  3,   1969 Friday,  October 3,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
PRINTER RETURNS
—brace stout photo
HOLLY HAMILTON'S legs were worth $9 to engineers in leg
auction Thursday.
Nurses leg auction
turns on engineers
Fifteen girls displayed their
gams in a leg auction at noon
Thursday.
The girls, all nursing
undergrads, were auctioned before
a crowd of cheering engineers in
the civil engineering building.
Bids began at a nickel and
progressed by five cent jumps
until a horn blew to signal the end
of the bidding. Some of the first
girls were auctioned off for prices
ranging from 95 cents to $1.25.
"We had no trouble signing up
girls for the auction or to man the
backrub centre," said nursing
representative Cathy Hunter
(whose legs brought $9.)
The leg auction and back rubs
raised $53 which will be donated
to charity.
TWO-BIT  BACKRUB by nurse brings a little pleasure to
Ubyssey reporter Brian McWatters.
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Recent GS issue
better than ever
By SANDY KASS
College Printers has resumed
printing the Georgia Straight, says
Straight editor Bob Cummings.
"I feel this week's edition of
the Straight is a big improvement
on previous papers," he said in an
interview Thursday.
"It is bigger (24 pages) and
contains a much greater variety of
articles.
"It is hard to produce a good
paper when we're involved with
criminal charges and court cases."
Three charges of obscenity
were recently dismissed in
provincial court, but the Straight
still faces charges following
publication of a Dr. Hippocrates
column and The Great Pentagon
Hunching Contest by Ed Sanders
of the Fugs.
The last issue of the paper was
printed in Victoria after College
Printers, which also prints The
Ubyssey .refused to handle it after
the city prosecutor's office
harassed the foreman of the press
room and the man in charge of
the camera room.
Cummings said the major
problems of the Straight are over,
but the paper is still in financial
difficulty. "We may have won the
court case but it is impossible to
win without losing financially," he
said.
RCMP Wage War On
Communes is the headline on
this week's lead article about
police raids during the summer
which wiped out two communes
near Kamloops and Quesnel and
weakened others at Ashcroft and
Clinton.
Another article concerns a
two-year sentence (four times the
maximum) handed down by
provincial court judge Lawrence
Eckardt for Vagrancy A-being
without   any   visible   means   of
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support. Former Sun reporter
Steve Brown has five stories in the
paper, one about Simon Fraser
University and the current PSA
strike.
Technical quality of the
current issue is the best yet.
There are no immediate plans
for instituting self-censorship for
the paper, as Cummings said: "It
would not always be possible to
censor every article that comes
in."
Now that the paper has been
acquitted of some obscenity
charges, Cummings felt there was
no definite need for the
censorship, but added, "We will
check with lawyers whenever
possible."
"Now that we are free of most
of our pressures, I feel we can get
much closer to the realization of
our goals."
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BLUE RIBBON COFFEE (1 lb.) 75c
EUROPEAN BAKERY WHITE SLICED BREAD
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PANTY HOSE (1 pair) $1.49
LARGE BRYLCREEM,  Regular  99c 79c
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DELICIOUS APPLES (2 lbs.) 35c
1 pair ot Donna Lynn Nylons FREE with
every purchase ot $5.00 or more. Page  16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   October  3,   1969
'All we do is vote for the
president'... 2 from Sun City
From page 1
cars and several large transports
were held up.
Included in the demonstration
were 40 junior high school
students from White Rock who
skipped classes to attend the
demonstration.
They told reporters they were
demonstrating because "We want
to live longer" and "I don't think
it's right for them to blow a bomb
off so close to Canada."
Their average age was 13.
BULLS ABOUND
About six uniformed RCMP
officers were present at the Pacific
Highway crossing with an equal
number of their American
counterparts. Several,
plainclothesmen were also
present, one of whom took
pictures of the demonstrators.
The only incident occurred
when an RCMP officer tried to
lead one of the transports through
the crowd.
"Just keep moving forward,"
he told the driver.
The truck moved forward
about two feet and was forced to
give up the attempt by the crush
of bodies.
A Canadian flag was draped on
the truck and demonstrators
began to sing the Vietnam Rag:
And it's five, six, seven,
Open the pearly gates,
We ain't got time to wonder
why,
We're all gonna die
Reactions of Americans
stopped at the Pacific Highway
crossing varied between outrage
and enjoyment.
Charles Conklin of Spokane,
Washington was the driver of the
first car stopped at the border.
"Actually, I'm kind of put out
by this demonstration because I
have to catch a boat in a little
while in Vancouver," he said.
"However, if it wasn't for that
darn boat I'd enjoy this thing; it
looks like a lot of fun." :
William Young of Everett was
not as complacent about the
demonstration as Conklin.
"I think this is a bunch of
nonsense." he said.
"I'll bet most of those kids
(the demonstrators) over there
don't even know why they are
here."
'WE ONLY VOTE'
Jerry Boesel of Boise, Idaho
was enthralled by the whole
spectacle.
Boesel said, "Wow, this is a
completely different experiience
for me; up to now, I had only
seen these things on television."
An elderly couple from Sun
City, Arizona were completely
bewildered by the experience.
"We didn't know anything
about this. Really, we have
nothing to do with the bomb
tests. All we do is vote for the
president; we don't have any say
in what he does."
At 3:45 a senior RCMP officer
arrived and asked people to
'please clear the road.'
"I think you've made your
point," he said.
The crows refused to move.
A demonstration leader then
took the mike and said they had
been there long enough and they
should leave of their own free
will.
He promised they would be
back if any more bombs were set
off.
The people hesitated for a
moment, then slowly began the
walk back to the Peace Arch.
The Pacific Highway sit-in
began just as the Peace Arch
demonstration was ending.
AMS external affairs officer
Mike Doyle said the breakaway
demonstration showd that those
participating had no
understanding of a symbolic
demonstration.
"This is an act of political,
social irresponsibility and sheer
political stupidity," he said.
James Stevens, district director
of the Canada customs and excise
said he was not overly concerned
about the Peace Arch
demonstration.
"I can certainly understand the
students' point of view," he said.
"It's unfortunate that it puts
us out of a job for a while, but
aside from that I have no
complaints."
The opinions of people
returning from the demonstration
tended to reflect disappointment.
CHEERS, BOOS
"The turnout was pretty good
but I don't think the
demonstration was as good as it
could have been," said Ken
Strang, arts 2.
He said many people were
disappointed that traffic was
rerouted to the Pacific Highway
crossing.
"Perhaps if the traffic had not
been rerouted there may have
been a few hassles," he said.
"The AMS did the best they
could in promoting and organizing
this demonstration under the
circumstances they faced but if
there was to be another
demonstration I don't think the
student response would be as
good." :
A girl who refused to be
identified said "We thought it was
a success. Too bad there weren't
enough buses."
"The demonstration did indeed
prove the point that Canadian
students are in agreement
regarding their disapproval of the
U.S. nuclear test plans for
Amchitka Island but I don't think
it   was   run   in   a   democratic
manner," said arts undergraduate
society president Dick Betts.
"Not all the issues surrounding
the demonstration were debated
and people should have a chance
to find out about them."
Meanwhile, almost 2,000
University of Victoria students
blocked the terminal of the
American-owned Black Ball Ferry
lines.
BIGGEST PROTEST
The students filled the narrow
lane leading to the ferry slip and
jammed surrounding streets for an
hour in what was the largest
student demonstration
undertaken since the university
was built.
Other UVic students picketed
the Sidney airport and stopped
passengers on the flight from
Seattle.
Forty island students also
arrived by bus in Vancouver to
help close the border at Blaine.
Some five hundred Victoria
high school students picketed the
legislative buildings.
At Paterson, 10 miles south of
Trail, two hundred and fifty
Selkirk College students blocked
20 cars at the border.
Students from Notre Dame
University, Nelson, blocked the
border at Rykerts and Nelway.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
-meh photo
LITTLE PEOPLE are staging daily demonstrations at Acadia Day
Care Centre.
Acadia day-care centre
takes your kids for $50
The Acadia Day Care Centre has been operational for more than
, a week with 16 regular children, ages three to five.
This service is costing the parents of the children $50 a month. If
parents are unable to afford the cost they can apply for a subsidy
from the social welfare department.
Arlene Waters, one of the three women in charge, said that while
they only have 16 now they expect to get a licence to accommodate
36 to 40 children.
A large amount of painting and construction had been done in
the old Acadia Camp common room that is now the day care centre.
Outside, there is a small fenced playground equipped with a
sandbox. In addition to the usual play facilities the children have one
black rabbit and guinea pig.
Most of the parents of the presently enrolled children are
students.
Bomb just jiggles graph
By JOHN MORET
Jiggle, jiggle, jiggle.
"You mean that's IT?"
The comment seemed typical of the crowd's reaction.
They were gathered around the output of UBC's seismograph as
the shock waves of the Amchitka bomb test came in.
The shock waves took seven minutes to come south, while the
crowd grew more tense, the CBC cameras ground on, and the thing
squiggled.
When the shock waves finally a/rived, they were almost
undetectable from the background "noise"
The geophysicists present weren t expecting any catastrophic
results.
Dr. Russell, head of geophysics, said they expected one ten
thousandth of an inch of earth movement.
That's some earthquake.
Measurement of the shock was small although exact figures were
not immediately available.
Blind need readers
If you have any free time and
don't know what to do with it,
contact Paul Theile, head of the
Crane Library.
The Crane Library serves the
"25 blind students at UBC. It needs
volunteers to come in for an hour
a week, and do some reading.
"There are two types of
reading to be done," Theile
explained.  "We  need volunteers
who will read into a tape recorder
and those that will read directly
to the blind."
The library's main trouble is
acquiring books which are
required reading for certain arts
courses.
Any interested people should
go to the Crane library in Brock,
and leave your name, or phone
228-2373.
Bird Calls
hits street
The students' phone book,
Bird Calls, will go on sale Monday.
Al Vince, Alma Mater Society
publications manager, said the
magazine would have 24 more
pages than last year's edition. The
format, however, will be much the
same as in the past.
There will be a total of 304
pages (256 white—48 yellow)
including the names, addresses,
phone numbers, and years of all
those students registered and
recorded in the registrar's files by
Sept. 13.
Bird Calls will cost the
customary $1 and copies may be
purchased through the bookstore,
the Thunderbird Shop and the
publications office in SUB.
Few turn out
for frat rush
300 people have "rushed"
UBC's 15 fraternities the
president of the Inter-fraternity
Council said Thursday.
John MacGowan, Eng. 4, said
the figure is somewhat less than
what the council expected.
MacGowan attributed this to what
he claimed were the
misconceptions which people have
about fraternities.
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Senate Elections
Nominations are now open for five campus-wide student
senators and one for the Education constituency centre.
Pick up nomination and eligibility forms from the AMS
General Office, second floor SUB, and return to the office
of the AMS Secretary. All forms must be received by the
Secretary no later than 12:30 p.m., Thursday, October 9th.
Now that all our
neat European gear's
nicely ironed and
hung up, why not
drop by and take a
look?
Also some groovy
home - designed stuff,
all by SIMONE, who drew yon sketch.
FOUR THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED THIRTY WEST TENTH Page 18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  3,   1969
MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
taking  part  in  'here  and  now'    which    comes    spontaneous.
Thieves
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I wish to announce the
untimely death of the Ellaschuk
Foundation for Controlled
Environment. Set up during the
first two weeks of the flood, here
on campus, the foundation has
flourished to the extent that
funds allocated to it last summer
have run out. You see, last
summer, when making up my
budget for UBC, I allocated
approximately $5.00 for an
umbrella. Imagine my surprise
when I purchased one for $2.25.
Fully protected during the first
week of rain, I was so confident in
everything that I left my unbrella
in the rack in the main Library.
Low and behold, on coming out
of the stacks, I found it had
disappeared. I shed a bitter tear
yet pulled myself together
thinking that I had protected one
impoverished, struggling student
from the elements. The next day,
I bought anouther umbrella which
I kept near me constantly-for
about three days.
The third day, while studying
in the library, I found it necessary
to use the facilities. In my
absence, the umbrella disappeared
from my study desk. I shed
another bitter tear, pulled myself
together and thought how I was
protecting two impoverished
struggling students from the
elements. That afternoon, I
purchased another umbrella.
The next day, I was again
studying in the library. The
umbrella went everywhere with
me during the study sessions: to
and from the water fountain, card
catalogue and facilities.
Unfortunately, I hung it up on a
hook, provided for the purpose, in
the toilet cubicle. I forgot to take
it off the hook on returning to the
study hall. When I went back
down, what to my surprise, it had
disappeared. This time I didn't
shed a bitter tear, I didn't pull
myself together, but I did start
thinking on the right track.
To the three charming people
out there who "borrowed" my
umbrellas, I would like to present
you with something more: a curse.
Until your dying days, may you
always walk through the rain,
sleet, and snow with only my
cheap umbrella to protect you.
Thank you, Mr. Editor, and I
remain, no longer innocent of
human nature.
LORNE ELLASCHUK,
artsl
Obviously, you did not read
Tuum Est, in which we advised
students to buy cheap umbrellas,
and, in the event of theft, to steal
someone else's umbrella.-Ed.
AMS bitch
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In a recent editorial, you
commended the AMS for
supporting striking PSA dissidents
and organizaing a rally against the
Aleutian A-bomb test. These are
just two of three recent incidents,
however, in which the AMS has
misused power and public money.
The first incident was running
a candidate against the Socreds in
Rossland-Trail. There are many
Socreds on campus who quite
rightly don't want their money
used against their party. If
$35,000 had been given to the
Socreds, which, ethics aside,
would have helped UBC more,
there would have been a storm of
protest, so why not if the
situation is reversed?
The" second incident was
support of PSA strikers.Taxpayers
pay most for universities, and
when they hear Mordecai
Briemberg say the purpose of PSA
is not to objectively study
sociology but to radically
revolutionize their society, it's no
wonder they kick. And no great
majority of UBC students agree
with Biemberg's type of change.
So who does AMS represent?
As far as the A -bomb blast is
concerned, the issue is not only
the possibilities of an earthquake
but also another chance to get a
shot at A-bombs in general. There
is nothing wrong in that, but is
is not the job of the AMS to
organize anti-bomb rallies.
What we have done is to collect
$29 from each student for the
benefit of all and then set up
guardians to regulate and control
this money. But as the Romans
put it, "Quis custodet ipsos
custodes?" And if you do not
understand Latin, find someone
who does.
JAKE VAN DER KAMP
arts 1
You raise the whole question
of the function of the AMS. Is it
to be a service union only? Should
it be a political union? If it is just
a service union, how will
expenditures for performing
artists and so on be justifed when
many students may not want to
view or listen to these artists?
As for your Latin, you do. You
vote in the elections. If you're
troubled by the practices or
structure of the AMS, come to the
conference on student
government in SUB on Saturday.
Maybe you will learn
something.—Ed.
Book-buying
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Ubyssey printed a
statement by the spokesman of
the Black Cross Club (Friday,
Sept. 16), "Duthie's obviously
aren't losing money." I think an
appropriate follow up would be,
the UBC bookstore has been
pulling the wool over the
students' eyes for far too long!
Not only are the bookstore's
prices, on the whole, the same as
Duthie's but I think it would be
fair to say that the bookstore's
cost of operation is far below that
of IDuthie's. One aspect of
operating costs that comes readily
to mind is that of rents.
The bookstore: one
location—Duthie's: five locations,
all five of which are in high rent
districts.
This of course is not the only
factor, only one of the more
obvious, I'm sure there are others.
International House
CAFETERIA
LUNCH:
| Mon. to Fri. 11:30 to 3 p.m.
SPECIAL:
"Curry" every Wednesday
COFFEE SHOP:
a.m. to 5 p.m. Weekdays
Looking at the bookstore's
statement of operations for the
year ending March 31, 1969 as
presented in UBC Reports we see
that together the bookstore and
the post office had total
expenditures of $2,013,442.
However, total revenues were
$2,111,927-an excess of $98,485
of revenue over expenditure.
Surely, the post office didn't net
that amount in revenue. Clearly,
the bookstore netted a large
proportion of it. The operating
statement neatly labels this
$98,485 as "Revenue for
Expansion" thereby relieving the
bookstore and post office of any
profit.
The question now is, what is to
be done with this money? The
title "reserve for expansion"
sounds great, but what the hell
does it mean?
I propose that a lot of students
(myself included) get off their
collective butts and find out what
is to happen to this sum that has
poured into the coffers of the
bookstore from our pockets.
Furthermore, we should find out
why our "non-profit" store for
students finds it necessary to price
their books on a par with a profit
organization such as Duthie's.
PETER TWIDLE,
comm. 3
Big poop
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I have a resentment:
There is a serious need to get
beyond the chicken shit or bull
shit of communication. And since
the phrase 'elephant shit' has been
effective in communicating the
meaning of this beyondness it has
come into common use with those
encounter groups.
I used the phrase 'Elephant
Shit Encounter' to distinguish this
experience from an attack-type
one. ESE is intended to develop
'here and now' awareness, out of
communication.
It is not psychological crap, as
you inferred, but meaningful
in-depth experience.
JEAN GRAHAM,
educ. 4
Let WORLD WIDE
stick it's
Travel Knows
into your arrangements
for Next Year
in
EUROPE
U-DRIVES
HOTELS
BUDGET - RAIL - PASSES
TOURS - PASSPORTS, etal
For Reservations and FREE Color Brochures
call
ON CAMPUS
5700 University Blvd.
224-4391
Vancouver's Leading
Travel Organization Friday, October 3,
TH
UBYSSEY
Page 19
dick button photo
LONGHAIRED BILL
HENDERSON is only a
probable starter for Saturdays
game at Thunderbird stadium.
Intramural
Notices
Men's Intramurals
1) Golf: All players registered for
the tournament scheduled for Saturday
are requested to:—
a) Play 18 holes University golf
course between today and Sunday;
b) Turn in your score cards (signed by one other person) to the
intramural office not later than
2 p.m., Monday.
2) Soccer and Football: Schedules
will be posted at the intramural office
today.   Competitions  start   Monday.
3) Swimming:
Monday—Phi Gamma Delta vs. PE
Education vs. Arts
Wednesday—Dekes vs. Education
P.E.   vs.   Arts
All    competitions    at    Empire    Pool,
12:30.
4) Cycle Drag:   Final  Results.
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
Arts
Forestry
P.E.
Engineering
Betas
A.T.O.
Women
's Intramurals
1) General meeting for all managers
Tuesday,   12:30  p.m.,   Women's Gym.
2 Swim meet finals will be Oct. 16th
at noon, Empire Pool. Final list wiU
be posted in the Women's Gym.
3) Night leagues start and continue
every Wednesday at 7:30.
4) Jogging club meeting, Monday in
the   Women's Gym.
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
Practice  times Tuesday  7-8:30,   Memorial     Gym;     Thursday     1-2:13     p.m.,
Women's Gym.
TRACK AND  FIELD TEAM
First meeting will be held Tuesday,
Oct. 7 at 12:30 P.m. in Room 213 of
Memorial Gym.
■3261W. Broadway     736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Believe it or not
Birds may win
The UBC football
Thunderbirds take on the Seattle
Cavaliers this Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium in an
attempt to improve their 0-3
record.
The Birds will be without the
club's leading rusher-star fullback
Paul Danyliu, who will be
sidelined with a bruised elbow.
The return of Dave Corcoran will
help the situation somewhat as he
is expected to see some action at
fullback.
Head coach Frand Gnup
seemed extremely serious about
the game with the Cavaliers, "We
gotta try to beat somebody so
we're gonna try to throw the ball
a good deal."
"We've been working on pass
protection all week too."
The Cavaliers, featuring the
same faces that have been with
the team for the last 10 years, will
be tough for the Birds.
They have virtually no passing
attack but have a strong line with
quick backs.
Earlier    in    the    season   the
Cavaliers   lost   to  Simon  Fraser
12-6   and   last    week   looked
■ extremely    strong   in    downing
Everett Junior College 26-6.
WOMENS FIELD HOCKEY
The women's Varsity field
hockey team will play and
exhibition game against the
Canadian National Team this
Sunday at Chris Spencer Field.
Game    time    is    1:00 p.m.
Part of Coach . Gnup's game
plan includes some ideas on
stopping the Cavalier attack.
"We're gonna give our kids
hockey sticks to cut em down at
the knees."
Game time is 2:00p.m.
Soccer is
Birds game
tomorrow
By BOB WEIDMAN
UBC soccer Thunderbirds
open their Pacific Coast Soccer
League schedule this Sunday, 2
p.m. at Callister Park, with
Columbus,* last year's league
champions providing the
opposition.
The Italians who are coming
off a 10-win in the Dominion Cup
final here last Sunday, are favored
to take the league again.
Meanwhile, the rookie-laden
Thunderbirds with an 0-2
exhibition record, have to be
considered the underdogs in this
match according to their coach,
Joe Johnson.
It doesn't bother him
though-being underdogs may
help the Birds: "People have been
writing us off as being just
schoolboys. The team is an
unknown quantity and if
Columbus takes us too lightly we
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS]
549 Granville St.
SCUBA DIVING
CLASSES
See Classified Section 63
685-6017
QBC STUDENT REP.-JOHN KEATING-Res. YU 8-5144
*
HEBB
THEATRE
FREE
TO ALL
LANDING FILMS
TUESDAY   -   12:30 TO 4:30 CONTINUOUS   -   OCT. 7
Poundwatchers see
way to jiggle it off
By SANDRA KIRBY
It is the newest and best club on campus.
The idea of a jogging club was suggested by a task
committee on Women's athletics which met this summer.
Do you know how many girls on campus go from class to
coffee-break and back to class again complaining of gaining
weight and wishing there was something they could do about it
besides dieting?
The Jogging Club is just the thing they are looking for.
And you?
Are you looking for some good exercise that will help you
meet a number of new people with the same interest?
Then come and joing the UBC Jogger's Club.
The first meeting of the year will be in the Women's Gym
Monday at 12:30.
They have planned only jogging so far, Monday and
Thursdays each week.
The time we jog won't be decided until Monday's
meeting. It won't be compulsory to jog each Monday and
Thursday, but the more you jog the sooner you can win your 50
mile crest... your 100 mile crest ... your 150 mile crest.
All women students are eligible. Come and jog.
We'll see all you active and will-be-active students on
Monday at 12:30 in the women's gym.
could pull an upset."
Johnson took special note of
his forwards because as he puts it,
"They are all serious scoring
threats."
This means that Columbus
won't be able to key on one or
two people for their defense, but
will have to be careful whenever
the Birds attack
The Birds will have to play in
Callister in front of an expected
crowd of some 2,500 highly
partisan Italian fans, and no one,
including Johnson is quite certain
thow this will affect the rookies.
The fans may motivate the
team to play more agressively; a
style Johnson feels is needed for
an upset.
You'd tore being a Kitten girt!
Glenayr
<s*
*?
fCmto,
WOOLMARK
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Feel at ease in this
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zipper, long sleeves. A
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Straight-cut Woolmark
Knit pants with elastic
waistband. New
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dyed-to-perfectly-match
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palette of new Fall shades.
Dry clean only.
W41/W17
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October   3,   1969
'TWEEN CLASSES
Gripe
for
grapes
FRIDAY
CLAM
Film   and   talk   on   California   grape
strike, noon in Bu.  100.
LEGAL AID
Legal   advice   given  Mon.,   Wed.,   and
Fri. noon, Room 237 and 237A in SUB.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
General  meeting,   noon,   Ang.   204.
CHESS   CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 216.
LITERACY CLUB
Meeting noon, Bu. 225. Will include
talks on requirements for library
school.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
"The   House   The   Jack   Built",   noon
in SUB Party Room.
VARSITY  OUTDOOR CLUB
Deadline for membership applications
today. Clubroom, SW corner of SUB
basement.
SURF   CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon in SUB
115.
SIMS
Introductory lecture on transcendental meditation by Jerry Jarvis. Noon
in   SUB  Ballroom.
FILM   SOCIETY
General meeting noon. New members
welcome.
CANOE  CLUB
Organizational meeting for Squamish
River trip October 5th. Noon, outside   Angus   110.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
Urban Planning Seminar, noon in
SUB  119.
FINE ARTS  GALLERY
Opening   of   Extensions   in   basement
.  of   main   library.    7:30   to   9:30   p.m.
Everyone welcome.
SCM
Interested people to help with publicity for anti-war benefit dance. Noon
in 216E, SUB. Also register for Gandhi
Centennial Symposium Oct. 10, 11,
and   12.
SATURDAY
Candle-light and  dance  party in SUB
party room,  8:30-12:0 p.m.  New members admitted  free.
NEW   MAN
Sing-in, Saturday, 8 p.m. at St. Mark's
College. There is no admission charge,
bring your own voices and guitars.
Refreshments will  be  served.
SUNDAY
ATC
Folk  mass  at  9  a.m.   in  chapel.
AQUASOC
Dive to Porteau. Sign in Clubs Lounge.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S  LIBERATION
Orientation meeting in clubs room.
CANOE   CLUB
Future North Thompson River trippers ;'T ase attend organizational
meeting at    uon in SUB 125.
EL   CIRCliLO- SPANISH   CLUB
Slides   of   Mexico,   Veracruz.   Tickets
for    playhouse.   International    House,
noon.
CHRISTIAN   PERSPECTIVE
Understanding the scriptures discussed  in SUB  125  at 7:30 p.m.
SPEAKERS   COMMITTEE
"Talk-in** on Operation Border Close,
noon. South SUB Plaza.
TUESDAY
SAILING   CLUB
General   meeting   rescheduled,   noon,
Bu. 104.
DANCE  CLUB
Bronze  and Junior Latin pin classes
will   be  held   SUB   ballroom   at   the
scheduled  times.
GEORGIA  STRAIGHT  PROSECUTION
Dr.    Schoenfeld   speaks,    noon,    SUB
auditorium.
DANCE  CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB ballroom.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000  GARMENTS  TO
CHOOSE  FROM
• Full  Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White * Coloured Coats
• Shirts and Accassorias
• 10%   U.B.C.   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631  Howe 688-2481
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75-t 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-t;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
GREAT DOUBLE DANCE! SPRING,
Thin Red Line, at Place Vanier,
Fri., Oct. 3 — 9-1. Res. 1.25, Other
$1.50.	
UNDERCUT RETURNS TO SUB
soon. Your Foresters proudly pre-
sent the greatest bash of 'em all.
TAKE A TRIP ON THE CROSS-
town Bus. Sat., 9-1:00. Sub Ballroom.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
14
LOST: GOLD WATCH INSCRIP-
tion "Susan June 1962" on back.
Reward,   call   Susan   261-8582.
LOST: BROWN BUCKLED SHOES
in white plastic bag. Size 9. Desperately needed. Call Leona 987-
9078.	
PERSON WHO 'FOUND' BROWN
suede jacket in S.U.B. Ballroom
please return to lost and found or
call   Gary   738-6809.   Reward.	
LOST: PEARL RING IN SUB.
Great sentiment attached. Reward.
Phone   Linda   224-1084.	
FOUND: A STUDENT'S BOOK-
let of tickets to the Vancouver
Symphony Society. See Bill, Fort
Camp,   Hut6,   Rm.   38.	
BLACK LOOSE LEAF FOLDER
taken from book store, approx.
3   p.m.,   Sept.   26.   Phone   733-7771.
FOUND: PAT A. MAHONEY'S
Student Card & Social Insurance
Card. Contact Library Circulation
office.	
PLEASE RETURN DOCUMENTS
from wallet taken from back
room of Village Milky Way Store
to  same.	
LOST: BLACK DRAWSTRING
purse. Reward for return of I.D.
and other papers—No questions.
Call   Barb—733-4785.	
LOST — GIRL HITCH HIKER
left black rimmed glasses, two
Tuesday's  ago.   Joan,   738-1310.
NOTICE: LOST/FOUND BEING
cleared out. Claim all goods by
Wednesday next.	
SILVER CH ARM BRACELET,
locket, in girls' change room.
High personal value. Patty, 594-
5357.     	
LOST: ONE GOLD CHARM
bracelet in Angus washroom.
Please  call  261-8533.  Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY — FREEDOM. $18.00
per month inc. insurance. See the
volume dealer in "Two-Wheel
Freedom" for details. Hi-Performance Honda 3712 W. 10th at Alma.
Phone 228-9077.	
DRIVER NEEDED FOR GLEN-
more-BP Area carpool. Thursdays
8:30's.   Laurie,  922-9778.
Special Notices
16
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Complete hair care. 5736
University  Blvd.   Tel.   228-8942.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP. 4 BAR-
bers to serve you. Open 6 days a
week.   5736   University   Blvd.	
DIRECT FROM SPOKANE THE
Thin Red Line, Also Spring, Place
Vanier.  Fri.,   Oct.  3 —  9-1.
MALE STUDENT WOULD LIKE
to have tel. conversation with Ger-
man  fem.   stud,   eves.   682-1150.
FILM SOCIETY GEN. MEETING
today 12:30, Room 247, Sub. New*
members  welcome.	
BOB DYLAN'S PREVIOUSLY UN-
published Tarantula now avail-
able    U.B.C.    Bookstore,    Duthies.
AQUA SOC. DIVE TO PORTEAU
Sunday,    Oct.   5.    Sign    in    Club's
 lounge.  Meeting today.  Brock 303.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.	
NOTICE: LOST/FOUND BEING
cleared out. Claim all goods by
Wednesday   next.	
FREE—CANADA CAREERS DIR-
ectory for class ot 1970 only.
Packed with career opportunities
in industry and Government. Also
information on school boards and
graduate schools. Call at the
Placement Office for your copy
now. 	
ESE-A 48-HR. WEEK-END EN-
counter group. For information,
phone   Lihsa,   224-3582.
Travel Opportunities
17
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: TEN SPEED BIKE IN
good condition. Phone Joan, after
six.    266-6669.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 VOLVO 544, asking $595 or
nearest  offer.   Phone   946-9162.
FOR SALE. 1963 V.W. TWO NEW
tires, Car rack, leatherette. $575
or best offer,  266-9706.	
1956 PLYMOUTH STANDARD SIX
4-door, 62,000 miles. Original
owner.   $195.00.   224-5189.	
'61 VALIANT, DENTED GUARD.
But mech. V. Good — recond.
engine,   etc.   $400.   733-3626.	
1962 AUSTIN 850. PHONE 733-7713
after 5.   Best offer over  $400.	
'67 HONDA SPORTS CAR. PER-
fect. Share low insurance offers.
263-7327.	
1960 V.W. DeLuxe. MECHANICAL-
ly good throughout. Radio. Just
city  tested. $425 o.n.o. 224-4581.
TRIUMPH 6 CONVERTIBLE, 1966
model, only 21,000 miles. Exc.
condition inside and out. One
owner. $900 or nearest offer.
Phone 261-0797, 1058 West 52nd
Ave.	
1966 FIAT 850 COUPE, REBUILT
engine and trans. Asking $850.
Phone    524-4611.	
1962 VW DELUXE MODIFIED 1200.
$825   or   offers.   Phone  733-5017.
'67 CORTINA DELUXE, V. GOOD
cond. Must sell immed. to best
cash offer. Sorry no phone. No.
22—1915  West   Broadway.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
WANTED—PLUS 4, OR SUPER
sports Morgan. No specific year.
Call David-Room No. 86. Phone
224-9834.	
WANTED:      1960-62      VOLVO,      IN
good  condition. Will  pay cash for
the   right   car.   Call   263-5975.
-**-
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
1969 BULTACO PURSANG SCRAM-
bler, Fbgls. body, 250 CC. 33 H.P.,
has lights, muffler removable. $500
224-0681.	
FANTASTIC VESPA SCOOTER,
'69.    90   cc.    $300.    228-9441.	
1968 MATCHLESS (NORTON),
touring model Atlas scrambler,
8800 miles, top shape. Offers to
$900. See Laurie, Room 262, Cunningham Bldg.	
'68 YAMAHA 100 CC. TWIN RE-
built, like new. $325, with helmet.
263-9996,    after    6:00.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
I NEED 15" D-140's; A GOOD
camera. For sale or trade—El.
Guitar.  988-4564 evening.	
EXPERIENCED DRAUGHTSMAN
and artist available for all kinds
graphs, diagrams, artwork. Very
low rates. Call John Kula, 224-
4146.
Photography
34
EXACTA VXLLA 55/1.9 Auto Macro
lens. Like new, must sell. Phone
224-9049   John,   rm.   224.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
L! S! D! LIKE SUPPER DANCES.
Place Vanier. Oct. 3—Fri. 9-1. Two
great  bands.   Res.   1.25.	
DAISY MAE WILL RETURN
again!   Undercut   is   coming.
BEV: GREAT SCOTT I AM SOR-
ry! Unseen arises circumstanced.
Another chance? Sometime, place.
RESIDENCE QUEEN CHOSEN
Sat. Sub Ballroom, 9-1:00. Dance
with   the  great  Cross  Town   Bus.
BLIND STUDENTS NEED VOL-
unteer readers to tape record
textbooks or read "live." No experience necessary. Mutual benefits. Leave name, time available,
and phone number at the Crane
Memorial Library, Branch 254,
daily 8:30-4:30 or phone 228-2373.
Please   help.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
TYPING WORK WANTED. 3589
West   10th   Ave.    733-5922	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.
Typing—Cont'd
40
EXPERT, NEAT, ACCURATE
typing on thesis and term papers
done quickly in my home. Low
rates.   Phone   266-4720.	
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED,
electric typewriters, UBC grad.
Will pick up and deliver. 30c per
sheet.   Phone   942-8144.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-
9253.	
EXPERT TYPING, COMPETATIVE
rates.   879-1807.	
STUDENTS TYPING ESSAYS,
Thesis and Editorial. Phone 435-
2108.	
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESES,
Stencils, etc. On 10th Ave., half
block outside gates. Phone 224-
0244.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c/
page, essays 30c/page — 5c pel
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.	
TYPING SERVICE. MRS. GAIL
Symons—224-6435, 3885 W. 12th
Avenue.	
"TYPING AT HOME." OWN
typewriter.   Call   224-0943.	
TYPING—PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00-
5:00.   266-6662,   after   6:00.	
STUDENT TYPING DONE, 30c
per page. 5c per carbon copy.
Contact Heather DuBois, 327-
8450.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
Help Wanted—Male 52
53
Male or Female
WANT TO MAKE MONEY IN
spare minutes on Campus? Luca-
tive, legal, far from laborious.
Call Mrs.  Duncan. 228-9597	
A GENUINE OFFER ENABLING
male and female students to earn
exceptional wages through part
time referral selling. A worthwhile opportunity for financial reward. If you're of 1.50 per hour
positions then breakaway. Experience is not essential, simply contact Mr. Watson at 733-6845 after
5  p.m.	
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
PRIVATE TUTOR WANTED FOR
maths 202 student. Call evening
261-6939,   Anthony.
Language Instruction
61A
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Learn Conversational French, Spanish, German or English (New Canadians for as low as
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Take   advantage    of   this   amazing
offer:   only  six  students   maximum
per group.
For   the   best  tutoring   in   language
conversation,    call   us    today    (8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) at 736-5401.
CONVERSA-SCHOOL
OF LANGUAGES
(Recognized Educ. Institution)
1603 W.  4th  (at Fir)
Music
62
GUITAR INSTRUCTOR NEEDED
Saturdays for boys and girls aged
8-14. Phone 224-3283, Dave Bell
Alma Y.
63
Special Classes
SKI INSTRUCTORS' TRAINING
COURSE — Whistler Mtn. — 6
weekends — Oct. 4th and/or 5th
to Nov. 8th and/or 9th. 6 consecutive Sats. OR Sundays—$20.00; all
12 Saturdays and Sundays—$36.00.
For information phone or write:
Jim McConkey, Alta Lake, B.C.
932-5422.
SCUBA DIVING CLASSES
N.A.U.I. CERTIFICATION
(Internationally    Recognized)
PLACE:  Crystal  Pool (West End)
TIME: On* night par week for 6 wks.
HOURS:   7:30-12:00 p.m.
STARTING  DATES: Monday, Oct. 6
or Wednesday, Oct. 8.
$50   COURSE   INCLUDES:
* 30 hours Instruction
* All equipment supplied
* Book • Ocean  check-out
<a- 20% off equipment purchases
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
Few Openings Available
REGISTER BY  PHONE
(24 Hr. Service)
685-6017
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
AVAILABLE   MONDAY   -    $1.00
at the  Bookstore
and   AMS   Publications   Office
Misc. for Sale—Cont'd
71
FREE PASSES TO GUESTS OF
Invitation 69/70 Book holders to
movies,   restaurants,   night   clubs,
etc. Don't miss yours, $1.75, at
SUB   information.	
LADY'S CHEMISTRY COAT, SIZE
34; overcoat in pure wool gabardine, size 42; very good quality;
sport  jacket,  42.  224-7623.	
1968 CANADIAN MINT COIN
sets. Must sell! Cal] 263-5975,
after six.	
FOR   SALE:   WAIS   TESTING   KIT
with zipper case  and stop watch.
$40.00.   Call   Elrod   at   228-3510.
FOR   SALE:   BED,   CHAIRS,   DIN-
ette  set,   tables,   rug,  mirror,   etc.
Cheap.  224-0534,  after  5 p.m.
WINCHESTER COOEY, MODEL
600. New .22 cal. bolt action repeater rifle with Weaver C4 Scope,
strap, carrying case and cleaning
kit. $50. Call 434-3047 after 6 p.m.
MATTRESS FOR DOUBLE BED.
Mint condition. Phone Tim at 228-
3934   or   738-5990.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURN. ROOM. MALE NON-
smoker. Light — washing — sandwiches. Breakf. arranged. Close to
UBC.  Phone  224-7141.
ROOM FOR LET. CLEAN, NICELY
finished basement room. Males
only please, 2995 W. 10th Ave.
Phone   738-0476.
TIRED OF COMMUTING? ROOMS
for male students on campus,
5760 Toronto Rd. Room $50 per
month, room and board $95 per
month. Kitchen privileges available. Linen changed weekly.
Parking accommodation for 20
large study room & lounge. Contact Ron Dick at the house or at
home.   224-0327.	
FURNISHED SLEEPING ROOM
for male on campus laundry facilities. Shower & Toilet $50. 224-
5726. 	
FURNISHED SLEEPING ROOM
for male on campus, laundry facilities, shower, toilet. $50. 224-
5726.	
STUDENTS ONLY — FURNISHED
light housekeeping rooms. Shared
facilities. Close to UBC, transportation. Available immediately.
$50 month. Lloyd or Tom, 732-
7827.	
2 GIRLS SHARE MODERN
sleeping room, private bath, twin
beds. Use of washer, dryer, TV.
Reasonable.   738-5942,   Kitchen.
TWO SLEEPING ROOMS, SHARE
kitchenette, bathroom. Suit
friends, men or women, $85 mo.
738-4892.	
BROAD-MINDED COUPLE HAVE
furnished basement room, private entrance for male student.
$45.00  mo.   732-6714.   3549  W.   19th.
MARRIED COUPLE GRAD. STUD,
seek overnight quarter once
weekly on campus or vicinity.
Leave message Wednesdays for
Jilek    Anthropology    Department.
Room & Board
82
BE A BOARDER AT PHI GAMMA
Delta. 10 mins. walking to any
building on campus. Call 224-9769
for details.
THE SIGMA CHI HOUSE IS OPEN-
ing this week so will all those who
were interested please secure a
room by $25 damage deposit or
the room will be let. 5725 Agron
omy  Rd.	
ROOM BOARD (Male) PRIV. ENT.
sleeping room. 3665 W. 11th Ave.
731-5996, Mrs. F. A. Phillips.
LIVE ON CAMPUS, PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Sauna, colour TV. 5785
Agronomy   Rd.   224-9684.	
THE SIGMA CHI HOUSE OFFERS
you, as a resident: largest rooms
with w/w carpeting, ample cupboard and drawer space, comfortable lounge areas, colour T.V.
Newest house on campus. Live
at The Sig House! 5725 Agronomy Rd. Come and see us or
phone 731-3030, after 6 p.m. (except   Wed.) ^	
Furn. Houses & Aprs. 83
GIRL STUDENT TO SHARE
great West End apt. with same.
$85  month.   Phone  Dawn  688-8909.
SENIO GIRL FOR FURN. WEST
End apt. 26th floor, indoor pool.
$80.   681-7079.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION

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