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The Ubyssey Nov 23, 1971

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Array Boycott speeds up, Kraft sales down
REGINA (CUP) - The boycott against the Kraft
corporation gained momentum last week as members of
the National Farmers Union picketed grocery chain stores
in major prairie centres and in the Peace River country of
Alberta.
The purpose of the picketing was to persuade
consumers to boycott Kraft products, thus helping dairy
producers in their battle for collective bargaining.
Kraft has been chosen as the target of the boycott
because it is the largest corporation in the food-marketing
field in Canada.
In Regina, 52 picketers covered 10 stores on
Saturday. The co-op and Safeway allowed the picketers —
mainly female members of the NFU - to stand inside
their buildings and distribute material, but Loblaws and
Dominion would not allow them to enter.
In Edmonton, 150 picketers covered 20 stores but
weren't allowed to enter any. In Saskatoon 125 picketers
covered 14 stores.
Picketers reported favorable response from
consumers, and clerks at some stores told them sales of
Kraft products were noticeably down.
NFU locals in Saskatchewan plan to picket grocery
stores in smaller prairie centres in the next few weeks and
to distribute boycott material. Similar picketing has
already taken place in Ontario and boycott activity will
move next to B.C. and P.E.I.
At an evaluation session following the Saskatchewan
picketing the Saskatchewan Federation of Labor promised
the NFU its full support in the boycott. The Regina Labor
Council and the Regina Student Union have also voiced
support of the ban.
Don Kossick, national co-ordinator of the campaign,
has discounted stories and editorials appearing in the
commercial media that the boycott is throwing union
members out of work. Workers at Kraft plants are not
unionized, and the NFU has lifted the boycott against
products from two of Kraft's subsidiaries, Sealtest and
Dominion Dairies, because they are unionized.
Meanwhile, sporadic guerrilla actions against Kraft
products in Vancouver supermarkets are on the increase.
The major tactic of Kraft-haters has been to roam
supermarket aisles with sharp pencils which can easily
pierce the plastic with which Kraft wraps-its products.
A favorite target in recent weeks has been Kraft's
Squeezee Instant Lunch, a jazzed-up kind of cheez whiz
that you're supposed to squirt onto a piece of bread, and
actually eat.
Vol. UH, No. 28       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1971
228-2301
.  ■       •  ■       * -J-    - ~
as 'racist'
l"\l)ON (CUP) - A stormy
i-'ii'i-n-Tsy involving charges of
i.i n 'i .i^ainst a history professor
lu- -nipted at the usually placid
I nr.'.-i .uy of Western Ontario.
11 ■ i: ■ _■ s came to a head
W-.-iln-'Mlay night when professor
k-'iui--i|i Hilborn invaded a
iluduiils meeting discussing
demands for his dismissal and was
involved in a scuffle with one of
his denouncers.
The demands for the firing of
the tenured professor arose from
an article he had written, which
appeard in the London Free Press.
In this article Hilborn attacked
those who support what he
termed "terrorists" in South
Africa. He said that the best way
to end the apartheid system in
that country was by a process of
"erosion".
T his could best be
accomplished, the article went on,
by increasing the prosperity of the
white ruling class in South Africa.
This would create a demand for
more skilled labor which would in
turn lower unemployment among
blacks while increasing their
standard of living and ultimately
their political powers. The article
concludes that the white ruling
class would be forced to liberate
the blacks just to keep the
economy running smoothly.
A group of students, including
in its membership representatives
from the Canadian Party of Labor
formed the Committee to Fight
Racism and demanded the
dismissal of Hilborn from his
teaching post because of his
allegedly racist views.
Hilborn showed up at the
committee's Wednesday meeting,
"to see what asininity they're
raising and reply to their charges."
The professor, who visited
South Africa last year, constantly
interrupted    speakers    at    the
meeting and charged that his
views as expressed in the article
were being distorted.
Tempers flared as Dave Hanna,
a member of the committee,
swung a revolving desk at
Hilborn's shin as the professor was
challenging one of his detractors.
Hilborn grabbed the desk and
tried to swing it back but was
dissuaded by Hanna's threat of an
assault charge and the efforts of
bystanders to cool them down.
The professor, in defending his
position said that he opposed
apartheid - the South African
government policy of complete
racial separation, with the blacks
at the bottom of the social,
economic and legal ladder — but
that the overthrow of the
government would result in
millions of deaths, mainly black.
Committee members argued
that the article served to further
the interests of racist regime and
that Hilborn should not be
allowed to continue teaching such
attitudes at the university.
Two raped
Two women have been raped
on the University Endowment
Lands in the past week.
The first was raped Tuesday
evening as she walked along
University Boulevard by the
university golf course.
The second woman was
accosted at about the same
location Saturday evening.
Both are UBC students.
A spokesman for University
RCMP said the police have no
suspects but the "modus
operandi" seems to indicate that
the same person is responsible for
both rapes.
Women are urged to avoid the
area at night and use public
transportation if possible.
—david phillipt photo
'YOU MAY TAKE ONE BANANA SPLIT/ said photographer David Phillips, and mountaineer Howard
Dirks complied in high-altitude game of May-I. Dirks was straddling "The Eye", atop a 1,000-foot drop on
The Chieftain, overlooking Squamish.
AMS Election Wednesday
President-Secretary
Polls open until 4 p.m.
Candidates' statements on page 8 Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23,  1971
Agreement close in AMS
office union negotiation
By SANDY KASS
Contract negotiations between
the Alma Mater Society and the
Office and Technical. Employees
Union are almost finished, says
the AMS general manager.
The union, certified to
represent office staff since Aug.
11, is negotiating through the B.C.
mediation commission for the
staffs first contract with the
AMS.
"Negotiations have been going
on since the union certification,"
general manager Brian Robinson
told The Ubyssey Monday.
Robinson, acting as AMS
negotiator, said he hopes an
agreement will be reached by the
end of the week when he will
meet with a provincial mediator
and union officials to discuss
terms of the contract proposal.
"I don't think the AMS and
the OTEU are that far apart,"
Robinson said.
"First contracts are always
difficult to negotiate."
The original proposal for staff
unionization    came    during    the
from former AMS better deal this year than the
affairs officer Sharon university administration gave it,
who   urged  AMS offie except  that   the  basis   we were
summer
external
Boylan
staff to unionize for their "own
benefits and protection".
Since Boylan's initial proposal,
a contract containing more than
200 clauses was designed by the
OTEU to include improvements in
salaries, staff benefits and working
conditions.
Robinson said no further
details on the contract would be
available until after the meeting
with provincial and OTEU
officials at the end of the week.
"At the moment the contract
is still a give and take matter,"
AMS president Steve Garrod said
Monday.
"What is important is that
AMS employees get a decent wage
and working conditions and that
we don't bankrupt the society in
the process," Garrod said.
AMS council Wednesday
authorized the president and
treasurer to sign a contract with
the OTEU if an agreement is
reached.
"We   gave   AMS  employees a
Federal grant to help
Crisis Centre expand
By VAUGHN PALMER
Vancouver's Crisis Intervention
and Suicide Prevention Centre is
expanding its research program,
says one of the centre's volunteer
workers.
The centre, which began taking
phone calls from people with
problems ranging from loneliness
to suicide will receive a
$40,000 grant from the federal
government to study trends and
implications of the service, staffer
Nad Mirhady said Monday.
The centre has received 53,383
phone calls since it began in July,
1969, Mirhady told a psychology
club meeting in Angus 24.
In March, 1970 the centre
expanded its operation to include
Now, a 9 a.m. to 1 a.m. young
people's service and a daytime
phone service for elderly people.
Mirhady said the centre
receives around 2,500 calls per
month, many of which are just for
general information on what to do
in a specific situation.
"But a sufficient number, over
half anyway, require long talks,"
he said. "The average length of
calls is 30 minutes.
"The hardest thing is
convincing peonle that work at
the centre isn't dramatic."
Mirhady said. "They've all seen
Sidney Poitier in Slender Thread,
and don't realize that less than
one per cent of the calls we get
deal with suicide.
"You can't make them believe
that work at the centre is dull and
can be depressing," he said.
Mirhady said he hoped the
study would aid them in selecting
staff.
"We only have four paid
members of our staff," he said.
"Most of the phone calls are
handled by volunteer workers
who we carefully select, rejecting
half for apathy, instability, or lack
of real interest.
"We now have a training
program for staff lasting a month
and a half, but we find it not
completely effective," he said.
"Maybe the study will help us."
He urged anyone interested in
working for the centre to phone
the business office of the centre at
733-1171.
The crisis line is 733-4111.
working from was so low, it didn't
really make much difference,"
said Garrod.
Robinson said the cuts taken in
the AMS office budget, "have not
helped us in our negotiations,"
but added he will make all efforts
to stay within the budget.
"The business office has
already taken steps, such as
getting a cheaper copying
machine, to decrease operating
costs," Robinson said.
Garrod said the AMS could not
exceed its budget allocations for
office expenses without
authorization from student
council.
However, Garrod said, there
should be enough money in the
budget margin to allow an
increase in January.
"Another alternative is to
charge student groups for services
which are normally done by the
staff for nothing," he said.
AMS office steward Sheila
McKay denied Monday rumors
that the staff plans to strike if a
contract settlement -is not
reached.
"A strike would be our very
last resort," McKay said.
With OTEU certification AMS
employees are able to strike on 72
hours notice.
McKay said staff members
expect a wage increase as a result
of the OTEU contract, but said
they are not so concerned with
working conditions as "there have
been no hassles over them in the
past."
The relationship between
four sensual people is limited:
They must find a new way.
LARRY KRAMfR..,
BATES      OLIVER REED
GLENDA JACKSON JENNIE LINDEN
m KEN RUSSELL'S film of
D. H. LAWRENCE'S
WOMEN IN LOVE'
THURS. 25th - 12:25
PRI.26&SAT. 27
7:00 & 9:30
CinemaWest
presentation
75c
HEBB THEATRE
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE
ELECTIONS:
Nominations are hereby opened
for PRESIDENT
and TREASURER
of the Science U.S.
Run now for a cushy job; obtain nomination and eligibility forms
from SUB 252, 11:30-12:30, Mon.-Fri.
Nominations close Mon., Nov. 29
at 12:30
ELECTION DAY:
FRIDAY, 3 DECEMBER
Vote Fiercely!
NOW ON
50th Anniversary
(1921-1971)
SALE
UP t° 50% Discount
Fabulous assortment of exciting
IMPORTS   from the FAR EAST
IDEAL PLACE FOR
YOUR GIFT SHOPPING
Teakwood and Rosewood Furniture
Ming Rattan and Wicker Furniture
Wide Assortment of Bamboo Baskets
Paper and Capiz Lights
Oriental Gifts and Curios
Shop early for Ifest selection
F00 HUNG CO. Ltd
'HOUSE OF MING"
In the heart of Chinatown
129 E. Pender,       684-0613
Open daily 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
including Sunday 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday, November 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  3
a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
In another Sociology 200
project under professor Howard
Boughey, a comparative
investigation of drug store prices
in Vancouver was undertaken.
Of concern to a number of
residence students is the
alarming difference between
prices at the University United
Pharmacy (located in the
Village) and most other drug
stores around the city.
Take as a hypothetical case
the student who enters the store
with the attached shopping list.
At the University Pharmacy this
person would pay $12.72.
Elsewhere the prices would
range from $9.71 to $9.42 - a
difference of 31 to 35 per cent.
While these are only seven
items in a drug store's inventory
it is significant that in the entire
list of products surveyed by the
group there is only one item that
is more expensive elsewhere and
that is at one store only.
Another independent survey
of birth control pill prices done
Nov. 2 showed that the
University Pharmacy was one of
the highest priced stores in the
area, a 21-day pack of Ortho SQ
being prices at $2.45.
By     comparison,     Issac's
Bayswater   Pharmacy   is   $1.49
and prices at several Shopper's
Drug Marts ranged from $1.49
•to $1.69 for the same product.
The following article was
originally picked up in Canada
by the Kingston Whig Standard.
It is reprinted here in order to
give wider exposure to current
U.S. government thinking
concerning the future of this
country. It was entitled A
Friendly Southern Neighbor
Looks North.
By JOHN SAMSON
The New York Examiner
Within 10 years the United
States will be consuming over 80
per cent of the world's energy
and resources, according to an
expert in this field.
Within   10   years,   all  fresh
water in the United States will
be polluted.
Within 10 years the United
States will have to take over
Canada, through either
economic pressure or force, in
order to survive.
"It's not really a question of
how," says resources expert and
advisor to president Nixon,
Henry Gablinger. "We certainly
have the means to conquer
Canada.
"It's a question of when. I've
advised the president we should
TABLE OF COMPARATIVE PRICES FOR SEVERAL DRUGSTORES
University Shopper's 10th Ave.
Item                                                   Pharmacy (2 Iocs.) Rexall Woodward':
ContacC 10 pack                                  $1.59 .89 .99 .99
222's                                                       1.40 .99 1.04 .99
Aspirin 100                                             1.05 .69 .69 .75
MacCleans 162 gm                                  1.29 .99 1.19 1.09
Listerine 20 ounce                                1.89 1.19 .99 1.29
Mitchum's Deoderant 2 ounce               3.25 2.76 2.93 2.59
Psssst Shampoo 7 ounce                         2.25 1.91 1.88 1.97
Totals                                                      12.72 9.42 9.71 9.67
—warren mayes photo
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE Til  Nawatzki holds forth at AMS all-candidates'  meeting Monday noon, while  members of opponent
Students' Coalition slate gape at camera. Acclaimed treasurer David Dick grins as others attempt to comprehend proceedings.
Tiny crowd listens to candidates
By DAVID SCHMIDT
About 50 persons showed up in SUB
party room Monday to hear four candidates
for Alma Mater Society president and two for
secretary explain why they should be elected.
Grant Burnyeat, law 2, Student Coalition
slate presidential candidate, said: "We believe
in negotiation and co-operation rather than
rhetoric and demands."
He suggested students make more use of
the bookstore and food services committees.
"We still aren't sure if we have exhausted
their possibilities," he said.
Allan Caplan, law 1, an independent
candidate, said: "This is a commuter campus.
We have to compete with mommy and daddy
and the color TV for the student's attention.
"If we have a middle class campus, don't
knock it, work with it. Don't give the students
something they should have, give then
something they want," Caplan said.
Steve Housser, arts 4, another independent,
said: "The central need is for better teaching.
We should restart course evaluation and
assessment."
His    plans    included
swimming   pool,
covering of the
more music on campus,
Quebec week, setting up a council scholarship
fund, and sponsoring a UBC refugee.
"I will do only what is in the
constitution," he said.
The fourth presidential candidate, Til
Nawatzki, law 3, refused to talk on particulars
because ."nobody pays attention to them
anyway."
"If students don't give a shit, it's because
all they're getting is shit from council."
He condemned the student coalition for
running as a slate because they were the
people who opposed the human government
slate but now have started a slate themselves.
He then quickly condemned the "assholes
in applied science who run around in their red
diapers, the jockies and their triangular balls,
the clubbies who can't support their own
hanky-panky clubs," ending with "Fuck the
administration."
Asked why he was running, Nawatzki
replied: "I have an ego to satisfy."
Secretary candidate Tom MacKinnon, law
3, said: "I am running as an alternative to the
student coalition because I don't like the
slates."
He promised support for the student co-op
bookstore and continuing support for
intramurals especially so that "150-pound
weaklings like myself have a chance."
"I feel I am the women's lib candidate
because I am running for the token woman's
position," he said.
Hilary Powell, arts 1, the Student Coalition
candidate for secretary, said: "Women's lib is
irrelevant."
When asked why only one woman was
running on his slate Burnyeat said Wednesday:
"We had enough trouble getting qualified
people to run, without having to look for
women too."
Powell promised continued support for
existing day-care and legal aid services.
"I ask you all to coalesce behind the
students coalition," she said.
The byelection will be held Wednesday
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with advance polls in
SUB and the three residences Tuesday.
start moving within the next two
years."
If you think this is dialogue
out of a science-fiction story,
think again. Mr. Gablinger is
deadly serious.
Granted that Canada has been
our peaceful neighbor for
several hundred years and that
we have shared a borderline
from Maine to Washington
without incident. But life in the
international jungle is rough and
if the U.S. is to make it to the
year 2000, it needs the fantastic
natural resources that sit just a
few miles above its border.
"It's all very simple," says
Gablinger. "Just look at the
figures.
"By 1985 there could be as
many as 275 million people in
the United States. And by the
year 2000 the population could
approach 350 million. Canada is
expected to have a population of
38 million by the year 2000."
But even more than its
present voracious consumption
of fuel, power, minerals, metals,
chemicals, plastics and exploding
population, the U.S. is dedicated
to an incredible growth in the
use of all critical materials.
Every 20 years the
consumption of energy and key
resources doubles.
"Yet from a resource
viewpoint," Gablinger explains,
"the United States is a have-not
nation. Some 33 separate basic
materials are on a 'critical' list.
Among those the U.S. must now
import and continue to do so at
an accelerated rate, are crude oil,
iron ore, bauxite for aluminim,
copper, lead, zinc, potash,
uranium, pulpwood, timber,
manganese, rubber and gold."
What all this boils down to is
very simple. Canada has an
abundance of most of the above
materials, but is exporting them
at a very slow rate.
After all, they don't want to
be caught short when the crunch
for raw materials comes.
But the U.S. has never been
shy about taking what it wants
in the past. And driven to the
wall, it will do the same with
Canada.
"Actually we're being very
nice about it," said Gablinger.
"We have offered all kinds of
deals to the Canadians such as
the Continental Energies
Program which would unite all
the resources in North America
into one common pool. If they
don't accept it, we'll just have to
force it on them.
"We have the economic
arsenal to do it. We could buy
enough Canadian dollars on the
speculation exchanges to drive
their value down to 15 cents."
The other natural resource
that Canada has in overwhelming
abundance is water. Within the
next few years, water will
become the world's most
precious element — perhaps
replacing gold as a medium of
exchange between nations.
"The United States now uses
400 billion gallons of water per
year," says Gablinger. "This will
become 900 billion by 1990.
Canada has one fourth of the
world's fresh water and the
largest coastline in the world."
The bargaining over Canadian
water has started a cold war in
resources that Canada can only
lose.
See page 5: EXPOSURE Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23,  1971
The young lawyers
Yup, here it is. Yer handy guide to the
upcoming byelections for AMS president.
For starters, everyone wanted to be Big
Daddy. When nominations closed, there were five
— count 'em, five — candidates for president. One
or two have since dropped out.
Of those remaining, it appears Til Nawatzki
and Grant Burnyeat are front runners.
Burnyeat is currently the law representative
on AMS council — a job he appears to take more
seriously than most council members who,
perhaps, have a firmer grasp on reality or don't
want to make it as lawyers.
He is head of the Students' Coalition slate
which has already claimed five of the seven
executive positions.
Burnyeat, a ruddy, rotund figure, quickly
gained fame on this year's council for his lengthy
nit-picking forays into constitutional details.
The major plank in his platform appears to
consist   of   pledges  of   more  co-operation   and
communication with the administration. A faith
in the value of 'opening up channels' between the
AMS and the big boys who run this place marks
Burnyeat's view of what student government
means.
Til Nawatzki, the other major presidential
contender, is quite a different person. (Or is he?)
To put it simply, Nawatzki is crazy.
As a matter of fact, Nawatzki is so crazy, he's
made it through two-plus years of law and is a
fairly famous figure at UBC.
In his undergrad years at SFU, he made a
name as ace columnist on The Peak, which he
bankrupted in a manner of speaking because his
column contained just about all the worthwhile
(and not-so-worthwhile) campus news.
Nawatzki has a sense of humor, anarchist
tendencies, is fun at parties and doesn't commit
perverted sexual acts with dogs or ducks —
though we're not ruling out chickens.
And he's been quite clear about why he's
running in this byelection:  He doesn't want to
This  here's  rotten
comme   subversne
propaganda   an'
I   don't  wanna
catch   any   a   you
clowns   readin'/
it f f f
■ i • • •
have to man a poll, he has an ego to satisfy and he
can't stand student council baloney.
He also can't stand the administration.
Where does all this leave us? We're not.quite
sure.
All in all, there's not much of a choice.
For others who feel the same. The Ubyssey
therefore announces a great new contest.
The person who concocts the best spoiled
ballot or write-in ballot, wins a night out on the
campus as a Ubyssey reporter whose assignment
will be to cover the first council meeting under
the new regime.
Safe Whiz
We see in this here rag today — page one, to
be precise — that guerrilla action against Kraft is
heating up in Vancouver supermarkets.
Seems that some people, presumably
dismayed that the big stores are continuing to
stock Kraft products despite the National
Farmers Union boycott, have decided to help the
consumer decide not to buy these products.
A pencil hole in a piece of cheese is a pretty
good argument.
Now, far be it from us to counsel or support
such wanton acts of vandalism and destruction.
Indeed, we were shocked and dismayed —
even scandalized — when we learned some time
ago of another such guerrilla activity.
This had to do with the California grape
boycott, when irate shoppers filled the bottoms
of their shopping carts with scab toquay grapes,
and proceeded to stack heavy cans on top.
The shoppers then faded into the night
leaving their deserted carts, oozing squashed
grapes, in the store aisles.
Sad days for corporate capitalism.
But more may lie ahead.
Imagine some of the things the grocery
guerrillas could come up with:
Undoing lids on jars of Kraft jam, so that if
the unwitting consumer picks up the jar by the lid
it will crash to the floor;
Placing used safes in jars of Cheese Whiz;
Running fingers through the Kraft chip dips;
Or testing the Squeezee tjy really
squeeezzzing.
These are vicious and destructive acts, which
we would in no way condone.
We merely remind our readers that the best
way to make sure they don't discover dead snakes
in their cream cheese is not to buy Kraft.
Letters
Grads
An open letter to all graduate
students:
Last Friday and Monday
questionnaires sent out jointly by
the graduate student association
and the Non-Faculty Teachers'
Union were placed in every
graduate     student's    box.    The
questionnaire is brief and to the
point and it is hoped that all
graduate students employed at the
university will respond.
The Grad Student Association
and the NFTU want to be able to
present the President's Workshop
on Graduate Assistants with a true
picture of the graduates' temporal
and financial condition at UBC in
THS WSSIY
NOVEMBER 23, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments. 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
What the hell yelled Vaughn Palmer but it wasn't easy for }lan
O'Brien to scream rats in the face of David Schmidt's and Lesley Krueger's
outrages about gophers and toady to Sandy Kass in the spirit of revelry and
Paul Knox in the midst said it was all chipmunkery in the hayfield, but
Gord Gibson and Mike Kidora didn't care, for what was Kent Spencer but
a Jim Adams rewrite and Make Sasges went home early to watch Warren
Mayes on TV and eat cheezies and David Phillips and Garry Gruenke
spotted it a mile off but didn't tell anyone until it was too late. Ted Turner
drank. And don't fergit, when yer smashin' th' state that there's a meeting
about photography at 12:30 and a celebrity photo seminar at 1:30 today.
order to push for reforms hi the
Graduate Assistant programs as
they now exist. We cannot do it
intuitively, we need your help.
If you are a graduate student
employed at the university as a
TA, RA, lab assistant or marker
and you have not already filled
out a questionnaire please pick
one up today (either from your
mailbox, from your department
office or at the grad centre), fill it
out and return it to the grad
centre by campus mail (it is
self-addressed) or in person.
We need your co-operation and
support if we are to be able to
effectively represent you on this
campus. Thanks.
Gina Quijano, President,
Graduate Students Association
Rawhide
Well, it looks like suedes and
buckskins will be the style for
another year. That musky odor
and soft feel brings one so much
closer to nature.
I hear some horrible people are
trying to sell furs on the campus.
Oh,   how   awful!   To  see  those
beautiful furs and to think they
come from animals of nature.
I hope my point is clear. It's
about time we stopped all this
hypocritical crap. People have
told me what they think of those
capitalist pigs selling furs — while
they twirl the tassles on their new
European reindeer rawhide.
Are sheep any more
expendable than mink?
Gary Holisko,
Artsl
Lewd
We are writing this letter in
protest of the AMS'
indiscriminate policy of allowing
anyone who asks to use the SUB
ballroom or partyroom, regardless
of their intentions.
In doing so, the AMS is placing
full responsibility (in the eyes of
the public) on the students of
UBC for any events held in these
rooms.
Now we consider ourselves to
be open-minded. If a campus
group wishes to conduct
performances in these rooms that
are objectionable to our tastes, we
will remain silent, as long as these
performances are closed to the
public. But when these groups use
our facilities as means of private
monetary gain through the sale of
tickets to the public, we feel we
must protest.
Perhaps the AMS booking clerk
can be excused on pleas of
ignorance concerning the
reputations of the groups asking
to use these rooms. However,
there are certain times when the
AMS can be charged with crass
indifference  to student opinion.
An example, and the reason for
writing this letter, is the
forthcoming "apple and stone" —
a so-called folk and blues festival
scheduled to be held in the SUB
partyroom. This "festival" has
been held twice previously, both
times in the same room.
Both times we attended, and
both times we were subjected to a
constant barrage of lewdness and
obscenity. We found the sponsors
and the performers to show an
astounding lack of taste and moral
qualities.
Now we refuse to muck-rake
by     bringing    up    every    last Tuesday, November 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
. embarrassment to us as students
that occurred during these two
shows. Suffice it to say that both
times we sent letters of
indignation and protest to the
AMS, but received no reply.
Perhaps this letter will bring
some action.
Since the AMS is aware of the
nature of these shows, why does it
permit them to continue in the
SUB partyroom? The public
already has a low opinion of our
morals and Christian values — why
degrade it further?
Write a letter of protest to the
AMS today!
Five signatures
It is a pleasure to find people
so keen on researching a
phenomenon that disgusts them
that they will return a second
time to investigate an "obscene
and  embarrassing"  performance.
university.   But   what   kind   of
institute have I transferred to?
All I can say is, if this is an
example of some of western
Canada's more capable youth, I
hate to think of what's in store
for Canada in the years to come.
Name withheld.
Fun
Flash
Last Friday I came to a rather
depressing realization.
Not until I noticed a Student
Coalition poster, saying "by
acclamation" did I figure out
what had happened.
The students at UBC had voted
out of power people who were
trying to implement a fairly
complete program and political
philosophy, people who were
sincerely interested in trying to
help the students.
If the students were not
satisfied with the progress made
by the human government, this is
what should have happened. But
who filled their place? People
whose names I've never seen
before. People who have never
presented a platform. People who
— with two exceptions - haven't
even been voted in. I have heard
of this deplorable situation
occurring at ridiculously apathetic
junior colleges.
I recently became a naturalized
citizen and having gone to college
for two years in the U.S.. I
decided   to   attend   a  Canadian
An open letter to the engineers
involved in Thursday's display in
SUB:
I would like to commend you
for the healthy, fun-loving,
child-like natures you have
managed to maintain throughout
your trying school years.
The cute display you put on in
SUB on Thursday, good-naturedly
removing several students' beards,
certainly must have been fun for
all involved. What could be more
fun than jumping on to tables and
in to people's lunches, than
leaping en masse on to the wearer
of a science jacket?
But why stop here? Imagine
the fun you could have pushing
people out of their wheelchairs
and into the library pond — or
throwing fire-crackers at blind
students.
Come on, use your
imaginations — the most
important thing is that you have
FUN!
Louise Hanic,
Science 4
Skagit
I shall continue to use the
Skagit Valley until my snorkel
becomes rusty.
But as co-author of The Future
of the Skagit Valley I vowed that
I would not become involved in
any further literary debates as to
the destiny of this green and
moderately fertile valley.
However, the rise of the
Eco-Warriors at the thirteenth
hour in last Tuesday's edition of
Exposure
From page 3
To international observers there are many small signs of the
growing tensions between the two nations — tensions that will
eventually either erupt into a war in which Canada will be
humiliatingly defeated or smolder into Canada's complete submission
to any U.S. demands.
Last month U.S. customs men manning the huge Canadian border
began carrying hand weapons for the first time since prohibition.
Defoliation of areas on the American side of the border has
already begun. This will create a 3,000 mile-long swath of open space
between the two countries.
Canada's swinging prime minister Trudeau recently blocked the
sale of a huge uranium mine to U.S. interests and America retaliated
by cutting down the imports of oil from overstocked petroleum
stocks of the Canadian prairies.
The two countries are arguing bitterly over the sovereignty of the
Arctic. The huge oil tanker S.S. Manhattan recently made a historic
trip through Arctic waters and now Canada is trying to place
restrictions on further such voyages.
All of this doesn't even begin to touch on sensitive issues like the
placement of the ABM missile defence system so that nuclear
explosions will take place over Canadian territory.
"Look," says Gablinger, "we've been protecting Canada for years.
In this game, you don't get nothing for nothing. It's time they paid up
for the privilege of living next to the richest country in the world.
They wouldn't be so well off now if it wasn't for us.
"As the president said to me "We're going to have to start calling
in our I.O.U.'s and Canada's the one deepest in debt to us'."
So, in the next few years, look for some new stars on Old Glory.
To keep the flag's design symmetrical, ten would be a good number
and that's just the number of provinces in Canada.
The Ubyssey compels me to put
tool to parchment.
Kass and Sydor reported that
the Skagit Valley means many
things to many people. The many
people they refer to are comprised
of, (in order of priority I wonder),
ecologists, the Seattle City Light
and Power Company and the
Canadian and U.S. Governments.
But what of Dai Jones, the baker's
son.
He may or may not be an
Eco-Freak, depending on the time
of year, has never heard of Seattle
City Cight or S.C.L.P.C, and
knew there were different
anthems but thought it was one
government.
The two-page article devoted
10 words to describing the value
of the valley to most of the
residents of southwest British
Columbia. It means just one thing
— the opportunity for a different
kind of recreational experience.
The flora and fauna inventory is
irrelevant for most people.
The 'environmentalists' have
been successful in bringing the
plight of the valley to the
attention of larger numbers of
people than otherwise might have
been the case. But an
acquaintance with the plight of
the valley does not replace an
awareness of the implication of
this recent incursion of the U.S.
into Canada for Canadians, and in
particular those residing in British
Columbia.
Any valley, mountain side or
estuary will prove unique if
studied in detail. But when we
have 'saved' the Nitinat, Boundary
Bay, the Skagit Valley, the Fraser
Canyon and the Court House
Garden what do we do with them?
To many of the residents of B.C.
their usefulness is a superficial one
— if it is a different shape it may
be worth looking at.
A reaction will depend on the
extend to which people are
acquainted with regional
environmental diversity, in which
context and eco-awareness is a
Good Thing. But let it not cloud
other dimensions in which we
should understand the importance
of a particular resource, the
ramifications if lost and the
implications of governmental
non-involvement.
Slaney and Co. cannot be
criticized for working for the
Americans — Con III has not
reached them yet, but they can be
criticized for collecting
environmental data pertaining
only to the Skagit Valley. The
valley only becomes meaningful
to the residents of B.C. as a
resource if it is viewed as a
component of a regional mosaic.
If the attempt of the lawyers
to thwart the flooding achieve
nothing else it may delay activity
sufficiently to facilitate a more
complete process of education on
the implications of flooding.
Allan G. Duguid,
School of community
and regional planning
. EDELWEISS
HAUS
'Spurts Specialists'
* NORDICASKI BOOTS *
* WARM UP PANTS    *
* 12.88 & up *
: edelweiss :
HAUS
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
1230 N. State 733-3271
Bellingham, Wash.
Next To Shakey's
Money at Par
Weekdays till 9 — Sattill 6        ^
ROYAL
BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA  STUDENT LOANS
Deposit Accounts-General Banking Services
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Manager
10th at Sasamat 224-4348
IHE MOST
SAVAGE
FILM IN
HISTORY!
The order was
massacre, and good
soldiers follow orders.
These soldiers
were the best.
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
FRI. NOV. 26 & SAT. NOV. 27
7:00   and    9:30
SUNDAY NOV. 28 7:00
SUB THEATRE
50c
SOLDIER BLUE
CANDICE BER6EH-PETER STRAUSS-DONALD PLEASENCE
J Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23,  1971
TODAY
ALPHA-OMEGA CLUB
Emergency    meeting,    noon,    SUB
105B.
CUSO
Information   night,   7:30   p.m.,   IH
upstairs.
WEDNESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Officers election, noon, IH 402.
UBC-NDP
Organization    meeting,   noon,tSUB
211.
VOC
Constitution revisions, noon, Angus
104.
'Tween classes
^ -, /»vr '",f ,
7/2',?, 2
ACE
Special    children   education,   noon,
Ed 204.
IL CAFFE
Slides of Pompeii, noon, IH stage.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Poet   Dorothy   Livesay,   noon, SUB
art gallery.
f.
FREESEE
Civilisation, noon, SUB auditorium
UBCSCC
Organizational     meeting,    8    p.m.,
SUB club lounge.
THURSDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Le    rat   d'Amerique,   noon,   Buch
100.
Hot flashes
Abortion cloy
marked
OTTAWA (CUP) - About 250
Ontario women gathered here
Saturday to demonstrate
their support for the repeal of
repressive abortion laws to the
federal government.
Their demonstration coincided
with many other demonstrations
around the world which marked
International Abortion Day.
The women who gathered on
Parliament Hill met with Liberal
MP Ralph Stewart who tried to
persuade them that the
government had "their • best
interests at heart".
However he was unable to set a
date   for  the   promised   abortion
debate in the Commons and
showed no optimism for the
removal of abortion from the
criminal code.
The pro-abortion
demonstrators were also met by
150 anti-abortion demonstrators
from the Alliance For Life, who
heckled pro-abortion speakers.
There were a few speeches in
support of the right of women to
control their own bodies plus a
few songs; then the demonstration
quietly broke up.
As the women dispersed one
demonstrator noted although it is
true legislatron alone can never
bring about a functional equality
for women nor end male
chauvinism, "We must at least
push for reforms that will allow us
to make decisions about our lives
and bodies without being legally
branded as criminals."
About 60 women marched
through downtown Vancouver
Saturday in a rally called by the
B.C. Women's Abortion Law
Repeal Coalition. The
demonstration was part of the
nationwide action.
Economics
A symposium on the current
international economic situation
and its effect on Canada will be
held this week on campus.
Political science professor Don
Blake will speak on the
recently-leaked Herb Gray report
on foreign investment Wednesday
noon in the SUB clubs lounge.
Commerce prof J. L. Evans will
speak on Canada's protectionism
at 3:15 p.m., same day, same
time.
Totem Park & Fort Camp
present
5 MAN CARGO
DANCE
TOTEM BALLROOM
Friday, November 26
8:30 P.M.
Res. $1.00 a Head
Non Res. $1.50 a Head
Political science prof Phil
Resnick will talk on ways to
withdraw from American
domination Thursday, at noon, in
the SUB clubs lounge.
Commerce prof Whatarangi
Winiata will also speak Wednesday
on recent international financial
developments at 2:15 p.m. in the
SUB clubs lounge.
Eskimo art
The hours of the Eskimo
sculpture display, which ends Dec.
12 at the Vancouver Art Gallery,
have been extended.
The new hours for the display
of Innuit art are 10 a.m. to 10
p.m. from Monday to Friday and
1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays.
Saturday hours, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. remain the same.
The works at the gallery, 1145
West Georgia, will be displayed in
European centres next year.
Cfiurcfies
Anthropology grad student
Gillies Malnarich will speak on
women and the church as an
institution of authority at the
Canadian Women: Our Story
lecture Tuesday, at 7 p.m., in the
SUB ballroom.
Food free
If you like free food, the SUB
art gallery Wednesday night is the
place to be.
"We're not exactly sure yet
what the food will be, but it will
be supplied by the alternate food
service and we're sure it will be
good," Alma Mater Society
returning officer Sandy Kass said
in urging students to be at the
gallery at 6 p.m. Wednesday to
count ballots for the AMS
president and secretary
by-elections happening that day.
"We need people desperately,"
Kass added.
Funky comfort
Musician Tom Northcott will
perform Thursday at 8 p.m. in the
SUB ballroom.
Admission is $1. Tickets can be
bought-at the Alma Mater Society
business offices or at the door.
Solid Comfort will be appearing
with Northcott. This new group
with their "contemporary funk"
sound will also be playing
Wednesday, at 8 p.m. at the
Simon  Fraser  University theatre.
FILMS
The 1930 Classic:
ALL QUIET
ON THE
WESTERN
FRONT
BY
Lewis Milestone
■ with LEW AYRES
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 24
SUB THEATRE
7:00        ' 50'
COMING DECEMBER 1:
TO KILL A
MOCKINGBIRD
ALPHA-OMEGA CLUB
Multiculturalism,  noon, SUB 105B.
LEGAL AID
SUB 232, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
WARGAMERS
Roman battles, noon,SUB 215.
VCF
Discipleship, noon, SUB 207.
CINEMAWEST
Women     in     Love,     noon,     Hebb
Theatre.
BAHA'I CLUB
Rap session for all interested, noon,
Buch. 230.
CCF
Dick York speaks, noon, SUB 205.
HAMSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL
31 spaces open to play Edge City
College, a game of organization and
design, 4:30-9:30 p.m., grad student
centre ballroom. Tickets include
supper. Available at school office,
Lasserre, local 2779.
FRIDAY
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
224. Homosexuals who would like
to write to others, write Box 12,
SUB, UBC.
SATURDAY
VOC
Curling party, 9:30 p.m., winter
sports centre.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 line*,  1   day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines,  1   day $1.25; additional
line* 30t; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads ate nor accepted by telephone and ate payable
in advance. Deadline it 11:30 rn.au, ttm day before pubttcation.
Publications OSice, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
STROBES.  BLACK LIGHTS.  BUB-
ble   Machines.   10%   off   rental   to
UBC students.  736-0944.
Lost & Found
13
Greetings
12
INEXPENSIVE. RECYCLED FUR
coats and general fur access. Pap-
pas Brothers, 459 Hamilton Street
at Victory Square. We trade. Open
Monday through Saturday 12 noon-
5:30  p.m.,   681-6840.
Special Notices
15
MARATHON GESTALT WEEK-
end Nov. 26, 27, 28. For information phone Allan Cohen, 224-5445
or John Mate,  731-7971.
WANT TO PLAY IN A CONCERT
band? Former high school musicians and anybody else who can
play, welcome. Phone Pete 684-
7759 or Cathie 939-0741.
ITBC BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Hair shaping, shag cuts
at reasonable prices. 5736 University Blvd., 228-8942.
TAI CHI CHUAN SELF-DEFENSE
health classes for men & women.
Bill Wong instructor. Phone 253-
93S6.	
OPEN BIBLE FORUM WITH BER-
nice Gerard. Chaplain. Topic:
"Watchman Nee's Concept of
Man". Beginning Wed.. Nov. 24,
Noon.  Lutheran   Centre.
$50 REWARD FOR INFORMATION
leading to return of 1969 red 4-dr.
Datsun. Licence AAA-513. 291-1946.
THE   GRIN   BIN   HAS   THE   LAR-
gest  selection   in   Canada  of  posters and pop art. Also Jokes. Gifts
and   24" x 36"   photo   blowups  from   |
your   own    prints   and    negatives.   I
Enquiries    welcome    at    the    Grin   !
Bin,   3209   West   Broadway   across
from   the   Liquor   Store.   Call   738-   !
2311. j
UBC FOLK SOC PRESENTS AN-
other Apple And Stone Folk Blues
Festival. Friday, Nov. 26 — 8:00
p.m..   SUB  Partv   Room.   S1.00.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
FOR   SALE:   1960
erican.    Running
over $80. Phone
RAMBLER   AM-
well.    Best   offer
Chris. 435-2186.
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Photography
35
f
t\)t TLtxiH anb gutter
\\ij       Camera*
W
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alto  at  Denman  Place
GADGET BAG
SPECIAL
List $16.95
Our, regular price  $13.50
Special  110.95
PRINTING    YOUR    OWN
XMAS   CARDS?
We have the widest selection of
Agfa and Ilford papers at the
Best   Prices.
x 3 FT. BLOWUP FROM NEC,
print or slide—56.00. Photo finishing 15<7, discount. 4472 West 10th
Ave., Ph. 224-1732. Howard Vasey
Galleries.
Scandals
37
FOR GUYS ONLY: RENO'S CLUB,
775 Homer, enter at rear. Monday-
Saturday, 9 p.m.-3 a.m. Sunday,
3 p.m.-11 p.m 683-1515.
ODS BODKINS. METHINKS LORD
Foppington's rout of the year will
be happening at the Park of Cecil
Green on the 30th of the month.
Tickets available in Buch. 472.
Pray thee come.
ANOTHER OBSCENE, DISGUST-
ing Apple And Stone Folk And
Blues Festival. Friday, Nov. 26,
8:00 p.m., SUB Party Room. Only
$1.00.
Typing
40
ESSAYS, ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385   after   6   p.m.
YR ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on   short  essays.
TERM PAPERS, ETC. SPEEDILY
and efficiently typed. 35c page.
Call Yvonne at  738-6874.   (Kits).
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESIS, Assignments, research papers. Fast
service. Near 41st & Marine Drive.
266-5053.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings. Weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745—Reasonable  Rates.
TYPING. ESSAYS, TERM PAPERS,
Theses,   Phone  224-7918.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays. Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.  Phone 263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
STUDENTS WANTED: $400 MTH.
part-time: in management and PR
of Anti-Air & Water Pollution
Control Products. Open for male
and female who qualify. Send resume to G. W. Oijen, 81 Howe St..
Victoria, B.C. This is ground floor
of a $100,000,000.00 Ecology Co.
—AUDITING  AND  ACCOUNTING—
Various Federal Government Depts.
Duties: Employees assist in the
audits of government and agencies
while performing duties selected
to develop their knowledge and
experience.
Qualifications: Must have by 1972
a Bachelor's Degree with specializations in Accounting, Commerce,
Business Administration or Finance. It is important to note that
successful candidates may obtain
their CGA or RIA while working
for the Public Service.
Forward a UCPA application form
to: Student Placement Office,
University of British Columbia.
Vancouver. B.C. Quote Competition 72-4001.
MALE STUDENTS WANTED TO
run Christmas tree lots. Trailer
accommodation required. Phone
733-2678 after 5:00.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKIS — TONI SAILER, 205 CM.
like new, $55.00. Contact Murray,
Rm.  205,   Civil Eng.  or 872-2785.
SKIS: HEAD'S 205 cm. $75: GRES-
giv 185cm $20: boots: Phillips 10-
speed $45: Hoover vacuum $30:
ironing board $5. Campus viewing.
224-9156.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CAMPUS ROOMS WITH KITCHEN
privileges, $60 month. 5745 Agronomy Road, behind village, drop
around today.
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM. NEAR
gates — private entrance. Phone,
facilities study—no cooking, sorry.
Ready now.  224-7623.
LARGE RM. IN 3-BDRM. HOUSE
14th & Burrard. Dec. 1st, $75. Prefer girl 22-2S yrs. 732-3470. Jacques
Room & Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.       86
PEOPLE     NEEDED     TO     SHARE
communal   house,   9th   &   Trimble,
224-1405.  Rent depends on number
" of people. Tuesday, November 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds
clobber
Redmen
The UBC Thunderbird soccer
team hosted the Royal Military
College Redmen on Saturday in
intercollegiate play and trounced
the visitors 7-0.
Wayne Larson opened the
scoring for UBC from a corner
kick by Tony Mayor 10 minutes
into the first half.
Mayor and Larson again
combined talents to put the 'Birds
two goals ahead as Larson pushed
a pass to Mayor who broke
through the RMC defence to
score.
Other UBC goal scorers were
Jim Sator with two goals, and Jim
Quinn, Phil Sanford with one
each.
Despite the high score against
them, the Redmen displayed good
sportsmanship and kept up a
constant effort during the game.
SPOR TS
Pronghorns easy prey
Janit   *>*-
-garry gruenke photo
WAYNE LARSON, UBC gets a squeeze from two Redmen as he
heads the ball during Saturday's game.
Rugby and hockey 'Birds win
Rugby
Hockey
UBC rugby teams used their youth and speed
Saturday to win 4 of 5 games. Only the Braves,
minus several key players, and playing against the
considerable experience of former B.C.
Representative Bucky Ellison lost.
North Shore Capilanos beat the Braves 23-8.
Excellent loose mauling by forwards and good
passing were the measure of difference in the 'Birds'
32-7 win over North Shore Capilanos.
After a relatively close 12-0 first half, UBC's
superior conditioning began to show. Eviction of
the Caps' John Langley from the game by Referee
Bill Wescot increased the 'Birds' advantage.
Crisp, close passing between forwards and backs
resulted in tries by Barry Lee, Spence McTavish and
Eric Lilly for UBC.
Best solo try of the game was John Mitchell's
65 yard dance past three defenders, the last of
whom received one of the nicest straight-arms seen
this year.
Ray Banks added two penalty kicks and three
converts.
In other games the Totems beat NS Caps 13-0,
the Tomahawks won over Ex-Brits 8-4, and the
Frosh beat Capilano College 10-0.
"Over all, there were some really bright spots,"
said Thunderbird hockey coach Bob Hindmarch
after watching his team trounce the University of
Victoria Vikings twice in weekend action.
Friday night the 'Birds beat the Vikings 12-3,
and Saturday 7-3. Both games were played before
near capacity crowds at the Winter Sports Centre.
The 'Bird line of Brian de Basio, Bob
McAneeley, and Doug Buchanan made mincemeat
of their Viking opponents, scoring 13 of the 19
'Bird goals.
De Basio got four, McAneeley seven, and
Buchanan two.
"They were just brilliant," said Hindmarch.
Friday night, the 'Birds went into the third
period leading 4-3. Although pelting Victoria goalie
Murrey Findlay with 19 shots, the Vikings
outscored them 2-1 in the second period.
There then ensued eight straight for the 'Birds.
What does a coach do between periods?
Nothing.
"You don't change what you're doing. There
comes a time when it overwhelms you," Hindmarch
said. "We had a lot of shots in the second period."
UBC goalie Ian Wilkie made 24 saves both
nights, Findlay stopped 43 Friday and 39 Saturday.
Friday and Saturday it was a
case of the UBC Thunderbirds
completely outclassing their
basketball opponents.
This was the story in the two
'Bird victories over the University
of Lethbridge Pronghorns, 93-55
Friday and 115-37 Saturday
night.
Lethbridge looked completely
out of place on the same court as
UBC and as the scores would
indicate, indeed they were. This is
not intended as a slam against
Lethbridge, because what can you
do to stop a pair of guards who
between them scored a total of 73
points over the weekend?
The two guards are Stan
Callegari and Ron Thorsen.
Callegari led the 'Bird shooters on
Friday night as he scored 20
points, while Thorsen took charge
Saturday with 33 points.
The rest of the 'Birds were
quick to follow the example of
Thorsen and Callegari, as six
players, Bob Dickson, Darryl
Gjernes, Peter Herd, Jack Hoy,
Callegari and Thorsen scored in
double figures on Saturday night.
In addition to the scoring, UBC
played fine basketball, both
offensively and defensively.
Despite the ease with which
they won, UBC resisted the
temptation     to     run    up     an
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LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
Women's
Intramurals
EXTRA BROOMBALL games:
today on main rink; 4:30 p.m.
GPB 11 vs. HEc and GPB 1 vs.
Alpha Phi; 5 p.m. Ed 11 vs.
Rehab 1 and Recreation vs.
Pharm.
Thursday on Rink 1: 5:30
p.m. DG 11 vs. Phrat and Pharm
11 vs. Ed 1; 6 p.m. Mawd vs.
Mack and Hamber vs. Nursing.
Thursday on main rink: 5:15
p.m. Hamber vs. Rehab 11 and
HEc vs GPB 11; 5:45 p.m. Totem
vs. VCF and AO 11 vs. Agric;
6:16 p.m. AO 11 vs. Ed 1 and AD
11 vs. Alpha Phi.
Dec. 2 on main rink: 5:15 p.m.
Mawd vs. Nursing and DG 11 vs.
Pharm 1; 5:45 p.m. KKG vs.
Rehab 1 and Phrat vs. GPB 1;
6:15 p.m. DG 1 vs. Agric and
Mack vs. ADPi.
MUCH ADO ABOUT
NOTHING
by William Shakespeare
(A 1930's production of the comedy classic)
AN M.A. THESIS PRODUCTION
Directed by Richard Ouzounian
November 24-27 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $2.00 -:- Students: $1.00
SPECIAL STUDENT MATINEE
Thurs., Nov. 25 - 12:30 NOON
Reservations: Room 207, Frederick Wood Theatre
UBC SOMERSET STUDIO
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2978 - W. Broadway at Carnarvon - 731-0437
Representatives SPIROS DOUKAS, RES. PHONE: 879-1842
are: ALAN KNIGHT, RES. PHONE: 731-8974
astronomical score, as Coach Peter
Mullins substituted both nights in
an effort to keep the score down.
Though they were two very
easy, and basically very dull wins,
they stretch the 'Birds' record to
5 and 0 and first place in the
B.C.-Alberta division.
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BARRIE.   ONTARIO Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 23, 1971
AM S presidential candidates
Burnyeat
It is my feeling that the
problems which face us all, as
students, can best be solved by a
co-operative effort with the
officials of the university
whereby negotiations replace
demands and rhetoric.
If I am elected I plan to work
through any existing channels to
bring about the correction of
these problems and to work for
the creation of further channels in
areas where students now have no
chance for input.
The Students' Coalition has
already instigated faculty/student
studies into transportation
problems (to and from campus),
day care centers for the campus,
the business operations of the
AMS (in an attempt to free more
money for student programs)
present and future use of SUB
space, and food and book store
facilities.
In our three month period we
will obviously not be able to
"change the world" and so we are
turning to the betterment of
student services and programs as
our top priority.
GRANT BURNYEAT
law 2
Housser
Hi! My name is Steve Housser
(Doc. Housser's Elixir
Government). I'm in fourth year
psychology. I'm running in the
upcoming AMS elections. I'm
running as an independent
candidate. Here is my spiel!
Old Doc. Housser is going to
give the AMS a dose ELIXIR
GOVERNMENT. Here is the
medicine:
• Direction   in   council   -
together government — get all the
petty bureaucrats to suspend their
political egos and get on with the
job.
• Revive the anti calendar and
course assesment. Bear down on
the dud profs - and there are lots
— better teaching! Especially in
first and second year.
• Drug Alert - set up facility
similar to Speak East whose soul
function is to provide information
for   those   messed   up   with   or
concerned about drugs.
• More music, more bike paths,
covered bike stalls, more bikes.
• Less cars — but at the same
time do every thing possible to
facilitate parking of those cars
already with us — shuttle rapid
transit from T and R lots (they're
really far away!).
• Another Quebec week. Bien
sur. No matter where your
sympathies may lie on the struggle
in Quebec it won't hurt you to be
exposed to their culture — I mean
its half yours.
• I'm not a jock in outlook but
I have a healthy attitude towards
sports having played rugby for
three years and rowed for one
year at UBC.
STEPHEN HOUSSER
arts 4
Candidates for setretary
MacKinnon
Although I am running against
a female, I consider myself more
of the women's lib candidate.
Since the position of secretary has
traditionally been a woman's job,
I am helping to change the
situation. Why doesn't Students'
Coalition run a woman for AMS
president or some other position?
I would continue the co-op
bookstore, something that has
been promised for years, but has
only come about through the
efforts of the ousted executive.
The controversy about sports
on this campus is that so much is
.being     spent     on     so     few
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style.
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
participants. I would like to see
better intramural programs set up,
especially in-large faculties such as
arts where no one knows each
other. This would enable 150-lb.
weaklings like myself to
participate and thus become less
disenchanted.
Too many students blindly
vote in a slate and then complain
about the ass-holes they voted for.
I would not vote at all rather than
vote for someone I know nothing
about, even if he is on a slate.
Having been secretary of the
Law Students' Association I have
mastered the art of taking minutes
at meetings, something that takes
at least 5 minutes to learn to do. I
can even type! Thank you.
TOM MacKINNON
law 3
r INTERNATIONAL HOUSE PROGRAMS"
^r-^^mm    GREY C(Jp BRUNCH
Sun. Nov. 29 at I.H. Food at
11:30 a.m. ($1). Game (in
color) at 1 p.m. Sign up by
Nov. 25 for BRUNCH.
international - Between Nations
OVERSEAS STUDENTS who would enjoy spending a few days over Xmas
as guests of Canadian families in other parts of B.C. should sign up NOW at
the I.H. office.
I.S.P.C. MEETING - 12:30 TODAYl
Alma Mater Society
ELECTION
NOTICE
Wednesday. Nov. 24
VOTE FOR AMS PRESIDENT
AND SECRETARY
-10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at:-
ANGUS
BARN
BUCHANAN
EDUCATION
ENGINEERING
MAIN LIBRARY    WOODWARD LIBRARY
SEDGEWICK
Library
SUB LOBBY
North End
SUB LOBBY
South End
Advance Polls in SUB and Residences
TUESDAY, NOV. 23rd
Ballot counters urgently needed! Please help at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in the SUB Art Gallery.
Powell
To all UBC students: It's the
old policy, "United we stand."
We of Students' Coalition are
aiming for progressive
co-operation — among the
faculties, between students and
administration, between UBC and
the community. Our platform
upholds this ideal with practical
and realistic plans, e.g. a daycare
centre operated by students (for
credit), improved transportation,
efficient contact with
administration, etc. etc.
I believe that Students'
Coalition, as a positive,
co-operating group, can make
significant improvements at UBC.
HILARY POWELL, arts 1
Nawatzki
It was disgusting the way the
present slate group effected the
demise of the human government
solely for the purpose of
satisfying their ego- and
power-cravings. Frightening is a
better word for it. Now we're
being offered another group of
like-minded (albeit reactionary,
and regressive) slaters to take the
place of a group that was
criticised just for that reason:
namely too much toeing the party
line. The human government was,
finally moving in the right way.
What is needed on the AMS
Exec, is some wit and humor, and
not only this silly seriousness so
evident in almost all student
politicians.
There are 20,000 of us, why
should we remain the milk-toasts
(sic) of the university
community? Why shouldn't we
have a hell of a lot more say in
regard to running the whole
show? If a campus silly (e.g.
Belshaw or McGregor) pulls a
half-ass stunt, we ought to be
right in there, in full force, to
effect a change.
Let's face the facts and get the
show on the road! We're a big
group with a lot of power behind
us.
TIL NAWATZKI, law 3
Fergus
All the
right noises    ©
** Capitol
Songs of a young Canadian. ST6370
Songs of a Canadian's wanderings.
Songs of a Canadian's loving.
Songs of a Canadian's experience. His name is Fergus.
He sings songs of his own making.
Songs of a young Canadian. Listen to Fergus. On Capitol.
Capitol Records (Canada) Limited Produced by: Greg Hambleton

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