UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 22, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128464.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128464.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128464-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128464-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128464-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128464-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128464-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128464-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128464-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128464.ris

Full Text

Array Vol. LIV, No. 4
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1972
228-2301
Acadia daycare centres to open soon
By BERTON WOODWARD
The three new daycare
centres being set up in the old
Acadia camp residences on
campus should be open
sometime in November, UBC
daycare council chairman
Roderick Barman said
Thursday.
And one centre has a target
date of Oct. 15, Barman said.
That centre, known as unit 3,
and another, unit 1, will care
for 24 children aged 18
months to three years. The
Tillicum daycare centre, the
third in the Acadia complex
will hold 20 children aged three
to five.
The daycare council has
launched a $30,000 fund-raising
drive to finance the conversion
of the huts but Barman said
Formal exam
time cut
by senate
The practice of holding
formal exams in regular class
periods two weeks before the
formal exam period at
Christmas and Easter has been
banned.
At a UBC senate meeting
held last June, a motion was
passed ruling out such exams,
with the intention of allowing
regular informal and
laboratory exams to be conducted in their place.
Inserted in the motion was a
clause what will allow the
holding of these exams if the
faculty dean approves.
this will cover materials and
skilled labor only.
Work parties of parents
whose children are housed in
the four centres currently
operating in Acadia Camp are
doing the bulk of the work, he
said.
There are now four centres
operating in the Acadia Camp
area but one of those, unit 1,
will move from its premises in
an old fraternity house to the
new complex, bringing the
total to six when all are
completed.
"This is not just a one-shot
project. It's the beginning of
something I hope will open up a
whole range of daycare centres
here," Barman said.
Financing is the main
problem in setting up  more
centres, Barman said, but at
least half the problem may
soon be cleared up.
The university administration, which is giving
the centres their land rent-
free, has a policy of not
granting funds for daycare.
However, the new New
Democratic Party government
may be able to make things
easier simply by using already
existing laws, he said.
"They don't seem to be
putting a big emphasis on
daycare which they damn well
should. But I'm not too
downhearted because there
are a great many things you
can do to create enormous
change within the laws as they
are," he said.
He said Norman Levi, the
new minister for Rehabilitation and Social Improvement, indicated an- interest in the council when he
told them last Sunday to set up
an appointment with him "as
soon as I return from Victoria". But Barman noted the
meeting will probably be
delayed because of Levi's new
priority assignment to set up a
minimum income for old-age
pensioners.
Barman said the council
hopes to work out a mutually
acceptable policy on daycare
with the provincial government and the university administration.
He said he thinks UBC should
have some centres staffed by
the provincial government.
Seepage 13: MORE
WALLY WEBFOOT weaves through baby whirlpools in
rain-riddled river that invaded D-lot after Wednesday night's
torrential rainstorm. Wealthy Wally was chasing his rain-swept car
but abandoned quest when 50 unemployed ducks picketted the last
half of river.
—daryl tan photo
Red tape eats budget
Alma Mater Society treasurer David
Dick says his budget is more complete
than any presented to council in years.
What does this mean?
It means, simply, that every
estimated and actual expense and
revenue of the society is listed for
everyone to see.
But one fact almost hidden in the
pages of figures is that administration
costs are almost half the budget.
So out of a total possible expenditure of
about $650,000, they spend $276,746.30
administering the budget, which leaves
only about $373,672.89 to actually spend
on campus projects.
Administration costs would include
office supplies, and equipment, but are
basically paid out in salaries.
For example, one budget notation of
$28,000 includes the AMS games room
manager, the booking clerk and general
manager Graham Vance's salaries.
Other such notations are scattered
through the budget, and by adding these
amounts The Ubyssey reached the
administration figure.
(Dick has listed his program and administrative expenses under each
executive program — president, vice-
president, treasurer, co-ordinator,
external affairs, internal affairs,
secretary and ombudsperson.)
What he hasn't listed is the operating
costs of the clubs, in university clubs
committee and  the  undergraduate
societies, because the treasurers of
these organizations haven't had the time
to set their budgets.
It also means Dick set his budget at
$905,926.01 when he really should have
set it at a lower sum — a sum that would
reflect the estimated costs of running the
society rather than the actual costs of
paying off SUB building loans and interest which automatically comes out of
the students' $15 SUB fee and other
revenues.
Dick estimates students will fork over
$247,500 this year to help pay off SUB.
However, he still needs another
$179,434.12 to cover the interest on the
loans. He says he intends to get this from
revenues of the student-owned sports
centre.
This type of budgeting makes Dick's
budget appear higher than it is.
Dick, on the advice of building
manager Graham Vance, expects SUB
will cost $249,533.60 to operate.
But Dick expects the society will make
a profit in SUB over the year because
estimated revenues are set at $252,000.
Expenses include the co-op bookstore
at $8,000, SUB filmsoc at $14,000 and the
games area at $21,000. Estimated
revenues are $10,000, $16,000 and $40,000
respectively.
He estimates room rentals on a
booking basis and a leesee basis will
bring in $28,000.
Another SUB expense is the activities
program which includes transportation
and communication, professional and
special services and rentals.
Again Dick intends to cover this expense of $35,700 with grants from other
organizations, and ticket sales which are
expected to amount to $30,000.
The external affairs budget has been
estimated at $11,412.59. However, close
to $8,000 of this was paid out last year for
a university endowment lands project
and has since been recovered from
federal government Local Initiatives
Programs money.
The internal affairs officer has
budgeted $300 to run SpeakEasy in the
SUB foyer. It will also receive $4,150
from grants and other sources outside
the society, including a large grant from
Labatts Brewery.
Dick estimates it will cost the internal
affairs officer $1,055 to run the
publications office.
Operating costs for Bird Calls, the
student telephone directory, are set at
$10,980 and the administration costs of
publications and organizations such as
Mamooks, Law Review and Forestry
Handbook are set at $2,475. Advertising
revenue is set at $12,400.
Dick has set the estimated budget of
The Ubyssey at $70,020. Last year the
actual budget for three papers a week
was $90,625.
Included in this year's estimates are
See page 3: BUDGET Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972
Olympits 'shocking' tor Canadians
By KENTSPENCER
To find out more about what happened in Munich and the on the spot
reactions to the Israeli tragedy, the
Ubyssey sent reporter Kent Spencer
out to interview Olympic athletes and
coaches.
The following article is based on
their accounts of the events in the
Olympic village on the days of the
massacre.
The special television coverage of
the USSR-Canada hockey game had
just ended and many Canadian team
members were headed home.
En route was building 31, the
headquarters of the Israeli Olympic
team.
As they passed building 31, members of the Canadian water polo team
heard what sounded like firecrackers
popping. Unconcerned, they returned
to their quarters in building 29, about
60 yards away.
The shots had really scared a
member of the Canadian swim team;
he bolted for cover. Back at the
Canadian quarters, he got into bed
and stayed there.
In the floors above most of the
Canadian team knew nothing of the
events in the Israeli quarters. They
slept through it.
The news came to most of the team,
early the next morning as many faced
machine guns.
"The guards were very, very
calm," said high jumper Rick Cuttel,
"but if you tried to force your way
through them they were excitable.
"One or two people tried at first —
to go training or to the breakfast hall
and the guards quickly started
pushing and shoving them back."
But the presence of the guards
bothered few. Ken Elmer, the
assistant track coach, took a back
door out of the building and promptly
continued on his morning run.
At first no one would believe the
news. "Sure there were two people
killed," some said. .The story was
thought to be a big "hoax. Luckily,
nobody tried playing Arab.
When the shock finally did set in,
people began to feel nervous. "I've
got an inventive mind," said Cuttel.
"In the breakfast hall (which viewed
the Israeli building) my first impulse
was to look under the table."
"We were concerned, obviously, but
it wasn't anything like we were holed
up inside bur rooms, teeth chat-,
tering,"said rower Trev Josephson.
What if the terrorists got nervous
and made a break for it? Or what if
there was a shootout? Incredibly,
these questions didn't bother people.
Outside the Olympic village
sightseers arrived by the thousands.
In a nearby field athletes worked out
for their events — and a football was
tossed around.
"It seemed funny in a way,"
Josephson said, "because here were
guys getting killed and in a field 50
yards away there were guys tossing a
football around."
Back in the Canadian quarters, a
London Daily Telegraph
photographer persuaded Elmer to
take his camera up to a balcony and
take some pictures.
"Every time I snapped a shot of the
guards they would whirl around,
ready to fire," said Elmer. "But I
went on taking the pictures anyway. I
think they were the ones that appeared in Time magazine."
By this time the Olympic village had
become an armed camp. About 5,000
policemen of various kinds were
stationed every 30 feet.
"From that day on the village was a
prison," said Lionel Pugh, head track
and field coach.
Athletes could come and go during
the day only. To get in, passes were
checked at two different points by a
total of five men. Every man in the
line had to see the pass once.
The first terrorist deadline passed
at noon and a second was set for 5
p.m. Negotiations continued all afternoon.
Somewhat before the second
deadline, high jumper John Hawkins
and teammate Cuttel made their way
over to the medical building, which
commanded a view only 60 feet
from the building that the Israelis
were being held in.
Inside the medical building some
elderly staff had been pinned down all
day. There was no way for them to
leave without exposing themselves to
fire — they could not get out through
the roof as Cuttel and Hawkins had
done.
Five minutes before the 5 p.m.
deadline German guards began to
surround the building. Some appeared on the roof, some in the
basement, and others at ground level.
All wore two-inch-thick bullet proof
vests.
One of the guards, helmet down,
walked over to the Israeli building
and started looking through the
windows. Cuttel describes him as
"very, very scared."
Just before five, the head terrorist
appeared at the front of the building.
Dressed in a white hat and white
trenchcoat and unarmed he walked
"very casually" up the building and
looked up on the roof, motioning for
anyone up there to come down. The
ill-fated compromise had been
reached.
Shortly after a bus was called to
take the Arabls and their hostages
over to a nearby helicopter pad. The
first bus that arrived was too small, a
bigger one was ordered. Then came
the truly sickening part.
The Israelis were marched out,
hands behind their heads and blindfolded. In the bus they sat down with
their heads on the seat in front of
them their hands still behind their
heads.
Hundreds of police had cordoned off
the road to the helicopter pad as the
bus took off. From the pad the
helicopter flew to the Munich military
airpost. The massacre there is now
history.
Funeral services were held the next
day in the Olympic stadium. Instead
of attending, many stayed in their
rooms to think quietly. The games
resumed that day.
"For a short time it was very
tragic ... it still is," said Cuttel.
"I wouldn't have wanted the games
to stop if I'd been killed," said Pugh.
"I think that's just what the Arabs
would have wanted to happen."
With the return of competition most
athletes mercifully forgot about the
events of Sept. 5. But those days will
remain with them for longer than any
of their other memories of the games.
CLASSICAL RECORD
Y 30489 Sibelius: Concerto In D
Minor For Violin And Orcestro,
Op. 47—The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Conductor,
David Oistrakh, Violin
32 16 0027—Schumann: Concerto in A Minor for Cello and
Orchestra, Op. 129—Pablo Casals, Cello with the Prades
Festival Orchestra/Schumann
Funf Stucke Im Volkston, Op.
102—Pablo Casals, Cello, Leopold Mannes. Piano
32.18 0141—Grieg: Concerto In
A Minor For Piano and Or-
ch./Schuraann: Concerto In A
Minor for Piano and Orch.
Dinu Lipatti, Piano, The Philharmonia Orchestra, Alceo
Galliera and Herbert Von Karajan, conductors >
32 16 0111—An Evening of Elizabethan Verse and Its Music
—W.   H.   Auden   and   the   New
York Pro Musica Antiqua, directed   by  Noak  Greenberg
Y 30042 — Beethoven: Concerto
In D Major For Violin And
Orchestra, Op. 61—Zino Fran-
cescatti, Violinist, Bruno Walter conducting the Columbia
Symphony Orchestra
Y 30043 — Mahler: Das Lied
Von Der Erde—Bruno Walter
conducting the New York Philharmonic, Mildred Miller, Mezzo-soprano, Ernst Hafliger,
Tenor
Y 30044—Tchaikovsky: Capric-
cio Itallen, Op. 45—The Cleveland Orchestra, George Szell,
Conductor
Y 3004S — Dvorak: Symphony
No. 9 In E Minor, Op. 95, "New
World" — Bruno Walter conducting the Columbia Symphony   Orchestra
Y 30046 — Sibelius: Symphony
No. 2 In D Major, Op. 4IJ—The
Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, Conductor
Y 30047 — Mahler: Symphony
No. 1 In D Major—Bruno Walter conducting the Columbia
Symphony Orchestra
32 16 0300—Waltzes From Old
Vienna — The Anlexander
Schneider Quintet
32 16 0304—The. Fabulous Forties at the Met—Various
32 16 0314—Beethoven: Sonata
No. 23 in F Minor, Op. 57 Ap-
passionata'VBeethoven: Sonata
No. 21 in C Major, Op. 53
"Waldstein" — Walter Gieseking,  Piano
S:: 16 0318—Colonel Bogey/The
Great Military Marches—The
London   Philharmonic   Orches
tra, Sir Adrian Boult, Conductor
32 16 0320—Dinu Lipatti
32 16 0335  —  Mozart:  Operatic
Arias—Ezio  Pinza,   Bass,   Bruno Walter Conducting The Orchestra    of   The   Metropolitan
Opera  Association
32 16 0338—Easdale:    The    Red
Shoes   Ballet—St.   Louis   Symphony     Orchestra,      Vladimir
Golschmann, Conductor
32 16 0342—The  Symphonies  of
Haydn,  Vol.  7  —  The  Vienna
State   Opera   Orchestra,   Max
Goberman, Conductor
32 16 0376 — Mussorgsky: Pictures   At   An   Exhibition—New
York    Philharmonic,    Thomas
Schippers,  Conductor
32 16 0380—Schubert:    "Grazer"
Fantasie—Lili Kraus, Piano
Y 30013   The   Blue   Danube—The
Cleveland Orchestra, George Szell,
Conductor
82 16 0382—J. S. Bach: Concerto No. 1 In C Minor For Two
Pianos, BWV 1060 — Robert
And Gaby Cascadesus, Pianos;
Surich Chamber Orchestra,
Edmond De Stoutz Conducting
32 16 0398 — Britten: Songs
From The Chinese—John Williams, Guitar; Wilfred Brown.
Tenor
32 16 0415—Contemporary Music For Cello — Ernst Fried-
lander, Cellist, Marie Fried-
lander,  Pianist
Y7 30051—Beethoven: The Nine
Symphonies — Bruno Walter
Conducting The Columbia
Symphony  Orchestra
Y S0289—Igor Kipnis, Harpsichord
Y2 30308 — Mahler: Symphony
No. 9 In D — Bruno Walter
Conducting the Columbia Symphony  Orchestra
Y 30311 — Brahms: Symphony
No. 1 In C Minor, Op. 68 —
Bruno Walter conducting the
Columbia    Symphony    Orches-
Y 30312—Tchaikovsky: Concerto In D Major For Violin And
Orchestra — David Oistrakh.
Violin, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy Conductor
Y 30313—Szell Conducts Richard Strauss — The Cleveland
Orchestra
Y 30491 — Beethoven: Concerto
No. 1 In C Major For Piano
And Orchestra, Op. 15—Glenn
Gould, Piano, The Columbia
Symphony. Vladimir Golschmann, Conductor
Y 30667—Bruno Walter's Wagner—The Columbia Symphony
Orchestra
Y 30668—Grieg: Schuman: Piano Concerto — Leon Fleisher,
Piano, The Cleveland Orchestra, George Szell, Conductor
Y 30669 — Schubert: Symphony
No. 9 In C Major—The Cleveland Orchestra, George Szell,
Conductor
Y 30670 — Tchaikovsky—Symphony No. 5 — The Cleveland
Orchestra, George Szell, Conductor
Y2 30848 — Mahler: Symphony
No. 2 in C Minor—New York
Philharmonic, Bruno Walter,
Conductor, Emilia Cundarl, Soprano; Maureen Forrester, Contralto; Westminster Choir,
John Finley Williamson, Director.
Y 3004S Mozart: Eine Kloine
Nachtmusik — Bruno Walter conducting the Columbia Symphony
Orchestra
Y 30851 — Bruno Walter1!
Brahms—The Columbia Symphony Orchestra
YS 31242 — Mozart: The Six
Quartets Dedicated To Haydn
—Budapest String Quartet
Y 31246—Rachmaninoff: Symphonic Dances/Casella: Paga-
niniana—The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy,
Conductor
Y 31274—D'Indy: Symphony On
A French Mountain Air/
Franck: Symphonic Variations
—The Philadelphia Orchestra
32 16 0012 — Vivaldi: Concert*
for Woodwinds and String Orchestra; The New-York Slnfo-
nietta. Max Goberman, conduc-
tor-
Plus   Many,   Many   More
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Friday, September 22, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Dick delivers the dough
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Alma Mater Society council
Wednesday ordered treasurer-
David Dick to pay The Ubyssey
for three pages of budget
published in Tuesday's edition.
Council directed Dick to pay
the special AMS ad rate of $450
for the pages, printed despite
staff objections that he was
impinging on editorial freedom
by forcing free publication of
the budget.
But in  an  emotional  five-
minute speech, Dick told
councillors his main concern
was "bringing the budget to
the students".
"I felt four pages were
necessary to explain the
budget fully and I felt The
Ubyssey was the best place to
do it," he said.
Ubyssey co-editor Jan
O'Brien said Dick was offered
one full page free to print the
budget.
"We told him everything
over that he'd have to pay for
as an ad," she said.
But she said Dick insisted
during a discussion at College
Printers on printing the three
other pages free as well,
"despite the fact the contract
says we have full control of any
editorial matter in the paper.
"And if it isn't an ad, then it's
editorial content and we should
decide whether it goes in," she
said.
But Dick said he based his
decision on a section of the
contract which stipulated
"final   responsibility"    for
publishing the issue rests with
AMS executive.
(The section reads in full:
"It is also understood that
insofar as the number of copies
to be printed, distribution and
actual printing or publication
of each issue the final
responsibility rests with the
society's executive, and all
communication concerning
such matters will be between
the society's manager of
student publications and the
printer.") '
Dick   didn't   vote   on   the
PENNY POWER to the tune of $200 was the result of a Monday
drive to raise money for Shuswap and Kwakuitul houses' upcoming
events. The 20,000 coppers came from pubs, banks, service stations
and friends — voluntarily. —sucha sing photo
Budget in committee until Wed.
From page 1
salaries and wages, transportation and communication
and office supplies.
Dick, acting on publication
manager Al Vince's estimates,
expects Ubyssey advertising
revenue will be $48,000.
The Ubyssey, at one paper a
week, will cost the society
$22,800.
The secretary is allotted
$2,001 for elections. Most of this
will go to the elections committee to administer polling
stations, printing and counting
ballots.
President Doug Aldridge is
responsible for statutory
funding of the undergraduate
societies set at $26,711.60, for
student council at $27,150 and
for the Crane library at $4,600.
Funding for the Crane
library does not come out of the
students' fees, but from a gift
from the 1972 graduating class.
He estimates it will cost the
society $15,550 to administer
$11,161.60 of undergraduate
•society grants.
He includes salaries and
wages,     other     personnel,
transportation and special
services under operating or
administrative costs.
Dick has also budgeted
Aldridge's student council
program at $27,150.
Salaries and wages to administer the programs is
budgetted at $21,600.
The vice-president is
budgetted to receive $4,750 to
run men's intramurals and
$1,950 towards the students'
share of women's intramurals.
The vice-president will also
have $6,000 from last year's
graduating class to study the
proposed indoor pool.
Dick said Monday administration costs reflected the
amount of time various
organizations such as The
Ubyssey, student council, and
self-sustaining clubs use
business office personnel for
organization business.
"However, if you look at just
the $9 AMS fee and the areas it
goes to, the budget appears
top-heavy," said Dick.
"What you have to realize is
that's not the only money we're
looking after."
He said part of the cost of
paying off SUB includes administrative or office costs.
The budget, presented at
Wednesday's council meeting,
now goes back to a budget
committee.
"In the committee, most of
the compromises are worked
out and the changes made," he
said.
The new budget then must be
passed on to council but only if
two-thirds of the committee
agree on the budget.
Jammed garbage
high in towers
The garbage chutes in Wally Gage Towers have been
jamming, causing numerous complaints from the residents'
about the stench of the place.
"When garbage jams in the chute at the second or third
floor it doesn't take long before the whole tower smells," said
residence clerk Dave Newton.
He said the chutes are jamming because students are
throwing their garbage down in cardboard boxes rather than
bags.
"We haven't enough people to go around and clean out all
the chutes," he said. "But it's improving, it wasn't as bad this
week as last."
i >»    i'»> *
Vote info for U.S. students
A table opposite Speakeasy in the SUB foyer will provide
absentee ballot information to American students today,
Monday and Tuesday.
Grad students Jack Davis and Wain Ewing will man the
table. Any American who is 18 by Nov. 7 can vote in the
presidential election if registered by Oct. 8. American students,
many draft dodgers, and deserters even if they are landed
immigrants can vote.
For further information phone Ewing or Davis at 224-7196.
Trudeau top hamburger
Another hamburger poll.
In August, a hamburger poll conducted by the Frying
Dutchman in Vancouver featured Barrett, Bennett, Anderson
and Warren burgers.
By some coincidence, the Barrett burgers led the field.
Now they are offering four new goodies — Trudeau, Stanfield, Lewis and Caouette burgers, at 50 cents each.
Standings to date show Trudeau burgers lead by 51.32 per
cent with Lewis burgers challenging at 25,02 per cent. Stanfield
burgers are third at 18.84 per cent and Caouette burgers trail
with 4.82 per cent.
Vote for the "hamburger" of your choice.
motion, which directed him to
pay for the ad out of the
president's information fund so
as not to make The Ubyssey
suffer further, saying he was
"too biased" to vote.
In other council business,"
speakers committee chairman
Penny Newman introduced the
proposed speakers program
for the coming year which she
said she hoped "will fill s
cultural gap at the university".
She said the committee has
drawn up a list of 13 speakers,
planned to visit campus for two
or three days during four week-
long periods throughout the
year.
"We're having the people
come for several days so they
can really get into the campus
life and so that rather than
having one large talk, they'll
be moving around and
speaking to different
audiences," she said.
Among the speakers will be
Marist philosopher Herbert
Marcuse, poet Sharon
Stevenson singer Bruce
Cockburn and architect Arthur
Erickson.
"We'll only be paying their
way here, their accommodation in Vancouver
and a small honorarium," she
said.
Newman said this still
amounts to $5,000 while the
AMS has budgeted only $2,000
for the committee.
"We've made the commitments, we've got the people
coming. In some cases we
can't back out — in others we
really don't want to, so we're
really strapped," she said.
But councillors generally
expressed support for the
program, which Newman said
will also include "resource
people" from Vancouver,
although these arrangements
haven't been finalized.
"This struck me right away
as a really great program,"
vice-president Gordon
Blankstein said.
"And I said right away, 'why
can't we do it?' And then I
thought of all the other great
things to do as well, and I'm
really in a bind about it," he
said.
AMS president Doug
Aldridge told the meeting that
the AMS is paying "in the
neighborhood of $4800" for a
survey compiled by Nat
Bailey's Food Service Consultants about taking over the
SUB food services.
"They said they'd charge us
$4800 for a complete survey,
where they did all the leg work
involved in the questionnaire.
But we told them we couldn't
afford that, so we're doing a lot
of the campus work ourselves," he said.
In response to questioning by
council members, Aldridge
said he didn't know how much
this would cost.
"But it'll be somewhere in
the neighborhood of $4800," he
said.
Council also voted to appoint
Stan Persky, grad studies and
arts representative Jim
Schoenning to the budget
committee.
They will join chairman
David Dick, Anton Kolsti, Ken
Lassessan and Laurie Mc-
Birney in proposing compromises for the budget after
every reading in council.
Blankstein also announced
nominations will be accepted
for the UBC Great Trek award,
given annually to someone
considered to have contributed
to the university over a length
of time. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972
FDR ONE THlAife.
TO  COMETH.
THAT  »S .WHY  „
jX>    IS   GfcADEP-
THAT IS WHV
A l_dt op you
j)6op our
THAT ]S WrfV
you lAU^K so
HARP  AT VOL*
IMAT IS WW
SOME; OF $U
CAMT   SMILE*.
eecfwxjz you
compete:.
-OH.NB CCHfenVOh)
VOESriT 0ND AT
BlAMCA-
Nice
It's really too bad because we were planning on
being nice this year. Really nice.
You know, the sort of niceness normally associated
with emcees and people who are out to get something.
Really, really nice.
We were going to wear nicer than nice smiles and
wash our hair twice a week with Gloop shampoo and
use the right kind of deodorant and in general look and
be so nice that by comparison one those stupid "happy
buttons" would resemble a passport shot of Attila the
Hun.
Miracle ingredient K-241 was going to prevail over
our lives. Niceness and truth would shine forth
forevermore.
However, thdse of you who are at present wiping
off their fingers have undoubtedly noticed that slime
and depravity continue to ooze from the rag.
"What happened?" you ask.
Well, several months of cheap stunts by Alma
Mater    Society    executives    is   what    happened.
Nevertheless, we're still here. But we need a
transfusion of new blood to replace the bitter puss now
seeping through our shrivelled bodies.
For all you "unliterary" types, this means we need
more staffers.
If you're interested, and are a nice person, come in
Monday noon to try your hand at newswriting. We're at
the north-east corner of the SUB on the second floor.
We've just about run out of niceness so perhaps
you can help. We'd sure like to put out a nice newspaper
again.
Besides, we'll take anyone. Even you.
J.A.
Exams
It would seem, at first, that the UBC senate's
decision to ban exams during the two weeks prior to
Christmas and Easter exam periods comes as a welcome
boon to both students and faculty.
We are informed that as of now students will not
need to skip regular classes in their other subjects to
study for an exam in another. A lovely sentiment. But
there is something here that does not ring true.
Consider: Is it plausible to have a system whereby
all exams are lumped together in one short period of
time? Or is it more plausible to remain with the original
system, whereby some exams are staggered, separating
them nicely, sc that the student does not break down
under the pressure of exam week?
Does it, then, serve the interests of the student
body to carry out this ban? Indeed, were the interests of.
the student body even considered when the motion was
made in the senate?
One begins to wonder what those several student
senators had in mind last June when they supported the
ban.
R.G.
Hotvcum ?
Upon reading the AMS
budget outline I found it sad
that $4,750 is awarded to men's
intramural sports and less
than half that amount —
$1,900— to women's intramurals.
What does this have to say of
the popularity and the status of
women in the athletic world of
UBC?
As a female I often question
the validity of "male oppression". Is this not an
example of the lack of participation and general passive
attitude of our sex?
Name withheld
arts 1
Pool
Your editorial on the covered
pool project in Tuesday's
edition of The Ubyssey raises
several points which I would
like to answer.
As the ad on page of the same
issue explains, the decision to
look to a new facility (rather
than to cover Empire) was
based on three premises:
1. For an extra $800,000 we
can have two facilities — one
covered and one not covered
whereas spending $2,000,000 to
cover Empire would obviously
leave us with only one facility
(although now covered, of
course.)
2. The   cost   of   eventually
Letters
covering Empire Pool would
be lowered by the building of a
separate facility.
3. While Empire Pool was
being covered (it is estimated
that this would take up to a
year and a half), there would
be a complete disruption of
service and revenue so that
students would be placed in the
position of having no pool
facilities at all for that period.
It should also be noted that
almost all other Canadian
campuses have more than one
such facility (Edmonton has
three and are planning a
fourth; Calgary has two) and
that covering Empire Pool
would not put us in the position
of being able to offer the type of
recreational facilities that are
available on most other
Canadian campuses (UBC is
now the only Canadian campus
not having a covered pool.)
You say that "We also would
trust the ad-hoc committee for
a covered pool a little more if
they would fully explain the
amount of interest incurred by
the proposed $925,000 loan
students are being asked to
support." As the ad on page 6
explains (and fully explains, I
believe), if the referendum
passes and the project goes
ahead the Alma Mater Society
will borrow up to $925,000 (this
amount will be lowered if our
expectations concerning our
ability to raise more than one-
third of the total sum from the
"outside"   community   are
THI UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 19, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
Flawlessly floundering through pages of yesteryear, Lorri Rudland
ruthlessly charged Berton Woodward with ruthless rampages on the future
but when Rod Mickleburgh created chaos by whittling wood at Ryan
Gueddes, Sandi Shreve shot stones at Forrest Nelson. Ah, but who saith
the old proverb an eye for eye, a tooth for a tooth, cried Kent Spencer as
he left for the dentist. Quoth Leslie Krueger, after recovering a fallen
contact, to be or not to be that is the question. At which point Paul Knox
perked up and pitched in an original: How canst thou quote such cretinous
cliches! Hush your foul mouths, whispered Jan O'Brien, while Gary Coull
crept to the fore monotoning bubble bubble . . . what's the rest? Blessed be
the weak for hey shall be strong, preached Mike Sasges when Gary
Kosinsky kicked the beachball to Sucha Singh, who volleyed it back to
Dirk Visser. Forsooth, saith I, quipped Kelly Booth when John Andersen
insisted his cat is really only plagued with lice, not fleas, at which point
Linda Hossie left to tend her feature and Robin Burgess stated flatly,
bongalokreega! So Steve Morris stamped his foot to punctuate Brian
Novak's sudden reappearance while Jim Rogers bellowed: food for
.thought, food for thought, food for thought. . .
^J>.CjSrvint\,'
correct.) This loan (the
maximum being $925,000) will
then be paid back by the use of
the indoor pool levy of $5 per
student per year. As is mentioned in the ad, we expect that
the total amount of interest and
principle to be repaid will be
about $1.6 million over about 20
years. It should be noted,
however, that both of these
latter figures will vary
depending upon:
1. The number of students
enrolled at the university
(obviously if more students are
in attendance, we can pay the
loan off more quickly and more
cheaply — by making extra
principle payments, we would
reduce interest charges).
2. Whether revenue from the
facility is used to pay off the
loan (revenue over and above
expenses could be used either
in this way or to make further
improvements/additions to the
facility and how such revenue
will be used will be left to the
discretion of the management
committee of the pool.)
3. The possibility of future
gifts to the pool fund from
outside donors which could
then be applied against the
principle.
We are asking students to put
up what, at the most, will
amount to $5 per year for a $2.8
million facility. This works out
to about $.60 per month during
the school year and for this
amount students will have the
use of the facility for free
swimming, for learning how to
swim, and for full recreational
and educational purposes. The
ad-hoc committee is convinced
that this is the best available
chance of bringing such a
facility to campus and hopes
that students will support the
idea by voting on October 4 and
5. I believe that students have
been presented with the full
facts on this matter and that on
the basis of those facts can
decide for themselves whether
they want to support such a
project.
Grant D. Burnyeat,
Chairman, Ad-Hoc Committee
to Get a Covered Pool for UBC
Box 152, SUB
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Though an effort is made to
print aU letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste. p
A
F
G
R
E
I
D
A
Y
These men's books — pages 7 and 8
This woman's movie —page 3 LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the first instalment is not made on or before
September 22. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis of a
medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. If
fees are not paid in full by the following date, registration will be cancelled
and the student concerned excluded from classes. Kirst instalment —
October 6, 1972.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment of
fees applies for reinstatement and his application is approved by the
Registrar, he will be required to pay a reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late
fee of $2 5.00, and all other outstanding fees before he is permitted to
resume classes.
FORESTRY
Presents
THE UNDERCUT
Saturday, Sept. 30th - Full Fac.
SUB Cafeteria
8:30 - 1:00
$3.50 Couple
Dress Hard Times
Tickets: In SUB
or from MacMillan Building
co
CM
■
00
VO
1123-1125 ROBSON STREET
20% DISCOUNT TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
IX
CO
CC
1-
LL
<
o3
(/)
Oi
■
CC
~Z-
D
O
I
1-
2
•
_§
z
a.
LU
a>
Q-
-i
O
1-
WE HAVE
A DIAMOND
JUST FOR YOU
The only difference Fn our diamonds
is the size. The beauty Is the same
whether the diamond is small or large.
Choose a diamond to fit your budget
from our complete selection.
L
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
Books
Growing up male
Jerry Farber made a big
splash about four years ago
with an essay titled "The
Student as Nigger". The
essay (which later became a
book of the same title)
analysed and counted the
humiliating ways in which
students are treated by
university administrators
and teachers.
The University of
Tomorrowland, Jerry
Farber   (Pocketbooks,
1972, $1.25).
Although Farber's new
book is titled The University
of Tomorrowland, it isn't
really a book about
education. The main essay
in the book is a look at
what's wrong with America
called "Why People Love
Capitalism". And the best
writing in the collection is
Farber's "Growing Up Male
in North America", a
narrative account of how
little boys systematically
become male chauvinist
pigs.
Farber's most sustained
argument is a pitch for
pacifism called "Nonviolence for the Nonsaint".
As for education, Farber
offers little more than a
couple of science-fiction
scenarios in which learning
either turns into total
technological fascism or
else becomes part of the
fabric of a Utopian society
(and thus, not much news on
what to do with the present
fragmented mess).
Although Farber might be
thought of as one of a group
of hip where-it's-at social
critics, the conclusions he
comes up with in The
University of
Tomorrowland are
refreshingly unmodern.
Challenged to provide an
alternative to the present
system, Farber replies:
"The alternative is
socialism: a pragmatic,
homegrown, decentralized,
democratic socialism in the
United States (and damned
soon)."
The bulk of "Why People
Love Capitalism" is a
popularized version of
various critiques of the
capitalist system produced
FARBER
.. .alternative socialism
by theorists from Karl
Marx' Capital to Felix
Greene's recent The
Knemy: What
Kvery American Should
Know About Imperialism. -
Although Farber's essay is
easily faulted (and its loose,
folksy style will drive hardline radicals crazy), its
insistence on seeing how a
particular economic-
political system wrecks
people's lives may be useful
as an introduction for many
readers.
Perhaps the most
significant point about a
book of informal essays
that, in 1972, locates
capitalism as the principal
enemy of human life and its
recognition that a highly-
publicized "counterculture" (1965-70) did not
result in basic social
changes.
Farber takes a critical
look at the deflowering of
the hippie phenomenon. He
notes that whatever the
liberatory elements of the
movement may have been,
they were quickly
swallowed up by the system.
"What had been a turning
away from hyper-
acquisitiveness became a
new way to sell merchandise."
Farber's most original
contribution is his essay on
how the distorted
masculinity of our society is
generated in everyday life.
Films
Here, using an autobiographical time-period
(early 1950s to now), Farber
is able to make us conscious
of how the male-dominated
society produces images of
women that rationalizes
their continued actual oppression by new generations
of males.
The six-year-old
schoolboy who notices that
boys' and girls' toilets are
separated in elementary
school is fully mystified by
junior high: "The girls'
room might have been only
next door to ours but still
there was no way I could
ever get from here to there.
Could you drill a hole in the
wall? Wow! . . . Just
imagine: We saw you!
"Saw them what? Shit?
Was that such a bizarre
activity? . . . Every year
my concept of 'girl' moved
farther from biological
reality as I experienced
it . . . the girls were
retreating deeper and
deeper into mystery."
From the casual concealment of basic biological
processes, Farber reconstructs the emerging
psychology of American
masculinity through kids'
dirty jokes, the
mysteriousness of one's
parents' sexual life ("When
I was twelve, my best friend
almost slugged me after I
told him his parents
fucked"), the romanticizing
of the 'clean' girl,
masturbation as the hiding
place for unexpressed
desire, and the norms of
violence.
The virtues of Farber's
essays are their conversational tone and their
simplicity. I'm wary about
what the over
simplifications miss (for
example, Farber says we
need socialism, but he says
virtually nothing about
social classes and their role
in accomplishing social
transformation), and undecided as to how useful
such writing is. My tendency is go give Farber the
benefit of the doubt. At the
present time, popular expositions of social criticism
appear to fulfill a
progressive function.
— Stan Persky
Duleima won't last long
Duleima is a third-class pot-boiler. With a
subdued promotional campaign and a
conspicuous lack of reviews in the major
magazines, it look suspicious. It slipped into
town and nabbed me and about 12 other
people at The Ridge the other night. It won't
last long.
Duleima, with Carol White and John
Mills. Direction and screenplay by Frank
Nesbitt, from a story by H.E. Bates. At
the Ridge.
The direction is clumsy and heavy-handed.
Nesbitt indulges in cheap, banal devices that
produce scenes and emotions that are un-
subtle and unbalanced often to the point of
embarrassment. The script is bad.
A chubby Carol White as the not-so-young
thing spilling out of her ragged dress in the
midst of farmyard squalor is as unconvincing as her put-on accent and fake
freckles. Opposite Miss White's Duleima is
John Mills as the slovenly, drunken farmer,
Parker. Acting far beneath his capabilities,
Mills   (curiously   retaining   some   of   the
movements of his fine performance in
Ryan's Daughter), is mediocre and sometimes over pathetic.
The story itself is not bad, but is stretched
too thin to hold our interest throughout the
overlong, slow-paced movie. It's an anti-
pastoral look at deceit, greed, dishonesty,
and laziness in a classically beautiful setting
in which the lust for money won't let true
love survive. Duleima leaves the Cinderellalike slavery of her home to live with a
miserly farmer, Parker, and invents a
jealous boyfriend to keep Parker at bay. She
gets some of the cash but rues her deception
when she actually falls in love with the new
young gamekeeper. The film climaxes with
an abortive juggling of emotions more yawn-
inducing than shocking.
A good opportunity to photograph lush
springtime fields and quaint old barns and
pubs is wasted. The music is ill-placed and
slants emotions away from the visual
message.
Have you heard enough? Probably it won't
run until the end of the week anyway. Stay
home and study. — CliveBird
Page Friday, Z
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972 Billy Pilgrim held captive near Dresden.
Films
Vonne gut's
diluted
By CLIVE BIRD
The wildly imaginative and original novel (of the same
name) about the World War II bombing of Dresden that
became a best-seller for Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. survives the
transition to the screen extremely well.
Director George Roy Hill (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance
Kid] is very faithful to the book and his direction is competent and solid but unfortunately not quite brilliant or in-
novative. That makes the film good but not great.	
Slaughterhouse Five, with Michael Sacks, Valerie Perrine
and Ron Leibman, directed by George Roy Hill with music
by Glenn Gould. At the Varsity.
Pilgrim and American soldiers with Dresden loot.
Ihe style of the novel readily lends itself, with all its time
movement and inter-planetary travel, to its new medium,
and we ride along easily with the hard-luck hero, Billy
Pilgrim, on his jaunts into the fourth dimension. The anti-war
theme becomes secondary to Billy's new thing: he has
become "unstuck" in time (the rest of us are "stuck" we
assume) and only he can travel at will through time zones
and to his beloved second home on the planet Tralfamadore.
His home life is so dreary it's no wonder he leaves.
It's not an easy film to direct and periodically it gets away
from Hill. Vonnegut (as usual) has so many threads going at
once that it's not surprising when the end result is a little
diluted and weak. The anti-war message works well but it's
predictable and at times almost corny; and time-travel is a
nice vehicle but doesn't really have much relevance to a
modern problem-filled world that can't even deal with one
time zone.
(Some of us, given the chance, might also like to escape
with Billy into the refuge he finds in his far-out zoo. It's a
difficult movie to analyze and makes one wonder, feeling
nothing as he leaves the theatre, just what he was expected to
feel. It's also tough to be too crazy about anyone as vacuous
and ineffectual as Billy.
Stephen Geller's script tries gallantly to get the whole of
the rambling novel into 90 minutes. He spends too much time
on the Dresden scenes and finds himself streaking through
the final minutes in a deluge of happenings that don't move
us to any deep emotion. One of his best touches is a frantically ironic scene that brings doom to Billy's wife and her
new Cadillac.
Rookie Michael Sacks is excellent as the shy, bungling,
loser Billy Pilgrim. The classic scapegoat, he is manipulated
by everyone in his life except his dog and his partner-in-exile
on Tralfamadore, Montana Wildhack. Billy finds his first
happiness with her in their blissful isolation from the USA
and the Lions Club.
Supporting performances from Ron Leibman (the revenge-
obsessed Lazzaro) and Valerie Perrine (Billy's sex-goddess
girlfriend, Montana) are both first-rate, though Leibman
often looks as if he is still on stage (where he is probably
more at home).
Visually, the film is a special treat. Even when the editor
lets those magnificent scenes of Prague (where the Dresden
exteriors were shot) go on so long as to make us think we
have stepped in on a travelogue, we can't blame him.
Cinematography by Miroslav Ondricek (who worked for
Milos Foreman) is exquisite. His composition is consistently
pleasing and pertinent.
Hill's touch is soft and sensitive. Little violence and sex,
and straight, honest reality is an admirable tack but perhaps
a bolder approach might have given the film the boost it
needs to get over the top into greatness.
The unglamor of the roller derby
Kansas City Bomber is an action movie about
professional roller skating. Raquel Welch is Diane
"K.C." Carr, a roller derby skater who Burt the
callous promoter (Kevin McCarthy) is planning to
turn into a marketable commodity.
Bomber doesn't pretend to be anything more
than a grade-B flick, and it's a pretty good one.
Director Freedman zips through an uncomplicated plot to effectively document K.C.'s
life in the heartless, sometimes violent sub-world
she lives in.
Freedman has picked an off-beat but authentic
slice of American life for his film. Like wrestling,
roller derby is a pseudo-sport. It's made to look
like an athletic event, but actually it's an in-
tertainment spectacle peddled to working-class
audiences in cities the size of Portland and
Denver. Freedman skillfully caputures the
spectators' faces in grimaces of rage, adoration
and sporting lust.
Like country music and Billy Graham
evangelism, roller derby is part of an unsophisticated stratum of the culture that most
middle-class Americans don't see. Freedman has
chosen his locale precisely because in its
unglamor — Portland bars and Greyhound
buses — he's able to depict the grinding down of
ordinary people.
In focusing on one of the institutions of popular
culture for the setting of his film, Freedman
follows a recent trend of American realist
moviemaking.
The tendency re-emerged in the early '60s (after
the cotton candy musicals of the anti-communist
'50s) with John Huston's filming of playwright
Arthur Miller's The Misfits — a vehicle written
for his wife Marilyn Monroe — the world of lonely
mustang hunters and Reno divorcees. This kind of
film, attempting to get at the social reality of the
United States, reached a peak with Arthur Penn's
Bonnie and Clyde.
Since then we've had Big Fauss and Little
Halsey (the seedy realm of bike racing), Butch
Cassidy and The Sundance Kid (a debunking of
the outlaw), They Shoot Horses, Don't They?
(organized marathon dancing of the 1930s), Fonda
and Hopper's Easy Rider, Bogdanovich's The
Last Picture Show, and most recently, Peckin-
pah's Junior Bonner (a study of the rodeo circuit).
What all these films (including Bomber) have in
common is a deromanticized coming to terms
with the search for adventure in American life. In
these films we find characters looking for the last
place where adventure might be. In an alienated
society, bronco-busting, banditry, or just roaming
the countryside represents the possibility of
freedom. Inevitably, these lonely heroes either
succumb to bleakness or the weight of society.
Just as roller derby is a popular entertainment,
Freedman has made a movie for mass audiences.
K.C. Carr's separation from her kids (the result of
a long since over marriage), her relationship with
her mother who takes care of the kids and wants
K.C. to settle down with a local businessman,
K.C.'s own ambition for "a piece of the action"
which the roller derby world gives her access to,
her affair with the sordid owner of the team, and
the rugged aimless competitiveness that erupts
into violence are all presented in an uncomplicated and simple style that anyone can
understand.
Whether or not Freedman has a sophisticated
political intention, that's the effect of his film. If
one wanted to make a film that shows how persons
are heartlessly used and discarded by a profit-
driven capitalist, one might make a movie like
this one.
And yes, for those who were wondering, Raquel
Welch is a perfectly competent actress. Bomber is
her attempt to struggle with the oppressive
sterotyping of her as a Hollywood sexpot. Like
Monroe, she wants to be seen as an actress.
Ironically, in a movie that somewhat explores the
exploitation of women, Welch's own effort to act
provides a real-life drama beneath the storyline.
— Stan Persky
Friday, September 22, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 CAMPUS CHURCHES
ON UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
Ministers: Rev. Luis O. Curran & Dr. W. S. Taylor
SUNDAY SERVICES:
8 a.m. Holy Communion at St Anselm's Anglican
11 a.m. Worship and Church School at both
St Anselm's Anglican & University Hill United
INVITATION TO  UBC STUDENTS - To an informal lunch
meeting on Oct 1 after the 11 a.m. Services at both churches.
Lunch held in University Hill Church.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PHONE: 224-7011 or 224-1410
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
10°/<
o
off on all
BOOKS
Just show your I.D. card
SEE OUR WIDE SELECTION
• All the latest fiction • Handyman's corner
• Serendipity section • Children's books
• Children's friezes » Gen. book dept.
• Canadiana • Art supplies
• Dover colouring books       • Gift books
DRIVE IN & SAVE
CHARGEX * EASY TERMS
MILLERS
1123 DAVIE ST. 683-1326
Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Miff's.
Suggested List
GOLDIE
HAWN
GENERAL
Odeon
851  GRANVILLE
682-7468
BUTTERFLIES
ABE FREE
SHOW TIMES: 12:00,
2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20
MATURE: Some
violence and coarse
language.
—R. W. McDonald
B.C. Dir.
GEORGE C. SCOTT
STACY KEACH
Vogue
91S GRANVILLE
685-5434
THE NEW
CENTURIONS
COLOR
SHOW TIMES: 12:15, 2:30,
4:40, 6:55, 9:05
British Actor Alan Bates,
from whom excellence
always can be expected
on this occasion surpasses anything he
has ever done on film.
 r-Les Wedman, Sun.
Dunbar
224-72S2
DUNIAR it 30lh
ALAN BATES JANET SUZMAN
ADay
in the Death
SHOW r   j -ry
•t\        TIMES:      Of JOe.Cgg
<£,„     7:30,9:30 OD
The press
White
hnight
runs
out of
targets
KURT VONNEGUT JR.'S INTELLECTUALLY INTRIGUING STORY
IN WHICH HIS OPTOMETRIST HERO TIME TRIPS OFF TO
ANOTHER PLANET AND BACK TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR.   _
■■MMIilWI'll
VSrSltU Occasional
224-3730V 'coarse language and swearing.   R. W. McDonald,
4375 W. 10th   SHOWTIMES: 7:30, 9:30 B.C. Director
YOU HAVEN'T SEEN ANYTHING
UNTIL YOU'VE SEEN  .
EVERYTHING *
By BRONISLAW CHRTIEU
Ohed a tear this drizzly Friday morning
for et al Fotheringham, rumpled, polka-dot.
columnist on the Vancouver Sun.
Over the past decade or so,
Fotheringham has managed to fashion
some sort of liberal, social crusader image
for himself by bravely attacking such fat,
slow-moving dragons as Cece ("I'm an
MLA, my friend") Bennett and mayor Tom
("for the good of the city") Campbell.
He has relied on personality barbs and a
clever, cynical arrogance to prick their
over-inflated balloons, while ignoring any
social or economic reasons for their rise to
power.
As Nat Hentoff once said of wondrous
Tom Wolfe, Fatheringpork has the social
consciousness of an ant.
For instance, when the workers stormed
the gates of the legislature two years ago,
our Allan reacted with fear and outrage,
and penned the praises of "courageous"
lieutenant-governor John Nicholson for
braving all that foul language.
Fotheringham also delights in poking
whimsy at the ha-ha-oh-so-funny women's
liberation movement.
But anyway, to return to the tears, now,
within the short space of three weeks, poor
Al has lost both "da Preem" and "Tom
Terrific" as whipping boys, and he is
rapidly running out of easy targets. Even
"Stagedoor" Ronnie Worley is leaving.
Faced with the prospect of a "decent"
government in Victoria and an impending
paucity of baboons on city council,
Fotheringham is clearly on the verge of
panic.
Wednesday's column contained only a
desperate reprint of a long, boring aside on
Dave Barrett written 3 1/2 years ago, and
yesterday he claimed Campbell was not a
"bastion of the Establishment" merely
because he had no membership in the
Vancouver Club.
That's the kind of shallow, superficial
analysis Fotheringham specializes in. It's
okay for someone like Campbell to make a
million dollars in rip-off real estate deals so
long as he doesn't use his position as mayor
to do it.
However, Fotheringham's certainly
conscious of the danger to his hard-won
image as government pin-pricker, and last
week he tried very hard to be the first to
criticize the new premier and his cabinet
selection.
He charged Barrett had reneged on his
promise not to create double portfolios, and
blamed an old political feud for Bob
Strachan's appointment to the "minor"
post of highways minister.
In his frenzy to give us "the dope",
Fotheringham ignored Barrett's announced intention to explain all the
following Monday, and, of course, at that
time, Barrett said the present constitution
prevented a cabinet larger than 14 members, while Strachan, as highways
minister, would be charged with the prime
responsibility of piloting the government's
auto insurance bill through the legislature.
Incidentally, there is no truth to the
rumor that Al Fotheringham is secretlv
soliciting funds for a Ralph Loffmark for
Mayor campaign.
According to the Vancouver Sun, the fruit
of the Jamaican ack ack tree tastes like
scrambled eggs.
Some really cheap films
Several off-campus movie theatre
bargains are available to students this
year.
The Kino Cinema at Main and Sixth
features foreign films and is currently
showing Polanski's Repulsion (at 7:30
p.m.) and Visconti's Sandra (9:30 p.m.)
nightly through next Friday. Student price
for the double bill is $1.50.
City Nights Theatre (150 East Hastings)
presents English language films. Current
fare (through Saturday) is Arthur Penn's
Bonnie and Clyde and John Lennon in How
I Won The War. The double bill only costs
$1.35 (show starts at 6 p.m.).
Pacific Cinematheque at 1145 West
Georgia is running several series
currently. Tonight, they are showing
Bergman's Shame, next Wednesday
there's a Canadian double bill of Michael
Grieg's One More Time for Johnny Cool
and David Cronenberg's Stereo; and on
Thursday Indian director Satyajit Ray's
Jalshagar is playing. Showings are at 8
p.m. and cost $1.
Page Friday
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972 oinema le
By ERIC HANSON
For those film enthusiasts who have been wandering through a celluloid vacuum during the
summer, Cinema 16 provides welcomed relief.
No longer do these impoverished souls have to
trek down to the Sea-Vue in Blaine or be subjected
to Frankie Avalon's Beach Blanket Bingo antics at
the local drive-in.
Instead, this season's Cinema 16 lineup of 29 films
will present four series: the works of Three
Directors, a selection of movie Rituals, an International series, and and popular Swach-
bucklers; all of which will go a long way in
satisfying those plagued with cultural barreness.
The Directors Series begins with Italy's Pier
Paolo Pasolini, who in the wake of Fellini and
Antonioni has incorporated his Marxist philosophy
into a new type of realism. The series opened
Monday night with Pasolini's first feature film
Accattone, which dealt with the rugged simplicity
of Roman life-in-the-street. Hawks and Sparrows
(Nov. 27), a minor work, and Teorema (Feb. 19),
his major comment on modern Christianity and the
sexual revolution, are the other two Pasolini
presentations. These three films demonstrate the
transformation that has occurred in Pasolini's
work as he abandons his admiration of the working-
class man with his chaste ideals and replaces it
with an incisive assault on the bourgeois and his
jaded pursuits.
India's Satyajit Ray, whose themes centre on the
stormy evolution of the family unit within an increasingly industrialized society, will be the second
director whose works appear in this nine-film
package. Interspersed among the Pasolini films
will be Rey's Pather Panchali (Oct. 10), an indepth
look at modern Bengali family life; Kanchenjungha
(Jan. 9), the Indian director's first and only color
film; andCharulata (Mar. 12), which concentrates
on the emerging role of women in India.
The three films of Japan's Kenji Mizoguchi will
no doubt prove to be the highlight of the Directors
Series. Greatly admired by Pasolini and
acknowledged as Japan's finest director,
Mizoguchi blends together the subject of women,
the period of medieval Japan, and a style of compassion in his works to create a very real and very
moving portrait of tragedy and social mores.
Mizoguchi's films include Madame Yuki (Nov.
6), concerning a noblewoman in medieval Japan;
Life of O'Haru (Jan. 29), a Venice Film Festival
prize winner; and Street of Shame (Apr. 2), a
portrait of a prostitute who is credited with helping
to change Japan's streetwalker laws.
Both the International Series and the Swashbuckler Series get underway next week. Roman
Polanski's English entry, Cul de Sac (Sept. 25) is
the first in the series of unconventional films from
around the world. Done in the style of his earlier
Polish shorts, Polanski's first feature black comedy
focuses on a pair of escaping robbers who terrorize
an odd couple in their remote seaside castle.
Shirley Clarke's Portrait of Jason (Oct. 16)
weighs in for the United States with a story about a
33-year-old black male prostitute and sometimes
night club performer who lets it all hang out.
Chile's representative in the series is Valparaiso,
Mi Amour (Nov. 13), employing a documentary
style to paint an emotionally involving portrait of a
Chilean working class family.
Turning to a chillier country, the series presents
on Dec. 4, Canada's only entry in the entire C-16
program: Clark Mackey's The Only Thing You
Know, a penetrating appraisal of a contemporary
teenager.
Black God, White Devil (Jan. 15) is the first
Canadian showing of the internationally recognized
classic from Brazil, focusing on a young couple who
are first caught up in religious fanaticism and then
join an outlaw gang.
One of the better examples of Italian Neo-realism
will be Vittorio de Sica's Bicycle Thief (Feb. 5), an
early film employing a documentary style for the
purpose of sociological narrative.
Japan's Masaki Kobayashi directs Kwaidan
(Feb. 26 and 27), the entire four parts of a supernatural anthology based on Lafcadio Heme's short
stories.
Wrapping up the International Series will be
Fireman's Ball (Mar. 26), the last film Milos
Forman made before leaving Czechoslovakia, a
production filled with his own blend of satire and
humanism.
The Swashbuckler Series will start this Tuesday
(Sept. 26) with various adventurers who buckle
their swashes across the Sahara, on the Spanish
Main, and through Sherwood Forest, giving an
international flavor to C-16's major entertainment
package. Among the films are Douglas Fairbanks'
silent, The Thief of Bagdad (Sept. 26); Errol Flynn
in Sea Hawk (Oct. 3); a silent double feature of
Fairbanks in the Black Pirate and Rudolf Valentino
in Son of the Sheik (Nov. 20).
After Christmas, Fairbanks makes his third
appearance in the series in Robin Hood (Jan. 8),
followed by Jean-Paul Belmondo's Cartouche (Feb.
12), and culminating in Errol Flynn's Captain
Blood.
The fourth series, The Rituals, is cross-cultural
and focuses attention on the serious games that
men live, kill, and die by. Luis Brunei begins the
package on Oct. 2 with El, a chilling depiction of a
possessive husband driven mad by jealousy.
Kobyashi's Harikiri (Oct. 30), the sjecond of five
in the series, examines the moral decadence
hidden behind military ritual in Japanese medieval
society.
A film sadly neglected on most film society
programs (Cornel Wilde's Naked Prey) will be
shown Dec. 11, with Wilde himself being the hunted
animal set loose in South Africa to survive through
trial by ordeal.
The Hunt (Jan. 22), one of the few Spanish films
to achieve world recognition, is concerned with a
rabbit hunt that is transformed into a man hunt.
From a Spanish sporting setting, the series turns
to medieval Bohemia where the Czech film, Valley
Of The Bees (Mar. 5), studies an order of knightly
monastics who combine military discipline with
religious fervor.
For those 16-millimetre addicts who have been
used to receiving complimentary cold showers
from the Sea-Vue or autographed 9 by 12 glossies of
Frankie Avalon from the local drive-in, Cinema 16
has an added treat of showing some 20 shorts in
their program throughout the year.
Admission to any of these presentations, held in
the Student Union Building auditorium, usually on
Mondays, are by series membership only. There
are no single paid admissions.
General memberships are available to the public
and even for the non-students, the investment is a
bargain with each film working out to less than $1
per show. This year, as in former years, C-16 will
maintain guest privileges on passes: each member
will be entitled to one guest per series.
Tickets and complete program information are
available from the Alma Mater Society, Pauline's
book store on Denman, and Duthie's bookstores.
Time and price details can be had by phoning
Cinema 16 at 228-3697.
This season promises to give the viewer a most
unusual sample of world film production. Just don't
expect to see Annette and Frankie in it.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii
cinema le
Friday, September 22, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, S Books
Not worth hype
Much to my chagrin, and I
suppose to the, disappointment of the publisher, I
put The Day of the Jackal
down, a feat which I had
been led to believe was
about as humanly possible
as laughing at the Nancy
comic strip.
The Day of the Jackal by
Frederick Forsyth. Bantam
Books, $1.75, paper.
Which is strange, because
you cannot put Jackal down,
because the Saturday
Review, Wall Street Journal
and Minneapolis Tribune
tell you so before you get to
page one.
And if you get that far, you
better be spellbound, as
were the Philadelphia
Enquirer, Guardian, and
Baltimore Sun.
But I did put it down, and I
don't think I was spellbound
I don't think I was travelling
with "the Jackal"
(Newsday) and I don't think
hob was raised with my
sleeping and eating,
schedules (Buffalo Evening
News).
Nevertheless, The Day of
the Jackal is a good thriller,
probably one of the best in
its genre in the last few
years.
But that doesn't mean the
hyperbolic comments of
some reviewers are to be
taken as the word of the God
or Allah or whoever.
For while Jackal is a good
enough thriller, some of
Frederick Forsuth's writing
stinks.
The book is the story of an
assassination attempt on
French President Charles
de Gaulle, in the time when
the Algerilan crisis was still
a crisis and the
Organisation de L'Armee
Secrete was still a force.
The plot is carried
through convincingly, for
the most part, and you don't
have to worry about the
logistics of inserting tab A
into slot B, or even folding
over flap C.
But you do have to put up
with having the man who is
back-stabbing intentionally
the French detective hero
being the man who is
(inadvertently) leaking
information to the OLS and
the Jackal (who is, of
course, the assassin).
And you do have to put up
with some rather banal
bedroom conversation and
some excessive coolness on
the part of the Jackal and
some poor use of language
and some very bad lines
(The customs man says,
"This is your passport?, as
if the assassin is going say,
"No, this is one I paid to
have forged for me because
I'm    going    to    kill    de
Gaulle.")
I compare Jackal with a
much better book, Nobody
Knew They Were There, by
Evan Hunter, which is also a
book about assassination
intent, but a better book
because it is by a man who is
a writer rather than just a
story-teller. There's a
difference. More next week.
Guys & Gals
fFxm "
LEES
LEVIS
DAYS
H.I.S.
TORS
BELTS
Export A
CANADA'S FINEST CIGARETTE
SHIRTS   _ ^ 7
Lot4431 W.lOih   g^£>   221-1232
<*,
* REASONABLE      £1
PRICES "^
* QUALITY \lW
WORKMANSHIP     ■
* FULLY £
GUARANTEED
SALES AND SERVICE
89t4 0akSt. 263-81 Zl
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
-22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS - CHARBROILED STEAKS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
*
thereat
k 3uys
shoe SovTroue
Black leather with rust suede.
Navy leather with gold suede.
only $31.00
byHOWMARK
t
Open Thursday and  Friday Nites
C.O.D. orders accepted.   Credit and Chargex cards honored
VILLAGER SHOE SHOPPES LTD.
542 Granville 435 W. Hastings
Le Chateau Branch 776 Granville
Guildford Town Shopping Centre, Surrey
1324 Douglas St. in Victoria
*"Design and Word Trade Marks in Canada of the Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
Page Friday, 6
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972 Books
Lost appetite
By LESLEY KRUEGER
"I frequently feel I've lost
something somewhere.
Spontaneity maybe, or an
honest appetite."
That's Mordecai Richler,
writing in his new book of
collected essays, Shovelling
Trouble.
It's an honest assertion, and
one that's particularly appropriate in a book that's
generally over-worked, overdone and in the end, boring.
Richler is by habit a smooth
and sophisticated writer. His
books are carefully drawn and
the minute description creates
a consistent and interesting
character, like Duddy in the
Apprenticeship of Duddy
Kravitz or Ziggy in Cocksure.
But it is this same preoccupation with detail that
drags Shovelling Trouble to its
death. Like a high school
English student or a university
professor, Richler is so concerned with getting his point
across that he re-iterates it
again and again and again.
Take the 28-page essay,
Bond, for example, on the
subtle white Anglo-Saxon
supremism found in most of
Ian Fleming's 13 thrillers.
An interesting point, and one
that deserves exploration, but
why at such great and overwritten lengths?
But some parts of some
essays — which isn't a very
good average — manage to be
spontaneous, if not  original.
Describing a Mr. Soon of his
obligatory two years on the
Paris left bank, he says:
"He had a filthy, knotted
beard, a body seemingly
fabricated of mechano parts,
the old clothes and cigarettes
we gave him, and a passion for
balaclavas. The police were
always nabbing him for
questioning. They wanted to
know about drug addiction and
foreigners who had been in
Paris for more than three
months wjthout a carte
d'identite. Mr Soon became an
informer.
"And what,' he asks, "do you
think of the poetry of Mao Tse-
tung?"
"Zingy."
"And how," he'd ask, "does
one spell your name?"
But most of the essays
sprawl under the weight of
their own ponderousness.
In his essay, Making It,
Richler castigates modern
American writers for
disdaining "their natural
material, which I still take to
be non-literary society, in
order to flay each other in
print."
Yet two pages later, what
does he say but "Making It (by
Norman Podhoretz), Mailer's
outpourings, the broadsides bv
(Nelson) Algren and (James)
Baldwin, all belong to a genre
with intolerable show biz
characteristics."
It's a fair indication of the
whole book. Richler criticizes
John Buchan and Ian Fleming
for anti-semitism, then writes
a "tittering essay on
homosexuality, where he
considers hilarious the fact
that there's a group of Dutch
homosexuals called Cultur-en
Ontspanningscentrum, which
abreviates to C.O.C.
In a critical review of Leslie
Fielder's book, Waiting for
China, he says he objects to the
main character not because he
"isn't accurately observed —
it's just  that he's been  ob-
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A TREASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
3-Speed - $69.00
Free Light Set
With English 10-Speed
SEE US
Before you empty your wallet!
WE HAVE REALISTIC PRICES
COMPREHENSIVE STOCK -
SATISFYING SERVICE
ASK OUR CUSTOMERS
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Theft Insurance — Cables — Locks Etc.
3771 W. 10th Ave.
224-3336
theBOOKFINDER
• COLES NOTES
• SCHAUMS
• NEW AND USED TEXTS
• POSTERS • CANADIANA
WE SELL BOOKS ON CONSIGNMENT!
4444 W. 10th Ave.
228-8933
served so often," then trundles
out 'when I was young in Paris'
cliches throughout his
reminiscences.
And so on.
Richler hasn't written a bad
book — only a boring one.
Heavy, over-done, it rarely
rises from smooth mediocrity
and an impression of 'hasn't
this been done sometime
before?'
at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
db
duthie
BOOKS
NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
HOW DOES THIS SOUND
TO YOU . . .
15% OFF
THE MANUFACTURERS SUGGESTED LIST
ON ALL OUR STEREO
COMPONENTS & ACCESSORIES
Bring in your I.D. card and receive our opportunities for
youth  grant.
COME IN AND SEE OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF STEREO EQUIPMENT
MILLERS
4 STORES TO SERVE YOU
1123 DAVIE ST.
683-1326
Open 9 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon. to Fri.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
622 COLUMBIA S
524-2016
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 - 9
782 GRANVILLE ST.
683-1395
9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Mon. to Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 - 9
726 YATES ST.
388-6295
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. Fri. 9 • 9
CHARGEX   •   EASY TERMS   •   LAY AWAY
OURDESnNY
IS WHAT ME
CHOOSE
TOM4KEIT"
P. E. Trudeau
The words are simple. The meaning is clear. It remains for us to do
something about it. If you've bothered to think about, it, now is the time
to bother to act. Come and work with us. Right now.
In Vancouver it's at 681-7261.
Liberalism — An openness to new ideas.
October 30 — The Federal Election.
Express Yourself.
LIBERAL R4RTY
614 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Friday, September 22, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Books
Exploited intellectuals
I
Counter-Revolution and Revolt, by Herbert
Marcuse, Beacon Press, 1972.
In his latest book Marcuse wants us to
consider the possibilities of a total
revolution, one which changes attitudes and
sensibilities as well as relations of
production.
And. unlike the proponents of the "hippie
revolutions" of various hues (Roszak,
Charles Reich et al), he wants to be serious
about the means and necessity of social
change.
Marcuse's urgency comes from his
analysis of the American social and political
scene which he sees developing into a
fascist-type counter-revolution in reaction to
the movements of the '60s which tended
towards liberation and socialism. Marcuse
witnessed first-hand the Nazi victory in
Germany and finds similarities in the
present U.S. situation.
Marcuse's basic orientation is seriously
socialist and Marxist. But he does want to
emphasize the more little known aspects of
Marxist thought. The second chapter of
Countei -Revolution and Revolt is given over
to a detailed discussion of Marx's early
views on nature which required that humans
find harmony in the natural environment
and not attempt to destroy it. Yes, Marx
wrote about ecology.
Taking the analysis which Marx formulated about classes in capitalist society
Marcuse juggles the roster so that class
constellations broaden to fit the new forms of
economic exploitation.
Marcuse's argument runs thusly:
Monopoly capitalism (the concentration of
wealth and power in fewer and fewer institutions) requires the exploitation of more
and more resources and labor to run itself.
Included in the exploited labor is the labor of
intellectuals such as market researchers,
social scientists and advertising experts.
These people who are in some senses
professionals are also used by the system.
They delude themselves (have false consciousness) if they think they are not being
used. They are beginning to have something
in common with the workers, whom they
help to exploit by being exploited.
So there is legitimate room for intellectuals in the workers' revolution, and it
doesn't merely involve intellectuals identifying with workers — as was the case, to a
certain extent, with Marx and Lenin. Intellectuals are objectively exploited as well
as having any possible consciousness of
alienation and this should lead them to
making a commitment to a worker's
struggle.
Here in Canada it is even becoming impossible for people with intellectual skills to
get jobs. The social position of the intellectual is changing.
The book is a continuation of Marcuse's
earlier works, particularly Eros and
Civilization and An Essay on Liberation. In
the latter book he discussed the development
of a "new sensibility" to challenge the way
an aggressive, competitive society teaches
us to view things. This is continued, but in a
more political context, in his discussion of
nature and art in Counter-Revolution.
— Dick Betts
I
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
Applicatidns are now
being received for
members of the following committees:
ART GALLERY COUNCIL:
for those interested in planning and setting up unusual art
shows in the SUB gallery.
OPEN HOUSE
please see other advertisement - Student-Tenant Liaison
Commitee - concerned with problems and discrimination
student tenants face each year.
COMMUNITY VISITATIONS
SPECIAL EVENTS
Would applicants please see the A.M.S. Secretary, Sally
Clark, in Room 250 SUB, for information.
This Year
BIRD CALLS
the UBC Student Telephone Directory
Will Include
40 BONUS COUPONS
Coming
Early
October
DANCE?
THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN FOR
Stallion Thumrock     Crosstown Bus
Seeds of Time
Valdy
Brave Belt
Cargo
Shylock
Fludd
Whiskey Hour
Crow Bar
Stone Beat
Apple Jack
Thin Red Line
Northwest Co.
Spring
Badge
King Biscuit Boy
Sunshyne
Everyday People
Wildroot
Tom Northcott  . . . and many more
to BRUCE ALLEN
TALENT PROMOTION LTD.
ASK FOR BRUCE ALLEN OR SAM FELDMAN
688-7274
Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972 Friday, September 22, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
U of T TA's organizing
TORONTO (CUP) — Graduate students who
teach at the University of Toronto may be
organized into a labor union if a campaign
being mounted by the graduate student union is
successful.
The GSU says the teaching assistants are
unable to deal effectively with the U of T administration and feel the need to bargain
collectively. The university refused voluntary
recognition of the union last spring, claiming
thp FA's wanted to organize only to be able to
strike. The GSU denies the charge.
The TA's grievances include the lack of a
university medical plan and other normal
employee benefits such as workmen's compensation, lack of a teacher-training program,
a disproportionate number of women teaching
assistants and little power over course content
and tutorial size.
Unionized, the U of T graduate assistants
association (as the new union is called) could
fight to change these situations as well as seek
higher wages.
A noted labor union has advised the GSU that
formation of a union would be legal, says past
president Larry Hoffman, who is spearheading
the campaign as the GSU's executive assistant.
The only problem expected at the Ontario
Labor Relations Board is determining an ac
ceptable definition of the bargaining unit.
If 65 per cent of the persons in the unit join the
association for the nominal $1 fee there should
be immediate certification. Hoffman hopes the
required number will have joined by Christmas.
The decision to form a union was based on a
recommendation in a report on graduate
assistants passed by the GSU in May. The
report says that 30 to 40 per cent of the teaching
done at U of T is done by teaching assistants.
Hoffman says this is a conservative estimate
and the real percentage is closer to 50 per cent.
The report was mailed to all faculty and
graduate students in the spring and distributed
again, along with a flyer stating the main
reasons for unionization, during registration.
The GSU also solicited membership in the
association then.
Hoffman says a broad spectrum of students
has joined the association, including some from
such departments as chemical engineering and
physics, which are usually considered
apolitical. Graduate students at McMaster
University are also investigating the possibility
of unionizing.
The major part of the U of T campaign is not
expected until next month.
UBC TA's attempted to organize a union last
year without success.
'Fit Christ into Marxist context'
5*
By GARY KOSINSKY
Eastern European Marxist and Christian
scholars are trying to reconcile their differences, West German clergyman Klaus-
Heinrich Kanstein said in SUB Thursday.
Kanstein said the Christian problem was to
fit Christ and all he represented into a Marxist
context.
Marx, an atheist, condemned the church as
being a pillar of support for the bourgeois party
in power. He believed the church would have to
be abolished if man was to find freedom, said
Kanstein.
Marxist-Christians, however, say this antagonism was directed towards the church as
an institution, not the content of Christianity.
Hence,  Marxist-Christians  have  to  prove
More openings
From page 1
He said both government and
volunteer-staffed facilities
should be set up because
government staffers could take
care of children whose parents
cannot take the time to work in
the centres.
But he said "if it is done on a
voluntary basis you'll get it
better run because parents
know better what is needed."
Beth kinds should provide for
half-day and full day care
for children and a third set-up
would handle children of
parents who do not have a fixed
work schedule.
Parents would be able to
book time on a regular basis,
though not necessarily in the
same time-period each week.
Barman emphasized the
view is his own "as a parent
with a child in a half-day
centre" and that a brief will be
released next week detailing
the council's view of needs on
campus.
Parents pay on a sliding fee
scale depending on their income. Maximum fee is $80
while some are completely
subsidized by the provincial
government.
Barman said the new centres
will be open to new applications since many of the
parents on current waiting lists
will have found facilities
elsewhere.
Free film
Richard Schreckner's film
Dionysus '69 is being presented
free by the graduate student
society and the arts undergraduate society at 11:30
a.m. Tuesday.
Schreckner's Performance
Group ts the resident theatre
group on campus and Dionysus
'69 is their version of
Euripide's Bacchi.
Marxism is not synonymous with atheism.
On the other hand, said Kanstein, some
Marxists are beginning to think 19th century
Marxist theory does not have all the answers
for 20th century man.
They say something is missing in communist
society and they hope to find that 'something' in
Christianity.
Kanstein alleged the Marxist-Christian
dialogue has suffered, partly because of a
revival of hard-line, low-brow communist
theory amongst leftist youth.
After his lecture, Kanstein questioned his
audience of twenty about Canadian problems.
Topics cited included nationalism, alienation,
and the election of the "godless socialist" New
Democratic Party.
c«C\& MTES TO U.B.C. %#*.
^ Typewriter Town ms
New & Reconditioning Typewriters & Adders
Ail Office Equipment     Trades Welcome
Specializing in SMITH CORONA compact electrics
iMTHHE.
{*
MR. FERRARI DRIVES A FIAT 128.
If you're thinking about buying your first
small car, you might keep this in mind.
After all, when it comes to cars, you can't fool
a Ferrari.
The biggest selling car in Europe.
Clarke Simpkins
FIAT CENTER
BURRARD at 7th 736-4282
P+C
BILL
CLARKE
CARES ABOUT QUADRA
During Registration Week, I shifted my attention to the "first-
time" voters, and spent many hours at U.B.C., chatting with the
students in the registration lineups. If the Liberals are looking to
youth for "Trudeaumania '72" they are in for a surprise,
because youth is one of the most disenchanted groups in Canada.
While at U.B.C, I handed out the following "Information for
Students" which should have added "... and Parents" ...
* * *
Do you have photostats of your car registration, marriage
certificate, and social insurance number? Do you have your own
or your parent's T-l income tax return?
Did you know that the Trudeau Government will force you to
produce these documents in order to obtain a student loan? The
system used last year (students declared their earnings)
worked perfectly well, but the Trudeau Liberals' love of
burea lcracy and invasion of privacy led them to dream up this
time-consuming procedure.
British Columbia is the only province to be subject to this experiment in bureaucracy. Could you imagine Trudeau experimenting on Ontario or Quebec?
Bob Stanfield and the Progressive Conservatives have always
taken a strong stand against the government's bureaucracy
invading the privacy of the individual. A Stanfield Government
would immediately abolish Trudeau's new regulations and
follow the simpler procedure used last year.
The reason why many students will require student loans is
Trudeau's policy of deliberately creating unemployment.
Trudeau's Finance Minister stated in his Budget Speech of
March 12, 1970, "Unemployment, slightly higher than that of
1969 might be necessary if we are really going to beat inflation."
The result has been a staggering level of unemployment which
today has reached 6.3% across Canada. (July, Statistics
Canada).
Yet Trudeau's policy of unemployment did nothing to fight inflation. This July, food prices took one of their highest jumps
If there is one group in Canada that should take the lead in opposing this unjust Liberal Government, it is young people. Last
year 46.3% of the 552,000 unemployed were between the ages of
14 to 24. If you are expecting to obtain employment in the future
because you are presently obtaining a university education, the
Economic Council of Canada warns that 75% of Ph.D graduates
will not find employment in the next 5 years.
Trudeau's Band-Aid solution to a very high student unemployment rate was the Opportunities for Youth Program. Many
projects were worthwhile, but only 15% of those who applied,
received grants. And receiving a grant solved no problems.
Even graduate students could earn only a maximum of about
$1600 gross. No wonder students need loans!
Bob Stanfield (and the Progressive Conservative Party) is
leading the way in developing solutions to the problems that
have been created for all Canadians as a result of Trudeau's
wasted years.
We believe that full employment can thrive only on an economy
where free enterprise has the incentives necessary to create
more permanent jobs.
FOOTNOTE: Bill Clarke is the Progressive Conservative
Candidate in Vancouver Quadra. His Headquarters is at 2105 W.
38th. Phone 261-2292. Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972
Fatuity club
threatened
RCMP and the university
traffic patrol were called
Wednesday to investigate a bomb
threat at the UBC faculty club.
Club manager Richard Hansen
said the threat was phoned in at
12:55 p.m. He said the caller told
a switchboard operator a bomb
set to go off between 2 and 6 p.m.
was planted in the faculty club.
Police conducted a search until
1:15 p.m. but no bomb was
found.
"No one was evacuated," said
Hansen.
"An open building like the
faculty club is easy to search and
we had an hour before the bomb
was set to go off."
When no bomb was found he
decided to keep the building open
and gave the staff members a
choice between staying or leaving.
Two left.
Junk show
All undergraduate societies
have been invited to a grand
preview of old junk, desks, chairs
and whatnot stored in the SUB
basement Monday noon.
Alma      Mater     Society
co-ordinator Bob Angus reminds
people to bring along paper and     JOiU   VJ9
thumtacks  to   tag   your   group's
choices.
Hot flashes
Democratic Party MP, will speak
on Canada's role in the war at 8
p.m., Sept. 29.
Workshops will be featured
Sept. 30, with Roger Rudenstein,
of the northern California peace
action coalition speaking.
The conference will be at the
Fishermen's Hall, 138 East
Cordova.
UBC outshone
BCIT outshone UBC by 450
shiners and $9,000 in last week's
joint shinerama.
UBC's contribution to the
cystic fibrosis foundation,
shinerama sponsors, will be only
$900, compared to more than
$10,000 from BCIT.
Gary Koss, shinerama
committee chairman, said the
foundation was trying to raise
money for their organization.
Koss said "apathy" caused the
UBC failure, adding "the
foundation supplied the shoe
polish and brushes, leaving us to
supply the shiners and the shoes.
Koss wanted to thank all the
people who came out to shine
shoes and said they will give it a
try next year.
Aptly, all the shinerama raffle
prizes were won by BCIT
students.
: y   '     . ifs« *y^*-f,   ryjv t'/,v,fy/.
And small clubs will have a
chance to tell students about their
activities, said Bob Angus, AMS
acting co-ordinator.
Fletcher said she expects 35-40
participants. At a general meeting
this week locations were decided,
and it was first come first served
for clubs choosing either the main
concourse, ballroom or party
room.
All clubs are welcome, said
Angus. They can set up a table
free of charge or a booth for $10.
"The $10 rental fee goes to the
physical plant," said Fletcher.
"Last year the UCC was able to
cover the cost, but this year, with
only five members, they can't."
Clubs wanting to participate
can contact Fletcher in SUB 230
or Angus 262.
Slide show
SCAN, a slide survey of
Canadian art, will be on display at
the Vancouver art gallery from
Sept. 27 to Oct. 29.
More than 2,000 slides,
representing the work of 204
artists working in Canada during
the past two years will be shown.
Admission is $1 and catalogues
will be sold for 25 cents.
War conference
The Vietnam action committee is
sponsoring a two-day conference
on the war in indochina.
Grace      Maclnnis,.    New
Tween
classes
Get out of your tree and join
something.
Clubs day will be held in SUB
Sept. 28. Chief organizer Pat
Fletcher, Ed. 3, said it will give
students a chance to see what
clubs are on campus and to get
involved in one.
IMP presents
Jazz Concert No. 5
FEATURING
MOMENTS
AT
THE ARTS CLUB THEATRE
8 P.M. All Seats
Sept. 24th $1.75
Reservations- 687-5315
TODAY &
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB S&
Marxism vs Terrorism, a free public
meeting with Grant Hargrave 8 p.m.
at 1208 Granville Street.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting in SUB 125 at
noon.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting, new members welcome at 11:30 in International
House.
WH1TI
& SPAGHL. „ „ww* ».m
I.Steaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatore'lj
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. -4 a.m.
Sun.
11 a.m. -1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS
HOME DELIVERY
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway'
(at Dunbar)
738-9520    738-1113
SUNDAY
SORORITY
Soroity     rush    begins    at     12    at
Panhellenic house.
MALAYSIAN-SINGAPOREAN     .
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Annual  general  meeting  2  p.m.  at
International house.
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk   mass   11   a.m.   at   St.   Mark's
Chapel    get    together    and    coffee
afterwards.
TAEKWONDO CLUB
Registration    and    uniform   orders
7:30    p.m.    in   gym    E    of   Winter
Sports Centre.
MONDAY
BOWLING
UBC bowling starts for more
information call Walter at
228-8225.
HILLEL
Bet Cafe lunch Monday to
Wednesday at Hillel house.
ELCIRCULO
Talk on the conditions in present
day Spain by K. Nebot
representative of the committee for
a democratic Spain noon at
International house.
TUESDAY
CONTEMPORARY DANCE WORKSHOP
Open   to   anyone   interested,   free
from   5  to  6:30  p.m.   in gym  E  of
Winter Sports Centre.
GERMAN CLUB
Organizational     meeting     noon    in
room 4&4 of International house.
ANGLICAN-UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist noon in Lutheran Campus
Centre.
WEDNESDAY
ANGLICAN-UNITED
CHURCH MINISTRY
Education and Status Quo noon
SUB 207.
OPEN HOUSE
72
Applications are now being received for
Open House '73 executive positions
VICE CHAIRMAN
TREASURER
RECORDING SECRETARY
FACULTY CO-ORDINATOR
CLUBS CO-ORDINATOR
.    SERVICES
TOURS AND GUIDES
TRAFFIC AND SECURITY
HIGH SCHOOL TOUR
PUBLIC RELATIONS
These interested please write to:
Chairman
OPEN HOUSE
Box 61, SUB     U.B.C.
or see John Keatings in SUB Room 230 A
9:30-11:00 a.m.
A SUB FILM SOC PRESENTATION'
Bob and Carol
and Ted and Alice
WITH
Robert Culp, Natalie Wood
Elliot Gould, Dyan Cannon
Friday 22nd & Saturday 23rd
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 24th
— 7:00
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines. 1 day $1.00; additional lines. 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable m
advance. Deadline is ]):30 am., the dav before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC, Van. &&C;;
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT UN-
dercut 72. Sat., Sept. 30, 8:30-1:00
SUB Cafeteria. Hardtimes, full
facilities.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
MISS NICHOLS, YOUR KEYS ARE
in  SUB lost  ft; found.	
Rides & Car Pools
14
TWO GIRLS NEED RIDE TO' UBC
8 a.m. from Kingsway & Fraser.
Phone   Vicki   or   Elayne,   872-1832.
RIDE WANTED FROM BROAD-
way and Heaather vicinity, about
7:30. Call Eric today 1-2 p.m. at
228-5692.
Special Notices
15
SEE DR. BUNDOLO DIE ! ! !
Live on radio.	
WANTED HELP FOR FILM PRO-
gramme Sunday nights Dunbar
Centre. Controversial topics. Stu-
dents  or  faculty  call 224-1374.
JOIN—CHOIR OF SACRED MUSIC
Monday nights, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Vancouver School of Theology,
6050 Chancellor Blvd. Men and
Women  welcome.	
INVITATION TO YOU—TO COME
to lunch after the 11 o'clock services at St. Anselm's Anglican and
University Hill United churches
on Univ. Blvd., on Oct. 1 — a
chance to get acquainted and talk
about possible future activities.
Lunch will be at University Hill
United  Church.	
MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATE
Student Centre can obtain pamphlets describing the Centre and its
functions from the office of the
Centre.	
FIRESIDE.—SUNDAY. SEPT. 24 —
Meet Alan Rimmer, National Secretary Student Christian Movement, 7:30 p.m., 4515 W. 12th.
Come hear about the SCM. Students and Faculty welcome, In-
formation,   V.   Anderson.   224-0069.
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October  .	
DISCOUNT STEREO. EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai, A.G.S.,
Zenith  TVs.  Call  732-6769.
FOR YOUR HAIR NEEDS. GIVE
the UBC Barber Shop, or Beauty
Salon a visit. 5736 University
Blvd.  in  the  Village.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
UBC BOWLING STARTS MONDAY
Sept. 25. Those wishing to Join
please  phone   Walter  at  228-8225.
COME TO SUB THEATRE. MEET
Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice,
7:00,  9:30, only 50c.	
YAC (YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB) IS
back! At Cecil Green Park on
campus. Every Thursday from 8-
12 mid and Fridays 4:30-12:30 p.m.
For Alumni & Graduating Stu-
dents.	
WILL JACK FELL JANE AT UN-
dercut 72? Cum and see! Sat.
Sept.   30   SUB  Cafe.
Typing
40
EXP'D TYPIST, THESES. ESSAYS,
etc.   Phone  Mrs.   Brown,   732-0047.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   263-5317.	
"EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TY-
pist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist.  Mrs.  Ellis — 321-3838.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
.51
PUBLIC   SERVICE   CANADA
This competition is open to both
men  and women.
CAREER   OPPORTUNITIES
FOR  SCIENCE  GRADUATES
For further information regarding
positions and required specializations, contact your Placement
Office. Application deadline: October 23,  1972.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED IMMEDIATELY — 10-
speed bike in good condition. Ph.
224-9684 ask for or leave message:
Blake
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'68 DATSUN 1600 SPORT. EXCEL-
lent condition. Silver-grey Hardtop, soft top, Tonneau, radio.
Good value at $1750.  Call 922-7348.
 '71   RENAULT   8	
— —   —   Low   mileage   —   —   —
— —  —  Rick,   224-7885   —  —   —
'68      FIREBIRD      350      CONVERT.
Must be seen.   Offers.  879-1924.
LEARN CHINESE DANCING AND
Mime.   Phone  261-5918.	
CHILDREN'S CREATIVE ART
classes. Child Art Centre, Acadia
Rd., South Section 1: 9-14 yrs.,
Mondays, 3:30-5:00. Section 2: 6-8
yrs., Wednesdays, 3:30-5:00. Section 3: 9-14 yrs., Thursdays, 3:30-
5:00. $8.00 for the year. Phone:
Miss Spears, Faculty of Education,   UBC.
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Autos Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobile*—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
"LANCER" MONSIEUR" SHIRTS.
Latest styles, 50% off. 1230-130
John,  Ron, Gage E5B6.4.	
PANASONIC RQ-1525 PORTABLE
tape recorder with accessories
and/or 5 inch tapes $50 or offer,
224-1683 eves.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
COUPLE NEEDED TO SHARE
large two-bedroom suite, partly
furnished.   $50.   266-0571.   732-7898.
COMFORTABLE ROOMS 10 MINS.
from campus on 15th Ave. Private
entrance. Cooking facilities available.   224-3427.
Room & Board
82
1971 SUZUKI 125cc STINGER. 5500
miles. Phone 684-6795 eves, ask
for   Phil.
Furnished Apis.
83
NEAR CAMPUS. SPACIOUS 3
room suite. Priv. bath & priv.
entrance. For two to share. No
cooking,  $40  each.   224-6389. Friday, September 22, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
SFU to come home I swimming lessons
SFU is ready to resume sports competition
with UBC on a regular basis, SFU athletic
director Lome Davis announced Thursday.
SFU would join the Canada West Conference
in both men's and women's sports and compete
with UBC on a league basis in wrestling, crosscountry, track and field, soccer, basketball,
and volleyball.
Football and hockey would be deleted
because of the expense involved. "Guarantees
would have to be made in hockey and football
before we would come in," he said, "otherwise
we can't afford it."
Davies pointed out the economies involved
in competing in the States where a trip to
Portland costs no more than a trip to Penticton.
The CWC which SFU seeks admission to is
an athletic league made up of universities from
Edmonton, Calgary, Victoria, and of course
UBC.
Canada West is the western counterpart of a
once large conference that was split up at the
Saskatchewan-Alberta border in 1971 for
reasons of economy.
SFU's return to Canadian competition
comes after years of play in U.S. circles. Since
its beginning as an athletic power SFU has been
famous for looking to the U.S. for most of its
competition.
However Davies wishes to change this
image of having an American-oriented sports
program. "I'm a Canadian and would like to
see as much competition in Canada as
possible," he said.
Davies went on to state that SFU is meeting
the requirements for membership and will
recruit the players for the sports that compete
only from within the province. SFU has offered scnoiarsnips to Americans, particularly
in basketball and football.
The Canada West Conference meets in
Calgary Monday and all things considered SFU
should be a member before it is over. The
qeustion of whether competition in sports like
basketball will begin this year will depend on
scheduling and conference rules.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY ACTION returns to UBC Saturday as the
'Birds take on Kats in a Vancouver Rugby Union game. Birds downed
Trojans 41-6 in season opener last Saturday.
'Birds try again
By JOHN ROGERS
Thunderbird assistant coach
Norm Thomas weighed his
team's chances against the U.
of Saskatchewan Huskies
Saturday.
"If they do what they did last
year we're ready for them,"
Thomas said.
Last year Saskatchewan and
UBC held identical 2-6 cellar
dwelling records. Thomas has
reason to believe that UBC will
pull ahead this year.
"They only have two good
receivers and if they are like
last year, not much of a run
ning attack. We have a pass
and run offense and should be
ready for them," he said.
The 'Birds have made more
wholesale changes since the
first game was dropped to the
Manitoba Bisons and the
second to Edmonton. They
have broken their "Texas
wishbone" offense up in favour
of a pro version of the offensive
line.
The receivers have been
juggled to remedy their poor
passing record and generally
the team has been arranged to
give younger players more
experience. (There is no junior
varsity squad this year.)
The   switch   to   younger
players seems to be a welcome
change. Too often in the past
the 'Birds have suffered from
the graduation of their well-
groomed hopefuls.
Last year's leading rusher
Ron Fowler is gone with no
replacement in sight.
Traditionally, by the time a
player has reached his peak he
is gone.
Although all universities
suffer by losing valuable
players a little planning to
ensure players developing
earlier is a worthwhile practice.
One 'Bird player who is out
before graduation is quarterback Jim Tarves. It was
announced Wednesday that his
back injury will definitely keep
him out for the remainder of
the schedule.
This leaves rookie quarterback Ten Hon Choo to step
into Tarves' boots. This may be
a bonus for the 'Birds as Choo
is a better option runner — and
if the offensive line has not
cured its ills, option runs will
be a must on Saturday.
But Thomas is optimistic
about the upcoming game.
"We're like the Lions," he
said, "but we're not going to
wait as long."
Johnson
to double
Joe Johnson, coach of the
UBC Thunderbird soccer
team, will be sitting on both
benches Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium.
The game is against Johnson's other team, the New
Westminster Blues.
The Blues will be
representing the western
provinces in the Canadian
Soccer Championship, to be
played in Toronto on Oct. 1
against Toronto San Fili.
Johnson's Blues have a
record of 28 wins, two draws,
and two losses in 32 starts this
season, including their latest 2-
0 victory over the Winnipeg
Thistles.
The situation of one coach to
two teams arose when the
Pacific Coast League
nominated Johnson to coach
the entry of New Westminster
Blues into the Canadian Soccer
Championship.
Following the final in
Toronto, Johnson will be
concentrating his efforts on the
'Brids.
Greg Weber, now playing
with Croatia will return to the
'Bird nets for the remaining six
games in the premier league.
Blues netminder Mike
Gilmore will be on the bench
resting up an injury to his ribs.
Gilmore will be one of Johnson's top players for the
Toronto final.
The exhibition game starts
at 2:00 p.m. Admission to the
game is Adults $1.50, Students,
Ladies, and pensioners 50c.
Players wanted
Hockey season is here again.
Anyone interested in trying
out for the team is asked to see
Bob Hindmarch, Rm. 212D
War Memorial Gym.
TUXEDO
RENTAL fr SALES
NOW! )j
DOUBLEKNIT TUXEDOS
AND DINNER JACKETS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE  ,
Formal Wear Rental*       '
631 Howe 688
at Empire Pool
Lessons   are   offered   to   students,   faculty,   and   staff   during   the
following hours:
TWF   9:30-10:15   -Bronze;  Red  Cross  -  Beginner, Junior,
Intermediate, Senior.
TWF 10:30-11:15 - Bronze, Award of Merit, Distinction.
MTH 9:30-10:15 - Red Cross - Beginner, Junior, Intermediate,
Senior.
MTH 10:30-11:15— Red Cross - Beginner, Junior, Intermediate,
Senior.
Less are  in progress and those  interested to attend  need only to
appear on the pool deck at the times listed above. No registration required.
For further  information   inquire  to   Room 208 Memorial
Gymnasium or telephone 228-2401.
—i     The University of British Columbia
|Sffl    Centre for
Continuing Education
READING &STUDY October-
SKILLS PROGRAM rBE"'
Reading Improvement Courses
The University of British Columbia Reading and Study Skills
Centre offers individualized programs for those who wish to
improve their reading and study skills for academic, professional
and personal reasons.
Course work emphasizes increase of Reading Rate and Comprehension, Previewing, Skimming and Scanning — Study Habits and
Skills — Critical Reading Skills — Flexibility of Reading Rate —
Reading Skills in Subject Matter, Professional and Special Interest
Areas.
The fee of $30.00 for secondary school students and full-time
university or college students*, and $Q0.00 for non-students,
includes testing, materials, counselling and use of the Reading
Lab. Class. Enrolment is limited to 18.
Classes are held in the East Mall Annex (Room 118 and 119),
beginning the week of October 2, and meet at the indicated times
for five weeks.
'Students — 3 courses (9 units or more). Student card may be requested.
CLASS SCHEDULE
Section
Time
Day
Room
Type
1      1
12:30-
1:30
M. T. Th.
119
Student
2
3:45-
5:45
M. W.
119
Student
3
3:45-
5:45
T. Th.
119
Student
4
7:00-
9:00
M. W.
118
Student
5
7:00-
9:00
M. W.
119
Adult
6
7:00-
9:00
T. Th.
118
Student
7
7:00-
9:00
T. Th.
119
Adult
8*
9:00-
12:00
Sat.
118
Secondary
Student
9*
9:00-
12:00
Sat.
119
Adult
* These sections commence October 14 and will meet for 6 sessions.
Writing Improvement Program
October - November 1972
Writing Improvement is an 18-hour non-credit program designed
to improve essay writing and composition skills. This program is
open to university and college students of all years and to persons
who are planning to resume their university and college studies.
As well as dealing with common core problems such as essay
organization and structure, sentence structure and punctuation,
the course will be concerned with special topics such as
organization of the long research paper, and research and
bibliographic techniques.
Each week students will be encouraged to bring their assignments
to class for discussion. Classes are small and students are dealt
with on an individual basis. Students will have an opportunity for
writing practice every week.
FEE: $30.00 for students; $60.00 for non-students.
DATES AND TIMES: Commencing the week of October 9,
classes will meet one evening per week (7:00 - 10:00) for 6 weeks.
Section 1 Tuesday 7:00- 10:00 Students
Section 2 Wednesday 7:00 - 10:00 Non-Students
LOCATION: East Mall Annex
For further information on either program, please contact the Education-
Extension Department, Centre forContinuing Education, 228-2181 (local 220).
REGISTRATION FORM
Name of program . ..
Name (Mr., Miss, Mrs.!
Address   	
Telephone   	
Year	
Faculty	
Section Number   	
Please make cheques payable to the University of British Columbia and
mail with this form to: Registrations, Centre for Continuing Education,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C. Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 22, 1972
*»•-* • St ■  ' •
BOB
STANFIELD
SHOW YOUR CONCERN— HE DOES!
TUESDA Y NOON
SEPT. 26th—S.U.B. BALL ROOM

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128464/manifest

Comment

Related Items