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The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1968

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 Trophy
again?
THE UBYSSEY
ol. XLIX, No. 30
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1968
224-3916
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1
"OH LOOK. Oh look at the filthy books. See, Dick, see. Why are children exposed to such
smut?" Mary Watt, science 4, ponders the so-called children's literature of Steinbeck, Tom
Wolfe and Harold Robbins on the bookstore's shelves. Count the dirty books and win a
dozen of the good stuff. Contest ends Monday.
on resigning
By MIKE FINLAY
Three of UBC's four student senators say they are prepared
to resign from the senate.
Senators Ray Larsen, Gabor Mate and Kirsten Emmott said
Thursday students are being ignored by the senate which concerns itself with irrelevant issues. Grad student senator Mark
Waldman was not available for comment, but has said that he
will remain in the senate.
"We are considering resigning, but will not do so if students
object," said Larsen. A meeting to determine student wishes will
be held Tuesday noon in Brock.
Larsen said students' demands for an open senate were disregarded, proving that the body does not consider itself responsible to the students.
"We were elected on a platform of making the senate open
to the press and public," he said. "But the motion for an open
gallery was defeated 40 votes to 15. The students' wishes were
completely ignored."
Mate said Thursday the senate was illegitimate in the way
it functions.
"The senate shouldn't have the right to reject any proposal
put to it by the faculty," he said. "The senate should serve students and faculty, and right now it doesn't.
"It's a place of petty intellectual snobbery and bickering
between faculties."
Miss Emmott is dropping out of university for personal
reasons and would be resigning anyway.
She agreed that the senate did not serve any real policymaking purpose.
All three undergraduate senators said the senate was inefficient in is operation.
Parnall said he did not think students were being ignored
in the senate and that it was in the interest of the efficiency
of the body that a gallery wasn't allowed.
"The speakers would be inhibited," he said,
lo page 3
see: SENATE DISAPPOINTED
. . . SCREWS  CODE OF ETHI(9
[BOLISHES  TROPHIES . . .
CUP revamps operating principles
Again, we did it.
For an unprecedented seventh time, the
anadian University Press has awarded the
>utham trophy for journalistic excellence to
iie Ubyssey.
Editor-in-ohief Danny Stoffman accepted the
vard Dec. 27, on the first day of CUP's thirtieth
itional conference, held this year at Simon
raser University.
The trophy is CUP's highest award, pre-
nted annually to the paper publishing more
an once a week, which attains the highest
urnalistic prowess.
One of the three judges for Southam was
Lerre Berton.
But next year he won't have to decide who
ill win it, and The Ubyssey won't compete for
CUP trophies have been abolished, follow-
g a motion by Stoffman.
Delegates agreed objective standards for
dging newspapers were unrealizable, and that
e competition was incompatible with CUP's
lrpose of encouraging cooperation among its
embers.
So a two-thirds majority of the 50 CUP
ipers voted to discontinue trophy competitions.
The Ubyssey will keep the Southam trophy.
Instead of making awards, qualified judges
ill receive subscriptions to the papers and
turn comprehensive critiques on the various
ipartments,  such as sports  and  photography.
Abolishing the competitions was  one move
a general overhaul of the CUP organization
id the principles guiding student newspapers.
Delegates also revised the CUP constitution's
— tawrenc* woodd photo
"IT REALLY ISNT a bum conference," says a CUP delegate
during informal seminar on newspaper supplements.
code of ethics. They redefined the principle of
objective newswriting, rejecting the expression "unbiased and accurate" reporting and replacing it with "fair and accurate."
The rewording, the delegates said, made the
ethics more realistic, for they agreed that a
complete lack of bias was both impossible and
undesirable.
Many delegates considered this move indicative of growing radicalism, particularly syndicalism, in the student press.
Originating in Quebec, syndicalism is a
movement to have society grant the student
full rights and obligations. It differs from activism by putting the issue on a national, not local,
level.
To some delegates, syndicalism is merely
the definitition of an existing trend toward
greater  student  participation  in   society.
"If anyone looks at himself, he will see that
he is basically a syndicalist," said Ubyssey
senior editor Pat Hrushowy. "I think that in
the coming year CUP will take a definite leaning toward syndicalism."
Elected into CUP executive for 1968-69 as
president was Kevin Peterson, editor of the
Gauntlet (University of Alberta, Calgary). Vice-
president in a newly created role to handle
accounting, is Allen Garr, columnist for the
Peak (Simon Fraser University). The new field
secretary is Bob Parkins, general manager of
the Varsity (University of Toronto). Selected
Bureau chief, to write wire copy and supervise
the OUP telex network, is Elly Alboim, business manager of the McGill Daily (McGill University, Montreal). Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  5,   196
Reassessed evaluation system
lowers Christmas exam rate
By STAN PERSKY
It's almost like a Christmas commercial on
cavities: Christmas exams in the faculty of arts
declined by 27 per cent this year.
In 1966 arts students (many of whom were
drenched in a driving rain while lined up outside the armory and fieldhouse) took 184 exams
at Christmas; in 1967 arts students (many of
whom wrote their exams wearing gloves in the
below-freezing unheated armory and fieldhouse)
took 135 formal tests, a reduction of 49.
Leading all departments in the move away
from testing was philosophy. They held exams
in seven courses last year; this Christmas they
eliminated them entirely.
"It indicates," said philosophy prof Robert Rowan,
"that nobody has been very
happy with exams."
Asian Studies cut back
from 16 exams a year to six
this year. Department head
William Holland said exams
were eliminated "particularly
in upper division courses
where one has a better means
for  judging  a  student's work PERSKY
than on the basis of a two hour exam. Several'
people preferred to rely on essays this year."
{Holland's department was praised by the student anti-calendar as particularly progressive.)
The faculty's largest department, English,
also reduced exams from 16 to six. (Exams
given included 179 sections of English 100 and
200, however.)
In interviewing faculty members to get their
comments on the significance of the disappearing exam, I spent more than two hours talking
with English department chairman, Geoffrey
Durrant, in a strange conversation that ranged
from the tiniest details of UBC life to the immensity of Vietnam.
NO COMMENT
Durrant had no comment for publication on
the exam question, but I suspect he prefers to
let the figures speak for themselves. I also got
the impression he felt an explicit Abolish
Christmas Exams movement would merely stiffen resistance to the change that seems to be
gradually taking place.
Other departments that either reduced or
have almost eliminated the Christmas exam are
W0i o r y, anthropology-sociology, geography,
psychology and theatre.
Exams in the various language departments,
however, either remained the same as 1966 or"
increased. The most significant increase occurred
in the French department, which gave 13 exams'
in 1966, 18 this Christmas. The increase largely
took place among third and fourth year students.
Prof. Katherine Brearley explained: "The
reason for the increase is that we're asked to
recommend students for the French government
and Woodrow Wilson scholarships, and it's difficult to make these recommendations without'
evaluations."
Later in our conversation, Prof. Brearley said:
"I'd be happy not to have exams altogether."
She suggested, that given improved teaching'
conditions, the teachers would be familiar
enough with their students' work that most
exams could be dispensed with and that lan-
\giuage courses would also be able to evaluate ;
students largely on the basis of compositional
work.
CLASS SIZE REDUCED
Although class size has been reduced in
French classes, the work load on professors
(either in number of classes or additional outside duties) is still heavy.
The issue, of course, is not simply the elimination of exams at Christmas. To see it merely
as that is to opt for a simplification that merely
distorts what's at the heart of the matter.
Rowan commented that the declining number of exams reflects a whole reassessment of
the role of grading. He predicted that there
would probably be fewer exams in April as
well.
COMPETITIVE SYSTEM QUESTIONED
Further than that are questions that examine
the very nature of the competitive" system as it
now exists.
There has been pressure on this issue both
from arts students and teachers within the
faculty. Students are not asking for elimination*
of exams so much as they are asking for op-'
tions: some students may want exams and some
may not.
Why, they ask, is it not possible to have a
variety of options that will meet the needs of
different kinds of students?
My own view is that articulate students are
saying that the whole competition-rat race style
has little to do with actual learning and that
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
LEAD SINGER of My Indole Ring socked it to 1,000 students
in Brock Thursday noon. Most listened, crosslegged on the
floor, in the dark as a deafening acid-folk-gobbeldygook-
rock beat was belted out.
Senate disappointed
From Page 1
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said the
signation of the student senaors was not realistic.
"They should keep their foot in the door and keep fight-
g," he said. "The senate won't pay any more attention to them
they resign."
Acting UBC president and chairman of the senate Walter
ige was not available for comment. Chairman of the board
governors, Nathan Nemetz had no comment.
Larsen said the senate is not living up to its potential and
ould involve itself with the board of governors over priorities
.d money matters.
Larsen also complained that the curriculum committee otf
lich he is a member hasn't met since the election of the stunt senators.
"It should be meeting twice as often as the senate body."
"CUS is supposed to represent the views of the students,
we are not acting in accordance with student wishes by sit-
lg on the senate," said Larsen.
The senate did not reject entirely the bid to end secrecy,
agreed to publish an agenda of meetings and a summary of
e business covered  at  each  meeting.
However, the student senators do not think this is enough.
Reaction to the student senators' decision was unfavorable
>m both the senate and students'  council.
"I am disappointed to hear they may resign," said UBC
gistrar J. E. A. Parnall, secretary to the senate. "They
ouldn't be upset if they don't achieve perfection in the first
ree months."
Library situation critical/
board to consider report
By PAUL KNOX
A report warning of critical difficulties faced
by UBC's library will be considered at a board
of governors meeting Tuesday.
The annual report by head librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs says funds must be obtained to
offset the depletion of a $3 million donation from
H. R. MacMillan.
"It will not be simply the future of the library that is in question. It will be the future of
the university," Stuart-Stubbs said.
Acting president Walter Gage said Thursday the board will study the report and other
documents that establish a definite need for
library expansion.
In the introduction to the report, Stuart-
Stubbs says that although there has been progress in the operation of the library, the portents of future difficulties were evident during
the last academic year.
The report covers the period from September, 1966 to
August,  1967.
In the last two years, the
library's spending has been in
the same range as the libraries
of Yale, Harvard, and the
Universities of California and
Toronto.
(Total library expenditure
for    1966-67    was    $3,212,590,
STUART-STUBBS
compared to $1,350,627 in 1964-65.)
However, UBC has only about 50 volumes
per student, compared with 79 per student at
U of T and 125 at Berkeley.
The report outlines a plan for needed additions to library buildings and construction of
new ones.
It includes new undergraduate, science, and
education libraries, and additions to the main
and Woodward libraries.
"The need for some of these buildings is
not a need of tomorrow, but of today and in
some instances, of yesterday," Stuart-Stubbs
said.
Also published is the result of a survey
taken among students by last year's student
library committee.
This showed that nearly half of UBC students are conscious of an inadequacy in the
library's book collection and think study space
should  be improved.
Among the library's achievements, Stuart-
Stubbs lists the acquisition of book-seller Norman Colbeck's 50,000-volume 19th century literature collection, and the fact that the library's
collection has increased in size by one third
in the past two years.
The library also joined the Washington-
based Association of Research Libraries and the
Intercommunications Council.
When asked for comment Thursday, dean
of arts Dennis Healy said UBC arts undergraduates, like most in Canada, work under conditions that leave much to be desired.
"Each arts student last year charged out
fewer than one title a month," he said. "This
is an alarming state of affairs."
Healy referred to a report prepared for the
faculty of arts by Ture Erickson, head librarian of Sedgewick library.
Based on the standards of the American
Library Association, this report says Sedgewick
lacks 63,000 volumes and has one-third of the
seating capacity  it  should  have.
The report concludes: ". . . This university
needs a library designed and built for undergraduates . . . Each day's delay in building
that library is  costing this university dearly."
Healy also made public comments prepared
at this request by departments and schools in
the faculty of arts. Here they are:
Dr. M. A. Ormsby, head of the history de-
parment, said the library possessed a good collection of basic history works, but needed attention at the third and fourth year level, and
massive   improvement at  the  graudate  level.
Head of Slavonic Studios, Dr. Michael Fut-
rell, said a major capital program must be
initiated in the library.
"We are hampered, delayed, frustrated and
exasperated by h^ overcrowding of space . . .
and by the inefficiency of the library's faciliics
(despite brave efforts by staff members)," Fut-
roll said.
Head of the French department, Dr. L. L.
Bongie said the inadequate library situation
often determines whether or not a graduate student will  decide to study  at UBC.
"Most prospective recruits ask to see the
library stacks even before they make inquiries
concerning their future colleagues,"  he said.
Head of fine arts, B. C. Binning said the
Library Research Fund grant given to the fine
arts library this year was $3,500, but should
have been $25,000.
"The price of out-of-print basic books in fine
arts is very high," he said. "Major catalogues
are often priced at about $1,000."
Dean of Science, Dr. V. J. Okulitch said
Thursday that he had not had time to read
the report and could not comment on it.
Social scientist
dominates confab
The social scientist will dominate the scene
at Rosario Beach Jan.  12-14.
Theme of the fifth annual science symposium
will be "the social responsibility of science and
technology".
Keynote speaker will be Dr. Robert Rowan
of the UBC philosophy department.
Dr. Theodore Rosebury, professor emeritus;
of bacteriology at Washington University. St.
Louis, will speak on chemical and biological warfare.
The senior editor of Ramparts, Gene Marine,
author of two articles called "America the
Raped", will speak on engineering and ecology.
Interested students should register before Jan.
10 in the Academics Activities office or in the
Alma Mater Society office.
Buses leave UBC for the symposium Jan. 12 at
5:30 p.m.
$< ^.(hALED/CTION! THE WORLD IS „.
J ^"(THE WAR GETS N0(JHER£, AND THE
I r_l&L0m ARE NOT CONVERTED! "
i: 5
 ^1 MEANWHILE... IN >S!'4.!'.*'S,
M UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press Trophy for general excellence. Co-winner
Bracken Trophy for editorial writing.
JANUARY 5, 1968
Praise (blush)
The Ubyssey hardly ever praises anybody and
rarely gets praised itself. But every time this year we
make both things happen by praising The Ubyssey,
thereby getting praised ourselves.
The occasion, of course, is our annual victory in
the competition for Canadian University Press's
Southam Trophy, awarded for general excellence in
campus papers published more than once a week.
Last month we won the trophy for the seventh straight
year. Then we led a fight at the CUP conference to
abolish the competitions for all nine CUP trophies.
We succeeded because most of CUP's 50 papers
agreed that competition among newspapers for trophies
was as foolish as competitions among university students
for marks. Ranking newspapers, like ranking students,
accomplishes nothing.
But trophy or no trophy, we deserve our annual
self-adulation and we're going to get it. Devour, ladies
and gentlemen, the names below. These are the people
who three times a week write, edit, photograph, layout,
draw, and proofread Canada's greatest university paper.
It takes them from five to fifty hours a week, an
example of devotion which wins them the ultimate
recognition: their names in 10-point type. Read on:
EDITORS
Stuart Gray
Susan Gransby
Murray McMillan
Kurt Hilger
Al Birnie
Kirsten Emmott
Pat Hrushowy
Mike Jessen
Charlotte Haire
Judy Bing
Boni Lee
Norman Gidney
Stephen, Scobie
WRITERS
Steve Jackson
Mike Finlay
Irene Wasilewski
Paul Knox
Mark DeCoursey
Judy Young
Jade Eden
Fred Cawsey
Hew   Gwynne
Alexandra Volkoff
Jane Kennon
Glenn Bullard
Patrick Dean
Luanne Armstrong
Richard Baer
Brock McLellan
Fran McGrath
B,o   Hansen
Pamela Mutch
Mike Fitzgerald
John Twigg
Jim Maddin
Pio Uran
Andrew Horvat
Scott Lawrance
Roy Starrs
Arnold Saba
Gordon Fidler
Al Wiggan
Chris Blake
Bob Brown
George Hollo
Dennis Gans
Jack Hill
Jimmy Pollock
Earl Lowry
Tom Cumming
Norm Holden
Doug Milne
Wayne McDonald
Eric Nielsen
John Mate
Irving Fetish
Wendy Carter
Scott McRae
Leslie   Plommer
Pat Ford
Nigel Thursfield
Denis Newman
Ted Syperek
Ann Arky
Terry Corriveau
Nick Rundell
Jerry Apfelbaum
Marianne Beichel
Jim Luckey
Brock Alexander
Stan Persky
Gabor Mate
Mike Lopatecki
SPORTS
Bob Banno
Bjorn Simonsen
Brian Rattray
Jo-Ann Canning
PAGE FRIDAY
Bert Hill
Keith Fraser
Alan Bell
ARTISTS
Rae Moster
Charles Crockford
PHOTO
Lawrence Woodd
Powell Hargrave
Bill Loiselle
PRINTERS
Ted Brown
George Tayler
Duane Ball
Bob Hankin
John Roberts
Colin Milne
Stan Waring
Wayne Bystedt
g4flB4*»
OH
A great new year, brought to you by the makers of 1967, 1966, 1965, etc.
GUERRILLA  GOVERNMENT
UBC is bliss in 1987
By STAN PERSKY
As the first toke spreads
through your central nervous
system join me on a science-
affliction trip to UBC, circa
1987.
* *   *
The student housing controversy-crisis continues to rage
today on several fronts. Several
conflicting reports arriving simultaneously at Ubyssey Central
temporarily short circuited the
mind of the news computer.
The sensitive electronic brain
that writes and publishes the
student newspaper was revived
after editor Manny Schloffman
donated his own well-chewed
stogie into the machine's oral
aggression hole.
* •   •
A field report from correspondent Nawman Kidney was
decoded as follows: "The delicate tones of the nightingale
were replaced at dawn by the
lazy zzz of green hummingbirds as the sun rose on Spanish Banks Woods this morning
where 8,000 arts leafies are
now domiciled in their living-
love-community-protest-against-
inhuman-housing.
SEXUAL SIGHS
"Your reporter interviewed
arts prez Flowerstem Burpsky
Jr. amid the twitter of birds,
the rustle of pine needles, the
last sexual sighs of sleeping
bags, and the flitting figures of
the long-haired nude leafies as
they emerged from their simple
huts of reinforced cobwebs to
perform their ritual morning
greeting of genital caress. Burpsky Jr. (the son, by artificial
insemination, of a former bisexual UBC arts prez of the late
60s, who subsequently died
shortly after the successful revolution in Bolivia in 1971) was
engaged in rapt contemplation
of a psilocibin ferm during
most of the interview.
"Burpsky Jr. said: 'The move
to the woods seems to be work-
nig. True, the 8,000 of us are
only a beautiful visual minority
among UBC's 53,000 students,
but we are an example of how
it is possible to live.'
"Burpsky Jr. then entered
his hummingbird-nest bathtub
which his exec-henchmen
Blushing Gracious, Jr. filled
with warm water and two kilos
of plop (a sporedelic drug) before joining the arts leaders in
his honey-scented broth.
ANIMALS
"Flying over the woods in a
helicopter on the way to his
6 a.m. Murder-Economics class,
commerce prez Pfeiffer Horfen-
dorsh was heard to mutter
tenderly, 'Fithy animals.'
"After being initiated by
arts veep Barley Brothberg Jr.
and his harem into the multi-
sex erotic habits of the leafies,
your reporter crawled on his
belly into the adjacent Chairman Mao Memorial Forest
where among the wounded
birch trees, radical violence
leader Greybeard Fate led his
guerilla army on yet another
assault against the SUB pentagon. Fate said, 'Violent resistance is the only correct Marxist
solution to the housing crisis.
We must capture SUB and execute the lackey pigs, AMS prez
Shimsham and his mouthpiece,
Drone Mutton.' Fate went on
to state that student government kill-ratios of guerillas
were vastly inflated."
On another front, AMS veep
Drone Mutton announced, "We
are making progress in the
housing situation." Mutton
drank a morning cup of styro-
caf and looked out the window
of his exec penthouse atop the
453-story student residence. As
the fog-pollution lifted from the
campus he could see the 40,000
students arriving in the helicopter flotilla, which appeared
like a thick-massed swarm of
hornets.
HUMBLE REQUEST
Mutton admitted, "This new
student rez isn't all we hoped
for, but the board of governors
letter rejecting our humble request for variety in student
housing was very polite. I think
we've won the fight for their
respect. Excuse me, I have to
prepare a brief."
The 453-story crackerbox-
scraper is built entirely of sty-
rofoam. Each of its 9,000 cells
are pleasantly identical. All of
the matching furnishings —
tables, chairs, toilets, blankets,
and toothbrushes are also made
of styrofoam. Dow Chemical,
which built the residence last
week, said that the use of a
single material for everything
in the building made it possible
to kep the monthly per-cell
rental down to $300.
This morning engineering
prez (Lynndon B. Scraggs said,
"The only way to get better
housing is to show the public
we're responsible students and
the only way to do that is to
get rid of those irresponsible
leafies in Spanish Banks
Woods. We can do that with
this jiffy-nuclear-splatter gadget that we mindlessly developed in our chem. eng. lab last
week."
BAREASS
Forestry undergrad prez
Smokey Bareass offered to
clear the Spanish Banks forest
for L.B.S. with a new laser-
saw so that the leafies would
be a better target.
Aggie undergrad prez, Blue-
jeans Zap-wap was unavailable
for comment. Zap^wap, nursing
an amputated torso at West-
brook Hospital, was injured in
last week's Engineering Artillery Stunt which demolished
the Forestry-Aggie complex in
six salvos. The engineers have
been assessed $1.29 damage
charges by an irate student
council.
Acting UBC President Bertha
Bland announced from Tahiti
where she is vacationing with
the entire administration staff
(18,433 strong), "I am pleased
to see that our students are
concerned students." Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January  5,   196!
UNIVERSAL ACCESSIBILITY
Union  rejects tuition
By DAPHNE KELGARD
CUS Associate Secretary
Students in Canada first began to talk seriously about universal accessibility to post-
secondary education after the completion of the
Canada students means survey.
The survey emphasized that only a chosen
few who happened to have affluent parents
were getting a university education.
In 1965 Canadian Union of Students congress decided this situation must be drastically
altered in order to provide access to post-
secondary education for all individuals, regardless of their socio-economic background. The
program of universal accessibility has been re-
emphasized and expanded.
What can be done to achieve the goal of
equal opportunity?
There are many barriers to higher education:
financial, social and psychological, in particular.
Each of these areas requires specific programs
as well as co-ordination and inter-relation between them in order to retain a sense of cohesion.
The social-psychological barriers are the most
crucial areas. Many young people are prohibited
from participating in post-secondary education
from the time they enter kindergarten. The
school system in Canada is geared to fhe middle
class child.
The presentation, methods of evaluating,
cultural implications and language used are all
derived from the middle class ethic.
The emphasis is on producing good 'products'
to fit into the economic system. Those who do
not fit are rejected. Very seldom is any attempt
made to relate the curricula to the child's experiences, particularly if they differ from
the 'norm'. This obviously presents a serious
barrier to learning, and, more importantly, to
creating a sense of excitement and discovery
in the child.
The socio-economic background can also present other serious drawbacks.
If the school is anti-education (in the true
sense of the word) then the home must provide
the necessary environment for discovery and
creativity. If the home cannot provide this
atmosphere, the child is doubly handicapped.
Minority groups suffer even more. Children
of the minority groups experience not only
physical and social handicaps to learning but
also tremendous psychological and cultural
violence. No allowance is made in the schools
for the teaching of particular cultural heritage
or tradition. Rather these things are destroyed
by the system. An outrageous example is the
way in which all children in Canada are taught
Canadian history.
The image of the Indian created by the textbooks has contributed significantly to the present intolerance and ignorance. The dichotomy
between the 'official line' and the traditions of
the minority create untold psychological damage to the child who is forced to accept one
version or the other.
If an individual does manage to overcome
the psychological and social barriers outlined
above he is still faced with significant financial
barriers such as tuition, books and living costs.
The present student aid plans are grossly
inadequate and can often act as a deterrent
rather than an enticement. For many, the idea
of borrowing upwards of $4,000 before graduation is a frightening prospect.
For those who borrow, repayment can be
a real hardship, particularly if they marry other
students with loans. To start a career already
several thousand dollars in debt is not an enticing prospect.
CUS is working for a program of tuitionless
education with stipends or living allowances
included. This is based on the belief that education is a right, not a privilege.
Students are contributing to society in a very
meaningful way toy pursuing post-secondary
education.
TRIPPING?
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From Youth Hostels to luxury hotels—in Great Britain or
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And American Express Travel Cheques — and all their
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Mm iday,   January   5,   1
968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO THE EDITOR
Praise
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I'm charmed to note from
he Toronto Globe & Mail
Dec. 9) that The Ubyssey is
still being infiltrated by hip-
jies, Commies and other pin-
cos, and is still offending
:ngineers, law students, ad-
ninistrators, Baptists, right-
ious off-campus editors and
>eople from the Chess Club
vho can't get their meeting
lotices in 'Tween Classes.
Congratulations. It means
rou're still the best college
tewspaper in the country,
'lease put me on the mailing
ist, as I've already missed
lalf a year of obscenity, taste-
essness, Maoism and good
ournalism.
ALEXANDER ROSS
managing editor, Maclean's
Ed note: Ross was editor-in-
hief of The Ubyssey in 1956-7.
yiore praise
Milor, The Ubyssey:
Heartiest congratulations on
ringing home the Southam
Yophy for an unprecedented
eventh straight year. You and
our staff can be justly proud
f this recognition of your
iany hours of hard work.
SHAUN SULLIVAN
president, AMS.
.ess  praise
Idilor, The Ubyssey:
May I correct a point in
our editorial, "Ashtrays"?,
>Jov. 17). You seem to have
een led to believe that I left
IcGill very much at odds with
:. This was not so.
In fact I left McGill for pri-
ate reasons that required me
to live in England, at least for
a few years. I was very happy
and quite unfrustrated at McGill, and received nothing but
kindness and support from
staff and students alike in
things I tried to do. I thought
it then, and still think it, a
stimulating and attractive
place, well deserving its world
reputation. Its atmosphere was
anything but  stultifying.
My resignation was presented to the principal, then Dr. F.
Cyril James, before the identity of his successor was known.
I served under Rocke Robertson for only seven months, and
became quickly attached to
him, and grateful for his ready
support. You say of me that
"he received no help from
Robertson". In fact, in the
seven months of our overlap,
he accepted every recommendation I made, and often
went further than I had expected. Nothing could have exceeded his kindness.
F.  KENNETH  HARE
London, Eng.
Two  choices
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to address myself to
Canadian nationalists. I mean,
of course, the English-speaking variety and particularly,
the type who will always mutter, "I don't want to" when
asked why he is not an American. To this type, I say consider the effects which such a
negative attitude has had and
is having.
I suggest such an attitude
has been a dominant factor in
the creation and maintenance
of the paradise of capitalism,
better known as Canada. Before denouncing me, stop and
Watch The
Ubyssey for more
news about
JON BRAWN
This explosive
speaker wiH be
on Campus January
17 and 18 — Speaking
on "Sex, Love and
Marriage!"
consider this question. Where
else has socialism for the rich
and free enterprise for the
poor been practised to such an
extent? Even the United States
has tried to adhere to its free
enterprise philosophy more
rigorously.
I suggest that there are but
two options open to you. The
first one is socialism. It would
set free creative energies so
long repressed and incidentally be a positive answer to
Americanism. The second
choice is to join the United
States. Of the many benefits
which such a union would confer, the most important would
be the loosening of capitalism's
grip in such a pluralistic society and the gain of a collective sense of purpose. In any
case, I ask you to reconsider
your position.
F. J. FRIGON
grad studies 3.
Tough   Tony
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Stan Persky pointed out a
need for Mafia classes (Ubyssey, Dec. 1). Mafia is a multi
million dollar business and
needs college-trained recruits.
They own cab companies,
hotels, bakeries, factories, and
sell dope, prostitutes, fear,
hate and bigotry. Millions are
made on abortions. Extortion
is lucrative. Bookkeepers are
needed. Mafia always pays
taxes, keeps most of its money
in the area.
In Hungary there is no
Mafia. It might not necessarily
hold that where the Catholics
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are in an area, you will find
Mafia, but you can be assured
that the Mafia will be strongest in an area controlled by
the Catholics. Catholics and
Mafia are very similar in the
way they make money. Catholics first of all sell fear, hate
and bigotry, make abortion
laws for the Mafia to break as
they do for prostitution. Catholics' biggest weapon is extortion: "Give all your money or
go to hell."
The Mafia  should lobby, as
do  the  Catholics,  for  tax  ex
emption.   Catholics   save   millions by not paying taxes.
I've been a practising Catholic 27 years, and worked with
the syndicate as a gigolo and
have found the Mafia to be a
better bet than the Catholics.
Unlike Mafia, Catholics pay no
taxes and send all the money
out of the area to the Vatican.
Mafia came to Vancouver and
the police hired a hundred
extra cops. Mafia is good for
employment.
TOUGH TONY
Vancouver
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Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Committee Appointments
'Vive  le Quebec  Libre!'  (?)
Interested in going to Montreal for a seminar on
Quebec Affairs, January 17-20? Or would you rather
travel to Winnipeg for a conference on International
Affairs, January 23-27? Those interested are asked to
contact Penny Cairns, AMS Secretary. Box 54, Brock.
Enjoy a candlelight dinner
at the
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Royal :riday,   January   5,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
CHECK MATE
The  first  of  a   regular  feature   on   the  world   of   international   chess
By DR. NATHAN DIVINSKY
(Divinsky, UBC professor of mathematics, was
nvited to write a chess column for The Ubyssey in
November after he told his class the paper was "no
food" because it didn't have a chess or bridge column.
Here is his first.)
Though sex is perhaps one of the few games
ilder than chess, it is not nearly as well organized.
Chess has a world federation, called FIDE (Fed-
jration International des Echecs), founded forty
rears ago, and this federation organizes regular
natches for the chess championship of the world.
Canada sent representatives to the preliminaries
six times and though we do re-
pectably well, considering our
>opulation and our relatively
roung centenary age, we do not
lave players to seriously threaten
he world throne of chess.
Last November, Duncan Sut-
les of UBC represented Canada
n the seventh interzonal touran-
nent held in Sousse, Tunisia. He
[id remarkably well.
In fact he  scored  the  highest LARSEN
>ercentage of any previous Canadian representative
n these world competitions.
Suttles, a graduate student in mathematics,
cored six wins, seven draws and eight losses for a
;otal of 9V£ points out of a maximum of 21. He
jlaced fifteenth out of the 22 competitors and earned the title of International Chessmaster.
Many players are full-time chess professionals.
This made it very difficult for the talented player
who does not devote himself full time to the game.
The four Russian representatives included the
chess champion of Russia, Leonid Stein.
Stein is a chain smoking genius who seems to
be a bundle of nerves but in reality is a superb
tactician and plays with incredible coolness under
pressure. I am certain his white corpuscles are
shaped like pink chess pieces.
The three U.S. representatives included U.S.
champion Bobby Fischer, the famous child prodigy,
now a more mature 24.
Fischer withdrew halfway through the tournament — some reports claim he was kicked out —
because of conflict with the tournament committee.
He is rather temperamental and complained
about noisy crowds, bad lighting, playing schedules
and lack of attention — something like UBC undergraduates during exams . . .
It is a great shame (Fischer's withdrawal, not
exams) because Fischer had a good chance of wresting the world title from Tigran Petrosian, the pre-
ent world champioa. During the first half Fischer
did win a sensational game against USSR champ
Stein.
However Fischer will have another chance in
three years time when the eighth interzonal is held.
South America was represented by 15-year-old
Henrique Mecking, the new Brazilian boy wonder.
At first the players felt he was over ambitious
White now castled and found himself mated.
How could this happen?
White to move and mate in one.
to attempt a try at so young an age and perhaps
they thought he was just another Brazil nut, but he
proved himself by scoring 11 points and finishing
eleventh.
The top six finishers from this interzonal now
.^^^^—^ enter a series of matches with two
'■■■dl^^^^Bmk,      seeded players: Boris Spassky and
Michael Tal, both of Russia.
The winner has the pleasure
of playing a gruelling 24 game
match versus Russia's great Tigran
Petrosian, chess champion of the
world.
The six finishers were: Bent
Larsen of Denmark, the greatest
Dane since Hamlet — he scored
PETROSIAN 15V6 points and incidentally lost
a very exciting game to our own master Suttles;
Ewfim Geller and Victor Korchnoi both of Russia
(14 points each); Svetozar Gilgoric of Yugoslavia
(also 14 points); Hungarian champ Lajos Portisch
(13%); and a playoff is to be held (probably in Los
Angeles in February) between U.S. veteran Sam
Reshevsky, Vlastimil Hort of Czechoslovakia and
Russian champ Stein, because they tied for sixth
with 13 points each.
See you all in L.A. in February . . .
P.S.   Here   are  two   post   New  Year  problems,
solutions to appear in my column next week.
Buildings ugly
From Page 3
student conditions would be improved if that
system were de-emphasized.
I asked each of the people I talked to about
exam conditions in the armory and fieldhouse.
Not only are the buildings ugly, the lighting
bad, the absence of washrooms (presumably invigilators have to walk with students from the
fieldhouse to the nearest John), and the notion
of being herded with 500 other people into an
unfamiliar place discomforting, but this year
temperatures ranlged from 40 degrees down to
25 degrees.
Neither of these buildings are heated. Consequently, the weather inside was not much different from the temperature outside. I asked
each of these faculty leaders if this was a reasonable condition in which to take a test.
Each person said: "Deplorable."
What disappointed me was that no faculty
person said: "I didn't know that. That's intolerable. I'll make sure this never happens
again. I won't permit my students to take exams
under such conditions."
Everyone evinced concern, but no one seemed to be angry about it. The best I could get
was the promise "to look into it."
nM-Bt^T Armouries yl 83o|b I
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AHTAUUUT$3.co0pi£TAT±TA? ha^d times
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE AMS OFFICE Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  5,   1961
VOICE OF ARTS ONE
Arts I assignments blow Elviras mind
— lawrence woodd photo
TITTERING life guard tries to get across to
drunken swimmers at SFU during the Canadian University Press conference over the
Christmas  holidays.
By AL VAN MEER
Elvira Schwarz had been at university three
weeks when she got her first Arts I assignment.
"Do a paper on something, if you like," it said.
She tucked it into one of her new jackboots, and let
it gnaw at her for a week. At the end of that time,
realizing she had only three weeks left to finish it,
she began to panic.
"Let's see, 250 words, and if I do 10 a day . . . ",
and then her boggling mind would careen off to find
refuge in rosier thoughts.
By the second week she had become a different
person. She had stopped eating.
"But Elvira," her mother would say, "just have
something. I made cabbage surprise, it was in the
Family Circle ..."
"I'm not hungry, mother," she would snap, and
bolt off to contemplate her task. Her quota schedule
had increased to 25 words a day and still she hadn't
done anything.
At last, desperate, she decided to ask Myrna for
advice. She didn't know Myrna very well, but she
admired her for her imported jackboots, and her
knack of bringing every discussion around to Sweden-
bong.
Myrna explained the assignment to her.
"It's to develop your own individual interest
and potential. Didn't you read the brochure? I mean
just do your thing, find your bag. Take me . . . I'm
doing the Seventeenth century and Sw ..."
Elvira   thanked her,   perhaps   a   little   too   pro
fusely. Myrna certainly was a warm person. Anc
those vicious stories about her selling herself in arts
free store had to be someone's sadistic fabrications.
So Elvira did her thing. At first she tried to do
something on the topic being studied — King Lear.
But the only part she could relate with was the storm
scene.
She began delving into meteorological journals,
disappearing into the stacks for days on end. More
weeks went by. The paper was overdue, but deadlines were passe in the New System. It was the
involvement that counted, and she was on to something. She started making weather balloons. By
Christmas she had 40 words of the rough draft finished, and undaunted, she pushed on after the ever
elusive Experience.
With her potential chaffing inside her, she rigged
up a basket to one of her weather balloons. Hei
seminar group had completely forgotten her as one
blustry January morning, she launched herself from
C lot.
She had found her bag. In the frenzy of finishing off the paper, she was unaware of the low flying
pelican buzzing her frail craft.
They bore her back shrouded in the remains oi
her balloon and buried her under the Blue Room
with appropriate ceremony.
The insurance company classified her death as
an act of God, to which her fellow students could
only add a hearty, algnostic Amen.
r
"\
MOLSON EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
Molson's Western Breweries Limited offers
challenging employment opportunities to university
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Openings exist for B.Sc. graduates in Chemistry,
and for third year Commerce undergraduates
preparing for careers on graduation.
Molson's Western Breweries Limited shares
in the national Molson tradition . . . almost two
centuries of active involvement in the
economic and social growth of Canada.
CAMPUS INTERVIEW DATES: January 8th and 9th
For further information, contact the Canada
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or write to Personnel Department, Molson's
Western Breweries Limited, 218 - 11th Avenue S.W.,
Calgary, Alberta.
MOLSON'S c0^m^mvmi^K^/
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THE     U BYSSEY
Page 9
AT  THE FLICKS
Film sludge  68
gets cheers, boos
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Alas ! for the fate of a film critic whose newspaper goes on
holiday. Here I was, crouching by my chimney-corner munching
psychedelic turkey, and longing to expatiate on the neurotic
monotony of Loving Couples or the metaphysical symbolism of
Point Blank, and the only thing my paper could do was go away
and win some crummy old award.
(Statistically, that was the 483rd mention so far in this issue
of The Ubyssey winning the aforesaid c.o.a.)
Christmas brought with it a sludge of new films downtown,
but remarkably little solid sustenance. (Valley of the Dolls ? Ye
gods and little fishes ! ! !)
Far From The Madding Crowd turned out to be exactly what
it was expected to be: a faithful, literate, and intelligent adaptation, with Julie Christie looking luscious, Terence Stamp just
winning the male acting honors, and the countryside upstaging
everybody. Lots of sheep, unrequited love, and How To "Win Her
Heart With A Wilkinson's Sword Edge Blade.
At the Varsity, Peter Watkins, director of
The War Game, is again on view in Privilege,
in which he takes a swipe at just about everything. The movie has several million things
wrong with it, but somehow it still ends up
OK. The basic flaw is, that, having found a good
idea in the first place, Watkins and his scriptwriters fail to populate it with fully realized
characters.
Too  often  he  falls back  on  elements  of
melodramatic cliche or facile satire.
For instance, the idea surely demands that the forces manipulating the hero, Shorter, should be felt as sinister, or at least
should be taken seriously. The satire merely makes them ridiculous, and laughs them off the screen.
I seem to be about the only person I know (apart from my
devoted wife) who really likes Chappaqua. At first sight, it may
appear to be a formless flow of brilliant but unrelated images;
but if you pay attention, the connections are there, and logical.
The portrait of the inside of addiction (distortedly filtered
through the outside of its cure) is a remarkably well-balanced
view of the pros and cons of drug experiences. (Although the
indiscriminate lumping together of all forms of addiction and of
all levels of drugs could confuse people trying to distinguish
between "hard" and "soft", or whatever dichotomy you prefer.)
The photography by Robert Frank (co-director of Pull My
Daisy, that lovely film in which Jack Kerouac goes lyrical about
cockroaches) is stunning, and alone makes the film worth seeing.
I found Chappaqua by far the most interesting of recent American
underground films that I've seen; and I congratulate Syd Freed-
man on showing it at the Studio, despite some of his advertising.
Finally, a friend of mine who is that rara avis, a Disney
aficionado, informs me that The Jungle Book is disappointing, but
Charlie the Lonesome Cougar is a dab hand at log-rolling.
Alberta Association  non-activist
By ARTHUR JOEVENAZZO
Special to Canadian University Press
The Alberta Association of Students is an
organization of Alberta's universities, junior colleges, technical institutes, and most other post-
secondary schools in the province.
Its chief aim is to lobby the provincial government for its member institutions and unite them
to promote cultural activities.
The organization was brought into being as a
reaction to the liberal Canadian Union of Students and was designed to be a conservative and
non-activist union.
Owen Anderson, the past president of the
AAS and Paul Djartasen, the past vice-president,
are both well known and influential members of
the Social Credit party. Helped by this connection, the AAS succeeded in obtaining a $2,000
grant from the Alberta government.
This is essentially the same arrangement the
CIA had with the National Students Association
in the U.S. By taking government grants on a
year to year basis, the AAS is subjecting itself
to the financial control of the Alberta govern^
ment.
If the attitude of the recent AAS conference
is any indication of the organization's direction
it has no fears of losing government support.
The conference turned down overwhelmingly
a resolution calling for student involvement in
academic government.
Delegates felt the resolution was too strongly
worded and might offend university administrations.
Lett scholarship
Nominations are now being accepted for the
$1,500 Sherwood Lett Memorial Scholarship.
The annual award will be given to any
graduate student nominated by a faculty or
student organization.
Interested students should possess "scholastic,
literary and leadership qualities, physical vigor
and moral force of character," according to the
UBC calendar.
Full details are available from the Dean of
Student Affairs.
Last date for applications is Feb. 28.
SCOBIE
&
-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE PHYSICISTS"
xs
(An Intellectual Thriller)
by Friedrich Durrenmatt
with
Tom Wheatley
Barney O'Sullivan
Dorothy Davies
Joseph Gotland
^
ws
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
JANUARY 12 - 20, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available  for  all  performances)
-    SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES    -
Monday, January  15th-7:30  p.m.
Thursday, January 18th ~~ 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 — or 228-2678
One of the few contemporary German plays to win international acclaim
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
I        FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
3?
■m.W»UT.1
RENTAL & SALES
* 2400   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
* Full Dress (Tails)
* Morning Coats
* Directors' Coats
* White and Coloured Coats
* Shirts and Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE   COSTUMES
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
4393 W. 10th Ave.
COMPUTER ANALYSTS
required  by
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION
Calgary, Alberta
INTERVIEWS FOR REGULAR EMPLOYMENT
January 19, 1968
with
POSTGRADUATES & GRADUATES
in
Engineering, Science, Mathematics or Business - Computer Science courses
or relevant experience a  definite  asset.
The installation: IBM 360-30 - CDC. 3200 - access to 360-75 via on-line teleprocessing - disks — tapes — on-line graphic displays — multiprocessing - staffed
by computer professionals.
For  Company  and   position   information contact your Placement Office. Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January  5,   1968
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
The new ...
. . . togetherness
THE WAYFARER
Ministers Form Inter-Church  Team
counseled with leading clergymen. He just returned from a
trip to Eastern Europe where
he ministered to both clergy
and laymen.
UNITING  SPIRIT  INVITED  FOR WEEK
Four are one
An inter-church team will discuss the Charismatic Renewal, and especially the recent breakthrough among Catholics
at Notre Dame (Indiana), Michigan State and Duquesne universities in a special noon hour lecture series in Bu. 202 Monday
through Friday, January 8-12. Speaking at various days are
Kevin Ranaghan who is a lecturer and Ph.D. candidate at
St. Mary's Catholic University in Indiana; Edward Gregory,
Methodist; Mel Boring, Princeton graduate; and Dr. George
Pattison, formerly dean of the Anglican Cathedral in Prince
Rupert.
The Inter-Church team ministries group believes that
today a spiritual awakening, perhaps as significant as the
Lutheran Reformation or the Wesleyan Revival is taking place
among Anglican, Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant
denominations.
In addition to the noon hour lecture series the inter-church
team will be involved in a clergy and laymen's teaching seminar Tuesday through Thursday at the Peretz Auditorium. Over
1000 invitations to a banquet for clergy have been mailed to
rabbis and clergymen in the Fraser Valley and Greater Vancouver area. The address at the 6:30 dinner meeting will be
given by Kevin Ranaghan and George Pattison.
The California based inter-church team is sponsored on
campus by the Associated Full Gospel Students, and in the
Peretz auditorium by a local ad hoc inter-church committee of
which the Rev. Robert Birch is chairman.
Sunday, the 7th, Kevin Ranaghan will participate in the
11:00 a.m. service at St. Anselm's on the University Boulevard.
In the evening he will be with students at St. Mark's College.
Another of the team's services in the campus community will
be at University Hill United, Sunday, 11:00 a.m., the 14th.
The speaker will be the Rev. Edward Gregory.
Ed Gregory returns
ED GREGORY, who will
speak on Thursday noon, is
becoming well known in Full
Gospel Circles at U.B.C. He
was with the group during
their Remembrance day weekend retreat last fall, and last
March was at U.B.C, for a
series on the Charismatic Renewal. The response to those
meetings led to the upcoming
series.
Gregory is a graduate of
Indiana University and Fuller
Seminary. He worked on the
staff of several Billy Graham
Crusades and as Associate
Staff for Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. An editor of
Campus Fellowship, he currently ministers to university
and seminary students across
Canada and the U.S.A.
Mel Boring
REV. BORING, a graduate
of Sterling College, and
Princeton Theological Seminary was until recently, assistant director of a campus
ministry at the University of
California at Berkeley. A contributing editor for Acts Mag
azine, he also works with
Campus Revolution, the campus arm of Inter-Church Team
Ministries.
RAY BRINGHAM is a graduate of Anderson College and
Phillips University. He served
on his denomination's executive council and has given
leadership to retreats and
prayer conferences. Now
working with all denominations, he participates in many
ministers' seminars.
Until recently, Dr. PATTISON was rector of St. Andrew's Cathedral, Prince Rupert, and Dean of the Diocese
of Caledonia. He toured Canada, USA, and Great Britain
ministering to some of the
largest congregations and conventions. On his trip to Great
Britain in 1965 he ministered
in   Anglican   Churches   and
Dr. G. Pattison
We look back a year
Last fall two Catholic Laymen, both members of the faculty of Duquesne University in
Pittsburgh were drawn together in a period
of deep prayer and discussion about the
vitality of their faith-life. The two felt that
something   was   lacking   in   their   individual
Christian lives.
Somehow there
was a certain
emptiness, a
lack of dynamism, a sapping
of strength in
their lives of
prayer and action. It was as if
in their lives as
Christians, too
much was their
own creation.
Having learned
of an inter-faith
prayer group,
where Christians often laid
hands on one
Ranaghan, A. B. another while
praying in con-
Kevin
(Dunwoodie) M.A. (Notre
Dame) teaches at St. Mary's %£^ for an
College, and is currently com- outp0uring of
pleting a Ph.D. in theology at the gifts of the
Notre Dame. He has given Holy M they
leadership to the movement began attending
for renewal through the Holy ^ meetings of
Spirit at Roman Cathohc m
Notre Dame University.
     Within a few
together with the faculty members from
Duquesne, decided to spend a weekend in
prayer, meditating over the first four chapters
of the Acts of the Apostles and seeking the
will of God. On the whole, the students knew
little, if anything, of the "baptism of the Holy
Spirit".
All day Saturday the group had met for
prayer and study. Saturday evening had been
set aside for relaxation.
One couple, engaged to be married, had
heard about the "baptism of the Holy Spirit"
and they desired it. Quietly they slipped upstairs, away from the crowd, and there, in
prayer, they were deeply touched by the
Spirit of Christ. After some time they decided
to return to the group below but not to tell
what had happened to them.
Simultaneously one of the girls, a
Duquesne co-ed, had felt drawn to the chapel,
and there had felt the almost tangible presence of the Spirit of Christ. In awe she left
the chapel and quickly urged others in the
building to join her there. By ones and two
the small group made their way to the chapel.
And as they were gathered together there in
prayer, the Holy Spirit poured Himself out
upon them.
Throughout the remainder of the spring
semester at Duquesne, the gifts of the Holy
Spirit continued to be poured out in this community of faith and to spread the joy of
Christ's love to many Catholics in the university area.
Ed  Gregory
weeks, the lives of these Catholics became
tremendously deepened in Christ. Jesus became real to them and they were at ease in
approaching Him as Lord and as Brother.
Along with this marvelous interior transformation, they received many of the gifts of the
Holy Spirit. These gifts as detailed in I Corinthians 12, once thought to belong only to
the Church of old, were being received by
members of the twentieth century American
Catholic Church.
In mid-February a small group of students,
Advertisement
WE ALSO LOOK
FORWARD ... SO WE
WISH YOU A
BLEST NEW YEAR
Advertisement
LONG TOPICS FOR SHORT WEEK
MONDAY: Kevin Ranaghan (R.C.) "The Outpouring of
the Holy Spirit at Notre Dame University
(Indiana)"
TUESDAY: Mel Boring (Pres.) "The Outpouring of the
Holy Spirit in secular universities"
WEDNESDAY: Dr.   G.   Pattison   (Ang.)   "An   Anglican
Dean and the Holy Spirit"
THURSDAY: Ed Gregory (Meth.) "How to be Filled with
the Holy Spirit"
FRIDAY: Mel Boring (Pres.) "Experiencing God's Love"
JANUARY 8 - 12, in BU 202
Advertisement Friday,. January  5,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
JS% . JpcA\ iU&S T^U,.« ^.>Sll
CONDUCTED    5y     Ur|CU      <*ORD|£,    MVCLE    4R*//£
r
JOYSOME
jinks wr
SANDY SEAL
3»WJ^ (j***^ *W *» W»«s» i_j» *i»»
iLiiJl jjji, $£ vjfel j» jTlJ! p gZ
. Jjkti* ji- *«£»» lulls'
«u**Y *—Jl,  ■>/•" "^"i <£•*" ^10-^
t^y »jyi 4-al jj »jH\ J*L Ux*>
J* _^~» . Vt>j" **^' *•** *^*V tr*v**i
jt.^1 tljtr c»j*\ \f o^ . wi^ii
i. il^j u/j'j*
Christian Science*
Pope Names
Non-Italians
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) —
Army recruiting stations in Oregon will remain open longer
during the Christmas holidays
"to accommodate the additional
young men and women who will
be in downtown shopping
areas "
Coustti AL
" Weel, Sandy," cries Scatty
to his little friend who' is busy
washing himself in the goldfish
. pond.  " Is the paint comin' aft
your.skin? *•
a aaa aiaa •>■«■.        V* f ^lwaua
Sandy. " In fact, it's want than
ever, for a' the colours o' the
kilt that yon painted on me hae
rin thegither."
Una    nteseats    her
on of LADY HUCGINS,
 , .-~**y Tory candidate fm
West Dambaxtoashire. Her caaa»
; naJaa  suit in an,  elegant  black
'fcarataea   model   nothing   faasy
ar difficult to manage.
The skirt*s pencil slim, with
stitched front panel,, the jacket
fitting, with cntaway line from
the waist. £-'
With her so*, Lady HuagSta
*ear» a silk crepe blo«se*r{a
SAwdci blue, lapel brooch of
sapphire and diamonds, and
Mack, court shoes.
And she aparaa a hat.
"Look! Is that no'.dread-
ial?" wails.our attic seal la
dismay. "Oh, micbty mtl"
exclaims Scatty. "I nhnrar expected that tae happen."
Discord at coeoa
M Weel, whit am I gaun tae
dac noo?" sighs Saady. "It
was yoar bricbit idea tae paint
aae hi the farsr place—so ye
oaght tae hae a aelation noo."
ERIC THOMSON
... needed Divine aid
Editor, The San, Sir — All
you people who wanted abolition of the death penalty for
murderers — you must be
proud of yourselves today.
ZELMA TINNION
Nanaimo
'/.
talks?
. ^'».
^*Jl'*i*-al J*- ^Ul aJaw J»ly.
OliUall u! ^jfj IfJ *-&/* **~* J* f**!^
jfs+k  diJ^"   UUiil   ^ij   .   ijXJ
■i/^* j* C>y j* Jfc^1 i' ^>. ^ *d»^
jUVI J* t oil . «i* jl«J *4-i» "•?;>*
— *iM jyiJI iJli 01 . *J>\jA\ d)!i (^* Uj
j^ill  <3pu  Ujc»   .   J"j—J   wn..I1  JUpTj
> *&& &'W vJtsjJ* c^
j* jiTti _^t tflit ^ t JUjf1 jj^-
..-Jir uvi v^^yi gj- ill,*'
jT Tx^> o£4 J^i c^1 ^-*-* Jt*^
j».t ^ *«iJ .bit jjl ot jt ^j>5U Si
j» ^ "JU-I  J^lli   «   (\» : M   l>y.)
t.JU^J^il
*J5^J ^j'^j lllk< < (Joil d^iil a^O Ux*j
j* jl* <jl "Vj tit _,» 4^ v < a»»yi
<J/M   01   Jij*   .    »4>-l>J   lJUlU>   OjS>J   0}| 1
»lia*-l   ^   ^Uaij   iiUt   Z^UJt   *JUi>-tl
>    Jal 0t L>b *1*!«I • <^^. OiJ*^
■MMaJamaaaaanaaaaamaimmanaaanaBaaBajai..
Saigon rebels last nigbt surrendered the National Surete building, the last big stronghold of the I
Binh Xuyen private army' in the
city, to Government troops.
Most of the rebel forces were
driven from the citjriast week.
As the 84 rebels in the building
surrendered, they shouted: " Down
with the rebels," and' proclaimed,
"May Prime Minister Ngo Dinh
Diem live for 10,000 years."
?"/ think you're utterly stupid and a
I disgrace to the Conservative party!"
'<*
S^S^M-WHS*9*
HILARY CALLS TO THE
BAR*.
WU'TDWETJWF   PDRSL
Fish Sleep
Soundly
GHIGKHIGEF   DP
x-n«rr.r«c LONDON (UPI) - Garage
ftUUliUU» attendant   Robert   Porter,   SO,
was awarded $9,600 damages
ANSWER NEXT U/EEK      Tuesday   because   someone
thought   he   was   a   duck.
UNSPOILED
RURAL  SURREY
many goddamn things
"Well, what have we here?" the sergeant says. He plunges an arm into announcer, Lyle Waggoner-a gorgeous
hunk of man with shoulders like Joan
Crawford - to introduce the guests.
"Hummmphh!"   the   RSM   sneered;
and turned on his heel.
"You'je lucky,"  said the sergeant
"Are you sureT*
"terrible!   Terrible!"   the   corporal
screams.
' "Y-yechhh!"*says the sergeant.
"Ar-iEfchhh!" adds the corporalj
.    "Ar-rghh!"    says    Sgt.    Kennedy.]
j    "Ah-teh-HO!"   snarls   the   corporal,
J    "Ar-r-rghhh!" Sgt Kennedy moans.
"You're all awful," the sergeant says.
"W-w-wh-aaa-t?" the recruit gasps.
Back at the barracks, the boys are!
solicitous. J
"May my eyes be torn from my head!
so 111 never see anything so awful as|
I've just witnessed!"
I got the hell out of there.
"You stupid fool—you've forgotten the transistor."
President Andrew McNaughton of Carleton University's birth\
control club pauses with Sonia Osborne, an active club member. Page  12
THE      URYSSEY
Friday,  January  5,   1968
'TWEEN  CLASSES . . .
. . . HAS  RETURNED
Last  minute tickets —cheap!
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets now
available for all smyphony and
Playhouse Theatre Company
performances. Appear with
student card a half hour before the performance and receive a ticket for $1.
BCAS
Education action speakers
needed. Leave name and phone
number in Brock ext. 258.
ARTS
General meeting, today,
noon, in JSM lounge. Politics,
love, death, rock, future.
SUS
All interested in working on
science   week    activities    call
John Taylor at 261-2607.
MUSSOC
Technical meeting in club-
room, Monday, noon. Stage
lighting, sound crews, make-up,
costumes, sets, programs. Executive meeting Tuesday.
COUNCILLORS
Meeting for faculty reporters Tuesday, noon, Ubyssey
office. All faculties should be
represented.
- Physiological psychologist expands
A physiological phychologist from the University of California speaks at UBC today on the Complex Properties of Single
Neutrons in Association Cortex.
Prof. Richard Thompson, whose work on the relationship
between brain and (behavior has received widespread attention,
speaks at 3:30 p.m. in Ang. 213.
EDUCATION
Seminar    representatives.
Regular meeting Monday noon,
ed. 100.
VCF
No meeting this Friday.
CIASP
Regional study day bus
leaves today at 5:45 p.m. for
Seattle. All CIASPers expected to attend. Information
Brock ext. 354.
FILMSOC
The Bomb: Dr. Strangelove,
Tuesday,   noon,   3:30,   6   p.m.,
8:30. Auditorium, 50 cents.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl   Burau:   Is   Canada   a
Police State? Bu. 202, Wednesday, 1:30 p.m.
CHORAL SOC
Practice   Saturday,   2   p.m.,
Mildred Brock.
IEEE
Arctic Flights, slides on the
Arctic and Northwest Territories   by   Dominique   Prinet,
Monday, 1 p.m., electrical eng.
228.
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting, Monday,
noon, Bu. 223.
AAC SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM
All students welcome to
science symposium at Rosario
beach, Jan. 12 to 15. Subject:
Social responsibility of science
and technology.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen Sie und sprechen
Sie Deutsch. Wir diskutierien
die Skifahrt nach Mt. Baker.
IH 402, Dienstag, Mittag.
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
Up to 50% Off
979 Granville St. at Nelson
Phone: 683-2819
Near the Downtown Theatre
FORMAL
ANO
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, whit* dinner   isckets,   morning
coats .  .  .  complete  size
range.
We   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
McCUlSH   FORM/U^WIAR
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
■A & B SOUND'
RECORD SALE
WIDE SELECTION AT LOWEST PRICES IN B.C.
MONO & STEREO
4 TRACK TAPES AND
8 TRACK CARTRIDGE
TAPES AT DISCOUNT PRICES  "   „.„.«, 4798
$3.58
All Other
COLUMBIA   Records
at Similar Savings
A*B SOUND
MU2-4846
Opmm Fridmy Until 9 pom.
57V Granville (at Dunsmuir)
MU2-1919
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
SKIERS
LOOK
FAMILIAR?
Get your Volkswagen tuned-
up now so you'll really enjoy
your ski trip.
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized  Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses .. .
look to
Plesc'tibi'ion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $24)0.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SOUL UNLIMITED THIS SAT., JAN.
6.  Brock Hall. 9-1.  $1.00 per person.
Lost 8c Found
13
FOUND FUR HAT OUTSIDE LIB-
rary — Please contact Pub. Office,
Brock Hall.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEEDED RIDE FROM PORT CO-
quitlam to UBC to arrive 8 o'clock.
Please phone 942-9156 in the evening.
RIDE NEEDED FROM CORNER OF
S.W. Marine and Balaclava in time
for 8:30 M & Th; 9:30 T, W, & F.
Returning anytime after 4:30. Please
phone Sharon, 266-8246.	
W1EST VAN. CAR POOL REQUIRES
one more driver from Hollyburn
area.  Phone  922-7489.
Special Notices
 15
OPEN DOOR DROP-IN CENTRE^
(Coffee house in Church cellar).
Every Friday night, 9-12 midnight,
corner of  11th and Fir.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
"Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30-6 p.m. Saturdays 'till
5:30.	
HOW I STOPPED WORRYING AND
Learned to Love the Bomb or Dr.
Strangelove, Jan. 9.
FOR RELIEF FROM THAT YEAR
end hangover—see Peter, The Cam-
pus Barber Shop,  Brock  Hall.	
SOUL UNLIMITED AT BROCK
Hall this Sat. Also Toads $1.00 per
person.  9-1 Sat.,  Jan.  6.
16
Travel Opportunities
C H A RT E R BUS TO SEATTLE
leaves UBC 5:45 p.m., Jan. 5. Returns 11 a.m., Jan. 7. All details
Brock  Extension  354.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
COMMERCE 374 MEHR & CAM-
mack (4th ed.), Principles of Insurance; Comm. 324 — French, Pers.
Management (1964) wanted. Phone
922-7489.
ONE    DUTCHMAN.    PHONE    L.B.
8 a.m. - 5 a.m.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
HAIR PIECES CLEANED AND
styled. Reasonable rates, U.B.C.
Beauty Salon in the village. 228-
8942.	
DR. STRANGELOVE WITH PETER
Sellers. Aud., 50c. Tues., Jan. 9.
12:30,  3:30,  6:00,  8:30 boom.	
WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? ASK
Alfie. Jan. 12. Friday, 12:30, 3:30,
6:00,  8:30.  Aud.,   50c.	
ALFIE FRIDAY, JAN. 12, AUD., 50c.
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. What's It All
About,   Baby.	
DUTCHMEN,   BEWARE   —   L.B.
Typing
40
TYPING: PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
5:00.  Phone  266-6662 — after 6:00.
TYPING   25C/PAGE,    CARBON   COP-
ies.  lOc/page.  685-7876 after 12 p.m.
"FAST     ACCURATE      TYPING      OF
essays   and   thesis   IBM   Executive.
Reasonable    terms.    Call    days   688-
4745.  Evens:   263-4023.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates   TR.   4-9253
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian. Individual, no contracts,
$3.00 hr. by B.A., M.A., B.L.S. 736-
6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
HEAD SKIS STDRD. 210CM GOOD
cond'n. 2 years old. Phone 261-8469
at dinnertime.
Still  a few left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Sale at:  Publication Office
Brock  Hall   or  UBC   Bookstore
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS ON CAMPUS—AVAILABLE
Now. 2250 Wesbrook. $40.00. 224-
9662.   Close  to Meal   Services.
SLEEPING ROOM WITH BREAK-
fast. Upper yr. male preferred. $55/
mo.  738-05G5 after  5 p.m.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Quiet, comfortable. Phone Don, 224-
9665, after 6 p.m.
Room & Board
82
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE IM-
med. for one male student. Call 224-
3504.
Unfurn. Houses & Aprs.
84
THREE ROOM SUITE, UNFURN-
ished. Self-contained. Would suit
two.   Phone   731-8326. Friday,  January  5,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
Democracy a myth
Serious  flaws   in   representation favor interest groups
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student democracy is a myth at UBC.
True, democratic elections are held every year.
True, speeches are made about representing the
students. And the Alma Mater Society council
takes office in a pink cloud of rhetoric.
But after the mist clears and the real work
of running a half million dollar business begins
in earnest, serious flaws in council's method of
representation appear.
Council made a few changes in the constitution last year, adding two more executive members, but didn't touch the problem of grossly
unequal representation.
A constitutional being — like council, is the
product of years of compromise and revision.
But it has turned into a body composed mainly of interest groups, widely unrepresentative
of most students.
Several years ago, undergraduate societies
were allowed representation on council. Now
council includes such groups as librarianship
(one vote) with fewer than 90 members, and
the universilty clubs committee (one vote) which
represents 100 campus clubs.
Rep by pop it isn't.
Agriculture students — 220 of them — have
one vote on council. Arts students — numbering
4,918 — also have one vote.
In January 1966, law student Garth Brown
saw the problems of unequal representation and
separation of the duties of undergraduate society
president and student councillor.
He suggested council be restricted to 15 mem-
Representation
on   council
NUMBER OF
WEIGHTED
GROUP
STUDENTS          ^
/OTE
VOTE
Agriculture
220
1
1
Architecture
122
1
1
Arts
4,918
1
2
Commerce
1,129
1
2
Education
2,950
1
3
Engineering
1,136
1
2
Forestry
222
1
Graduate Studies
1,727
1
Home Economics
280
1
Law
402
1
Librarianship
85
1
Medicine
237
1
Music
200
1
Nursing
251
1
Pharmacy
132
1
Physical Education
500
1
Rehab. Medicine
96
1
Science
3,422
1
Social Work
166
1
Univ. Clubs Cttee.
100 clubs
1
Residences
all residences
1
bers elected at large plus a six-man executive.
The office of activities co-ordinator would
be changed to ombudsman.
Nothing came of Brown's recommendations.
In the following October, council appointed
first vice-president Charlie Boylan chairman of a
constitutional revisions committee.
His report, which went to council a year ago,
urged a bi-cameral student government consist-
ins of a 20-member council and a representative
assembly.
Each faculty would elect a member to this
assembly for every 500 students. This would
have provided a 60 member assembly.
A ten man executive in the separate council
would include vice-presidents for government
liason, external student affairs, academic affairs,
internal student affairs, administration liaison
and housing.
He also suggested salaries for the AMS president, treasurer and Ubyssey editor.
The recommendations were turned down by
council a week later. The constitutional revisions
passed at last year's general meeting were a
step in the direction of council's democratization
but still fell short.
They included two new positions on the
executive — ombudsman and external affairs
officer — to be elected at large.
The ombudsman's job will be to investigate
complaints and to recommend action.
The external affairs officer will chair the
Canadian Union of Students committee and inform council of government education policies.
To compromise Boylan's and Brown's representations and to give the larger faculties a
greater say in student government, the weighted
vote was introduced.
Under the weighted vote each undergraduate
society got one vote per 500 students who voted
in its election — up to a total of three votes.
Under this plan, arts gets two votes, education three, science two, commerce two, and
engineering two. But even this falls short of
true representation. A special motion is required
before the weighted vote can be used.
More recent council reform was suggested by
law president Jim Taylor.
In a report to council Taylor called for much
of the AMS work to be done by committees responsible to council. He didn't suggest any radical,
democratic restructuring of council.
But president Shaun Sullivan said Taylor's
report was only intended to spark discussion.
Sullivan said no formal recommendations will
come from the AMS executive — which he said
was concerned about the problem — until January.
A real democracy can't exist under the present system of pressure groups and tiny schools
each having their own representatives.
And until meaningful changes are made In
council's structure AMS will continue to be
irrelevant to everyone but councillor's wives
and mothers.
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Top quality merchandise for a Manufacturer's Agent who is
discontinuing Vancouver Warehousing.
MAYNARD'S
4TH
GENERATION
BONDED
AUCTIONEERS
Just One Block From The Art Gallery
Going West on Georgia St.
DANCE
TO
SOUL UNLIMITED
SAT..  JAN.  6,  9-1
BROCK HALL
$1.00
$1.00
Summer Employment Opportunities
in
Federal Government Deportments
Approximately 1,800 summer positions are available across
Canada for undergraduate and graduate students in the
pgre and applied sciences, engineering, and those in
medicine, dentistry and pharmacy.
Salaries will range from $300 to $640 a month and there
are generous provisions for travel to and from places of
work.
Details and application forms are available at your placement office. Closing date for receipt of applications is
January 26, 1968.
SUBSCRIBE  TO
CHINESE PERIODICALS
PEKING REVIEW IN  ENGLISH
A weekly  political and theoretical  journal of Chinese  news and views.
Airmailed all  over the world.
1 Year 2 Years 3 Years
$4.00 $6.00 $8.00
CHINA PICTORIAL
Published every month in Peking for readership abroad. Each issue has
44 pages or more.  12 to  16 in colour.
1 Year 2 Years 3 Years
$6.00
$3.00 $4.50
CHINA RECONSTRUCTS
A popular, illustrated monthly for the general reader.
1 Year 2 Years 3 Years
$3.00 $4.50 $6.00
CHINESE LITERATURE
A monthly magazine on Chinese literature and art.
1 Year 2 Years 3 Years
$3.00 $4.50 $6.00
FREE  1968 CALENDAR FOR EACH  SUBSCRIBER
Catalogue and Samples upon request. All Periodicals Mailed from
Peking with Beautiful stamps. (Allow 6 - 8 weeks for Delivery) Add
"plus exchange" on  cheques only.
ORDER FROM
CHINA ARTS AND CRAFTS LTD.
33  East Hastings Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
ANNUAL
CLEARANCE SALE
RECORDS
20% - 50% OFF
RADIOS
LEXANDER &
ALSO
•  RECORD PLAYERS
TV's, Etc
XELSON
4558 W. 10th
PPLIANCES Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January  5,   1968
•V\*A*N&X!k-HI-FI
EXCLUSIVE FOR SCOTT, MclNTOSH AND KLH
. . . Prestige Brands Hi-Fi Components
Turntables: Garrard, Thorens, Lenco, Elac-Miracord, Sony Dual —
Amplifiers, Tuners: Scott Mcintosh, Bogen, Quad, Dynaklt, Sony,
Marantz, Eico, E-V, Trio, Beomaster — Tone Arms, Cartridges:
Shure, Ortofon, S.M.E., Empire—Tape Recorders: Recorders: Am-
pex, Becord, Sony, Tandberg — Speakers: Wharfedale, Lansing,
Goodmans,   Electrovoice,   KLH-AR.
Drop    In ,..._.... Phones:
e.0.r- SR?lh.™.  Freeman s Hi-Fidelity      "ju \-9°sf
Free    Brochures * MU   3-0725
671 Howe Street, Vancouver,  B.C.
SOCIAL CHANGE
AGENTS WANTED
IF
IF
ENQUIRE
You  are about to graduate with  majors in the  behavioural sciences or with Social Work credits;
You  are  interested   in  a  challenging  career  helping
people and communities change;
about opportunities in the British
Columbia Probation Service, Corrections Branch.
A representative will be on campus January 11th for employment interviews. Arrange appointments through the
employment office, West Mall.
CAREERS IN
CANADA MANPOWER
MANPOWER ANALYST
Those interested in appointment as Manpower
Analyst (Competition 68-4310) willing to serve in locations in British Columbia and at other locations across
Canada may arrange a preliminary interview through
the nearest Canada Manpower Centre.
MANPOWER COUNSELLOR
Opportunities for appointment are available for
applicants willing to accept positions outside of British
Columbia. If you are interested in the position of Manpower Counsellor (Competition 68-4002), telephone
your nearest Canada Manpower Centre to arrange an
interview.
The Canada Manpower booklet "Get Involved"
which outlines career information is available
at your University Placement Office.
The Department will not be conducting interviews on campus.
i i
JEAN SHRIMPTON
tf **.
BEHIND THE
SCREAMS
AMD THE
HEADLINES
ARE THE
PUPPET-
MAKERS!
PAUL JANES
DIRECTED BY PETER WATKINS.
ACADEMY AWARD WINNING
DIRECTOR OF  THE WAR GAME
TICHNICOLOR
Varsity
224-3730V
4375 W. 10th
They pull the
strings of the
most unique and
controversial
entertainer
of our time.
Showtimes
7:30 & 9:30
JpOAt JtoIL
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor -
The one thing wrong with a Christmas holiday is that it
all too soon comes to an end.
Yours truly had a lazy holiday as usual. It was nice to turn
on the TV, sit back in a cozy chair, and watch every sport from
football to ice hockey and back again.
My bleary eyes are not due to New Year's but to the old
boob tube. Now, thank goodness, UBC's teams are getting back
into action and we'll be able to see the real thing live.
* * *
The many hundreds of you who wept bitterly at the end
of the UBC football Thunderbirds' season will be happy to know
that the Birds did do one thing worthy of note.
They helped the Simon Fraser Clansmen set six season
team records because of their poor performance in the Oct.
16 game.
The Clansmen had the greatest total offense in one game
against UBC (471 yards); the greatest total passing in one game
against UBC (211 yards); the most passes completed in one game
against UBC (11); the most pass interceptions in one game against
UBC (4); the greatest total penalty yardage in one game against
UBC (157); and the most points scored in one game (32) against
our heroes.
Let's hope that the coming clashes between 9FU and UBC
in basketball don't produce the same kind of results.
The Birds meet the Clansmen on Feb. 10 and Feb. 23.
JV ice squad unbeatable
It would be rather hard to outdo the success of the UBC
Junior Varsity ice hockey squad in their current runabout.
A member of the Richmond Intermediate League, the Jayvees
are currently sporting a 10-0 record in league play and 12-1
record overall. Their only defeat was a 7-1 exhibition loss to
Chilliwack Army over the holidays.
Apart from being on top of the league, they also have the
top scorer in Ernie Lawson, with 15 goals and 11 assists; three
of the five leading scorers are Jayvees, and the leading goalkeeper is Don Cram with a 2.40 goals against average.
Next below them in the standings is Ladner with a five-
four-one record. Then comes Vancouver, Richmond and Steveston,
though none has the slightest chance of catching the powerful
UBC team.
Next games for the team are against Ladner at UBC on
Monday at 7:30 p.m. and Steveston in Richmond on Wednesday
at 8:00 p.m.
In senior hockey action, the Birds travel to Calgary this
weekend.
Coach Bob Hindmarch's heroes will play a two-game series
against the University of Calgary Dinosaurs.
These two games count towards the Birds' conference record,
which now stands at two wins and two losses.
Their season record, including exhibition games, is five
wins, three losses and one tie.
Pugh predicts
Alberta jaunt
successful
UBC track and field team
will participate in an Intercollegiate meet and in the
Canadian National Indoor
Championships in Edmonton
over the weekend.
"Because of the bloody
miserable weather," says coach
Lionel Pugh, "the meets will
be held indoors. Our main
strength will be in middle distance, jumping and shot events.
We can make absolutely no
impression in sprinting so
we're not bringing any sprinters along."
Pugh cited some fine examples of his main strengths.
The jump team is composed of
Gordon Dong (long), Sam
Vandermeulen (high), and Ray
Stevenson (triple). Putting the
shot will be the West Vancouver product Mike Dowty.
In the middle distance are
those three celebrities Ken
French, Dave Greening and
Tom Howard.
Turning to the other half
of the team, there are Pat
Mills and Betsy George, enough
to bolster anyone's spirits.
Miss Mills competes in the 880
and Miss George is the favorite in the hurdles.
Also going are Anka Troel-
stra, an all rounder in track
events, Joanne Heatherington,
much experienced in the V4
mile and sprints, and Leona
Sparrows, shot putter from the
B.C. team.
"This intercollegiate meet
will provide an indication as
to who will win the WCIAA
Championships in February,"
says Pugh. "Most of the teams
taking part will be western
universities, Manitoba, Calgary, Simon Fraser, and so
on."
The meet will be held in
Edmonton's magnificent new
field-house.
- CUP THIS AND SAVE -
THE FILMSOC LINEUP
FOR SPRING 68
Tues., Jan. 9 - DR. STRANGE LOVE
Fri., Jon.   12 - ALFIE - restricted
Thurs., Jan. 18 - A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON
THE WAY TO THE FORUM
Thurs., Jan. 25 - BLOW-UP - restricted
Thurs. & Fri., Feb 1 & 2 - HELP & HARD DAY'S NIGHT
Thurs., Feb. 29 - THE GREAT RACE
Thurs., Mar. 7 - GOLDFINGER
Thurs., Mar.  14 - WHO'S AFRAID OF  VIRGINIA
WOLFF
Thurs., Mar. 21 - PRIDE & PREJUDICE
Thurs., April 4 - GREAT EXPECTATIONS
ALL SHOWS IN THE AUD. - 50c Friday,   January  5,   1
968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
THE SKI BUM     The ties
that bind
By BJORN SIMONSEN
If you went looking for good skiing during the holidays you
were likely disappointed.
Probably the only people who did get any good skiing conditions were those who went to the interior or Banff.
Many favorite areas south of the border had to close due
to lack of snow while our local mountains were generally poor
due to rain and low cloud. Whistler Mountain had a couple of
glorious days of sunshine at New Years but for the previous
part of the holiday season this area was also plagued by bad
weather.
In case you didn't get your new boards at
Christmas, you may be thinking of buying a
pair. As you enter your favorite ski shop you
will be confused by the ever increasing volume
of equipment to choose from.
The ski industry is becoming more and
more like the automobile industry every year.
There are new makes, models, styles and colors.
Your car conscious mind will be tempted by
such names of skis as "Mustang", "Camaro",
"Javelin", etc., etc.
Before buyinig a new pair of skis make      SIMONSEN
sure you know what you are getting. This probably applies even
more to the inexpensive "beginners' sets" than to the proven
and reliable brand name skis.
Don't be dazzled by bright colors but examine the construction of the skis (number of laminations, type of wood, etc.)
and try to determine its behavior on snow in terms of flex,
camber, torque, base, etc. It is always best to bring along someone who knows what these terms mean and who can pick out
the skis which are most suited to your needs and ability.
It is important to make sure that you are buying a matched
pair of skis. This is most simply done by comparing the serial
numbers since both skis should have identical numbers if they
are a pair.
A more thorough way of checking whether they are matched
is to put both skis together, base to base, in an upright position.
Slowly squeeze them together at the middle (camber point). If
the skis are matched they should close tightly with no gaps
along the edges. The tips should split out slightly, usually about
one inch.
Another simple test is to put both skis on the floor, side by
side, base down. The skis should be even with each other across
the tops. If one ski sags below the other they are not a matched
pair. One ski is "flat".
Always bear in mind that the skis' ultimate behavior depends largely upon the skier himself.
The UBC soccer Thunder-
birds are having a lot of
trouble breaking ties thi?
season.
If they had won any of their
four ties, they could be in second place in the Pacific Coast
Soccer League.
Pacific Coast League
Columbus 9
Firefighters 9
UBC   T'Birds 8
West'r   Labs 9
Burnaby V. 11
Victoria 8
North  Shore 8
W
6
5
3
4
4
2
1
F A Pt
20 12 13
13 11 11
16 10 10
11 13 10
18 22 10
11 15 5
7 13 3
Their last league game
against the Vancouver Firefighters ended in a 2-2 tie, but
as coach Joe Johnson says, "A
win tomorrow will bounce us
into second place."
Saturday's game is also
against the Firefighters. It
will be played in Callister
Park starting at 2 p.m.
The Birds will be without
the services of first stringers
Jim Berry, Kirby Carter and
Russ Hillman but Johnson
says that the team's play will
not be badly affected by the
injuries to the trio.
On the brighter side though,
both Gary Thompson and Jim
Briggs, the scorers from the
last game, will be playing.
After the month-long layoff
from league play and a short
holiday in California, Johnson
is hoping to get back on the
winning track.
SPECIAL  EVENTS  PRESENTS
DR. HERBERT APTHEKER
BROCK  LOUNGE - NOON
THURSDAY, JANUARY  11th
American  Marxist  —  Director  of  the American
Institute of Marxist Studies
Speaking   on
"THE NEGRO REVOLT"
READING IMPROVEMENT
AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
Special student and faculty classes begin the
week of January 15 — Room 119, East Mall Annex
OFFERED BY THE UBC EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
Mon. & Wed. - 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
Mon. & Wed. - 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs. - 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs. - 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
10 Sessions: Student fee:  $35;  Faculty fee: $55
Classes are limited to 21   persons
To register or for further  information,  contact:
Education-Extension, the Extension Department, 228-2181
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
•BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■ KERRISDALE   41s.t at YEW
WINTER IS HERE!!
^r Free Antifreeze Check
j{ Free Battery Check
■Jr; Goodyear Winter Tires
if Imported V.W.  Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W.  10th
224-0828
STILL AVAILABLE
BIRD GALLS
1967-1968
THE UMWBSflY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STUD€HT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
BUY A COPY TODAY
Publications Office, Brock Hall
or UBC Bookstore Page 16
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday,  January  5,   1968
He scores
THE
UBYSSEY
he shoots
t*
\
" "^v..:s"^"-   ;;;";:.■
***,&*»»• *-,»»• »>* -**«%'•
•****»%■'-4,   .♦■      ^'W,#1l«**t#«#«*
KEN KERN, kicker for the UBC rugby Braves, warms up his magical toe in preparation for
the  game against Meralomas this Saturday at 2 p.m. on Wolfson Field.
Skiing  standards  sought
By BJORN SIMONSEN
Wouldn't it be nice if the ski industry would
standardize some of its products?
Have you ever tried to replace a broken or
lost steel edge? It's almost impossible to find
one which fits even if you comb every ski shop
in town.
The same goes for cable release harnesses.
You can never find the right length or even
the right type of cable. If a screw should happen
to pop off your front throw or if a part wears
out it is hard to have it replaced.
The problem lies with the ever expanding
ski industry itself. It used to be that only two
or three major companies manufactured all
equipment and as a result one could get replacement parts almost anywhere.
Today, however, there are more than a dozen
countries engaged in ski and ski equipment
manufacturing, each country having several different companies who are involved. Each year,
each company changes models and makes certain addions to their existing lines and with this
comes changes in such basic things as steel
edges.
No ski shop is equipped to stock spare parts
i for each ski and harness they carry and only
a few stock parts for the most common brands
of equipment such as Nevada, Marker, Solomon
and Tyrolia.
It is therefore wise to consider what you
are getting into when purchasing equipment.
Until the ski industry as a whole can get together and standarize certain basic parts in their
products, it would seem well advised to stick
to well known and widely distributed equipment
that can be easily repaired or replaced at any
ski shop. It may cost a little more but at least
your ski trip won't be ruined.
Flying high?
Can the Hawks withstand the attack of the
Birds and, if so, where do the Doves come in?
No, it's not a friendly Congress debacle, merely a field hockey game.
You see, the UBC Thunderbirds are in second
place in the league and are itching to get into
first. During the next two weeks they'll get their
chance when they meet their chief opponents,
the Hawks' A and B teams.
P     W     L     D     F    A    Pts
Hawks A 9      9      0      0    39      2    18
Thunderbirds
9
8
1
0
29
5
16
Pitt Meadows A
10
5
4
1
10
12
11
Grasshoppers A
9
4
4
1
17
13
9
Jokers
9
2
7
0
11
19
4
IN BASKETBALL
Birds dance on
without Dixon
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds can two-step to the top
of the Western Intercollegiate Conference tonight and tomorrow
night at War Memorial Gym.
Birds grapple with University of Calgary Dinosaurs in a
pair of four-point games that could vault UBC into a first-place
tie with Manitoba.
WESTERN CONFERENCE STANDINGS
Won Lost Points
MANITOBA     6 0 12
UBC        2 0 4
CALGARY     2 2 4
ALBERTA        15 2
SASKATCHEWAN         15 2
Coach Don Newton's third-place Dinnies are led by high-
scoring center Al Kettles. Third in conference, Kettles is
averaging 23.3 points per game.
DIXON OUT
Missing from UBC's roster will be starry
Ian Dixon, out for two weeks with torn ligaments. The high-scoring forward sustained his
injuries in Portland last month in an exhibition » ^_ ,f
game with Lewis and Clark. ||hI   ««
Capable handyman Dave Rice will replace HK» "™^
Dixon in the starting lineup.
HOLIDAY SPLIT
Birds managed to hold their own against
American schools during the holiday break,
winning three and losing three. DIXON
The UBC quintet split with Lewis and Clark and took
two games from weak Alaska Methodist before succumbing
twice to Portland State last weekend.
The first game December 1 with Lewis and Clark saw
Birds' Dixon score a last-second basket to sink the home team
99-97.
The following night, Birds lost both Dixon and the decision,
bowing to the Portland school 111-97.
Mullins and his charges proved poor Christmas hosts to the
Vikings from Alaska Methodist trouncing the northerners 89-65
and 98-60.
The Portland State Vikings bore little resemblance to their
Alaskan namesakes.
Marion Pericin's Oreigonians improved their two-five won-
lost record with a pair of easy wins over the Birds in a pre-
New Year series in Portland.
Birds are unbeaten in league action and have five wins
and six losses for the season.
In Junior Varsity action over the holidays, the Jayvees
were downed twice in the Pensacola Tourney in Washington.
Peninsula Junior College of Port Angeles beat them 108-84
and Shoreline of Seattle defeated them 80-66.
Tonight at 5:45 p.m. the Jayvees will play Simon Fraser
freshmen on the mountain and will play a return match at 6
p.m. Monday night at UBC.
( Optimistic  Spence
faces tough  going   (
Santa Claus, in all his benevolence, brought coach
Donn Spence and the UBC rui?by teams nothing but tougher
competition in the New Year.
The five teams, which were totally inactive over the
holidays, presumably mourning exams and dreaming of
Santa,'s suirar plums, have now moved up one division each.
The big switch was brought about by UBC's senior
team, the Birds, transferring to the Pacific Northwest League which features teams from Oregon, Washington and
California.
To fill the gap Saturday, previously undefeated Braves
play Meraloma I's in a first division game while the Tomahawks play Ex-Gladstone in an intermediate division game.
Both games get underway at 2 p.m. on Wolfson field.
The Totems play prior to the other two at 1 p.m. in
a second division Igame against Meraloma IPs.
j§ The Birds start their new year with a game in Thunder-
I bird Stadium against Oregon State in two weeks, but are
jj inactive this weekend.
§ "We're looking for a good showing, it is a new ex-
j perience for all the teams. We've had good practices, and
1 the teams are working hard. We're hoping for the best,"
p said Spence, the eternal optimist.

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