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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 1968

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Array Mutton's
on the menu
THE U8YSSEY
but where's
the broiled
lameduck?
Vol. L. No. 12
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1968
48'
224-3916
FIRST YEAR SCIENCE STUDENTS enthusiatically transport an engineer to
Jill Cameron's SUB office. It seems this engineer and a few friends invaded
a science general meet. Great'.fun eh boys? By!,the way, didja ever hear
— John friiell photo
of Mexico ? Seems, the engineers and sciencemen are having a fight
down there too. Wouldn't that kind of a game be fun. I wonder if Fraser
would   still   say   things   like   the   'protest'  story   if   he   were   in   Mexico?
AMS general meeting
debates pub in SUB
Drinkers unite !
The Alma Mater Society will hold a special general
meeting Tuesday noon to discuss ways and means of getting
a pub in SUB.
And there's nothing to lose but pub-ins if the meeting
succeeds in working out a way or a mean.
Place is outside SUB, at the southwest corner.
A spokesman for the Women's Christian Temperance
Union charged The Ubyssey Wednesday with presenting
only one side of the liquor question.
Here is the other side:
The spokesman, Mrs. Janetta Rodgers, along with her
teenaged son Lance, visited The Ubyssey office Thursday
morning and engaged most of the staff in hot debate about
the role of liquor in our society.
She continued: "The legality of alcohol is not justified
in face of the expense to society — in dollars and human
lives — by the remaining 40% who use it." She concluded
that increased drinking by younger people and students)
would only make the situation -worse.
Besieged with calls to break out the beer, she left The
Ubyssey office after endorsing Welch's grape juice.
New BoG head gets
mixed UBC reaction
Protest and I'll
break your nose'
UBC engineers will use violence against any students detaining them from attending interviews with industrial recruiting officers, says engineering undergrad society president Fraser
Hodge.
"There will be some broken noses and broken heads if they
try it this year," Hodge told a meeting of the alumni association
commission on student participation in university affairs Tuesday.
Last November, more than 100 students sat in and marched
around UBC's placement office to protest recruitment of students by Dow Chemical of Canada, which they alleged was
producing war materiel for use against Vietnamese civilians.
But this year, said Hodge, although he wouldn't use force
himself, "there are some engineers who are fed up and won't
stop at anything to get into that office."
Hodge made the comments at the commission's first meeting, in which members talked to students from UBC's technical
and professional faculties. The commission was formed in August to examine the causes of student unrest.
Engineering students also warned at the meeting that they
would oppose to the extent of violence any attempt by students
to interrupt classes or the operation of the university in their
quest for academic reform.
The selection of millionaire forestry magnate, Dr. Walter Koerner as chairman of the
UBC board of governors brought mixed reaction on campus Thursday.
The Alma Mater Society, in a prepared
statement, questioned the choice of Koerner
in light of student demands for participation in
decisions that affect them.
Faculty association president Dr. William
Webber endorsed the selection on the grounds
of Koerner's experience and past association
with UBC.
"He has been a good friend of the university
and I think his appointment is entirely appropriate," Webber said in an interview Thursday.
"He is a man with a lot of experience and one
who has devoted a lot of time to the welfare of
UBC."
The AMS statement said it had been hoped
the vacancy (created by the resignation of
Nathan Nemetz) would have been filled by an
individual chosen by the students and facutly.
"With demands we have been hearing from
students for campus-wide participation in the
decisions affecting students and facutly, we
thought this would be a prime consideration in
the selection of the chairman," said AMS president Dave Zirnhelt.
Ruth Dworkin, internal affairs officer, said
in an interview that the choice was "perpetuating the capitalistic structure of the university
that we  are trying to  change."
Koerner was named chairman Tuesday in a
closed meeting by the board, which has final
say in all matters of UBC policy and finance.
Three of the board's members are elected
by the senate, which includes faculty in its
membership, and the other five members are
appointed by the lieutenant-governor of B.C.
Asked for a statement by The Ubyssey
Thursday, Koerner said, "I am not prepared to
say anything at this time; I will release a statement next week."
Victoria tent-in
Rlnnrl tn+nl      Protests housing
U ■ WW       f \*/1 W I VICTORIA (Staff"i — A tent-in bv about 4C
falls short
Why  aren't you bleeding ?
The Red Cross blood clinic had an
average of 350 donors per day at the beginning of the week, but this number has
dropped considerably.
Those who read on clinic signs "Is this
blood going to American troops in Vietnam?" shouldn't worry. Dr. Stout, organizer of the drive, wishes to emphasize that
the blood goes to Canadians in B.C.
If not enough blood is obtained, the
B.C. hospitals will experience a shortage
for two months.
There has been a total of 1,057 bleeders at SUB. Of all the faculties only
forestry has gone over its quota.
Agriculture was passed by phys ed for
second place, while architecture and faculty and staff are trailing.
VICTORIA (Staff) — A tent-in by about 40
students in 14 tents at the University of Victoria is protesting the lack of low-cost housing
permanently   available   to   students.
The 5,000-student university — which has
campus residences for only 300 at $90 per
month — is located in the posh Victoria suburb
of Oak Bay which restricts the number of unrelated persons in a house to three.
"Government irresporisibility has been
shown in failure to provide adequate capital
grants to be university s:o that it can afford
to build student residences on campus," says
a statement issued by the tenters.
"When students have tried to take the initiative in providing co-operative housing, they
have met nothing but red tape and cold
shoulders from the city and provincial bureaucrats."
The tent-in, which started Sunday night, is
expected to last another week. And the administration is reported to be backing the tenters.
Similar tent-ins blossomed and faded last
month at the University of Toronto and Queen's
University in Kingston. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968
The Alma Mater Society
ofthe
University of British Columbia
Statement of Estimated Net Revenue and  Expenditure
Year Ending May 31, 1969
(With Comparative Figures for 1968)
REVENUE
Alma Mater Society Fees
Profit from College Shop
Rental Income	
Interest Income
Sundry Income 	
Total Revenue	
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED
Non-Discretionary:
Student Union Building
Accident Benefit Fund
Brock Art Fund
Brock Management Fund
Canadian Union of Students
Men's Athletic Committee
Women's Athletic Committee
Discretionary:
Students' Associations (2)
Academic Symposium
B.C. Assembly of Students
Radio Society (2)
W.U.S.C.  (2)
Intramural Fund  .
Office Equipment Reserve
Open House — 1970
Provision for Loss on Inventory
EXPENDITURE
Campus Activities and Events (3)
Publications  (3)      	
Registration Photographs
University Clubs Committee
Admin, and General Expenses (1)
Total Allocation and
Expenditure 	
MARGIN     ....    	
Prop«j-w*
Allocation      Allocation Actual
"•»             im« ma
$432,000    $464,000 $493 520
2,000 5,505
2.400 3,118
2,500          5,200 5 528
5,300 5,942
$434,500    $478,900   »513*,613
$ 270,000    $ 240,000    $ 252,555
1,800
1,500
9.000
13,500
1,600
1,500
8.000
10.400
67,200
12,800
1,884
1,500
8,418
12,628
70,715
13,470
$295,800    $341,500    $360,970
7,930    $    9,905    $   14,613
400 400
2,084
300
5,090 5,300
3,830 2,800
1,000
1,000
300
5,390
2,800
2,633
1,000
2,500
$   17,850    $   19,795    $   31,720
$   14,750 $   15,705 $   23,541
16,450 15.400 16,590
4.800 4,800 4,836
4,000 5,000 5,878
59,250 53,500 55,380
$   99,250    $   94,405    $106,225
$412,900    $455,700    $498,915
21,600 23,200 14,698
$434,500    $478,900   $513,613
SCHEDULE  1
Statement of Proposed  Administrative  and  General  Expenses
Year Ending May 31, 1969
(With Comparative Figures for 1968)
Prop-sad
Office Salaries     	
Student Government Expenses:
Executive Salaries 	
Dinner Meetings   	
Entertainment
Travel      	
Elections and General Meetings
Council Committees 	
Other Expenses   	
Means Survey  	
Stationery and Office Expenses
Honoraria, Gifts and Donations      .
Insurance	
Telephone and Telegrams	
Postage  	
Audit and Legal
Public Relations Expense    	
Depreciation Expense
Repairs and Maintenance
Budaat
Budaat
Actual
1948
lata
40,000
$   36.450
$   35,635
5,500
2,350
3,948
100
800
1,022
200
700
700
200
400
214
1,400
1,300
2,046
100
100
439
1.200
1,200
888
233
1,400
1,100
523
1,910
1,500
1,318
100
460
338
4.300
4,300
4,128
300
300
240
1.200
1,200
2,050
350
350
363
690
690
940
300
300
355
$   59.250    $   53,500    $   55,380
SCHEDULE 2
Statemen of Proposed Discretionary Allocations
Year Ending May 31, 1969
(With Comparative Figures for 1968)
Students' Association and
Undergraduate Societies:
Agriculture        $
Architecture  ...
Arts
B. Comm.-C.A. Students 	
Commerce	
Dentistry 	
Education	
Engineering	
Forestry	
Graduate Students'
Home Economics
Law Students' 	
Librarianship	
Medical   	
Medical and Dental
Music  	
Nursing      	
Pharmacy	
Physical Education
Rehabilitation Medicine
Science     	
Social Work Students'
Undergraduate Societies Committee
Margin   	
Proposad
Budsat       t
19*9
120    $
600
395
235
700
745
160
120
180
455
100
250
100
195
265
140
105
665
200
100
190
1,250
50
900
700
1.200
400
300
150
600
IOC
450
270
150
300
110
100
800
200
585
Baianca
May 31
1941
■ 218
57)
503
619
315)
2,890
1.059
1,290
177
201
7
505
208)
142
288
340)
8)
673)
337)
5,013
Subsidiary Publications
$    6,130   $    8,905   $   10,982
1.800 1,000    (        659)
S    7,930    $    9,905    $   10,323
SCHEDULE 3
Campus Activities and Events and  Publications
(With Comparative Figures for 1968)
Year Ending May 31, 1969
Campus Activities and Events:
Academic Activities 	
CU.S. Committee  	
C.U.S.O	
Conferences	
Co-op Housing  	
Debating Union 	
Education Action Programme
Fall Conference	
Festival of Contemporay Arts
Frosh Orientation 	
Frosh Retreat     	
Higher Education Promotion .
Homecoming	
Housing Action Programme
Housing Office 	
Mamooks      	
Performing Arts Committee
Speakers Committee 	
Special Events 	
Subsidiary Symposia 	
Publications:—
Student Directory ....
Sundry Publications
Tuum Est	
Ubyssey    	
Proposad
Allocation
194V
1.750 $
250
1.000
5,000
250
100
200
200
4,000
1,000
1.000
1,925 $
130
1,100
4,750
250
1,500
500
500) (
750
400)
300) (
5,000
1,000
2,532
400
1,007
7,075
500
275
396
1,642
500
1,551)
884
38
2,510
1,000
122)
5,838
617
$ 14,750 $ 15,705 $ 23,541
$( 1,500) $( 1,600) $( 1,225)
300     250 155
650     550 -753
17,000   16,200 16,907
$ 16,450 $ 15,400 $ 16,590
Bored student
makes own job
Dave Norton, sick of unchallenging summer
jobs, decided to create his own.
Last May, third year law student Norton
started 68 Invitation 69, a student-oriented book
of entertainment passes.
"I've done everything in the last eight summers from piling lumber to selling brushes
door to door, and last May I decided to do something with a challenge," said Norton.
He then spent the next five months contacting people in every area of the entertainment
field.
"I must have talked to 200 people, trying
to find the best possible reductions for entertainment students would be interested in," said
Norton.
"The experience of meeting these people
and learning about their business was fascinating — an education in itself.
"When I decided to start 68 Invitation 69, I
had several ideas in mind. Students have a lot
of time to enjoy Vancouver's entertainment but
not that many know what this city has to offer.
"Also, many business firms interested in
attracting students would be willing to offer
special rates."
68 Invitation 69's 33 different offers include
movie passes, ski lift and tow tickets for
Whistler Mountain and Mount Baker, free ice
skating, bowling, horseback riding and golf as
well as free food.
The book also includes passes to night clubs
and coffee houses.
The booklets are available in SUB, the campus bookstore, and residence canteens as well
as from student salesmen at 50 cents per book.
"The sales have been fantastic. The book's
been out only two weeks and hundreds of
people have bought them."
NDP poll chooses
LaPierre, Berger
Laurier LaPierre and Tom Berger topped
a recent poll — as campus favorites for the
leadership of the NDP.
The poll was carried out on Clubs Day by
the UBC New Democratic Party.
LaPierre was the outstanding favorite to
take over as national party leader when Tommy
Douglas retires, as announced, in 1969. LaPierre federal vice-president of the NDP, now
teaching history at McGill University, received
51.5 per cent of the votes, with over four times
as many votes as second place Tommy Douglas.
If a new provincial party leader were to be
chosen, Tom Berger is first choice at UBC.
Dave Barrett placed second with about four
fifths as many votes as Berger.
Eldridge dares
Reagan to duel
SAN FRANCISCO (CUPI)—Eldridge Cleaver, hounded by California politicians and legal
officials, lashed back Wednesday at governor
Ronald Reagan, calling him "a punk, a sissy
and a coward."
He challenged Reagan to a duel to the death
or "until he says Uncle Eldridge" — and gave
the governor a choice of weapons: guns, knives,
baseball bats or marshmallows.
The Black Panther minister of information
was speaking to an overflow crowd of 2,500 in
an hour and a quarter speech at Stanford University near here.
The University of California at Berkeley
is awaiting final decision on a proposal to
allow him to lecture there. The Berkeley faculty meets Friday to discuss the action of the
board of regents last month limiting Cleaver
to one lecture on the campus.
Cleaver described the United States as "the
successor to Nazi Germany, the number 1 obstacle to human progress — not Russia, not
China, but Babylon, right here in North America."
Giovanni's Comes to West 4th!
With His Award-Winning Hairstylists
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
Why have we added
shape to our
Soft Shoulder tailoring?
Because you asked for it
Men who wear soft shoulder tailoring are
generally more fashion conscious. They select
clothing with more variation of colour, pattern, and texture.
It is the same with styling. Even though soft
shoulder styles are traditional, our customers
like just a touch of change periodically . . .
to give each suit in their wardrobe a certain
individuality.
The trace of shape, the deep side vents, two-
button closure — these are styling details
currently emphasized by Cambridge stylists.
It's their job to know what customers want,
and to create styling innovations which start
the trends.
If you like to be fashionably dressed, our new
soft shoulder "shape" is the touch you need.
The Woolmark on the Cambridge label assures
you it is a quality tested product made of the
world's best... Pure Virgin Wool.
Cambridge
Traditionally fine clothes.
2174 W. 41st in KERRISDALE
AM 1-2750
LTO Friday, October 4, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
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ill
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— dick button photo
n SUB
RENE DUMONT — speaks tomorrow at 11:15 a.m
for the African Symposium workshop.
Politicians, professors
highlights Africa talks
Speakers from Sierra Leone, Ghana, England, France, and
the U.S. will participate in the African Students Association
symposium this weekend.
Today, Hon. L. A. M. Brewah, minister of external affiairs,
Sierra Leone, will be speaking at noon in SUB on the Future
role of the Military in African Development.
Tomorrow, a workshop will be held at SUB.
At 10 a.m., W. E. Abraham of the University of Ghana will
be speaking on African Political Philosophies.
At 11:15 a.m., Rene Dumont, University of Paris will speak
on Difficulties   of  African   Socialism.
At 1:30 p.m., St. Clair Drake, Roosevelt University, Chicago,
will speak on: Pan Africanism: Myth and Reality.
Peter Lloyd, University of Sussex, England will speak on
The Politics of Ethnicity: the Nigerian Example at 2:45 p.m.
Election statements
in Tuesday edition       *'
Candidates for Alma Mater Society and student sen-  *-■*■
ate elections must have their statements in to The Ubyssey  k<
office by Monday noon for publication in Tuesday's paper,  u
Seconder's statements will not be printed due to lack   ,
1  of space.
Seven file nominations
in student senator race
Nominations for senate and Alma Mater
Society elections closed Thursday.
There are now seven students running for
the position of student senator: three for AMS
secretary.
Vincent Richard, arch 1; Stephen Slutsky,
grad studies; Ron G. Smith, commerce 3; Stuart Rush, law 2; BiU Ferguson, law 2; Don Munton, grad studies; and Carel Howe ed 3, are
candidates for the three senate seats.
Stan Persky, arts 4; Dulcie Brimacombe, ed
4; and Isobel Semple, nursing 4, are secretarial
candidates.
Munton is running for his second term as
student senator.
He says that student representation on senate has been effective.
"Decisions have been made that would
have been substantially different if the students
hadn't been there."
Rush said student representation can be
more effective if there are more students on
the senate.
He questions the effectiveness of the student on the senate committees.
"One out of seven members has no significant say in making the decisions. In a situation
like that there should be an equal number of
students and facutly."
"But there is also the issue of the structure
and function of the senate," he said.
"I will move to abolish the board of governors and have the powers constituted under
the Universities Act transferred to the senate."
Rush wants to establish a student senate
body through which students can demand a
more thorough role in the decisions that affect
us.
Munton feels the senate long range objective committee is a very important one.
"My main reason for running again is to
get back on this committee. It is here we study
the philosophical question—-what education is
all about," he said.
There is disagreement among the candidates
for secretary as to the role the secretary should
play in the AMS.
Miss Brimacombe says the issue is whether
one' can put the time and interest into the job.
"I'm not a publicity monger, seeking a radical change," she said. "The job entails quite a
bit as the AMS has .formed a lot of committees
that the secretary has to chair."
Persky thinks student government has been
a disappointment so far. He is more concerned
with the philosophical aspects of the job.
PET says students selfish',
Saskabush Thatcher no-shows
REGINA (CUP)—More than
1500 chanting University of
Saskatchewan students marched here Wednesday to confront
prime minister Pierre Trudeau
and provincial premier Ross
Thatcher.
All they got in reply to their
protests about student loans
was rhetoric from Trudeau and
a conspicuous absence from
Thatcher.
Trudeau told the students
they were "selfish" to ask that
student loans be made to all
academically qualified students. He said governments
just can't go ahead and print
money and society as a whole
bears the financial burden of
education.
Seeing his comments were
bouncing off the demonstrators, the PM retreated behind
"education is a provincial matter — I'm sure you get the
message" and tootled off to the
airport after speaking for about
ten minutes.
Thatcher never appeared but
an aide said he would speak
to students "at a later date."
Some students had hoped the
demonstration would force
Thatcher to make good his
summer promise to close Saskatchewan's universities at first
sign of activism there.
The crowd followed a huge
Canadian flag and bristled with
signs reading "Toss Ross", "We
want loans", "A free university In a free society" and
"Just society just for the rich".
The demonstration, contrary
to mass media reports, Was in
the most part peaceful, though
brief shoving occurred as the
crowd strained to get closer
to hear Trudeau.
The crowd parted to make
way for the official party on
its way to the airport and broke
up soon after.
Student upholds right
to shit in faculty can
By JOHN GIBBS
What does a student radical do when nature calls?
According to Pat Chen, geography 3, the logical thing
to do is to answer the call at the nearest washroom. Accordingly he has been using the faculty washroom in the
geography building since the beginning of the term.
Thursday, however, the law, in the person of secretary
Mrs. Donnan, caught up with him and threatened disciplinary action if the crime continued. He was told the student washroom was downstairs.
"But all my classes are on the second floor," Chen told
The Ubyssey Thursday, "and when you have to go . . .
well, I just never had time to look for the other one."
When Chen voiced dissatisfaction he was directed to
Dr. J. L. Robinson, former head of the department, who
allegedly called him "a student radical . . . looking for
trouble."
Dr. J. D. Chapman, head of the department, told The
Ubyssey he wasn't going to get excited about the infraction. "If he's the type of person who gets mad about a
thing like this, then that's his problem."
As for Chen, when nature calls? "I intend to continue
to use the faculty washroom — it's a matter of principle as
well as convenience."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising, local 26. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 4, 1968
For Engineers:
A revealing point in the current Mexican student
rebellion is that much of the leadership and support
among the students comes from technical faculties such
as engineering, architecture and medicine.
The reasons for this spring mainly from the economic
and social realities of Mexico, rather than any qualitative
difference in the personalities of technical students at
UBC and those in Mexico.
In fact, if conditions in Canada were to deterriorate
to the level they are currently in Mexico (and indications
are that this will be the case in the not-too-distant future) the technical students will likely be in the forefront
of the radical movement they presently condemn.
Technical faculty students generally have a better
grasp of the economic realities of their environment
than do arts students, whose courses deal mainly with
the social institutions on top of the economic base.
The technical students know that their jobs are vital
to the basic operations of the economy, and that when
they graduate they will get recognition of this by above-
average salaries.
In their social consciousness, they undoubtedly know
that it is largely due to their efforts that the economy
progresses in its given direction.
And if the UBC technical faculties can be described
as 'reactionary' in a general world anti-capitalist, anti-
imperialist trend, it is only because they feel that the
economy they live under is sound and progressing and
they can play a rewarding part in it.
For Mexican and'other South American technical
students, however, the reality they observe is quite
different.
All around them is an environment of grinding poverty and despair, obvious signs that the economy of their
nation is unable to meet the requirements of their people.
They can also see clearly the overwhelming control
foreign interests have in their economy. And the operation of these foreign companies is based on the needs of
another country, not their own.
The technical students realize that the economic
growth of their countries is not progressing as fast as it
could, because the impetus for development comes from
outside their country and is not designed primarily to
improve the conditions within it.
Because of the suppressed economic conditions, technical graduates are often without jobs upon graduation,
yet all around them they see how their training could
be benificially put to use.
Because of the overwhelming foreign control of the
economy, there are few national agencies that they can
enter which will allow them to pursue their goals.
For this reason, many are obviously coming to the
realization that the economic organization of their country should be changed, and are taking action on their
beliefs.
Technical students at UBC seem always willing to
take action on their beliefs: example their announcement
that they will retaliate with violence against any attempt
of radical students to forcibly take over senate or board
of governors meetings.
Hopefully they will be as ready to take action when
the crisis in the Canadian economic structure comes.
For the economic conditions of Canada are remarkably similar to those of South America, with the exception that at the moment they are meeting the material
needs of the majority of the Canadian people.
Undeniably most of Canadian industry, particularly
in extraction of raw materials, is controlled by American
interests, whose economy is largely dependent on the
Vietnam war. and exploitation of other countries, for
its current boom.
When the war ends, and if similar operations are not
undertaken elsewhere in the world a major recession will
knock the bottom out of the demand for Canadian raw
materials, and with it Canada's general prosperity and
the jobs of the technical graduates.
Then, hopefully, we'll all be on the same side, and
ready to get down to it.
Digging contradictions
By STAN PERSKY
There's  an argument  raging about senate. "wasting  time".   Nobody  will  agree  that  oui*
Understanding the contradictions is what's mutual understanding of what any situation is
called  political education.  But as  usual most constitutes a political achievement. (That agree-
people are shouting for "action", even when all ment, by the way, doesn't yet exist, which is
the possible actions are meaningless. Although why I'm writing this.)
many radical students might disagree with me But  events  press  on,  faster  than  we can
I  think you  could  come to various decisions handle them. And we're faced with elections
about this issue, but if you don't understand the and boring candidates, even though there isn't
situation your decision is useless, an agreement on what the problems are.
The   following  considera- UNSATISFYING ..
tions seem to be involved in              The  response of the  radical  students has
the student senate elections: been to make the following proposals. I feel
The administration and fa- these   proposals   are   based   on   an intelligent
culty, while accepting student analysis of the situation and that they're reason-
participation, don't really be- able.  At the  same  time  they're  unsatisfying,
... -*^-» •**■*,    «     lieve in it. They allow students emotionally  and  politically.   (In  praising  the
Bl     "M     *     to participate under political virtues   and   criticising   the   defects   of   these
P*% A       pressure, and then deny that proposals,   I'm   unable  to   offer   "constructive
this is the case. The emana- alternatives" that will solve our problems.)
tion  of this feeling (or "the              Radical students propose we shouldn't parti-s.
vibrations" as the hippies put cipate in  these elections  and  in  fact,  should
it)   permit   the   students   to campaign  against the election itself. The ad-
PERCKY            treat the issue in a contentious vantage of this proposal is that, in the process,
* *                  spirit that's cold, realistic and many students will bs educated as to one ver-
politicaily calculating. The students seem to be sion of the "real" situation, and that the admin-
saying,  "As long as they keep faking it, we istration and  faculty  may  come to  take  our
might as well not act with feelings of coopera- Point of view more seriously. They will see that
tivencss,   but   treat   the   matter   as   a   power we aren't willing to play meaningless games,
struggle, and fight it out, inch by inch."                           And a more Utopian proposal* has to do with
Students   feel   that   having   four   senators a.''S^'Se°*" ^'T '^ ^ ^^
among eighty is tokenism. By tokenism, they HE^rCT7° RADICAI'IfM .*,,«.
mean that while the student viewpoint can be The student council has already rejected the
veVbally  presented, when  it  comes  to  conse- radical   approach   to  this   problem.   They ve    _
quences, whan it comes to a course of action announced they intend to go ahead with the
being  voted   on,   the   students   can   be  easily elections. The radicals could, of course, attempt
voted down. The concept of tokenism is pre- to st°P tne election by force   e.g. seizing the
sented by a small group of students. A larger ballot boxes' destroying the ballots, etc) or in a
group thinks and argues that progress is being more humorous way could screw things up by
made, and that the student viewpoint is conse- setting   UP   lots   of   additional   polling   places.
quentiaUy heard in committees. rePlete   with   fake   ball°ts>   different   names,
tovphtqm  rvsMDip straight   chicks,   etc.,   and   create   a  situation
r, , . , ., whereby many students could justly claim that
This group of students point to the senate's th     didn>t haye a legal opportunity to partici. .
recent decision to open the senate to 30 spec- pate in the election and that it should be held
tators and the press. The students presenting a    in   -  haven>t  seen  any evidenee that  the
the concept  of tokenism point to exactly the _adical gtudentg haye the desire Qr energy to
same issue as being an example of what they ca__y Qut either  of thege actions
mean. They say,  "Look how long it took the It,_  important to see  the poUtical  reality,
senate to  accept  in any way  a  fundamental There wag a procedure for the elections an*3
principle of how government is going to oper- fte  ^g   unqu.8Stioningiy  adopted   it.   Maybe
ate   Look how much opposition there is, even th      took the eagy way Qut   maybe they were  ,
at   his time, to the idea of an open senate. And cid6ken_   Radical    students    could    campaign
isn t the limitation of 30 idiotic ? Surely, the againgt the whole election.
senate  can  meet  somewhere  as  we  want  to, HOW EFFECTIVE '
could attend " How ,effective wouid this be ? The number
Finally,  there is an even larger group of Qf students wiUing to conduct an anti.campaign
students at UBC who evidence no interest in seems tQ me miniscule As a politicai operation,
the matter whatsover. it gtrikes me ag a degperate? frustrated move.
Another question that hangs over the whole But it would amount to a courageous stand on
issue is: what will the senate look like event- principles. *■>
ually ?  How many students should be  on it ? Further, the "alternative" offered to partici-
Representation   by   population ?   Equal   repre- pating in senate, that of working primarily on
sentation for  students  and  teachers ?   Should the departmental level isn't good enough,
anyone be  on the senate except members  of ENTIRE BODY
the  current   university   community? Merely working in departments isn't going ,
The string   of  unanswered  questions   goes to change overcrowding, isn't going to move us
on at length and it seems, that despite all the from bounded cources to a notion of an open
popular talk about communication, there isn't program. I mean, Arts I isn't something needed
very much of it  available. In  answer to  the by just first-year students,  but  an  idea  that
question, what more can be done? There are would benefit   the   entire   student  body.   And
committees, commissions, hearings, mass meet- these  are  issues  that  the  AMS   ought  to be
ings and publications by the students and the fighting for.
administration.  How can you say communica- I'm   surprised   when   even   radical   student
tion isn't good ? Well, all I know is that most councillors wander around in a depressed way,
students don't feel the matter is very important. pointing out the uselessness of AMS. Not only
MAKE PROPOSALS could they argue for the importance of depart- -
Usually, when I point this out, people fin- mental work (which they do), but they could
ally and reluctantly agree that this is the case. put all of our politics into perspective by show-
Then they get a little angry because this has ing what can be done at the AMS level and by
been pointed out, and irritatedly demand that arguing for an intensive examination of our
instead of explaining the situation I should psychological stance and its consequences in
make some "constructive proposals". They inter-personal relationships,
treat my explanation, which they wouldn't Which is why I'm running for AMS
accept at first, but now grudgingly admit to, as secretary.
EDITOR: Al Birnie Tonight! Cod Is Dead, says Joey Small-       Muriel    Moscovich    and    Frank    Flynn.
wood! Irene   Wasilewski  froze   in  her   tracks,
«*— "»' k-« uTW^-s ^ % ~t s. ^urrder^Va^d
News   John Twigg **   °-*l* „,,„„{,_£«  «_,,;,,-   h™?»   w£" Zvdu rain dances. Michel Lalain chased
paper clip chains* sex, fun, booze, nasn, ,_.         ___                         ,    ..         ,,.        .    .
Managing    Mike Jessen siJCp and that elusive thing called at- %™™?™T„,™r?*i ™*„°.*?%J£
Phot. .... Fr.d C.wsey. Pow.., H.rgr.v. ^^^i^lSL^TZ^^^ ^s££_£"S_S_S orTTr E&
w"-<*   P'ter Ladner ^S^'J^^'^^SX but  Norman  ™W  refrained,   prefer-
«••« Friday   Andrew Horv.t of sra   wm  it be   the   sTme?   Never ring to use Nader Mirhady as a lariat*
Sports   Jim Maddin Will   It  be   as   good?   Of   course,   with Ann Bishop will be fulfilled on Tues-
everybody helping who will be. day.
Fascists (including Alex) unite! ! !  Go Come around today at noon and help Maddin is still playing solitaire.
Southam, Young Hack! Freedom for the us   move.   Anybody   is   welcome:   bring Dick   Button,   Lawrence   Woodd   and
Students and People of North Kaliman- y°ur  friends  and  enemies. John   Frizzell   took   glossy   black   and
tan!  Candy is Dandy,  but  Sex  Doesn't For the last time. Ann Arky and Irv- wl"te photographs. Photogs meet today
Rot    Your   Teeth!    Gabor   Mate   is   a ing   Fetish   cavorted   around   the   root at noon in Brock.
Liberal!   Virginity  is  a   State   of  Mind! cellar. And for the first of many times. And so the end. Our only friends are
Goodbye  Cruel Office! Deadlines are  a Alex Volkoff played city ogre, dodging in   SUB.   Enter   the   snake,  whose   skin .
Myth!  Get Your Hoods, Men: We Ride ice cream rolls from Erik Brynjolfsson, is cold.                                                           j SECONDS BEFORE DEATH in hail of bullets, man gazes in terror
at advancing troops from balcony of Mexico City apartment Wed-
—AP Wlrephoto
nesday night.   Gunfire which swept plaza during student riots
has already killed two of hip companions.
l\
ABOVE- THE FROMT-PAGE PHOTO OF
THE VANCOUVER SUN. THU R6, OCT. Zrd
1st EDITION. BELOUJ- THE FRONTPAGE PHOTO OF THE VANCOUVER SUN,
THUR6., OCT. 3rd, 2nd. EDITION.
CONTROVERSIAL ROYAL PHOTO TRULY WARM AND CHARMING FAMILY SCENE
—Copyright Telegram 1968
QUEEN ELIZABETH cradles infant son Prince Edward in endearing family photograph soon after
her youngest child's birth in 1964.   Snapshot was.
apparently taken by Princess Anne as Prince Philip,
Prince Charles and Prince Andrew gathered around
bedside in Buckingham Palace.   Photograph was
published in London over Queen's objections after
first appearing in French magazine. p£ 2wo
Mundane  Muscovites
&.*■*»*'
By MICHAEL FREEMAN
Between Nov. 15, 1967 and Aug. 10,
1968 I was a visitor in the USSR, under
an exchange between the National Research Council and the Soviet Academy of
Sciences.
I lived in Dubna, a small town 75
miles north of Moscow, where there is a
large, international institute doing research
in nuclear and high energy physics. For my
interests, there was no better place to work
in the Soviet Union, and I was able to collaborate in some interesting research.
I made short visits to Leningrad and the
Black Sea (Yalta and Sochi), one day visits
to Zagorsk and Kimri, and many short
trips to Moscow. The rest of the time (except for a 3 week holiday in Rumania) I
spent in Dubna. Like all other foreigners
in the USSR, I required permission to visit
any place outside Dubna, and this was always obtained within 2 days.
After a few months, with the help of
some private lessons, I had picked up
enough Russian to get by. I usually spoke
English with the people I worked, but In
Shoddy workmanship
general, few Russians are able  to speak
English or  any  other foreign language.
DRUNKENNESS
I really had no opportunity to meet
university students, but there were a number of "aspirants" (grad students) in Dubna.
Most of my friends there were young
scientists. I found it was usually easy to
meet people on the street.
Naturally, in nine months I picked up a
tremendous number of impressions, some
favorable, others not. Neither western nor
Russian propaganda can be trusted too far.
In general, the more immediate impressions tended to be negative. Thus, many
tourists who spent a short time in the
country would have negative impressions.
The material standard of living is very
noticeably poorer than that of Western
Europe or Canada, and although there is
very little advertising, there are political
slogans and pictures of Lenin everywhere,
for example "Long Live the CPSU",
"Workers of all countries, unite", "Long
live the Soviet people", etc. There is very
little variation in architectural styles, service in stores and restaurants is unspeakably bad, and waitresses make no secret
of the fact that they resent their job and
the customer. With a few exceptions, Russian products are expensive, scarce, and of
shoddy quality. The amount of visible
drunkenness (skid row style) is greater
than in Canada, and greater than .in
most other countries. For a socialist country, there are very great differences in the
standard of living, especially between rural
and urban areas. There is a stupid, unfeeling bureaucracy pervading into almost all
areas of life. This produces a certain mentality. (Anybody familiar with certain
branches  of  the  civil  service  will  know
what I mean.) As for censorship the only
foreign newspapers available are those of
certain foreign Communist parties. All
books published or translated must be officially okayed. This also applies to films,
paintings, and music, although standards
are a little looser here. This does not prevent people from getting foreign information, as they can listen to BBC, Voice of
America, Radio Peking, etc. on short wave
radio (in Russian).
'VALUTA'
Foreigners from the west are constantly
approached by young Russians wanting to
buy "valuta" <hard currency, esp. dollars)
or clothes. They want dollars because there
are special shops which sell Russian and
imported goods only for Valuta at quite
good prices. It is often impossible to buy
the same things in an ordinary store.
On the favorable side, many public institutions and services are of extremely
high quality. In particular, the Moscow
subway would put to shame those of Paris,
London, or New York. There are excellent
sports facilities, theatres, and parks. Many
necessities are very cheap. Rent is almost
nothing, about ten dollars per month, I
think. Full medicare is free for everybody.
Children's expenses are very cheap. Services like haircuts, shoe repairs, etc. are
cheap. There is full employment although
some jobs are a bit contrived. There is a
real equality of opportunity for education.
Although they have a very small percent
age of university students, the vocation of
the parents appears to play little role in
determining who goes to university, or to
other institutes of higher education. Contrast this with the cross-section of population we would find here from a survey of
parents of students, in particular, medical
students. Books are very cheap, in particular, technical books which are so expensive here. The one exception is books printed before the revolution, which are fantastically expensive.
'UNGRATEFUL CHINESE'
Talking to people, I came across a wide
spectrum of opinion, from people who
never questioned what they read in Pravda,
to people who thought Russia would have
been better off without a revolution. I met
no Trotskyists or Maoists or anyone with
ideas to the left of the official Soviet position. The lack of certain elementary (to us)
freedoms such as the right to travel abroad,
and the right to engage in political action
bothered people somewhat, but not nearly
as much as it would bother Canadians. The
reason is that for most Russians, life now
is better than it has been in the past, and
they expect that it will continue to improve.
I found many Russians to be extremely
nationalistic. When speaking about China
or Eastern Europe, I often met the type of
comment: "Look how ungrateful they are
after all we have done for them." I encountered a large number of racist comments, directed towards Africans. This
seemed also to be a factor in the very widespread fear of China, coupled with a very
genuine fear of another world war (based
on experience) and strong anti-Chinese propaganda. The common attitude towards
Lenin is that he is treated as a god. The
parallels between Christianity and Leninism (at least in their Russian variations) are
striking.
Russians tended to be puzzled by the
insane North American attitudes toward
sex. In general, sex is not an obsession, nor
even much of a topic of conversation. It's
just something to enjoy. Abortions are
cheap and easily obtained, although they
don't have contraceptive pills. Marriages,
however, don't seem to stand up any better
than in the U.S. Several people questioned
me about "hippies", and in Moscow I
noticed some high school students who are
playing hippy. I've heard that they are
smoking pot now, but I never had any evidence of this.
In conclusion, I would say that the
Soviet Union is a truly conservative power.
Its similarities with the USA far outweigh
the differences. If it preserves its empire
any longer than the USA, it wil be because
its rhetoric is more revolutionary.
by K. TOUGAS
I saw Bergman's Hour of the Wolf once again to prove
that I was wrong. My first impression had been of a
minor, unimportant film, certainly very disappointing
after Persona. While subordinate perhaps in audience
appeal, Hour of the Wolf is in fact a great film.
In a fable approaching the moods and horror of Poe
and E. T. A. Hoffman, Max von Sydow portrays the very
personal struggle of Johan Borg, painter who as artist is
more powerless, more sensitive, more harshly mocked—
at the mercy of society. Without a doubt, from the scenes
of relative calm through to the pain and paranoia invading the consciousness, this film is at least in part a most
definite statement of an artist on art. For Johan Borg,
creation is suffering. While the artist creates from an
inner (almost base) compulsion of good and evil, heaven
and hell, "art is supremely unimportant in the affairs of
men".
Seemingly more simply structured than Persona, the
opposite is in fact true. Just before entering the chamber
of climax Borg is told: "you'll see what you want to see";
the same applies to the viewer.
Unlike 8V2 which balanced between what was happening to Guido/Fellini and what was imagined, Hour of
the Wolf is the conflict of past, present, imagination and
nightmare in two characters: the painter's wife and Borg/
Bergman. The narrative vascillates between Alma's tale
comprising her fears, suspicions and imagination, Borg's
tale as told to his wife, Borg's mind as reflected by his
visions of strange man-eaters and birdmen, the artist's
mind and thoughts as depicted in his diary which comprises
in itself all the previous threads and more, heightened by
a marionette play within a play, and finalized when what
was once seemingly fiction comes true, and truth itself
haunts its victim. The mask is pulled from the face to
reveal a skull ...
It is within this framework where every barrier dissolves (excepting two definite cycles: that between the
two titles, and that living second—the film—sandwiched
between Liv Ullman's opening and closing narrative),
where Johan Borg vanishes in a frenzy of demons and
vultures, where he dies if he wasn't dead already.
Certain specific images deserve comment. The pervading demonic mysticism arising from the fatal spell of
birds ("fogel" in Swedish, "vogel" in German) evokes the
vultures in form of human beings, leeches of the artist's
inner self. His terror begins with sketches of the demons,
birdmen, which he shows to Alma; Veronica Vogler
tauntingly appears, ending with a flourish in their final
vampyrish scene of lust or love. The vampires, lovers,
friends, acquaintances draw from the life of Johan Borg,
taunting him, invading a precious solitude. These too, are
our vampires, and we they..
The Gothic influence of past Bergman films manifests
itself within the island's castle where one of its inhabitants,
Lindhorst (resembling Bela Lugosi's Dracula), stages a
marionette show to entertain his two new guests. Mozart's
"The Magic Flute" has its puppet hero appearing on the
miniature stage, searching a path in the darkness, calling
out the heroine's name which becomes a broken, rhythmic,
incantation, a "magic formula". The tiny imitation metamorphoses into Johan Borg, searching, visibly manipulated
by Linhorst (just as production set sound opened the film);
a reflection of the entire "plot". The darkness, once a
closet of childhood punishment, emits the demons which
breath by breath suck his life away . . . Hour of the Wolf
becomes this magic, incantatory parable.
With an expressionism and a flourishing imagery
reminiscent of Cocteau's surrealism, Bergman plots the
growing cancer which forms the obsession of Johan Borg
within the mysticism of an intensely personal statement
demanding the fullest emotional commitment. Perhaps
it is the loss of face occuring close to the end of his
trajectory (bringing to surface, as in Persona, the floating
corpse of a child—possibly his own) that must finally
seal his self destruction. Or perhaps, as Alma ponders:
"When a woman has lived a long time with a man, doesn't
she become like him? Was that why I began seeing those
others? Or were they there all the time?"
The film becomes the dream, and when light replaces
darkness, it is as though there was nothing, except the
dream. . . .
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968 pfi 3hree
Ragas   and   MuSSins
In praise of Charlton Heston
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
I've postponed for a week or so the column
about The Graduate, which I promised last week,
because last Friday night I renewed one of my
oldest loves: for the fifth time, I went to see
Charlton Heston in El Cid down at the Hollywood.
Don't, whatever you do, just dismiss it as
"another goddamn epic". El Cid is, among other
things: the greatest epic ever made; Anthony
Mann's most beautiful film; Hollywood's pure
myth of honour; and the ultimate aesthetic justification of Charlton Heston.
Let's start with Charlton Heston. He is often
decried as the worst of he-man pseudo-actors with
with no talent except his torso. But I prefer the
view of French film critic Michel Mourlet when
he says:
"Charlton Heston is an axiom. By himself
alone he constitutes a tragedy, and his presence
in any film whatsover suffices to create beauty.
The contained violence expressed by the sombre
phosphorescence of his eyes, his eagle's profile,
the haughty arch of his eyebrows, his prominent
cheekbones, the bitter and hard curve of his
mouth, the fabulous power of his torso: this is
what he possesses and what not even the worst
director can degrade. It is in this sense that one
can say that Charlton Heston, by his existence
alone, gives a more accurate definition of cinema
than films like Hiroshima mon Amour or Citizen
Kane, whose aesthetic either ignores or impugns
Charlton Heston."
Heston's presence, thus defined, is coincidental
with his role as epic hero to such an extent that
Sombre phosphorescent*.
a good director like Franklin Schaffner can use
this almost abstract idea of "Hestonism" as an
element in his films, such as The War Lord and
Planet of the Apes. In Apes, for instance, they
have great fun with the fact that the character,
Taylor, thinks of himself as a Charlton Heston
type, whereas the script keeps on undercutting
him and making it clear that he's really a creep.
Heston is perfect in this role, and Schaffner
is adept at putting him down. Similarly, in The
War Lord, Schaffner plays Heston against type,
pointing up the unheroic sides of the character and
relying on the mere presence of Heston to get the
balance right.
But despite these entertaining variants, Heston
is at his best when he can slide neatly into the
true epic role: and El Cid is the best he's ever
had.
Now a word about epic. Epic is the most basic
form of narrative art, and it can only exist in a
certain kind of society. In Homer, the word
"arete" means "virtue", but it also means physical
prowess. There is no distinction between being
"good" and being "good at". Might is right: physical and moral force are at one. Achilles and
Beowulf are epic heroes mainly because they're
"good at" fighting.
In more complex societies, epic, as Milton
found to his cost, isn't really possible. Take a
simple example: the kind of Western in which
there is a hero who is fast on the gun, and always
Big, Isn't it ?
wins tKe final shoot-out, while in the background
there is an idealistic lawyer muttering about replacing the law of the gun by the law of the
statute. "We've gotta make this a decent place
for our women and children to grow up in, etc.
etc. etc."
The difficulty here is that the lawyer is Introducing into the story a higher standard of moral
judgment — and in any work of art, the characters are to be judged by the highest standard presented within that work, not by any lower standards, and not by any extraneous standards. Now,
by the lawyer's standard, it doesn't matter a
damn who is faster on the gun. If by some unlucky chance the good guy lost the final gunfight
and the bad guy killed him, this would In no way
affect the moral judgment between them. Might
is not right. But in the true epic, it is.
This "epic split", as I call it, runs right down
the middle of most Westerns, and most so-called
epics. Hollywood's big epic film is always structured so that the biggest spectacular scene — such
as the chariot race in Ben-Hur —* comes as the
climax of the action. But by the Christian standard, which is present in Ben-Hur, the chariot
race is completely irrelevant to the moral issues
of the story.
Thus the problem of the epic film has always
been to find some way of making the spectacular
action relevant to the moral action — otherwise
it is just another goddamn epic.
Richard Fleischer's brilliant anti-epic Barabbas
had the bright idea of exploiting the irrelevance,
so that the fact that Barabbas does not die, despite
having sulphur mines collapse around him, or
being flung into the arena against Rome's champion gladiator, becomes the central moral point
of the story. And when Barabbas does finally act,
his action is morally wrong simply because It is
action.
Barabbas is the most ingenious solution I have
seen to the problem of the epic split, but the best,
and the simplest, is El Cid.
Because with El Cid we are back in a society
where epic is possible. This is the society of the
mediaeval Christian chivalric code, in which the
highest ideal is honour, and honour resides in
the blade of a sword.
It is a world, quite simply, in which a moral
accusation can be cleansed by physical prowess.
The Cid is accused of treachery, and he clears
himself in a duel. A man stains the Cid's father's
honour: he reclaims his father's name in a duel.
There is a glorious moment early in the film
when the Cid challenges the King's champion to
a duel, in order to cleanse his father's honour.
The champion tries to dissuade him — go home,
kid, I'm far too good for you, no-one will blame
you for not fighting me. The Cid's answer is to
draw his sword and say: "Can a man live without
honour?" "No", the champion replies, and also
draws his sword.
It is an exhilarating moment to watch: it is
the movie, "epic" becoming art.
Within this code, then, El Cid provides the
context in which the physical action can become
morally relevant. This in itself would not be much
good unless there was a moral action going on as
well. Thankfully, there is.
The film is a myth: a pure myth of honour.
Its central character is conceived as the absolutely perfect knight, true to every ideal of chivalry. The action subjects him to several tests, all
of which he meets magnificently. The action is
complicated by a love-involvement (after all, this
is not only epic but chivalric Romance as well),
but the central theme is that of the Cid's loyalty
to his King.
The King (brilliantly played by John Fraser)
is a weakling, a coward, a murderer, unworthy
of his position, but he is still King, and the Cid's
loyalty is unbroken. It doesn't matter what kind
of creep the King actually is: myth is about absolutes.
Thus in the ending, when the King, after the
convenient manner of legends, reforms, the greatest thing which the dying Cid can say to his love
is that "I want you — and my children — to remember me riding into battle beside my King."
Maybe I'm just a sucker for the sob-stuff, but I
find this ending, even on the fifth time through,
tremendously moving.
The beauty of the film's conception, the pure
myth of honour, is more than matched by the
beauty of it visually. Director Anthony Mann,
photographer Robert Krasker, and design team
Colosanti and Moore, produced in Ed Cid one of
the most extravagantly beautiful films ever made.
The settings, costumes, and especially the sweep
of the bay round to the walled city of Valencia,
provide in every shot of the film perfect compositions, arrangements of colour, harmonies of
motion.
The central visual image is that of the circle,
repeated time and again in connection with the
Cid, expressing his perfection, as the circle is
perfect. (An odd contrast to Godard's Alphaville,
in which the circle is the prime symbol of evil.)
El Cid was Anthony Mann's greatest achievement. His next film, Fall of the Roman Empire,
was only intermittently successful, and after that
he rather went to the dogs with duds like The
Heroes of Telemark and A Dandy in Aspic. The
latter, during the making of which he died, is a
sad epitaph to a great career. We can only regret,
intensely, that his long-standing project to film
a Western version of King Lear never came to
fruition.
But El Cid remains, the ultimate in epics, and
a great film by any standards. It's been out a
good few years now, but it sill shows up every
now and then at re-run theatres like the Hollywood, and I always make a point of seeing it
whenever I can.
Last Friday, the fifth time through, it was
still great. I'm looking forward to the sixth.
Well, there's epic, and then again, there's epic.
Friday, October 4, 1968
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Subliminal Submusic
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
One of the more insidious features of the SUB building is its sound system, an offshoot of Muzak and Q-Music,
the sound "atmospheres" usually encountered in supermarkets. As in the supermarkets, the sound system in SUB
is inescapable, "in the air . . . everywhere" — in the halls,
private rooms, lounges, and lavatories. Even in the "reading rooms" (UBC euphemism), the sound of thumping bass
notes and an occassional melody seep through the woodwork.
Whether or not what is being broadcast through the
system (currently CKLG-FM and CHQM-FM) is "good"
seems to me irrelevant, more important being the way the
whole sound system Is being used.
The fact that the system remains located in one build
ing is one of the reasons why UBC, in spite of any recent
developments, remains basically a disunified campus. Why
didn't UBC's mythical master planners consider a communications system for the whole campus, with broadcast speakers set up in each building (i.e. — the lounges-, or better
still, why not a closed-circuit TV system along the same
lines? The answer may partly lie in the paradox that
though such systems could be used to inform or involve
effectively, they will be ineffective as long as they are
relegated to being background "atmosphere" filling the
sonic vacuum in people's heads.
Meanwhile, the problem of the intrusive system still
exists in SUB. Although each speaker has its own control
knob nearby (perhaps put there for those who enjoy playing in a masturbatory manner with knobs on stereo sets,
similarly withqut any consideration for the music), this implies a tiresome amount of effort stopping and turning knobs
while going through the building and not wanting to listen.
In the lounges this practise might prove dangerous, especially if you arouse the ire of a group of twenty-year old
teeny-boppers who "like" the music, having been brainwashed with it for most of their lives.
I would suggest that there is only one method to help
preserve our sonic sanity and effectively deal with this invasion of privacy which is now spreading to the campus —
a takeover of the SUB sound system a la Orson Welles'
"War of the Worlds", and using the system sensibly, if at
all. If this fails, there is the final solution: ripping the control knobs off the walls and punching holes in the speakers
with pencils. Let it be known that student revolution can
apply to music!
Either we act now, or prepare ourselves for the final
submission on the day when the capitalistic and bureaucratic
operators of SUB install several little booths into which we
can step, insert a quarter into a slot, and listen to a few
seconds of cherished, uninterrupted, beautiful silence . . .
The young person's guide to jazz
By PETER LINCOLN
Since last writing a column about
jaziz and blues about six months ago
little has changed because as usual summertime and the living is easy.
The death of Wes Montgomery, who
was just beginning popularly, was probably the most significant event. His
guitar style especially his use of octaves
in his solos, was the most revolutionary thing to happen to the jazz guitar
in twenty years and his death parallels
the death of John Coltrane approximately a year earlier.
Aside from this the jazz scene remained static as is evidenced by Downbeat's critic poll. No major upsets;
Miles Davis, Jimmy Smith, Sonny Rollins, Gil Evans, Duke Ellington, J. J.
Johnson, Ella Fitzgerald and Johnny
Hodges were the familiar names at the
head of the familiar columns. The
avant garde received minor recognition
but lately that scene like the general
American scene is quiet.
In the field of blues, gospel and
rhythm and blues there have been
some subtle changes. What has occurred has been an interchange and an
exchange. Jazz has over the past few
years devteloped a school of funk derived from r & b, Mel Brown being ai
prime example of this new breed. This
summer an r & b vocal group, The
Dells released several records which
went on to be hits (There Is, Please
Don't Change Me Now, Wear It On
Our Face and Stay In My Corner) featuring a pile-driving snow tender lead
vocal over dissonant harmonies, vocal
and instrumental, as well as using mildly atonal melodies. Their success could
signal the beginning of new concepts
in pop harmony and at the same time
the death of the Lennon Sisters.
Another interchange of ideas is
found in the music of Junior Wells
(who was in town last summer). Wells
on his first album featured the standard folk blues line-up but the difference between his blues and Howling
Wolf's for example was the intense
beat. It was almost danceable. Wells
since then has added horns and organ
and has effectively combined the blues
with rhythm and blues in his two later
albums and now is probably the most
influential young bluesman around.
(Downbeat gave him a new star award.)
On the pop scene itself rock and
roll seems to be reviving. The Beatles
with their hits Lady Madonna (a variation on the bass line of Midnight Hour)
and Revolution (an amalgamation of
Chuck Berry, Jim Reed, and Little
Richard) are the prime examples of
this return to pure primitive lust.
Another example of this is the success of Steppenwolf with their two hits,
Born to Be Wild and Sookie, Sookie
(an old r & b hit for Don Covay) both
raw and in no way playable on the so-
called good listening stations (Eddie
Fisher, Steve Lawrence, etc.).
Rock and roll was originally a pop
version of rhythm and blues but over
the past years it had wandered so far
from its original roots that it had lost
all its force. Rhythm and blues in the
meantime emerged stronger and harder than eVer in the sixties with its
growing gospel influences in the voices
of soul stirrers like Ray Charles, James
Brown, Wilson Pickett, Otis Reddings,
Tina Turner, and Aretha Franklin. The
force was a reflection of the rage of
the Americans who it was being sung
from, to and about. Now the pop artists
seem to be going back to these roots
and the public seems to like it as is
witnessed by the results of a summer
television series. The winner was Sly
and the Family Stone, a rhythm and
blues group which records on Okeh.
The group features a female trombone
player, blood curdling yells that melt
into intricate harmonies, and to top it
off a cossack booted organ player who
does some kind of the strangest you
ever seen — Clyde combination of soul
and Ukranian dancing. Makes you
warm all over. This is what rock and
roll was meant to be, crazy beautiful,
like Elivs' blacked out hip movements
on Ed Sullivan, better than 10,000 draft
card burnings.
The biggest thing locally is the continued success of Bobby Taylor and the
Vancouvers. They are the first group
to break into the American r & b surveys in any big way. Working with
them at Motown is another Vancouver-
ite, Tom Baird, who arranges and
writes for the same label. The Night
Train Revue with Sy Risbee and Chuck
Flintroy have also been successful landing a year's worth of big night club
contracts in the States.
There havte been a few changes in
the lineups of the soul bands. Carl
Graves continues with Soul Unlimited,
Frank Strauther has joined Billy Taylor with the Spectres, Al Johnson now
sings with the Epics (and at the Elegant
Parlour), Jayson Hoover has a new
band, and Kentish Steele is back with,
the Shantelles.
There is only one addition to the
night club scene, The Factory which is
now featuring the Mike Taylor Trio
along with Henry Young (who played
with Nina Simone, guitar that is).
The most worthwhile place to go
this week is the Marco Polo which is
featuring Clara Ward and her gospel
group. Aretha Franklin attributed Miss
Ward with beginning her career and
you only have to see her once to know
why. Clara Ward sings about God the
way he should be sung about, and its
enough to make an atheist get baptised.
Clara Ward is a flesh and blood intellectual singing about a ball and jack
God. Amen.
1 Roll $3-2 Rolls $5
THE LATENT IMAGE
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968 p£ 5ive
Why
ace?
Wall
By  IAN  D.  SLATEH
Internal hemorrhage is America's greatest danger. A nation which even in part
seriously considers Wallace as its next
president can, with mounting justification,
call itself sick. The sickness fortunately
does not overwhelm all Americans but it
has affected enough of them to make George
C. Wallace a real force in the coming presidential election.
Wallace's hope of course, most observers agree, is not really the presidency —
that may come later — but it is to siphon
off enough votes from the two major parties,
thus enabling him to dictate the terms of
future  alliance.
His appeal is to the discontent and frustration we all feel from time to time with
our present society. He gives that discontent which is a nebulous, tangled web, a
name. He calls it "racism", pitching black
against white and inextricably right against
left. He elects to make "racism" the basic
issue in American politics but it is never
called that; it is instead camouflaged by
his "law and order" theme. This theme appeals to a people who are tired of riots,
irrespective of cause.
Wallace does not bother to analyse the
elements and causes of dissension or to consider them objectively. His analysis is as
simple and as hillbilly-like as the connotation hitherto attached to "cowboys and
Indians". He is convinced that all left wing
elements are bad, consisting of anarchists
and, of course, communists. The only right
is the right itself; an understandable conclusion for Wallace who receives substantial financial support from oilmen and the
like.
Wallace's old-time "fundamentalism"
appeals to the relatively uneducated, but
nowadays it also offers a tangible thing, a
thing to point to for the millions of other
Americans tired of violence,  confused  and
shuffled about by the great social upheaval
of  their  age.
The time of the quiet and subservient
negro is heading towards its eclipse. Aided
by the intelligentsia for the most part, the
•sweeping liberalism of young Americans,
inculcating new concepts of morality and
social justice, threatens, and is in fact
undermining, traditional values. Whenever
the traditional values are threatened, fear
becomes an important ingredient In the
politics of a nation and Wallace is the high
priest of this fear. When Eldridge Cleaver,
minister of information for the militant
Black Panther movement, is invited to lecture at two major U.S. universities the extent of this new liberalism becomes starkly
evident and to Wallace supporters justifies
all their fears.
The American society will never be the
same again. The hitherto undisputed precepts of American life involving east side
and west side, , black and white, are of
course in frightening disarray. The kids are
smoking pot and the. parents don't know
how to deal effectively with it. Wallace
knows how to deal with it, from negro lecturers to kids smoking grass. He says that
if the police were allowed to run the country for two years he'd make America livable
in again.
The safe, appealing thing about this
philosophy of police dictatorship is that it
is definite. To a mind confused by the complexity of our time, a time of computers,
of fervent nationalism, of student rebellion
and of increasing crime, the surrender of
personal responsibility to a police state is
attractive; that Is, if you are in the right.
This appeal to thwar+ed effort, this call to
throw in your hand, this plea to give the
green light to a regime that will say, "Look,
mister, just close your door, don't look out,
and we'll clear yoUr street," is not only an
appeal to the right. It is an invitation to
tired responsibility that often takes on the
form of a worn out, weary parent amid a
crisis in American history. At the voting
booth it is an invitation to endorse a demagogue, an extremist and dictatorial government based on a racist philosophy. It is an
Continued on pf 7even
The Finest Service!
Tippet Tenth Satber
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Friday, October 4, 1968
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By PHIL  SURGUY
There are three westerns playing in downtown
theatres right now, two bad and another that is a passable,
pleasant  evening's  entertainment.
Hang 'Em High is a cheap, boring attempt to cash
in on the success of the three films that Clint Eastwood
made for Sergio Leone. The only thing worth saying
about it is that I hope that those who haven't seen it
already, stay away. When people pay money to see such
tripe, it only encourages the producers to make more films
of that kind; and this ties up the theatres and prevents
local showings of the two dozen or so fine new films that
will not be seen in Vancouver for at least a year, if at
all.
Custer of the West is in the same bad bag as Hang.
It is so bad that, after seeing it, I felt angry and wanted
to stand outside on Georgia Street and try and persuade
the people lining up for the second show to go elsewhere
for their fun. What follows is only a partial list of this
movie's offences.
■,
',
'■
'■
i )
LJ
At The  Retinal  Circus
Friday - Saturday — SUNDAY
Mother Tuckers Yellow Duck - The Mock Duck
1024 DAVIE
ACADEMY AWARD ACCLAIM!
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It is an old-fashioned movie in the sense that the
stationary camera is turned on and allowed to photograph
whatever moves past it. In 1903, Edwin S. Porter made
The Great Train Robbery in this way. It is eight minutes
long, and is a better film than Custer.
It would seem that no one connected with Custer
knew much about modern cinematography and the way
moving cameras can do such things as add to the development of character and make a story more meaningful
and interesting. The overall impression is that the cameras
and cast were in the same location at the same time only
by accident. Whenever an accident of this sort happened,
someone turned a camera on and took a picture of whatever was in front of it. The result is one of no real effect
of any kind, only a vague, undefined spectacle. Also, in
the conversion from Cinerama to regular film, most of the
distance shots lost any focus that the original might have
had.
The waste of Robert Shaw's talent is disgraceful. If
he's so hard up for bread, his fans would probably be happy
to send him some. Twenty-five cents from each of us
would do. This would also serve to keep money out of the
hand of his producers who will only use what they get
from Custer to waste a lot more film and inflict another
botch of a movie on us.
Shaw's limited attempt to speak like an American
works only to emphasize the script's shoddy characterization of General Custer. One gets the impression that
different groups worked on the film; and that those who
did the final half had no idea of what went on at the
beginning (or the middle, for that matter), and that Shaw
paid no attention to any of them.
The movie starts with Shaw and his men riding horses
about the Swedish countryside. He yells "charge" a couple
of times, the numbers 1861, 1863, etc., flash on the screen,
and some cannons are fired. Then the Civil War ends. By
now we're supposed to know that Custer is a glory hound
and a restless man of action. Just in case we don't know it,
he tells us. "I want action," he says.
So he goes off to fight the Indians, and we are told
that he becomes a famous Indian fighter and that he
realizes that what he is doing is no less than genocide and
in the interests of greedy gold miners and railroad barons.
And, from some hints in the dialogue to that effect, we are
told that the social and political issues raised by the final
solution to the Indian problem have begun to bother
General Custer. All this telling takes up the bulk of the
movie.
Shaw and the cast talk about the problems, a Russian
duke drops by the fort, they talk some more, they have
a few drinks, the miners act up, and Custer goes to Washington. There he denounces somebody, sees a couple of
shows, chats with his wife, and has a look at an armored
railroad car. This last gives him a chance to make a little
speech about how technology will take all the man-to-man
fun and competition out of war. Then he goes back to
Dakota and becomes the glory seeker we were told he was
at the beginning of the picture.
The film tells one hell of a lot, most of which is contradictory and/or inane. And everything told could have
been printed on a poster and read in the lobby while the
dreary short that accompanies Custer was being shown.
Anyway, what passes for the Battle of the Little Big
Horn is fought. It is ludicrous, historically inaccurate, and
much of it is out of focus. At one point, Custer tells the
Cheyenne (whoever made this film doesn't seem to have
heard of Sitting Bull or the Sioux) chief about the armored
train. The chief is unimpressed. Custer and his men are
killed, and those in the audience who haven't left already
can leave.
Custer of the West was intended as a Cinerama "road
show" (road show means a lot more ballyhoo and doubled
prices), and was seen in Europe as such. But its North
American release date coincided with the debut of a
crummy TV western series about Custer that proved to
be too much competition for the movie.
If you must waste your time at westerns, 5 Card Stud
is the best bet right now. It has Dean Martin as a gambler,
Robert Mitdhum as a guntoting preacher (somewhat like
the knifetoting preacher he played in Night of the Hunter),
and Roddy McDowell as a rather engaging lunatic. There
are also a couple of chicks in the film who are there, as I
suspect they are in all westerns, to show sceptics that
that the cowboy heroes, who spend so much time with
other cowboys and animals, are not fairies or given to
buggery.
The movie is a pleasant piece of mindless entertainment that has the easy-going air of professionals being
themselves that characterizes Martin's TV program and
the night club acts of his friends. My only quibble is that
the casualness that surrounds the killing in all westerns
sets the tone of every death in this film; and the initial
killing, which later proves to be a major part of the plot,
is not emphasized in any way. In spite of that sort of
thing, however, 5 Card Stud can boast of a fair attempt
at an interesting story and a certain amount of suspense.
When comparing it to the two other films, one is tempted
to call it great.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968 pfi 7even
PFoetry
By ROY STARRS
Joe Rosenblatt is a man with odd obsessions. Anyone who turned on to his
last book, The LSD Leacock, is familiar
with this particular source of his charm
and orginality. In the poems of that volume,
he had this big hang-up about eggs. Every
second image was hard-boiled and shaped
vaguely like an oval. He hatched such won-
A review: Winter of The Luna Moth,
poems by Joe Rosenblatt, Anansi.
Toronto, 1968.
ders from his egg, in fact, that he made
Gunther Grass look like a sadly impotent
old hen.
If novelists are said to create one true
character in their life-work, poets, perhaps,
may be said to create one true image.
Rosenblatt, however, is a poet of great
fertility. It is with justice that he exclaims:
"Spirit, you ovulate more symbols than
the Virgin Mary". In the present volume
he appropriates from the world of matter
one more object as his own, namely, that
creature of darkness and inversion, the bat.
For our generation, Rosenblatt does for
bats what Stevens, in his generation, did
for blackbirds. Until now, of course, the
bat has existed in the human psyche only
in association with the widely acclaimed
hero of comic strips and television, Batman.
For the convenience of all future nightmares, therefore, Rosenblatt has defined
the bat. (A suggested topic for English
graduate students: From the Egg to the Bat:
a Poetic Evolution. And suggested for opening queries: Was the original Egg a Bat
Egg ? Do bats, in fact, lay eggs ? How much
scientific inaccuracy is allowed by poetic
license ? and so on.)
Rosenblatt's bats are not the witches'
props of late-night horror movies. They
are beautiful and they are delicate:
Proboscis probing
"the painted bird", the oriental bat
is high on perfume.
Radar ears bend
gnomes are near with Cyprus nets.
They pass by a sleeping apricot.
In another mood, the poet views his
bats affectionately as "Cave Babes":
In Hades, in damp cancered caves
troglodytes hang up their hang ups.
Fresh from placental shopping bags
bounce babe bats with raspberry eyes
sonar to mother's nipples.
Or mockingly, with a touch of Jewish
humour:
UnHebrew bird.-Pluto's pet
you sanguine most unkosher meals:
gerbils, hamsters, dragonflies
Zest more shrike to your appetite
in the graveyard ot your mouth.
more Wallace
Continued from pf 5ive
invitation the progressive America hopes
and trusts will meet with majority rejection.
There is an old fashioned term for Wallace. It is old fashioned and it is true. Wallace is a bully. In a more sophisticated sense
you may call him "fascist" for his Americanism is the nationalism of white superiority.
If a real statesman was in the ring Wallace would find it much more difficult to
siphon off votes, but regrettably neither
Humphrey nor Nixon seems to qualify. At
the best they may be regarded as successful politicians. Substantial voting gains by
Bats, we find, may even be the occasion
of philosophic profundity. Standing outside
the bat cage at Stanley Park, Rosenblatt
made a startling discovery:
In this Martian landscape
I realize there's no sex lite after death.
What the poet does for bats in this
volume, he does also, to some extent, for
fish, mice, moths, lizards, worms and even
Uncle Nathan. Like Saphire and Meta-
morpho in The LSD Leacock, Uncle Nathan is memorable as a character and efficacious as a narrative device. Addressing his
nephew from the grave, he emerges as a
man of great wit and irrascibility, with
fish-slaughter on his conscience:
Yet, more soul pinching than worm's
acetyline,
no commerce is there in the Netherworld.
Earth Momma, forgive me for malicious
filicide
for every fish I disembowelled was a child;
there is no Raddish for aborted caviar.
Earth! Earth! is the bitch still green
Heed with people and Aardvark powers?
But Rosenblatt's greatest oddity, and his
greatest originality is not the material of
his poems, but the language. His language
is an astounding mixture of neologism and
anachronism and, because of this mixture,
there is a continual element of surprise.
One encounters, side by side, pop references
along with Mythological references, hip
jargon along with scientific jargon, beat
terminology along with Biblical phraseology.
The poety itself is a cross between a
Safeway billboard and a chapter of the
Talmud, an aciid-rock instrumental and a
Georgian chant —- all of which one suspects, has been translated from the original
hieroglyphics, executed on synthetic papyrus. If it were ever set to music, the problem would be whether to use organs or
bongo drums. (Is this the eclectic, multimedia dissonance which McLuhan has posited and which, sixty years ago, Spengler
prophesied as the last achievement possible
to Western civilization ?)
For a start, Rosenblatt isn't afraid to
employ traditional poetic devices such as
alliteration, repetition and formal rhythm
to give his poetry a richness of sound, a
resonance which is reminiscent of Dylan
Thomas:
Wide, wide are the margins of sleep
deep, deep, deep in the flowerbox earth
I sleep . . . sleep . . . sleep. . .
There is also much punning and wordplay: "Pigs piggle thru my pigment". And
another delight of poetry, which is both
traditional and very modern: the clever,
unusual, but at the same time, appropriate
use of a word: fish lips "ellipsing" or
"atoms hum / eloping with a perfect planetary sun."
All in all, Joe Rosenblatt writes a very
readable book of poetry.
Wallace threaten to force a no-majority
decision into the House of Representatives
to choose the next president; thus challenging the rationality and practicality of
the two-party system.
Probably the most significant and certainly the most depressing aspect of Wallace's presence in the current presidential
campaign is that an increasingly larger segment of American society is no longer willing, whatever the reason, to take account
of, or understand, the causes of its dilemma
but rather is determined only to deal ruthlessly with the symptoms. This is the manifestation of fear in a time when to keep
your cool offers the only hope for solution
and progress, even if the solutions are often
fumbling and experimental, even if the progress is at times painstakingly slow.
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Friday, October 4, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Special General Meeting
A Special General Meeting will be held at 12:45 p.m.,
Tuesday, Oct. 8, 1968, outside SUB to discuss ways and
means of getting a Pub in SUB.
JENNIFER JOHNSTON,
(Acting AMS Secretary)
pf Sight
DUTHIE
BOOKS
is back on  Robson  Street
At 9T9 ROBSON - 684-4496
OUR   U.B.C.
4560 W.  10th  Ave
BRANCH
.   -   224-7012
ana
670 Seymour St.
- 685-3627
DUTHIE
BOOKS
Did you get a
CANADA STUDENT LOAN
before July 1,1968?
Are you again enrolled as a
full-time student?
If the answer is Yes to both questions, you should contact
your Bank Manager before November 30, 1968.
REMEMBER it is your responsibility to confirm your interest-
free status at your bank, to ensure that you are not charged
interest on your continuing loans.
GUARANTEED LOANS ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA
ATTENTION
1969 GRADUATES IN
ARTS - SCIENCE - COMMERCE
The Institute qf Chartered Accountants
of B.C. is sponsoring
A FREE NOON HOUR FILM
on TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, at 12:30 p.m.
in Room 106 Buchanan Building
Representatives of the Institute will be present
td answer questions about a career in
chartered accountancy.
ifLy^p  a Wst of -Vhir^s
Galleries
Last night a two week
exhibition of Chuck Yip's
drawings and miniature
sculptures opened at the
Danish Art Gallery. Chuck,
a versatile and award-winning Vancouver artist, concentrates on using pen and
ink, engraved and constructed wood and a conglomerate of wires and
fishing lures for his three
modes of expression.
The fact that he concentrates on design in his
line drawings, tempers
and limits any demonstration of heated expression
and I found myself wanting to pull his lines apart
so that I could jump in
and  identify myself  with
Letter
Editor, Page Friday, Sir:
Re: Lise Dominique's
Page Friday poetry re-
vieiw. Few poets ever
achieve major poems in
their lifetime. In one 25
cent newspaper Greydon
Moore has presented two
poems with major visions.
(One is of universal love
through the concept of The
Planet Man, the other describes a man - made beast
called the donkeyodeon
which destroys love.) In the
same paper he presented
thoughts of two serious
people both of whom have
IQ's that have tested over
Etcetera
To be scene soon: M. A.
Thesis Production of
George Buchner's Woy-
zek, directed by John Rap-
sey. Woyzek, considered to
be the first modern tragedy, is actually an unfinished play, "a mosaic of
some twenty-nine scenes".
See it at the new Dorothy
Somerset Studio Theatre
(behind Freddy Wood) Oct.
16-19, 8:30 p.m.
Poet, Walter Bauer, and
poet-translator, Henry
Beissel,   will give  a  joint
Plug
"Tales of the Reedy River
—being the sung poems of
. . ." Poems, stories, fairy
tales, psychomyths, call
them what you will, they
are beautiful.
After years of being called the Pseudo Dylan, Don-
his patterns. As design,
however, I found them sensitive and technically well
executed.
His woodcut engravings,
following the theme of his
line drawings, achieve a
far better sense of rhythm.
They are developed in the
direction of traditional
Chinese art in which gold
letters fuse and soften into
a black background. Both
show strength and mastery
over the medium.
The wire sculpture, a development of the line,
leaves me with a sense of
incompleteness. The wires
reach up but are too delicate to hold onto anything.
The show, however, is definitely worth visiting and
any final judgment is left
up to you.
B. W.
200, if that means anything.
As for Mr. Moore's concrete poem; The Diamond
Pattern for the Hydrogen
Atom is not only a clever
anagram, it can also
be looked upon as a
metaphorical bridge between poetry and fundamental science. His gravitational equations are numerically balanced which is
enough reason for publishing them, even though they
do not conform to present
scientific thinking. Nevertheless such nonconformity
defines the need for new
insights into the basic nature of things, and I thank
Mr. Moore for reminding
me of it through his writing. Bill Freeman
German - English reading
Wed., Oct. 9, at 8 p.m.,
Ang.   104.
Visual Art, works of
Norman Yates, "mythology
of the human senses". Griffiths Galeries, 1304 SW
Marine Drive, Oct. 6-25.
Arriving this weekend,
just as leaves and rivers
turn cold, are the delegates for the thirty-second
annual Goose Congress
to be held in Lost Lagoon.
Discussed will be food and
living conditions on the
Northern Lakes. Visitors
welcome. Bring hip waders. Bread crumbs will be
served. V. H.
ovan   is   doing   his    own
thing.
A person who has realized that sanity and peace
lies in the serenity and
warmth of a child's hidden
simplicity.
A beautiful person. With
beautiful songs. Donovan.
Tomorrow night. At the
Coliseum. Listen to him.
J. C.
2034 West 41st Avenue
Vancouver 13, B.C.
Telephone 263-7121
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968 Friday, October 4, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
Summer session revisions
proposed in Senate report
By FRANK FLYNN
Senate is considering lengthening the summer session to
13 weeks.
At their monthly meeting
on Wednesday night, the senate considered a report of a
committee headed by Dean Ian
McTaggart Cowan.
The report recommends that
the seven week summer session
should gradually be phased out
and replaced with a 13 week
program of new courses for
the undergraduate, and
an extension of formal aspects of the graduate level
programs.
But there will be difficulties
involved.
Whereas summer staff is
often obtained from outside this
university, the extended session will make this policy extremely difficult to continue.
Thus the necessity will arise
to have residence professors
teach during the summer.
When presenting the report,
McTaggart Cowan remarked
on the teaching responsibilities
of profs who teach during the
extended session.
"When a man teaches in summer session, he can be excused
an equivalent amount of time
in winter session."
A special seven week summer session will have to be retained for the benefit of teachers continuing their education.
Slacks Narrowed
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Remodelled
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• Shirts & Accessories
• Mail  Orders  Invited
(Downstairs)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
INVITATION
first meeting of
Full Gospel Students
(charismatic  renewal  interest
you — you should come)
Monday   6:30 - 10:00 ?   p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTER
CHINESE SUPPER (.75c)
meet others and find out
what's   up  for  this   year
(D.  Bennett, M. Boring,
Wilkerson, etc.)
Bring a friend —
More information or a ride?
call 266-9275 — Bernice Gerard
The report suggested faculty
members should have a complete break from lecture duties
for at least one 13 week term.
At the same meeting senate
established a precedent by recommending to the board of
governors that enrollment be
restricted to 700 students in
the law faculty.
In asking for the recommendation  Dean  George  Curtis  of
Registration
at 34,000
in six years
If you think UBC is crowded now, just wait five years.
At Wednesday's senate meeting, registrar Jack Parnall presented preliminary figures for
this year. As of Sept. 20 there
were 20,111 students registered
here.
Parnall said with the present
admission policies, the number of students would reach
34,000 in five years.
A committee was formed to
study the problem.
law said the numbers of students in his faculty have increased largely in the last two
ye a r s and that they have
space for only one third of
the 500 students they have
now.
Curtis claimed that over 80
percent of the faculty's instruction is done in 25 year old
huts. He also said that the law
student-professor ratio in law
is the highest on the campus
at one to 22.
He stated that a student population of 700 will make the
law school the second largest
in Canada.
When asked where students
who are not admitted here
might go, he said that Osgoode-
York in Toronto is expanding
from 431 this year to 930 next
year when they move into new
buildings. There is also a new
law school being built in Alberta.
Dean Walter Gage chaired
the meeting in President Ken-
enth Hare's absence. Gage
announced that Hare hoped to
be able to return by the next
senate meeting.
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by LEW MARVIN
(A   philosophy   of   life   and   death   embodied   in
the  soul  of  world  revolution.  Intense  visually.)
- ALSO -
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* Active participation sessions with native instructors
*  Day or evening *  Private or small group
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PHONE 736-5481
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968
Telly shows  way it is
at Point Grey and SFU
A little learning is coming into Vancouver,
living rooms this month.
Vancouver's very own CBC TV station
(channel 2) will present a series of half-hour
television programs Mondays at 10:30 p.m.
about UBC, Simon Fraser University and their
relevance to the world and education.
The show is titled A Little Learning, from
Alexander Pope's Essay on Man: "A little learning is a dangerous thing."
The show is acted, directed and produced
by students, about students and their schools.
The first show Sept. 30 featured interviews
with Genetics prof Dave Suzuki, classics
studies head Malcolm MacGregor and Alma
Mater Society internal affairs officer, Ruth
Dworkin.
Student interviewers — including former
Ubyssey reporter Kris Emmott and actor Lanny
Beckman — also asked the hordes of registering frosh: "Why are you here ?"
They got answers ranging from "It's the
thing to do" to "I want an education."
Next Monday they ask prospective university students from Point Grey high school what
they expect from an institution like UBC.
McGuigan knocks system
in first SCM project talk
Simply providing more
teachers and facilities will not
solve the problem of overcrowding in the classroom, says
Father Gerald McGuigan, one
of the originators of the experimental Arts  I program.
In a speech to 100 students
in Angus 104 Wednesday noon,
McGuigan said what is needed
is a change in teaching methods.
McGuigan's speech on Re-
fbrm in the Classroom was
the first event in the Student
Christian Movement study
project on university reform.
"Teachers should place more
truslt in students to educate
themselves," said McGuigan.
"In the present lecture setup,
students have no cross relationship intellectually with others
in the class."
Toronto students show
support for Mexicans
TORONTO (CUP) — The graduate students' union at the
University of Toronto Wednesday sent a telegram to Mexican
president Gustavo Diaz Ordaz supporting Mexican students in
"their struggle for democracy and academic freedom".
The telegram contained a motion passed by a general meeting of the 5,500 member union "in response to the call by the
Mexican student  union  for  international  solidarity".
CORRECTION
The Institute ot Chartered Accountants
ot B.C.
FREE NOON HOUR
FILM
will be shown
TUESDAY, OCT. 8th
(NOT Nov.   1   as advertised yesterday)
at 12:30 p.m.
in Room 106, Buchanan Bldg.
This presentation will interest
1969 GRADUATES IN
ARTS - SCIENCE - COMMERCE
for Representatives of the Institute will be present
to answer questions about a career  in
chartered accountancy.
He said that teachers should
develop the students' own initiative and integrate their
studies.
"Some students, at the end
of their university studies are
confused about the totality of
their education.
"They find that their knowledge hasn't been integrated by
the time they have completed
university."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
Soccer Birds play Croatia
win vital for first spot
Coach Joe Johnson sends
his soccer Thunderbirds against
Croatia, a new team in the
Pacific Coast Soccer League
this Saturday at 2 p.m.
The Birds must win this
game to remain in contention
for top spot in PCSL due to
their 2-2 tie with Burnaby
Villa Wednesday night.
Manny Vaartnum and John
Haar got UBC's goals last night
and both were equalizers.
Johnson said the Birds carried the play well Wednesday
and even had a good attack,
but they just couldn't score.
The only games for UBC
home fans this weekend are
two Junior Intercollegiate Ath
letic Association games, soccer
and rugby.
The rugby game will be
played at the Thunderbird
Field which is on the south
end of campus close to the
Winter Sports Center.
The soccer game will be
played on the Gym soccer field
which is just behind the Wat-
Memorial Gymnasium.
Opponent in both cases is
the University of Victoria and
both games start at 1:15 p.m.
In an interview on Thursday Johnson said he expects
a closely fought game, because
although new to the league,
Croatia has played together
for three or four years.
Birds meet Hawks
in grudge match
Johnson also is looking for
his team to pick up their goal
production record, as they have
now had nearly as many goals
scored on them as they have
scored.
Haar, Gary Thompson and
Jim Briggs are all looked upon
to donate goals to the Birds
cause.
In the interview Johnson
said it looked like only Len
Lenvoy and Dave Kotula will
be doubtful starters.
He also said there was a good
chance he would be switching
players to give them a chance
to prove . to him they should
be starters.
The game is to be played
at the new Thunderbird Stadium Saturday starting* at 2
p.m.
Entry to the stadium is free
with the presentation of an
AMS card.
The UBC field hockey Thunderbirds take their sticks up
this weekend to renew an old
rivalry.
Their game on Saturday is
against the Hawks Firsts who
defeated them last year in British Columbia first division
play, to take over from the
Birds who won for four years
previous to that.
The Hawks' league victory
last year was in a large part
due to their two game victor-
Like sports?
If you are interested in sports
and would like to get your
name in this paper we need
you. Come to The Ubyssey office in SUB and ask for the
sports editor.
ies over the Birds last year,
so the game on Saturday is a
real grudge match.
Coach Eric Broome admits
that it will be a hard game,
but feels confident in view of
his team's success last week
against the Jokers, when they
won 4-1.
Broome expects good play
from everybody but he singled
out goalie Sandy Hill and center half Paul MoMillen (captain) as the people to watch
on defense and offense.
The game will be played at
the new Spencer Field iwhich
is up close to the Stadium.
The Firsts start at 1:30 p.m.,
and the seconds start at 3 p.m.
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FOR BOOKINGS
NORM WILLIAMS
738-5987
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Your FREE Grad Photos
Now Being Taken
Mobile Studio Locations
TODAY OCT. 7 TO 22
Parking Lot near Behind Brock
Education Bldg. (South)
Arts Students Anytime
Hours — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
736-0261
The
NOW-PLACE
it SAT. 8 P.M.-"The Faery Dance & Others"
Social for all. Special Frosh welcome.
* SUNDAY 10:30 A.M.-Vicar Gene Baade leads the
Worship Service. Coffee fellowship afterwards.
* SUNDAY 6 P.M.-Cost Supper. 7 P.M. - Fireside Topic:
"The Theology Thafs LEFT".
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Across from the Village
5885 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
MEET OUR STAFF . . .
Left to right — Hans, Jack, Joe, Werner, Peter
THE EXPERTS WHO SERVE YOU
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CERTIFIED MECHANICS
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4314 W. 10th 224-0828
FALL and  WINTER SPORTS
1968 SKI SWEATERS
PEDIGREE SLACKS AND SKI PARKAS
SPECIAL SALE ON  C.C.M.  SKATES
25% Off Regular Prices of 79.95 - 23.95 - 29.95
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10th AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040 Page  16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 4, 1968
TWEEN CLASSES
Reading for Georgia Straight
Poetry readings: Byrne, Law-
rance, Persky, Robinson —
donations to Georgia Straight
Defense Fund. Noon today,
Bu. 106.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Meeting Monday noon in
SUB courtyard to support
United Farmworkers. Nix on
California grapes.
AFRICA SYMPOSIUM
Hear Sierra Leone's external
affairs minister L. A. M.
Brewah talk on the role of
the military in Africa noon
today. Dr. Hugh Keenleyside
reads Sen. Paul Martin's
speech on foreign aid at 7:30
tonight. Workshop on political philosophy socialism,
Pan-Africanism and the politics of ethnicity all day Saturday. All events in SUB
ballroom.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting Monday noon in IH
400-402. Talk by Miss Jill
Covner on Spanish Folk
Music.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Second memebrship meeting
Friday noon, Bu. 221. Short
talk on What Is Marxism?
with questions and discussion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Take in The Faery Dance and
Others Saturday night at
Lutheran Campus Centre,
8:30. Free admission. Hear
Val Anderson speak Sunday
on The Theology That's Left.
Supper at 6, discussion at 7.
VARSITY DeMOLAY
First general meeting and
elections noon today, Ang.
313.
CHINESE VARSITY
Frosh mixer 8 to midnight
SUB rooms L and M.
PHOTOSOC
Visit new facilities in Brock
Ext. 163 any noon, new members welcome.
FORESTRY UNDERGRAD
SOCIETY
Undercut '68 is on in SUB
next Friday. Hardtimes dance
with Hank and the Hobos.
UKRAINIAN VARSITY
CLUB
Meeting Monday noon, SUB
213.
DEBATING UNION
Forum debate Tuesday noon,
SUB 205.
CIRCLE K CLUB
Meeting Friday noon in SUB
council chambers.
AFRICAN SYMPOSIUM
DANCE
Caribbean Natives and The
Organizational play at International House Saturday,
8:30 p.m. $1.50 a couple,
drinks will be sold.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Gymkhana Sunday morning
9:30 in B lot.
SCIENCE
UNDERGRAD SOC
Jackets and sweaters on sale
noon daily in science common room, Math Annex 1119.
VCF
Communication problems? —
Mr. Sclater has the answer,
noon today, Ang. 110.
FLY CLUB
Organizing meeting noon today, Bu. 221. New members
welcome and provisions will
be made for reduced rental
and flying course.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Last chance for new member applications in box in
SUB basement lounge. Will
not be taken after 5:30 tonight.
ENGLISH LITERARY
UNION
Meeting noon today, Bu. 106
for election of student-faculty
committee.
COMMERCE
Pre-law meeting noon today,
Hut G14 to discuss elections,
membership cards.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Meeting noon today, SUB
meeting room D for those
people wanting to work with
the committee. AAC puts on
symposiums and lecture
series through the year.
EXPERIMENTAL  COLLEGE
Karl  Burau  speaks  on  Hitler's   Character   and   Basic
Ideas noon Monday, Bu. 100.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Study groups on Arts I and
Science, SUB room 1 with
Dr. W. Young, Monday noon.
Teaching and Learning, Dr.
B. St. Jacques, SUB room
B, Tuesday noon. Function
of a University Education,
Tuesday noon SUB room 1,
Dr. Don Brown.
KARATE CLUB
Members of UBC Karate club
meet Saturday morning at 9,
SUB room 200.
SDS
The Emergency Free Speech
movement will hold a song
and threatre demonstration
at the court house foundation 2 p.m. today.
COMPUTER CLUB
Meeting noon today, Chem.
250.
BADMINTON
Students recreation Sunday
2-5 p.m., Women's gym.
SUS
Dance tonight in Totem Park
with Tomorrow's Eyes.
SUS
Science elections-nominations
open for president, Veep,
AMS rep, publications officer, public relations. Ma.
annex 1119.
PATIO.
■EAT IN .TAKEOUT** DELIVERY
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON
in the Village
Reasonable Rates in
Hair Coloring — Styling — Cutting
CALL MISS DIANE or MISS MARGARET T^*
(No Appointment Necessary)
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942
PHRATERES
Members may pay their fees
Friday afternoon, SUB room
119.
MUSSOC
General meeting for all members and those interested in
joining Wednesday noon in
old Auditorium.
NIRKODA DANCERS
People interested in interpretive and folk dancing call
Judy Hirt, 874-8905, or come
to the Jewish Community
Centre, Sunday 1 p.m.
CIASP
Find out how you can help
develop Mexico and yourself in summer '69, noon today, SUB 105-B.
PIANO RECITAL
Emma Contestabile of the
Conservatorio Santa Cecilia,
Rome, today noon in music
bldg. recital hall.
TEACHER'S COMMITTEE
ON VIETNAM
Kay MacPherson, recently
returned from North Vietnam, discusses the view from
Hanoi, noon today, New Arts
1 blue room.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Venez vous amusez ce soir a
la premiere partie de l'annee.
Orchestre, nourritures, etc.
Addresse: 6161 Cambie; en
bas heure: 8:30-1. Membres-
gratuit, autres 75 cents.
Meeting today in I.H. upper
lounge.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75$, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TONIGHT — TOMORROW'S
Byes in Totem Park — Oct. 4 —
9  to  1 — Couples  $2.00.
AFRICA SYMPOSIUM DANCE AT
International House, Sat., 5th Oct.
8:30 p.m. Bands "Caribbean Natives" & "The Organizations". $1.50.
Liquor   Licence!
FORESTRY'S "UNDERCUT '68" FRI-
day, Oct. 11. Hard-Times stomp in
SUB. Tickets early next week In
SUB.
DIRECT FROM LASSITER'S DEN!
The Five Man Cargo, tonight at
Place Vanier. Residents $1.00, nonresidents $1.25.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST LADIES' WATCH ON BEACH
below Fort Camp, Sat. 21st. Phone
Ray  224-9662,   leave message.
LOST: FABER - CASTELL SLIDE -
rule: Transparent case near bookstore.   Phone  261-8839.
LOST BLUE WALLET, DESPERATE
for my I.D.! Sani 433-4839.
LOST FODDER WITH NAMES,  SUB
Wed.   Dave   Dickins,   224-9846.	
HELP! DOST GLASSES. IN BROWN
"Prescription Optical" case. John
RE  8-9763.
LOST, CANVASS JACKET IN C-LOT,
Sept. 20. Phone LA 6-577*.
LOST HEMMT SLIDE RULE, GREEN
hard  ease.  Reward.  277-8730.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WANTED—RIDE TO KELOWNA ON
long weekend. Will pay some lor
gas.   Phone   Sally,   738-2469.
gas,   rnone   aany,    joo--*io'*.	
CALGARY — Thanksgiving Weekend.
WANTED*. 1-3 passengers to share
expenses. Leaving Oct. 9th (after-
noon).   Phone:   Larry   224-3367.
RIDE   WANTED   FROM   WELLING
ton   (Van.   16)   and  Rupert  8:30   till
5:30   Mon.   to  Fri.   Phone  433-3151.
YIKES! WE NEED DRIVERS FOR
West Van. carpool. West Bay or
Dunderave  area.   Phone  922-2137.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.	
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.       	
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore: at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.	
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
1951 CHEV. 4-DR. IN GOOD RUN-
ning condition. Excellent student
transportation.   Phone  261-3231.
PONTIAC 4-DOOR AUTO. EXCEL,
cond. Body, mech. and interior. 1960.
Phone   266-8621  after   6   p.m.
1965 CHEVY VAN, NEW REAR END,
new tires. Excel, condition. Side
doors,   windows.   278-6354.
'56 VW DELUXE WITH '67 MOTOR,
and '64 fenders. Good mech. cond.
$400.   224-9120.
SACRIFICE OFFER MUST SELL
1963 Chev. 4-door 6-cyl. auto. $950
or best offer.  Don 733-1760 Eve.
VOLVO '62. NEW REBUILT MOTOR,
shocks, paint. Immaculate $1,200.
228-9357.
1960 MORRIS 1000 WHITE, BLUE
interior, 11,000 on engine. Phone
Don at  266-7938.
USED IMPORTS — PRICED FROM
$200 to $2,000 — ten to choose from:
Grand Prix Motors — 1162 Seymour.
682-7185.  Open   'till  8  p.m.
G.T. AND SPITFIRES IN STOCK AT
Grand Prix Motors — 1162 Seymour
682-7185.   Open   'till  8  p.m.
Automobile—Repairs
24
TIP TOP COLLISION, 167 PEMBER-
ton, N.V., 988-4613. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Courtesy car. Open
Saturdays.
Motorcycles
26
'65 HONDA 305SS, $295. EXCELLENT
condition.   738-5952.
'67  BULTACO  METRALLA,  250 CC.
28   h.p.,   5   speed,   731-9093.	
'67 KAW1ASAKI — 4,000 miles — Excellent condition. Grand Prix Motors
—1162 Seymour — 682-7185. Open
'till  8  p.m.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
THE PAISLEYS LOVE-ROCK MUSIC
and multi-colored Strobic Lightshow
must be heard and seen. For bookings call Paul 731-7301, Love and
Peace.
Miscellaneous
33
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
DIAL - A - DATE
P.O.  Box  3348-4
Vancouver 3, B.C.
Send  $1.00 with  your name,  age,  description, telephone number, likes and
dislikes   for   our   monthly
"DIAL - A  - DATE" List
Your name will be on It.	
"UNDERCUT '68" IS THE OFFICIAL
SUB opening Friday, Oct. 11. First
dance with  Hank and the Hobos.
U.B.C.   BEAUTY   SALON
We  clean,  style  wigs  and  hairpieces.
Reasonable  rates.
5736  University Blvd. 228-8942
MALE MODELS REQUIRED FOR
hair styling course — for information call Mr. Terry Skeates at the
U.B.C.  Barber Shop.  Eves.  874-7473.
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
FEMALE NEEDED — ONE CUTE
female for Wed. nites curling. Phone
Stu  987-5609.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1967 FORD FAIRLANE G.T. 390 CU.
in. 4-speed, 31,000 miles, power disc
brakes, white w/red int. Phone
872-2277 or 327-4463.
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice, Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.	
2 PR. MATCHED LINED DRAPES,
floral. 8 widths, $35. Car vicinity
60th & Granville. Room for 4. 266-
2289.	
DANCE TO THE FIVE MAN CARGO,
direct from Lassiter's Den, tonight
at Place Vanier. Residents $1.00,
non-residents  $1.25.
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
wish to earn extra money—Will
baby-sit in your home evenings or
days on "weekends, do domestic
work or home repairs. Reasonable
rates.   Phona  733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS, PHY-
sics, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent tutors. Phone 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR     STUDENT     TELEPHONE
directory.   Buy   pre-sale   tickets   for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publications Office, Brock Hall.
VARSITY   SPECIALS
Students' desks     from 14.95
New bunk beds   pair 29.50
Book eases   from 8.95
New  252   coil  Hollywood   bed
complete    - -    49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 146
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM AVAILABLE NEAR CAMPUS.
Full house privileges. Male only.
After 6 p.m. Available Oct. 15.
224-4506.
ROOM WITHIN WALKING Distance of campus for rent to female
student.   Call  224-4072  or   736-7631.
FOR RENT, LARGE BEDROOM ON
1st floor in modern duplex, full use
of all facilities, near 4th and Vine.
Phone  evenings,  732-6058.	
FURNISHED ROOM. MALE ONLY.
Kitchen privileges, private entrance,
other   advantages   $60.   Phone   733-
8702.	
WARM     QUIET,     CLEAN    FURN.
room.   Some  kitchen   privileges.   Use
phone $45.  224-0301.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Scandals
37
DAISY-MAE, WHERE ARE YOU?
I haven't seen you since "Undercut
'67", meat you at "Undercut '68".
SCIENCE ELECTIONS — NOMINA-
tions now open for President, "Vice-
President, A.M.S. Rep., Publications
Officer, Public Relations Officer. —
Details from Math Annex 1119.
Nominations   close   Thursday.
Typing
40
TYPING   DONE   AT   HOME.    TERM
papers,  essays,  etc.  Phone 736-0538.
EXPERIENCED ESSAY  TYPIST, 30c
a typed page. Phone 683-2859.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced    essay    and    thesis
typist. Reasonable Rates. TR 4-9253.
ESSAY TYPING ETC. 25c PER PAGE.
The number to call  684-5783.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
BABYSITTING 2 AFTERNOONS A
WEEK. Chance for some studying.
266-2950.
SKI INSTRUCTORS WANTED. NO
teaching experience necessary.
Training course begins at Whistler
Mt. on Oct. 13 at 9 a.m. and continues for six consecutive Sundays.
Fee $20. Apply to Mr. Jim McConkey, Garibaldi Ski School, Alta
Lake,  B.C.   932-5422.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
at Phi Delta Theta house. 2120
Wesbrook,   224-9073.
WANT GOOD FOOD? ROOM AND
board still available on campus.
Stop in at 2280 Wesbrook or call
Jim   at   224-9986.
ROOM AND BOARD—WANT GIRL
$75.00 or kitchen privileges. $60.00.
Phone 261-3688. Kerrisdale evenings.
MALE OR FEMALE! ONE SINGLE
large room or 2 sharing. 1344 West
55th Ave.  266-4554.
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE, MALE
students over twenty-one. Single
room $99. Shared room $75. Phone
228-9258 after 5:30. Apply evenings
after 5:30 at 4493 Sasamat.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
WANTED CHRISTIAN GIRL TO
share basement suite. Reasonable.
Call  Pauline  at  733-0584.
WANTED 4 GIRLS TO SHARE UP-
per half of house with two others
— desks, lamps, cooking facilities,
sitting room, bathroom, semi-private entrance, phone, linen. $43.00
each.  Evenings 733-4476.	
WANTED NEAT RESPONSIBLE
girl to share furnished house with
two (2) others. Own bedroom. 5
min.   from   U.B.C.   228-9105.	
FURNISHED PRIVATE BASEMENT
suite. Two male students. Kits area.
Phone   731-1629.
SHARE OFFERED FOR MADE STU-
dent modern Penthouse apt. Reasonable   price,   224-6968.	
GIRL PREF. OVER 21 TO SHARE
apt. near Broadway and Burrard
with German girl. $60.00 incl. phone
Gretel,   732-6756.
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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