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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1967

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Array les
peterson
Vol. XLVII, No. 38
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 20,  1967 (    *
CtU-K _^^^S3,re.»TEK 224-3916
SOIL TESTERS
.  . . new residence here?
Campus planners silent
on 'residence  drillings
Tests are being conducted for the erection of a new
residence complex, but nobody is talking about it.
The tests were uncovered when a Ubyssey photographer discovered drilling operators taking soil samples
from an area north of Totem Park.
A workman said the tests were to determine whether
the ground would hold a new residence complex about
the size of Totem Park.
Campus planning officials refused comment.
"There are some proposals," said assistant architect-
planner J. A. Kamburoff, but he added; "I'm not free to
comment."
Tentative plans for an additional 3,000 beds of on-,
campus housing were announced Oct. 6 by UBC president
John Macdonald, but there has been no definite announcement of specific buildings.
It is likely that the residences will follow plans
similar to those of Totem Park, since Macdonald stated last
fall the formation of new drawings is too costly.
March marches on
despite Peterson
Plans continue to unfold for a mass student march to Victoria despite education
minister Leslie Peterson's refusal to cooperate.
All member students of the B.C. Association of Students from B.C.'s three main universities are toeing asked to participate.
UBC student leaders expressed disappointment Thursday over Peterson's blunt
refusal and claimed they would continue
with plans as scheduled.
Peterson Escapes
(Ubyssey reporter Val Thorn attempted to
contact Peterson at his Victoria and Vancouver residences and at several other locations
in Vancouver. She also tried to meet him at
a trucking convention at the Bayshore Inn
but he escaped unnoticed.
"We are sincere in our requests from the
provincial government. All four groups of
students from technical, nursing, university,
and high schools feel this is a serious problem and want to be heard," said AMS president Peter Braund.
Representatives from each of these
groups will accept Peterson's invitation to
meet him at 9:30 Friday, January 27.
BCAS president Frank Flynn will represent his organization while AMS first
vice-president Charlie Boylan will speak for
all UBC students.
These two will then meet with all marching students to pass on Peterson's comments.
Representatives from all political parties,
including Peterson, have been asked to address students. Peterson has already turned
down the offer.
Copies of the BCAS brief will be given
to all members of the B.C. legislature which
open on Tuesday.
Legislators Unaware
The brief asks for equalization grants,
gradual elimination of university tuition, an
independent grants commission, and student
representation on university senates and
boards of governors.
"I am convinced that half of the legislators are not aware of the crisis," said Braund.
"I am also convinced that some action
will be taken as a result of our protest," he
said.
Braund denied Peterson's claim that the
march would be harmful to education in B.C.
"I don't think it will be harmful at all,"
he said.
"The march is constructive and positive
as is the brief. I do not believe the public and
news media are aware of education's problems."
Peterson said in a letter Wednesday to
University of Victoria AMS president Steve
Bigsby that he had always been prepared to
receive the representation of students.
"We've been presenting briefs for years,"
said Braund.
"We get a nice dinner, a pat on the back,
and nothing is done. It's time we backed up
our requests with concrete action.
"This won't revolutionize the educational
system overnight but it will be a beginning."
Head of elementary education at UBC
F. H. Johnson said with the number of
marches nowadays they don't carry much
impact on the public.
March Could Do Good
"A student march could do no harm and
could do some good," said political science
prof Walter Young.
He could see no reason why Peterson refused to meet with the marchers.
Braund explained the plan of attack to
The Ubyssey Thursday.
UBC students will leave Brock Hall at
9:45 Friday morning, Jan. 27, to catch the
10:30 Tsawwassen ferry teo Victoria.
All students will assemble at the University of Victoria for coffee and donuts before
proceeding downtown.
At 2:30 the students will congregate at
Centennial Square where they will be addressed by representatives who have spoken'
to Peterson.
"We have parade and parking permits
and ferry and buses have all been arranged,"
said Braund.
"We're ready to go — for action."
ACTION WEEK
Education issues open
Education action week is your chance
to discuss the most important issue concerning all young people in B.C.
Most faculties have organized open
forums to discuss education issues as seen
by leading faculty and AiMS spokesmen.
"Don't let them hog the floor. If you
have anything to say or ask, be sure to
speak up," says AMS vice-president Charlie
Boylan.
"If we are convinced, we'll fight; if we
fight, we'll win."
The program for education action week
is as follows:
TUESDAY, JAN. 24 AT NOON:
1. General meeting Forestry in F & G
202
Dean J. A. F. Gardner and Carolyn
Tate
chairman: Mike Sywulych
2. Science: Dr. G. E. Rouse (curriculum
Peter Braund
chairman: Frank Flynn
Hennings 307
3. Education: Dean Neville Scarfe
Charlie Boylan
chairman: Wayne Wiebe
Education lounge
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25 AT NOON:
1. Music: Dr. G. W. Marquis
Carolyn Tate
chairman: Bruce Taylor
Music bldg. Room 104
2. Arts: Dean Dennis Healy
Charlie Boylan
chairman: George Roberts
Buchanan lounge
THURSDAY, JAN. 26 AT NOON:
1. Engineering: Dean W. M. Armstrong
Peter Braund
chairman: Eric Newell
Civil Engineering 201
FRIDAY, JAN. 27 AT 8 P.M.:
1. Medicine: Dean J. F. McCreary
Peter Braund
chairman: Hubert Williston
unannounced
Action  think—in—library noon Page 2
TH_      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1967
COMMENT
BY AL  BIRNIE
Hope, faith and napalm
Stumbling into the living room as my
parents watched TV Wednesday, I again
came across an aspect of the North American
'War-Think' <every Pepsi you buy supports
The War, teeny-tripper) which never fails
to bring slight nausea.
Facing a crew-cut, laughing sea of GI
faces, that effervescent commentator on the
American way of life Bob Hope was bringing
a few hours of
cheer and remembrance to 'our
boys', the defenders of the faith.
An officer of indeterminate rank,
apparently just
over from Stateside, was keeping
the faith with
tears in his eyes.
"You boys are
doing one hell  of
a job. The people back home are praying
for you. God bless you, and God bless you
too Bob Hope, for giving up your Christmas
to spend it with the boys."
With Anita Bryant ending off with a
sexy rendition of the Battle Hymn of the
Republic, the cheers, whistles, and shouts
from the assembled throng reached a level
exceeded only by the response when Hope
mentioned to the boys that they'd be going
home, eventually. End of part one.
Martha Gellhorn (one-time wife of Ernest
BIRNIE
— don kydd photo
HIGH FLYING SNOOPY descends the hard
way from his Sopwith Camel suspended
amid the Brock Lounge rafters. Words on
parachute publicize annual fraternity
bash which features another kind of high
flight.
Hemingway) reports for the Manchester
Guardian on her visits to orphanages and
hospitals in South Vietnam:
"The babies are tiny, wizened, soft skeletons, with pain already marked on their
faces. They are too weak to move or cry.
'Starved,' Soeur Jeanne said . . . There are
1,500 children in this orphanage, nine others
in Saigon alone.
"There are 500 patients . . . The tiny
children do not cry out in pain; they twist
their wounded bodies in silence . . . the
napalmed skin on the little body looks like
bloody hardened meat in a butcher shop.
"(We always get the napalm cases in
batches," the doctor had said. "And there's
the white phosphorus too and its worse because it goes on gnawing at flesh like rats
teeth, gnawing to the bone.")
"There is no warning and the people can
be bombed day or night, because the area
is considered entirely held by the Viet Cong,
and too bad for the peasants who cling to
their land which is all they have known for
generations.
"If neutral observers went through the
provincial hospitals and asked the people
how they were wounded and who else in
the family was killed, I believe we would
learn that we, UNINTENTIONALLY, are
killing and wounding three or four times
more people than the Viet Cong do, so we
are told, on purpose." End of part two.
What is the morality of a people, a government, a society who quote the Bible (to
borrow from Lenny Bruce) "Thou shalt not
kill, but
Does His goodness, or yours, march on
with each napalm bomb?
Is the American Dream a dead body in
a booby-trap pit in Vietnam?
Is the thought of Mao or aspirations of
the Vietnamese people forces so obscene as
to be opposed in this way?
In the past, other civilizations have risen
from the wilderness, developed their landscape through technology, but have perished
with hardly a trace or regret when they
develop an obsession with material advancement.
The institutionalizing of land and peoples
to feed a creation which treats human beings as just another resourse to be exploited
and must have more and greater expoita-
tion to exist, is^carrying the rationalization
of the individual to the society to its ultimate  conclusion.
That which lives by force and destruction will die by the same means.
A god of the common man, an embodiment of ultimate human ideals, which is
rationalized into action diametrically opposed to its essence, will effect ultimate retribution on its false prophets and disciples,
Cardinal Spellman.
SUB calls tenders
Tenders were called Thursday for construction of UBC's Student Union Building.
The plans to be bid on are unchanged
from the originals according to a SUB
spokesman.
SUB will include a small auditorium,
TV room, two music rooms, art gallery,
party room, special facilties for clubs, ballroom, and six-line cafeteria and snack bar.
Cost for the project has been estimated
at $4.5 million.
Tenders are due to report by February 20.
WARD
Music Ltd.
Instruments
Music
Records
Teacher's Supplies
412 W. Hastings    682-5288
?SE
FORMAL
SEMI-FORMAL
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STUDENT RATES
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NEW ARRIVALS
Speedwell BRM mag wheels
for Volk's. each $59.95
Cable Tire Chains.
set     .$21.95
Raydyol Mirrors $ 8.95
Peco Muffler Systems_$24.95
Key Fobs __  ....     ...    $  1.95
WIPAC Adjustable Map
Lights   ... $ 5.95
10% DISCOUNT TO
STUDENTS
Overseas Auto Ports
12th and Alma
736-9804
Students  put finger
in  Brock food  mess
Longer hours for the Brock Hall cafeteria is the first
problem being considered by the student-faculty food
services advisory committee.
At the first committee meeting Thursday morning,
food services head Ruth Blair agreed to prepare a cost
estimate of opening one side of Brock until 8 p.m. weekdays and 4 p.m. Saturdays.
Student committee members Lome Hudson and John
Kelsey agreed to investigate the numbers of students who
might use the late hours and to investigate costs of publicity to attract students.
The committee, chaired by plant scientist Dr. A. J.
Renny, also discussed food services costs, hamburger quality
and surly service from cafeteria staff.
UBC  shook   up   mildly
UBC's seismological station recorded three minor
earthquakes late Tuesday and early Wednesday.
Assistant professor of geophysics Dr. Robert Ellis said
the equipment registered very minor disturbance.
They accured in the Puget Sound area of Washington
state.
Ellis said the seismological station didn't feel the
shocks were significant enough to run a check on their
magnitude or location.
Play politicians meet
The parliamentary council has announced it will sponsor the parliamentary assembly to replace the defunct
mock parliament.
The proposed assembly will be based upon equal representation of all parties, each to have a maximum of 15
seats and equal time to present bills.
The vote on each bill will be a free vote, and parliamentary procedure will be followed.
The plan is based upon an idea first put forth by law
student Mike Coleman.
No definite date has been set for the assembly.
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear  Rentals
Tuxedos White A Blue Coat*
Full   Dreu Shirts  & Accessories
Morning  Coats Blue Blazers
Directors' Coats 10%   UBC  Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3--H67
2608  Granville  (at 10th)  4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by Sears)   HE 5-1160
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
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6814174 ■_-_-_-_-----lm»la»mmm"-»*m. u 1-«7S1 Friday, January 20,  1967
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
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UH"
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„*>*'
— kurt hilger photo
HOLY MANHOLE, Batman. Religion has just gone way
underground. Or perhaps it's just a convenient way to go
to   hell—or   an   even   better   way   to    get   to   heaven?
Architect-inventor speaks
A "visionary of the 20th century", Buckminster Fuller
will speak at UBC on "Man's Potential: Vision Unlimited".
Inventor-architect Fuller is famous for his geodesic
dome, which uses less structural material to cover more
space than any other building devised.
Fuller will speak at 12:30 in the armory Jan. 25
on invisible evolution and at 8:15 at Totem Park Jan. 26.
on how the world could be made to work..
Law students knock
Harvard standards
The UBC law faculty's policy of marking by the Harvard
scale, is costing law students its students $4,500 a year, claims
a UBC law student.
Bert McKinnon, Law 3, has been named head of a student
committee studying law scholarships.
At present, said McKinnon Monday, the faculty uses a
system which marks lower than other faculties based on
Harvard standards), thus depriving law students of scholarships
which otherwise might be awarded.
By comparison, in a medicine class last year, a student
with 70 per cent average, stood 40th in his class of 60, while
a law students with an average of 70 per cent stood only 14th
in the class of 93.
When government scholarships require a 70 per cent
average to qualify, 66 percent of the medicine students would
be eligible, where only 15 percent of the law students would
qaulify, McKinnon said.
The faculty gives two reasons for the discrepancy in
marking.
They say no students with first class averages enter
law, so there should toe no first class average given.
Cohen tunes in LSD
A leading authority on LSD will answer Dr. Timothy
Leary, an advocate of the drug, at UBC Monday.
Dr. Sidney Cohen will speak at 12:30 in the auditorium an all aspects of the drug including its dangers,
under the title An Answer to Timothy Leary.
Cohen has been studying LSD for 13 years and has
written two books on the subject.
Campus politicos attack
motives, demonstrations
By VAL THOM
Black power, Berkeley, and the board of
governors came under fire from all sides
Wednesday from campus politicos.
Charlie Boylan first vice - president,
Gabor Mate, and Blue Guard president Andrew Gates took broad swings at each other
during a meeting
at Interna-
tional House discussing student demonstrations and
the International
scene.
Mate and Boylan disagreed on
the effectiveness of
student demonstrations.
Mate    said    demonstrations were BOYLAN
limited in their effect.
"The value of a demonstration is in a
greater degree of consciousness and a
greater recognition of reality.
"For instance, the students demonstrating at Berkeley want to change the structure of Berkeley but the free-speech movement there knows they can't really change
Berkeley without changing society," he said.
"If an activist agrees demonstrating is
useless, then he has to decide how to change
society," he said.
"What way is most effective?" Gates
asked. Neither he nor the others present
answered the question.
Mate was asked what was to be done if
demonstrations were futile.
"A march is a mass action," replied Mate.
"It gets through to a lot of people. Thus
marches and distribution of literature on a
wide scale do lead to analysis of the point
being demonstrated."
Boylan had a different approach to the
question of demonstrations.
"If a person demonstrating is under the
illusion that action will accomplish something definite, and it obviously won't, then
this is an illusion. But the act of demonstrating is not therefore necessarily invalid and
invalued."
The question of student representative
sitting on the board of governors was discussed.
"How relevant is it to ask for changes
in the system without making others aware
that the whole system should be changed?"
Mate asked.
"There is a danger in asking for small
changes. These might be granted."
"Wouldn't these little changes help to
achieve the larger changes?" asked Ann
Jamieson, arts 4.
"These little changes won't cause a
change in position as is obvious in the board
of governors," Mate replied.
Boylan felt that changes were a question of power.
"This  is  the  significance  of  the  black
Braund challenges
think-in haranguers
Faced with today's education think-in in
front of UBC library, AMS president Peter
Braund Thursday challenged all haranguers.
"This is an important issue — I will
challenge anybody who wants to debate,"
said Braund.
The think-in, to form an action plan to
meet B.C.'s education crisis, occurs today
at noon.
Other thinkers, screamers, and yelpers
at the affair include Ubyssey editor John
Kelsey, anti-trivia expert Gabor Mate, AMS
expert Kris Emmott, and former second vice-
president Bob Cruise.
Rain will move the think-in to the
sheltered part of Buchanan quadrangle.
power movement," he said. "The demonstrators don't want civil rights any more,
but the ability to rule."
Returning to the value of demonstrations, a student asked Mate if he felt that
the demonstrations about the Vietnam war
would keep the controversy alive and keep
the U.S. from turning too ''rightist" in its
policies.
"The war policies are not decided on the
street. When the powers decide to cease or
escalate the war they will do so without
referring to the demonstrators," replied
Mate.
The student said this action would not
be tolerated by the public.
"I won't take back what I said," Mate
replied. "The demonstrations do have a
value in keeping the controversy alive,
however."
Boylan sounded off about the board of
governors.
He pointed out that over half of the members of the board represented the large
lumber concerns in B.C.
"These people use the university to
strengthen  their  own position,"  he  said.
"The university turns out engineers to
develop their forests, philosophers to study
words rather than ideas, and sociologists
to apologize for it all," Boylan said.
Unionist blasts
ex parte actions
as legal invasion
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ex parte injunctions give management
unfair control over labor, B.C. Federation
of Labor secretary Ray Haynes said Thursday.
An ex parte injunction is one whereby
only one side in a management-labor dispute can . obtain a court order preventing
the other, usually labor, from picketing or
wildcatting.
Haynes was speaking at a panel discussion on injunctions in labor disputes, sponsored by the industrial relations and commerce law clubs.
George Wilkinson, vice-president of a
Vancouver construction firm, represented
management.
Haynes talked about the increase in the
number of injunctions granted in the past
ten years.
"In the decade 1946-55 there were 63
injunctions granted by the courts, in the
ten years from 1956-65, 233 injunctions were
granted, mostly against labor," said Haynes.
Haynes referred to the United States
where the Norris-LaGuardia Act virtually
ended injunctions in labor disputes. He urged such legislation for B.C.
"There must be open courts and witnesses, not just affidavits, as in B.C. courts."
In B.C., employers may submit affidavits
to a judge for consideration. In the case of
ex parte injunctions, only one side must be
heard for an injunction to be granted.
Haynes said in the U.S. labor and management must have exhausted all other
avenues before asking for an injunction.
"■Injunctions are important but not in
labor," said Haynes.
"Our problem has been the invasion of
labor disputes by the legal profession."
Haynes said the courts were no place
for the solution of labor disputes.
Wilkinson cited the strength of the unions in B.C.
"More persons per capita belong to unions in B.C. than in New York," he said.
He said unions have completely clouded
the issue on injunctions.
"An attack on injunctions could be an
attack on the judiciary system," he said. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
To be Canadian today can only mean, objectively, to struggle against the American empire.
-JEAN ETHIER-BLAIS
Montreal, Jan. 7, 1967
JANUARY 20, 1967
Think, baby
Education action week starts Monday.
So far, it's a jumble of little rallies all over the
campus and a small, orderly march to Victoria.
The whole thing has been planned from the top
without the people who will march, and the result is a
nicey-nice walk across the legislative lawn to hear a
report of how a lovely-rogy brief was presented to the
education minister.
We're having a think-in in front of the library to
see whether students want to take more forceful action.
Like not moving from the legislature steps until
education minister Les Peterson emerges to divulge the
fate of education next year.
Come and think.
...and then act
In case you missed it, here's why students must act
next week:
• In 1963 and 1965, students marched and petitioned
for higher education. Yet, both marches were followed
by either fee hikes or budgetary cuts by the provincial
government.
• Every year, briefs are sent to the government stating the needs of education and suggesting reforms like
students on the senate, out-of-town equalization grants,
fee abolition, independent grants commission, and more
education spending. Each year, these suggestions are
ignored by the education minister.
• Thus, the orderly protests and dignified briefs of
the past have had no effect, and thevprovincial government continues to put blacktop and dams before people.
0 This year, retiring president John Macdonald
says B.C.'s three universities need $66 million from the
government next year.
• He says past performance shows we aren't likely
to get it, even though the gross increase in expenditure
is only $6.5 million.
• Education minister Les Peterson refuses to confront students and thus refuses to tell what he knows—
the fate of education. Therefore, it must be bad.
• It is certain that premier-cum-finance W. A. C.
Bennett knows what the next budget will contain for
education. He delivers his budget speech to the legislature during the first or second week in February. But
the breakdown of the education figure to elementary,
secondary and post-secondary spending comes only with
the education estimates—early March.
0 If there is a deficit between university grants and
university needs, a fee hike and general belt-tightening
at the university follow. But teaching and research have
already been tightened to the last notch. A fee hike is
intolerable. ,
0 Trouble is, the university can't set its budget until
after Peterson makes his March estimates. Among other
things, it needn't announce a fee hike until April — or
June, as last year.
0 At that point, students either pay or go— and all
the marches and briefs of the past have been for nothing.
The only possible time for action is now.
O/i, the pain
We note an ad in our own classified section claiming all the interesting people will be at Mardi Gras.
Gee, Mardi Gras sure knows how to hurt a guy.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing     ..       Richard Blair
News    ..   . ...      Carol Wilson
City       .           Danny Stoffman
Photo        fowell Hargrave
Page Friday    _  ...   ...    Claudia Gwinn
Focus          Rosemary Hyman
Sports             -    Sue Gransby
Ass't News Al Birnie
Ais'tCity    _        Tom Morris
CUP  Bert Hill
Victory party tonlte. All staffers
and dates welcome. Free booze.
Find out where In office.
Val Thom chased baby-face Les
thru hotel corridors. Charlotte
went to Strasbourg:. Murray McMillan, Margaret Ladbury, Joan
Fogarty, Don Stanley, Liu Shao-
chi, Derreck Blackie, Kathi Harkness, Boni Lee, Kris Emmott,
roadrunner Val Zuker, Bo Hansen  and  Elliot  Rlhl  made  news.
Mike Jessen and Tony Hodge
speared sports. Fotogs Kurt Hilger and Al Harvey frugged. Dennis Gans posed for mental health
and Derrek Webb sat.
Here comes  one of the inhabitants nowl
How money works:
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Is the (B.C. provincial government going
to do three universities out of $27 million?
Or will we have $27 million taken away
and $20 million handed back?
Or maybe even get it all back?
If it sounds puzzling, Premier Bennett
is glad. So long as nobody knows about it,
the $27 million grab is quite probable.
Here's how it will work:
UBC operates on revenues from a variety of sources. We get individual gifts
and bequests, research grants from the American government, fees from services and
sales such as the Haney forestry project and
bookstore and, of course, tuition fees.
Most important, however, are grants
from the provincial and federal governments. They make 70 per cent of revenues.
• • •
Last year, according to Dr. Macdonald's
December 27 statement, B.C. universities
got $33 million from the province.
The year before, they got $26.5 million.
That's an increase of $6.5 million. The '65-
'66 figure, 26.5 million dollars, was also an
increase of $6.5 million over the previous
year.
Now suppose, said Dr. Macdonald, that
the province increased its grant by the
usual amount, and if another $27 million
were available, we'd have the $66 million
he finds necessary.
Let's digress for a minute. Why do we
need $66 million dollars?
Dr. Macdonald listed a lot of good reasons. Operating costs, building costs, development, rising enrollement, implementing
the Bladen Report — it all costs money.
Salaries and prices are going up.
But isn't he asking double the amount
of last year's grant?
Right — but it's unfortunate he put it
that way, because $66 million is double last
year's provincial grant.
• • •
Macdonald wants the provincial grant
to go up only the usual $6% million. The
rest of the $66 million is the $27 million
we were just mentioning. It's the amount
we ought to get from the federal government.
This year, however, we don't get a
penny from the federal government, except
for research grants. Ottawa has a new
policy.
In the past, Ottawa gave operating
grants on a per capita basis to the province.
This is for operating the universities, not
building.
Now, however, the federal government
is turning certain taxes back to the province
in lieu of grants to education.
Ottawa is ceasing to collect four percentage points of income tax and one percentage point of corporation tax, and letting
the provincial government take over these
tax resources. Prime minister Pearson estimates this will come to about $27 million
in B.C.
• • •
"Ottawa says this is a substitute for
federal  aid to post-secondary  education,"
says a university spokesman.
"But nothing compels any provincial
government to use it for any particular
purpose.''
In other words, Premier Bennett is
handed $27 million and told to use it for
education. Universities need it. We would
have gotten it under the old program.
But if Bennett spends it on highways
or bridges we can do nothing.
Ottawa has opted out of supporting universities, and we must depend on Victoria.
Macdonald has said Victoria can do it, but
Victoria won't unless the public grasps the
situation.
• • •
Last year Quebec premier Jean Lesage
got $17 million this way. Only $9 million
ended up at universities. McGill asked for
a $3.5 million increase in operating funds
and got $96,000. If that happens here, it
means cutbacks — it means slowdowns —
it means a university that can't afford to
get better and might get worse.
And that's not all. Recall last year's $33
million provincial grant. Of this, about $25
million went for operation, salaries and so
on, and the rest for building .In Bennett's
budget estimates, operations and buildings
are separated.
Last year's federal grant was $9 million
and this year's will toe nothing, but $27
million is coming to the province and
should come to us. But suppose Bennett
keeps out $7 million for general government. That means $20 million for universities. And suppose it goes in the "operations" column.
The figure of $25 million for last year
is now suddenly $45 million. Everyone will
think the B.C. government has given us an
enormous raise.
So even if Bennett gives universities
only part of the $27 million federal grant,
he'll still look good unless you know what's
happening.
As Dr. Macdonald pointed out, unless
the total is $66 million, it isn't enough. *_*:«jp-__*.«_.»-*_»-»"-.* .» ■» •".*■.•■__-■*-«_»-* ■:»«-__•,-» pf
... a weekly magazine ot
comment and reviews.
JAN. 20,  1967
ON TH£ COVER: Moster
man in black and white
ink on white background.
Another drawing by Rae.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants:  judy bing
(for moral
support)
sue richter
rosie   hyman
(for driving
us  nuts)
cartoons: gordon fiddler
rae moster
photo:  kurt
The activist:
who is he ?
By DAVID L. AIKEN
Canadian University Press
International
Students most likely to be
active in student protests are
those whose parents raised
them permissively, and who
have the affluence to ignore
conventional worries about
jobs and status, according to
a recent study by a University of Chicago sociologist.
In a study of "the roots
of student protest," Richard
Flacks, assistant professor
of sociology, writes, "It
seems plausible that this is
the first generation in which
a substantial number of
youth have both the impulse
to free themselves from conventional status concerns
and can afford to do so."
Flacks proposed as an hypothesis that students today
are active in protest because:
• They find student life
highly "rationalized," which
is related to impersonality
and  competitiveness.
• They have been reared
in permissive, democratic
families, which place high
values on standards other
than high status and achievement.
• These values make it
more difficult for students
to submit to adult authority,
respect status distinctions,
and accept the prevailing
rationalized, competitive system.
• Since they are "not oriented   to   the    (prevailing)
norms of achievement," they
feel less need to accept conformity to "get ahead".
Moreover, they can afford
to be non-conformists—"affluence has freed them, at
least for a period of time,
from some of the anxieties
and preoccupations which
have been the defining features of American middle-
class social character".
• They spend a long period in a university environment which, with a series of
events around 1960 including Southern sit-ins, has
changed from an atmosphere
of "cool" non-commitment
to concern with direct action.
"A full understanding of
the dynamics of the movement requires a 'collective
behavior' approach," Flacks
comments.
• Finally, the formerly
disorganized bohemian forms
Chiselled finely paid
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
I Old battered thinker
; with a chip off your shoulder
': and five gold mosquitoes
buzzing the classics of temporal
knowledge
. into your finely chiselled
I ears
I Your eyes stare straight in front of you
; / look behind me
i You offer me your broken bowl
' Shall I give you some of my magic coins
: or use it to be sick in?
I I shall give you some of my magic coins
| / shall throw them into your bowl
: as the stars were flung at the sky
I My coins are old the inscreptions
i have faded, if you rub very
* gently on paper
', you can maybe just see
. On one side there is an old king
I On the other side a phoenix
My coins put light in the empty
i        windows as you
i walk below them at night without
j excuses and
■ wonder if she's there or alone or
' writing a poem down from the window
r (I have one of the thirty Judas pieces
I shall not give you that one
The field of blood is mine)
i My coins are as gentle
I as night mourning day
'(They promise to pay
! the bearer on demand
i / shall give you some of my magic
I coins —
I What a pity your hands are stone
they will all be stolen by your
gold mosquitoes
Perhaps you would prefer
an umbrella?
>iY'\\*       <-     ;„' ii <>~\%V W',','j:v. ,'sii&?^4_Sk\l»\»tvV„.-j*,s_r
policies,"  Flack reports.
In demographic terms,
Flacks found that activists
are likely to be from high-
income, well-educated, professional families from urban areas. Activists are also
disproportionately Jewish,
and tend to come from recent immigrant stock, his
study found.
Only about one-third of the
activists in the large sample
of Chicago-area students,
however, said their political
position was "socialist,"
while more than half said
they  were  "highly liberal."
While all students reported opinions more liberal
than those of their parents,
there was a significant gap
between the parents of activists and those of non-activists.
Clearly, student activists
are likely to come from liberal, politically active families.
They are also likely to come
from families in which "permissive, democratic" child-
rearing practices are used, as
shown by the parents' own
reports.
The homes of activists
were also those in which
values other than material
wealth  are fostered.
Flacks rated students on
four values patterns:
• Activists are high in
romanticism, which he defined as "sensitivity to beauty," and, more broadly, "explicit concern with . . . feeling and passion, immediate
and inner experience".
• They are also high in
intellectualism — concern
with ideas.
• Humanitarianism is also a trait of activists, who
are "concerned with the
plight of others" and place
high value on egalitarianism.
• Activists are low, however, in moralism and self-
control, defined as "value on
keeping tight control over
emotions, adherence to conventional authority and morality, reliance on a set of
external inflexible rules to
govern moral behavior."
of deviance have become
translated, through the liberal-minded parents, into a
developing cultural tradition
into which the activist students are socialized.
A second generation of
radicals is reaching adulthood, born of the radicals of
the thirties, Flacks pointed
out.
Attempting to discover why
the current crop of college
students has developed such
a strong protest movement,
while students of the fifties
were noted for apathy, Flacks
organized a study of the family backgrounds, political beliefs, and values of students
active in such movements.
For a second study, he
seized the opportunity offered by the spring sit-in at the
University of Chicago's administration building.
According to Flacks, the
most striking results of these
studies are:
• Student activities differ in terms of values and
attitudes from non-activists
to a high degree.
He attributes the uniformity among activists to the
effects of a subculture reflecting their shared perspectives, not simply to "common
personality traits or social
origins."
• Parents of activists also
"deviate from convential
middle-class values and attitudes to a marked degree".
• The difference of values
between students can be
directly traced to different
values of their parents,
Flacks believes. He contradicts "a frequently expressed stereotype of activist students as rebels against parental  authority".
• Activists are not ideologues. While they are "militant, committed, and radical
with respect to particular Issues, they are not committed
to overarching ideological
positions."
This point is reflected
"most dramatically in their
unwillingness t o describe
themselves as socialist or to
endorse   explicitly   socialist
Concert contrasts
By   MURRAY   McMILLAN
Sunday's performance by
the Vancouver symphony
orchestra was a concert of
opposites.
There was a contrast in
selections of music ranging
from the light Mozart overture to La Clemenza Di Tito
and Stravinsky's elf-like Pul-
cinella Suite to the all-engrossing Brahms' second
piano concerto, and Strauss'
Death   and  Transfiguration.
Variety in sound occurred
as well, from the quiet beauty of the third movement
piano and cello passage in
the Brahms, to the overwhelming finale in Death
and Transfiguration.
Size also entered the picture, as 5*2" pianist Claudio
Arrau teamed up with 6'4"
conductor Otto Werner-
Mueller.
The Mozart, a seldom heard
selection, masterfully played.
The Death and Transfiguration left the listener exhausted under the weight of
the compostiion.
Stravinsky' s Pulcinella
Suite is a playful thing. In
its eight separate passages, it
ranged from a delicate chamber music style, to a harsh
noise which ruined the sixth
and seventh sections.
Arrau's mastery of the keyboard and Werner-Mueller's
mastery of the orchestra
were evident throughout the
Brahms' piano concerto. The
work was executed as the
engrossing composition it is.
Especially notable was James
Hunter's cello solo in the
third movement, which sang
out over the packed theatre.
pf 2wo
j smm$«? >&.<v -"a"v->?r#'~'-.,-".' ^ ~, r v. »wi» ^-r,:n i^^^T^^rrfOT?^^ ^^_---_____--------s^_____--___^________
i Page 6 THE      UBYSSEY Friday, January 20, 1967 THE MIND TRAP
shoulder boulder trapped, this
cord around my shoulder snapped wrench tense stretch flex,
push rush bound, found among
the stones the old, cold ploy
and thre rapid snapping ot the
snakes after choosing to bruise
my hands against the milky
mist, the silkytwist of rope,
grope in the dark black sack,
acrid light seeping in, peeping
in through my dreams, drew
in the shadows of the seams,
the intricate web of silk,
spiderless, invisible binding
wrist, wrestling right from
wrong, white as a lily, wet as
chicken flesh. Enmeshed in the
whirling hurled vortex, word-
world water wound in sound
and bound by winding sheets,
the word-worm winds its way
through shroud and shrivelled
and loud is the footfall ot a
bat. nothing is instant, everything is done underwater,
green and slow troubling only
the silent seaweed stretching
heaven wards, in seaward semblance, breath sea green
taught air, teeming with
dream and drained ot life.
£¥
heads snap from the trap trail
triumph train true who and
on. Run ran run have run will
run where and who and on in
up down through snap trap
and no one.
ivfe
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^ $*(***/
STOP
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w&i
black squares and chairs stare
down the long hall and sheep
sleep and what do you do when
your sheep catch front legs
and hang on the fence and on
one counts cares shares and
squares, black black black.
Turn from the inside out turn
turn turn rabbit cornerscaught
in the long dark hutch sheets
white and night riding the
slow dark ceiling and sheep
caught in the corner with cobwebs webs and slow steel
snares trap
%
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^A- -  - ii   a-UJ,
The sickness:    society or self ?
By BONI LEE
The disturbed university student: Is he sick
or is society sick?
It's a question that skitters through the
mental-health-on-campus problem, as the realization comes that most disturbed students are
a new kind.
That breed is one of the thinking individuals, the students seeking academic fulfillment at university, searching for answers and
finding none.
The disturbed student coming into focus
today is not the student who cannot cope with
academic pressures.
The emotionally and psychologically disturbed student today is an intelligent and active
student who thinks, really thinks about the
society around him.
This disturbed student does not sit locked
in his room poring over books. He does not find
it hard to make friends nor does he remain
apathetic to student activities.
But he questions the atmosphere around
him and he probes the value of his society. He
asks himself and society:
Why, nine to five workday?
Why a university degree?
Why a starving two-thirds of the world?
He is the student disturbed not by the isolation but the impersonality of the university.
And more often than not, he is a student of
latent and stifled creative talents.
Emotional crises
For some, the turmoil culminates in a major
or minor emotional crisis.
For others the turmoil extends deeper into
a self-examination or a searching probe of
'society ending in complete breakdown and an
unwillingness or inability to face reality.
Time also reported that National Student
Association's Chuck Hollander estimated 20 per
cent of college students use drugs ranging from
pep pills to marijuana, and amphetamines, to
the psychedelics (LSD and mescaline).
On the UBC campus known suicides number
five to six per year.
Said psychiatrist Dr. Bennet W. Wong,
"Attemped suicides on campus are common.
Some never even get to the health service."
The campus drug situation reflects this growing alienation.
Informed sources say suspicion of marijuana
smoking in residence has led to police surveillance of student residents.
UBC psychiatrist Dr. Conrad Schwarz said
he didn't think barbituates, dexedrine, or heroin
are serious problems.
"But LSD, a dangerous drug — we're seeing
sufficient people with complications from it,"
he said.
Indicative of the growing use of drugs,
especially marijuana, are articles appearing in
recent Ubysseys:
"Marijuana and LSD users in Vancouver
are organizing."
"A $2 'head tax' is being collected by the
city's marijuana smokers for the protection of
their brethren."
A Ubyssey editorial stated: "It (marijuana)
is used much as the rest of society uses beer—
a thing to do with your friends before dinner."
Those who do, find escape from what they
call a "grey reality"; a reality unacceptable to
their standards and demands.
A fourth year student, a club executive,
attempted to explain her recent breakdown.
"A multiversity"
"It's not the bigness of the university," she
said. "It's the matter of the multiversity. I was
hoping to find something in university — I am
now completely frustrated with education.
There's a lack of continuity in taking the
courses you want and a lack of freedom in
pursuing things in these courses.
"I have not been an academic in any way,
shape, or form; yet, in three months I'm going
to graduate with a little piece of paper that
says I have my bachelor of arts degree.
"I think the problem is mainly one of acute
depression brought on by university pressures.
"You don't get academic fulfillment here.
You seek fulfillmetn in other activities and become more of a pseudo-student. You get into
an even bigger rat race.-
"University typifies the sickness of society.
Students come here looking for some method
of dealing with the world, but not in it, and
find more people, professors included, hung up
here than anywhere else."
Dr. Schwarz said, "Mental health on campus
is a cause for concern. There's enough emotional difficulty on campuses to justify expansion of psychiatric services quickly."
Schwarz prepared a recently released Canadian Union of Students report on university
health and psychiatric services.
Students seek help
The report points out that a 1963 CUS survey showed from 49.5 to 69 per cent of students
at seven universities polled "felt a desire to
seek counsel or advice regarding emotional or
psychiatric problems."
"A student is under a lot of pressure. He's
got to pass," said one graduate social worker.
"He's studying constantly and if he's not
studying, he's subconsciously worrying about
his studies. He's always worried about his own
potential. This could make or break a person."
A new emphasis on liberalism assaults the
student with new and different political, religious, social, and moral views.
"This is a learning environment," the social
worker said. "'Learning is a responsibility —
your responsibility. And it's your responsibility
to experiment and to know. This carries right
on into sex, politics, and religion."
The student new to the university has added
problems. Uncertain of himself in tooth potential and career, uncertain of the university but
intensely aware of the importance of his education, he is thrown into an atmosphere unlike
any he has known. He is confused by what he
once thought, what he should think and what
he wants to think.
Straight from high school, he must learn
to make his own decisions, so he must isolate
the issue, examine the ramifications, study the
pros and cons, and make a definite choice. He's
been taught not to be impulsive, he doesn't
want to be impulsive and at the same time is
terribly unsure of himself. But time runs out
and the decision must toe made.
And for many, that decision is to leave the
university, to drop out, to think for a year or
more.
"There is a fear of coming to live in one
direction and the development of oneself to one
unit," said Bennet Wong.
"Most of the problems are problems of 'ego-
diffusion', not being able to find oneself," he
said.
Sees 3 per cent
"Kids getting lost don't know where they're
going or what they're doing."
Wesbrook psychiatric clinic sees an estimated three per cent (500' students) of UBC
student population.
CUS' student mental health surveys found
friends are usual people consulted toy students
who need psychological help.
Many students need and want psychiatric
help but don't seek it, because of lack of knowledge of facilities — or because of the social
stigma still attached to psychological and emotional problems.
One girl admitted: "It took me three weeks
to get up the courage to see a psychiatrist. I
felt it was admitting weakness on my part."
"Some kids feel they shouldn't verbalize;
they keep the problem internal, and it becomes
a real problem," said one student.
In his report ODr. Schwarz noted that students questioned on a CUS survey listed their
three serious problems as: (1) despondency and
depression, (2) lack of self-confidence, and (3)
relations with the opposite sex.
"Students and faculty members have some
difficulty recognizing that the average university student is still engaged in the process of
forming his identity.
"At any point in the search for meaningful
relationships which will help him to define himself as a total person, the student may encounter catastrophe.
"Study habits may be adversely affected,
impulsive course and career choices may be
made reach suicidal proportions, insecurity may
lead to dropping out of university and anger
(fo pf 5)
See: SICKNESS
Page -8;
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1967 By IAN CAMERON
Entertainment seekers, arise! People who
work at their studies during the week and
want to relax on the weekend, take note.
We have the answer.
Or at least we have the answer for this
weekend. The answer comes in the form
of a play at the York Theatre, in the 600
block Commercial Drive.
The play Lord Arthur Saville's Murder
is presented by the Vancouver Little Theatre
group.
It is an adaptation of an Oscar Wilde
Sickness
(from pf4)
may lead to the rejection of legitimate authority."
That mental health on campus has been a
student concern is obvious.
National student groups have called many
conferences and seminars and conducted surveys on all aspects of this topic. CUS backed
and partcipated actively in the distribution of
the  Schwarz  report.
And already the Schwarz report has come
under student fire:
"Dr. Schwarz is proposing yet another department to more ghettoize and standardize
the university process," wrote Ubyssey assistant
news editor Al Bernie in an analysis of the
report.
"What students need is some real ideas
which will work towards bringing the Great
Society more into relation with basic human
individualism. And they need impetus from the
academic community.
"They do not want to be rationalized to the
existing system, which is what Dr. Schwarz's
increased health services will do," he said.
"The kids breaking down are the ones who
cannot accept the standards of an insane society
but are being forced to," suggests a third year
student politician.
"Psychiatrists are merely fitting these individuals into a system."
But there are still some on the university
campus who think student mental health is no
cause for concern.
"I don't think there's that much of a problem,'' said one student.
"Maybe the issue has been hashed over too
much," said another.
For these people a solution for the disturbed
student of today may be of little or no consequence.
But a solution for the obvious student turmoil must be found.
Oskar Werner
winner of the New York
Critics' Best Actor Award
TECHNICOUr
Showtimes: 7:30, 9:30
Sunday 3, 5, 7:30, 9:30
Adults $1.50
Students $1.25
story, and is directed by John Parker, the
new artistic director. Saturday, Parker informed me that he had entertained doubts
about the whole thing when he took the
job, but if the performance I saw is any indication he should have no worries.
The play is a typical Edwardian drawing room comedy; in fact it's so typical that
it's almost archetypal. When the curtain
rose I thought for a second I'd misread the
title, because it starts with a piano playing
the Wedding March offstage, followed by
a discussion between a butler and a young
peer on the advantages and disadvantages
of marriage — exactly like The Importance
of Being Earnest.
I hate reviews that do nothing but outline the plot, so we will dispense with that
by saying that the young peer in question
discovers he is fated to commit a murder,
and the sooner the better. Who gets murdered is immaterial, and his search for a
victim forms the bulk of the play.
The play itself was well done, considering
the fact that it an amateur production. There
was no "Omigawed here comes that mother
again I wonder if she'll get through this
scene alright" feeling about it.
On the other hand, there was no "Here
comes the valet again, let's laugh" feeling
either. The cast did a competent, workmanlike job, with just two exceptions. Jack
Droy, who played the butter, was somewhat better than competent. He has a sense
of timing that is invaluable in comedy, and
the laughs he got were always just a bit
bigger than anyone elses.
The other exception was Gail Chester,
in the part of the maid. She was up to standard generally, and more than up to standard
in some respects, but her accent slipped once
or twice.
An accent is sometimes hard to keep up
throughout a performance, but it would be
better to omit it than to be inconsistent.
The only other criticism I have concerning the actors is that Lyla Chaykoski the
fiancee, neglected to allow enough time for
laughs and her lines were lost.
The effects were good, with one minor
slip on the sound which was covered up
by the actors in a< most professional manner.
The theatre is not the best in the world,
but the company does very well with what
it has.
I would prefer to see the floods less
powerful, as they light up the house more
than they should with the present arrangement.
To delve into the realm of statistics, I
counted 25 small laughs, eight large ones,
and two spontaneous applauses. That comes
out to one general laugh every four minutes,
not counting snickers and titters.
That may not be continuous merriment,
but it's better than average, by a long shot.
All in all, the production is a winner.
Anyone who expects to see the original cast
of My Fair Lady for $1.50 is going to be
disappointed, but anyone whose idea of
entertainment consists of the average Hollywood effort will be delighted. People who
know something about theatre will be well
satisfied.
For advanced booking, phone the York
Theatre. Tell them we sent you.
Next week in this column I'll review the
Arts Club production, Wednesday Night.
It stars UBC type Angie Gann, and should
be a winner.
MCOIS
Truffaut
Julie Christie
her first role since her
Academy Award & for "Darling"
I
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Meanwhile, back at the lodge, it's time-out time for
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Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
MEMBERS FOR HOST COMMITTEE,
TENTH ANNUAL C.U.S. SEMINAR
Members will make arrangements for the Tenth
Seminar, to be held in late August or early September in the Lower Mainland area. The position would
involve work on one of the following sub-committees:
Finance, Facilities, Public Relations, Transportation,
Entertainment, or Clerical. Some tasks will require
more participation during the school term than in the
summer; others will require little activity until the
summertime. Experience in related work is helpful,
but not essential. Members will attend the Seminar
as part of their duties. Further inquiries and/or
applications should be directed to Box 153, Brock
Hall, or phone 224-6965.
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will be
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
HOMECOMING CHAIRMAN:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Homecoming Chairman. Eligibility forms are available from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock). Applications
and eligibility forms must be submitted to the Secretary of the Alma Mater Society, Box 52, Brock Hall
before Thursday, January 19th, 1967.
Friday, January. 20,. 1967
THE      U B Y S S E .Y.
fag©■•».■ HmtH&zm?^ V,S"H *VW&
Awareness guards our system
Editor, Page Friday:
I am sure many students
are disgusted by the hypocrisy and extremely poor
taste (and often sciencemen)
in the thoughtless "bomb
the Cong" placards (The
Ubyssey, Jan. 12), and their
thoughtless publicity by The
Ubyssey.
On many topics, including
the Vietnam war, a greater
awareness and social responsibility is urgently needed, not only because of the
tens of thousands of lives
lost each year in the war,
but also because of the great
dangers of this.
Besides the obvious danger
of escalation leading to nuclear war, there are the ap
parent increasing alienation
of the Eastern and Western
worlds, and the precedent of
widespread chemical (if not
biological) weapons in a war.
Last September 22 eminent
American scientists wrote to
President Johnson emphasizing the danger of this precedent, and its impact on future use of CB weapons.
A country and its people
ACID rockers dance to the electric sound of Don Payote's Fantastic Sensations
in  Brock  lounge, Thurs.
pASA&nta
Dr. Sidney Cohen
'_4 Reply to Timothy Leary'
Dr. Cohen is the coauthor of a book on
L.S.D. with Richard
Alpert. In addition he
has written two other
books "The Beyond
Within" and "The
L.S.D.  Story."
Dr. Cohen is the chief
psychiatrist at Wadsworth hospital in Los
Angeles. For the past
13 years he has done
research on L.S.D.
LS.D.
Mon., January 23,12:30
-35c
1967 Summer Employment Program
Social - Economic Disciplines with
the
FEDERAL CIVIL SERVICE, OTTAWA
Thinking of a Career?       Try us out hr the summer!
QUALIFICATIONS:
1. You must be specializing in one of the following:
Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, Industrial Relations,
Business Administration, Commerce, Economics, Statistics, Social Work,
Psychology, Medical Social Work, History, Home Economics or Library
Science.
2. You must be enrolled in an Honours program and entering the final
year of this program in the fall of 1967, or continuing studies at the
post-graduate level.
SALARIES:
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APPLICATION FORMS:
Available at your Placement Office — Complete and return to the Civil
Service Commission of Canada, Ottawa 4, not later than Jan. 31, 1967.
must know what they are doing and where they are going; lack of understanding
and consequent onesidedness
is certainly a major cause of
war. This is even more important in the atomic age.
Yet despite this, many of
us couldn't care less or are
hypocritical.
Even The Ubyssey, which
as a local mass medium has
great responsibility, spews
out trivia instead of dealing
with more important and
urgent matters.
For instance, as far as I
know, The Ubyssey has not
had a single article on last
November's China Teach In
discussion sessions. This is
just an isolated example but
one just has to read The
Ubyssey to see the utter irrelevancy of at least 90 per
cent of the material. Nor
have there been any responsible editorial views on the
subject.
We do not have to have
any political views on the
war and other very urgent
important issues (necessity
for preventing nuclear holocaust, the explosive conflict
between Chinese communist
and Western ideologies, the
growing gap between the
rich and poor nations, etc.)
unless we are well informed,
but there is no excuse for
refusing to understand the
issues and thus be able to
prevent the worst, at least.
Not to do so is not only
very foolish, but also very
dangerous.
It is when a nation loses its
social responsibility and enlightenment becomes general
apathy, which becomes hypocrisy, that one can take
seriously Hardial Bain's
assertion that there is serious
danger of a kind of fascism;
aside from its moral implications, this is most dangerous.
Public awareness is a main
safeguard of our democratic
system; this is fast disappearing, in an age where it is
more important than ever.
ANDRES LOO
science 2
NO PROTEST
I realize that neither the
editor of The Ubyssey nor
the editor of Page Friday
was responsible for certain
deletions in my article on
jails (Ubyssey, Jan. 6), so a
protest is not in order. But I
would appreciate it if I could
present one of the parts
which was left out. Without
it, I imagine some readers
would have been a little confused.
After the words 'I start to
undress. Take off my coat.
Start unbuttoning my shirt. "I
said take off your clothes",'
should have come:
"■Fist hits my body. Don't
feel it. Fist slams into my
nose. Blood flows. Doesn't
hurt. But O this pain inside.
How can he hate me so
much? My mind weeps. And
I'm scared."
PETER LIGHT
library staff
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Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1967 School sex education:
teenyboppers stoppers
By PETER LINCOLN
I recently had the pleasure
of a attending a meeting of
the Planned Parenthood and
General Hoopla Society and
I am taking this oportunity
to make known to the rea-
d e r s the history-making
events which took place.
The chairman of the group
at present is George Washington Washandwear, often
misnomered as the father of
the birth control movement.
(The actual founder was
Eric the Crud, a used carp
salesman).
The audience responded
fervently as Washandwear
called for an end to creeping decency. This applause
soon turned into pandemonium when he shouted "Don't
make your kids suffer.
Don't have any."
A few individuals in the
audience started yelling "Up
wth sperm!" but this outburst was small and confined to a few of the older
members of the group who
still retained the earlier
established ideas of free love.
The highlight of the evening and the thing that the
whole evening had really
been for was the speech of
Aldous Bewoulf, noted lech-
erer.
In his speech he conceived of a stronger and more
militant birth control movement, to be spearheaded by
a political  party  known   as
the Safe Guard, which he
said would be a sort of "illegitimate front" for the policies of the parent movement.
He said the platform
would consist of a call for
the abolition of the natural
birth rights of man and that
if elected one of the first
steps in the implementation
of this would be the establishment of a national
sperm bank at Ottawa. He
stated once again the line
which had brought him
fame: "There'd be no taxation  without  population."
He proposed more sex education in schools in a
"teeny-stoppers for teeny-
boppers" program.
Washandwear's proposals
were immediately and unanimously adopted. With the
audience so obviously inspired the chairman called for
suggestions for a new party
slogan. He was not disappointed.
The slogans varied from
the more conservative "The
party that doesn't kid
around" to the more radical
"The nation that aborts together, cavorts together."
It was finally decided for
the sake of wider public
support and offending fewer
minorities to adopt a more
pf 7even
middle-of-the road slogan,
"Fifty-four forty or we
might fight if circumstances
indicate that action of this
nature might ibe most conducive to assuring the welfare of the public, all other
things being equal."
Only one incident marred
the night. It seemed that the
treasurer who was to have
presented a temporary baby
budget at the meeting had
some last minute business
dealings to attend to in Rio
de Janeiro. The picture he
sent of himself and his new
secretary working hard in
his penthouse suite assuaged any misgivings or
doubts anyone might have
had.
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Friday. January 20,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 ->   , \3>>^c- . ^ -*«*~<ns,-.
Let us compare Cohen's — books
By SEYMOUR MAYNE
Two books by Leonard
Cohen published by McClelland and Stewart: Let us
Compare Mythologies, and
Parasites of Heaven.
Leonard Cohen's Let Us
Compare Mythologies should
have been available ten years
ago, for the first edition in
the McGill Poetry Series
went out of print in a few
months after publication in
1956.
What one unconsciously
does now is to bridge these
two books and wonder where
Cohen has gone from the
early sources of his first
book.
Critics and anthologists
have always presented the
mythopoeic Cohen but have
neglected the less ornate and
starker elements of Mythologies.   Summer   Night,   one
Long
night
trip
Eugene's O'Neill's Long
Days' Journey into Night begins with each member of a
family uncomfortably asserting a defensive image of
himself with the others and
ends with each resigning
himself to his weakness in
an utter state of hopelessness. In between, the family
conflicts, confesses, and rationalizes. None of them can
help the other; none of them
can help themselves.
The set design is appropriately suggestive of a poverty
that is incongruous with the
expensive type of dwelling.
Each of the characters sits
in a particular chair which
is ill fitting; just as each of
them is out of joint with
himself.
The director conveys the
pace of the rocky and torturous self analysis and denial that the family subject
themselves too.
The stage business is expressive of the individual
iharacter's idiosyncracies and
conflicts.
As the penurious father,
the dreamy mother, the
pushy elder son and the dependent younger one, each
of the actors in his or her
respective role is convincing right down to the physical twitches that express
the characters' neuroticisms.
The fifth act, however, left
this viewer expecting the
end to come after every
speech. No fault of the director. I have the impression
that O'Neill was trying to
delay the inevitable in a
flood of words, which perhaps he hoped might transform what he felt must come.
pf 8ight
Girding of the loins, raw knees, self judgment
elongate the glinting mosaic in the idolatry of terror
of the first poems to map out
the back-and-forth directions
of Cohen's wandering and
the blatant affront to innocence, is a sharp poem besides the mythopoeic favorites.
Another, Rites, is a hurt
shout. These two poems point
to how he purged his styles
into "The Spice Box of
Earth" and "Flowers for Hitler"—the directness married
the fascination for the dark,
glinting mosiac of pain, and
the recounting of pain.
Parasites of Heaven is a
book of calm poems—a respite after the furious world
of   Beautiful   Losers.   The
poems, simple on the surface, translucent, with ambiguous ironies, can be read
and sung as songs, as chants
or psalms of the aftermath.
The striking pages concern themselves with the
lingering pain of self judgment, whose agony Cohen
loves to elongate along with
the brave poigancy of being
the  Exile,  the Chosen One:
You know where I have been
Why my knees are raw
I'd like to speak to you
Who will see what I saw
Some men who saw me fall
Spread the news ot failure
I want to speak to them
The dogs of literature
Pass me as I proudly
Passed the others
Who kneels in secret flight
Pass us proudly Brothers
Or   the re-visions   of  the
idolatry of the self:
/ come to this page
in the not so early morning
with a picture of him
whom I could not be for long
not wanting to return or begin
again the idolatory of terror
What may put off some is
the inclusion of many earlier
pieces, obviously reworked
versions from notebooks.
They suffer from the over
reliance on oblique similes,
or the pathetic fallacies that
Cohen  falls   into   when   he
projects himself onto everything at hand.
Where now, after this girding of the loins?
He had the last line of each
verse of the song but he
didn't have any ot the other
lines, the last line was always the same. Don't call
yourself a secret unless
you mean to keep it.
He thought he knew, or he
actually did know too much
about singing to be a singer;
and if there actually is such
a condition, is anybody in it,
and are sadists borne there?
It is not a question mark,
it is not an exclamation, it
is a full stop by the man who
wrote Parasites of Heaven.
Even if we stated our case
very clearly and all those
who held as we do came to
our side, all of them we
would still be very few.
That's Cohen on Cohen.
help wanted in Antigua, Burundi,
Columbia, Ghana, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Madagascar,
Peru, Rwanda, Sarawak, Tanzania, Tchad, Trinidad, Uganda, and Zambia.
it's your world.
These countries have a lot in common. Every one is
no place for you if all you have to offer is lofty
ideals. These are countries that need realists—people
who are ready to get down to work. And come down
to earth. Literally. Don't kid yourself . . . signing up
with this outfit will mean slugging it out through a
tough, demanding job. That's the only way you'll fill
the needs of these countries. And who knows, maybe
you'll have a few of your own filled. What is CUSO?
It's a national agency created to develop and promote overseas service opportunities for Canadians.
It arranges for the placement of qualified men
and women in countries that request their
services. If you're sent to a country it's because they've asked for you. Or someone
like you. How does CUSO work? Abroad, it
works through different international agencies
who all assist in the placement of personnel.
In Canada it works through local co-ordinating
committees, located in most universities, but serv^
ing the whole community. What kind of people are
needed? People with' something to offer. People with
things like knowing how to teach mathematics or grow
wheat, how to clean a wound or build a bridge. These
countries need people who are adaptable and mature.
People with initiative. People who can earn respect, and
give it. Think about it for a minute. You'll know what
you have to offer. What is the selection procedure like?
Tough. Because we don't believe in sending underdeveloped people to developing countries. Preliminary
screening is carried out, where possible, by local
committees. CUSO then nominates candidates
to governments and agencies requesting personnel, who make the final selection. CUSO
also makes arrangements for preparatory and
orientation courses. How do you apply? Get
more information and application forms from
local CUSO representatives at any Canadian
university, or from the Executive Secretary of CUSO,
151 Slater Street, Ottawa.
CUSO
Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1967 Friday, January 20,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  13
DISCORD, ATTACKS'
China visitor denies
Campus ferment grOWS Red Guards rioting
BY CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Students threaten to crash a closed board
of governors meeting at Waterloo University.
Fewer than 100 miles away, Glendon
College students' council calls for an assembly on the subject "whether or not the president of this university has the? intellectual
integrity to discuss his views publicly".
At the same time, a Montreal daily newspaper predicts the University of Western
Ontario, torn with student-faculty-administration discord over university government
structures, could become Canada's Berkeley.
In Calgary, 3,500 miles to the west, students at the Southern Alberta Institute of
Technology attack paternalism in an administration which forces them to attend 90 per
cent of their classes and refuses to listen
to their complaints about lack of adequate
health services or residences at SAIT.
Meanwhile, a timid report notes that
only one Canadian campus possesses student
health and psychiatric services that are on
a par with U.S. facilities. The report, published by the Canadian Union of Students,
warns of new discontent raging in student
minds across the country.
PART IN DECISIONS
An editorial page in The Daily Ryersonian, student paper at Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute, recommends that courses at the
institute be extended to four years; supports
student "'freedom" to take a part in decisionmaking within the academic community and
calls for cessation of U.S. bombing raids on
North Vietnam.
An effervescent McGill history professor
named Laurier LaPierre travels thousands
of miles across Canada, telling students that
Canadian universities are "ghettoes" and
the students who attend them do little more
than contemplate their navels while the
world around them seethes with social injustice.
And across the country, student councils
hold superficial discussions on the problems
of education, the social and economic barriers to post-secondary education in Canada
and the inadequacies of university factories.
Their un-structured rivals in student activism, the Student Union for Peace Action,
holds a meeting and decides that more structure is needed in their protests.
Most of this in one week. And all amid
the politeness and bromides which are Canada's Centennial year.
CRASH BOARD MEETING
This week, the campus hotspots are the
University of Waterloo and Glendon College of York University.
At Waterloo, students council president
Mike Sheppard has vowed to back up his
council's resolution calling for open decisionmaking in his university community.
He and other council members were
planing to show up at Jan. 19 board of governors meeting — in spite of protests from
university president J. G. Hagey.
In a letter to Sheppard, President Hagey
said the plan to attend the board meeting,
with the student newspaper present, could
jeopardize work being done by the joint senate-student committee on university government.
This committee, which has three student
representatives, was formed last term to
study the Duff-Berdahl report on university
government and to "bring forward proposals for any desirable reforms of the existing structure of government at the University of Waterloo".
Sheppard has denied the student federation is trying to alter board procedure, saying it is impossible to change the board's
structure without revealing its operations to
the student body.
ORGANIZED STUDENT STRIKE
And when the committee submits this report to the board of governors, debate on the
subject will foe closed.
Sheppard said that while there is little
immediate likelihood of an organized student strike being called to support student
demands for the "open-door policy", he
warns that council won't accept compromise
solutions and could call a strike if all
methods of sober debate and negotiation
fail.
Student council members at Glendon
College, another centre of campus ferment,
are seriously examining the new Advisory
Committee on Student Affairs there.
The committee fell apart in November
when student representatives from Glendon
and York campuses refused to support the
university president's 'close d-m e e t i n g'
policy.
However, President Ross set up another
committee — termed a "bastard committee"
by council vice-president Rick Schultz —
similar in every respect to the old one.
"He's just set it up in the same way, thus
making student representation on it impossible," says council president Jim Macdonald.
Macdonald is now trying to establish a
university-wide, student-faculty committee
which he hopes will overshadow the ACSA
and eventually advise the president on matters of student concern.
FULL REPRESENTATION
Several faculty members have already
indicated strong interest in this proposal.
Macdonald and Schultz are fighting for
a committee which will give students full
representation in areas concerning them.
Although council itself realizes secrecy
is sometimes justifiable, it "must be the exception rather than the rule,' says Schultz.
Rumors are already flying that students
will strike if President Ross refuses to meet
their demands.
Meanwhile, Allan Offstein, former editor
of Glendon's student newspaper, the Pro
Tern, is blasting students for their "apathy,
silence and ignorance of their group power".
No one escapes his scathing tongue,
which accuses the faculty of selling "their
obligations as cultural and intellectual leaders to the machinery of bureaucracy, and
prostituting their values and ideals for the
whoremaster known as security".
In a front-page editorial in the paper,
Offstein tells students they are not getting
what they are paying for, they are not getting what they are "entitled" to.
Until the students realize what they are
missing — in the way of leadership and
education ideals — they will continue to
sell themselves short, he said.
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The western press is "criminal" in its reporting of what's
happening in China, a recent China tourist said Tuesday.
Clive   Ansley,   a   graduate '      ~~.      T        ~~"
"They   laughed   when   we
quoted   the   western   reports
and   asked us   to   check   our
skins  'before  we   left  to   see
that we were intact.
"It is obvious that this third
and fourth hand information,
fragmentary and contradictory is not material on which
a person can base a sound or
reliable political analysis
about country which is as
large and as complex as
China.
"We are dealing with a big
oountry witfti very complicated
internal politics faced with
some extremely difficult and
complicated choices."
a graduate
student in Asian studies at
UBC, talked about China to
a packed house at the Advance Mattress coffee house.
Reporting of events in
China is very sensationalized,
said Ansley.
"There are reports of riot
and of pitched battles and
important officials being
dragged through the streets
and of Chinese threatening to
tear the skin from white
peoples' backs. These things
are not happening."
Ansley visited China last
year and talked to red guards.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20,  1967
— powell hargrave photo
A WILD DISARRAY of flying bodies, flailing sticks, and a lost puck (right corner) was
typical of the rough action at the UBC-Alberta game Thursday noon. Picture shows
one  of the rare moments when the Birds neared  the Bears' goal.  Bears won  4-1.
Birds suffer in scramble
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds lost
the opening game of the Hamber Trophy
series 4-1 to a strong University of Alberta
squad Thursday.
The Golden Bears came out to win and
outplayed the Birds in every period. Al
McLean, playing best for the Birds, picked
up UBC's lone goal on a booming shot late in
the first period.
The Birds, who came out very slowly,
played their worst game according to coach
Bob Hindmarch. He feels strongly, however,
that his team will be able to take the series.
McLean's penalty at 2:02 period number
one led to a power-play goal by the Bears'
Gerry Braunberger. The Birds tied the score
with McLean's tally at 16:41, but at 19:01
the Bears went ahead to stay on Braunber-
ger's second goal. The opening period ended
with the Bears ahead 2-1.
The Bears came out quickly in the second
period and at 2:14 made the score 3-1 on
a goal by Darrell LeBlanc. The Birds tried
to stop the Bears with stiff body checks
but nothing seemed to work for the UBC
team as at 19:50 Del Billings got Alberta's
final goal.
The Birds have now lost three WCIAA
games in a row.
>The Hamber Trophy was donated in 1950
by the late Hon. Eric Hamber, former Lieutenant Governor of B.C. and former UBC
Chancellor. The Cup has only been won
twice by UBC, in 1950 and 1963. Alberta's
perennially strong hockey teams have won
the trophy 14 times. The series continues
at the Winter Sports Centre with games at
8:30 p.m. Friday and 2:30 p.m. Saturday.
JV's vanquish eleventh victim
The UBC JV's basketball squad continued to master its opposition teams with a
81-61 win over Kerrisdale Wednesday night.
The victory ran the JV's win streak to
11 straight. It also gave them a record of
28 wins and no losses against Jr. Mens
competition over two years. The UBC
team is atop the Inter City hoop circuit with
26 points on 13 victories.
Larry Donaldson and Gordy Hogg led
JV scorers with 14 points each. Sam Van-
demeulen and Derek Sankey each had 11.
In a display of excellent defensive play,
Vandermeulen held Kerrisdale's leading
scorer, Ross Molberg, to only two points.
Doug Dougan, however, managed 28 points
for the Kerrisdale squad.
When the playoffs start the first place
team will play the fourth and the second
will play the third. The winners will then
meet to decide who will represent B.C. in
the Canadian finals to Ibe held in March in
Saint John, New Brunswick.
The JV's next game will be against Victoria at 4:00 p.m. in War Memorial Gym
on Saturday.
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds play
two very important games this weekend
against the University of Alberta Golden
Bears.
The games, which will be played in Edmonton, are a must for the Birds if they are
to stay in the running for the WCIAA title.
The UBC team has to maintain a good
road record to keep up with the Conference
leaders, Edmonton and Calgary. All three
teams have two losses.
In previous games with the Bears, the
Birds have won one and lost one. Last weekend the Birds lost 73-72 before beating Calgary 65-58. Their Conference record stands
at 2-2.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
UNIVERSITY HILL
(United)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
'A Long Look at the Future'
HAROLD MacKAY
ON THE BOULEVARD
ST. ANSELM'S
(Anglican)
8:00 a.m. & 9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion
11:00 a.m. Mattins
"Genesis — a Myth?"
JIM McKIBBON
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to get by! YOU know this.
Consult us. Vancouver's
first tutoring college. (Still
here because we get results). To third year University — Our staff is fully
qua-Uiied. Success rate?
Above 90 per cent pass it-
subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571 Hew* Street
683-8464
OKITA OVERPOWERING
Last Saturday UBC's Yoshi Okita won his second straight
judo tournament this year.
Okita fought at the YMCA, winning both the lightweight
black belt championship, by defeating Tabata on a throw and
a strangulation technique, and the overall championship. He
threw Sam Taknaka cleanly.
Okita captured both titles earlies this year at the UBC
judo tournament.
In the colored belt matches, the club was represented by
John Michalski and Doug McLean. Although each lost, to
Frank Uyoyama and Fred Menard, they displayed a great deal
of speed and ability.
Both were considerably hampered by their inability to
train last term. This slowed some of their best techniques and
cost them power.
s
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYFS EXAMINED
2 Convenient Offices
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   41 s.t at YEW
Graduating Students
Interested In
A Financial Career
should have an interview with
The Royal tat
representatives on campus
January 26th & 27th
Appointments made at the Placement Office
The Royal tat
COMPANY
Canada's Leading  Trust   Company
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ALL THESE METALS
ARE AVAILABLE  AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR .. . 685-2271 Friday, January 20,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page   15
Row, row, row...   To Present Brief
With the addition of new equipment and
a new assistant coach, the UBC rowing
crew is preparing itself for the Pan American Games.
The history of rowing at UBC is an impressive one. Laurels began pouring in under coach Frank Reid in 1954. That year
the UBC crew won the British Empire
Games. The victories continued in 1956 with
a gold medal in the fours and a silver in the
eights at the Olympics.
In 1958 the crew brought back a gold
in the eights and a silver in the fours from
the British Empire Games. In I960 it was
a silver in the eights at the Rome Olympics.
The crew returned with another gold
medal in 1963, from the Pan American
Games in Brazil. And in 1964 they recorded
their last big win — the gold medal in the
pairs at the Tokyo Olympics.
The crew has gone down since, held
back by the older equipment. But it is building up once again.
Crew members, under the direction of
coach "Wayne Pretty and assistant coach
John Cartmel, are working on a new program of conditioning.
This includes weight training, cycling,
and exotronic leg conditioning, developed
by Cartmel and Dr. E. Bannister of the faculty of phys. ed.
UBC aquired new equipment last fall,
a new coach boat and an Italian eight-oared
shell. The shell, the gift of UBC's 1966 grad
class, is the same type with which the
world's best crews are having success.
Coach Pretty hopes it will bring UBC
to the forefront of world class competition
once more.
The crew is led by captain Wayne Os-
terhout who has rowed at UBC since 1961.
He was also a member of the Canadian crew
which went to Yugoslavia last September.
Most of the other members have rowed
collegiately for two or three years. In the
eights we have Bruce Noble at the bow,
Bill Chapman at stroke, Bruce Clark, Wayne
Osterhout, Brian McDaniel, Fred Chapman,
Brian Rigby, and Eric McAvity. The coxwain is Herb Crawley.
In May, UBC wil compete in the West
Coast Collegiate Championships in Los Angeles and at St. Catharines, Ontario at the
Canadian trials.
A win here will give the crew the right
to represent Canada at the Pan American
Games in Winnipeg in July.
If they are successful at the trials they
will also be asked to take part in the Centennial Regatta at St. Catharines in August
with the best crews in the world.
— bill Cunningham photo
LAST LAURELS, a gold medal in the pairs
at the Tokyo Olympics in 1964, were
brought home to UBC by George Hungerford and Roger Jackson.
Student council will present a four-point
brief to education minister Leslie Peterson
at the rally on the legislature steps Jan. 28.
The rally is the climax of a march on
Victoria by students from B.C.5s four universities, B.C. Institute of Technoly, Vancouver
City College, nursing schools, and high
schools, publicizing the needs of higher education.
The brief will include a request for
equalization grants for out-of-town students
and a demand for the elimination of tuition
fees.
The establishment of an independent
grants commission to administer government
grants to universities is called for, as is
student representation on the senate and
board of governors.
Profs pep up meet
More than 500 black and iblues screamed,
drank, and threw toilet paper streamers,
lunchbags, and paper darts during the annual science pep meet Thursday in Hebb
Theatre.
Sciencemen watched a skit envisioning
the student take-over of the faculty and
senate in 1984. In the skit Drs. L. G. Harrison, N. J. Divinsky, J. W. Bichard, D. C.
Frost, B. R. James, and C. E. Dolman took
roles as Beatle-wigged students at a faculty
meeting.
It was the first time profs have participated in the event.
Science queen Brenda Bryan presided
over the booze raffle.
Gymnastics go
Six UBC gymnasts will show their skill
at the first home meet of the season.
The four-way competition begins at 2:00
p.m. Friday. UBC is hosting the University
of Alberta (Edmonton), Victoria College,
and Everett Junior College.
Representing UBC are Captain Dennis
Fridulin; former Canadian Junior Champion, Bill Mackie; returning letterman, Pete
Prince;   Ray   Stevenson;   Clint   Buhr;   and
John Samela.
• •       •
The UBC wrestling team will give a 10-
point advantage to a tough Western Washington State line up this Friday night.
The Thunderbirds meet the Vikings at
7:00 p.m. in the Women's gym. There is no
admission  charge.
Last year Washington defeated UBC 30-
5. This year UBC will toe without wrestlers
at 123 lbs. and 152 lbs. Chuck Tasaka is out
with a shoulder injury.
Here is the line up for the Birds: Wayne
Cave, Dennis Boulton, Ron Turner, Dirk
Heiss, Ken Kerluke, Greg Greiner, Jim For-
nali, and Chris Nemeth.
• •       •
Once again the field hockey games
sheduled for last week were rained out.
The schedule is now seven weeks behind.
Games will probably be made up on Sundays.
This coming Saturday, weather permitting, the Thunderbirds go against North
Shore at 1:00 p.m. on Wolfson field, Tomahawks vs. Pitt Meadows B at 2:30 p.m. on
Wolfson, and the Braves play Vancouver A
at 2:30 p.m. on Spencer.
Rugby now rolling
This weekend marks the opening of the Northwest Intercollegiate Rugby League with the UBC Thunderbirds going
against Victoria College.
The game will take place In Victoria on Saturday afternoon.
Two years ago the Birds won the league which consists
of teams from UBC, Victoria College, Western Washington
State, University of Washington, University of Oregon, and
Oregon State.
Last year UBC lost in the finals 9-6 to U. of O.
U. of O. is going to be the team to beat once again this
year. In September of 1966 this team made a tour of Great
Britain. This gain in experience, and the fact that there are
a number of Internationals playing for them, including Alan
Morton, an ex-Wallaby, would indicate that they will be a
very tough team.
In other rugby action this Saturday, the Braves play North
Vancouver at Kinsman Stadium, the Totems play Simon Fraser
Academy, the Tomahawks play St. George's. All local games
kick off at 1:30 p.m.
Graduates  In Civil  Engineering
Highways Department
PROVINCE   OF   MANITOBA
offers
Job Opportunities
Covering  a Wide, Range of Activity
Placement will be made in one of the following sections:
Bridge Office
Planning  & Design
Materials & Research and
Field  Operations
Wherever possible, the successful applicant will be
employed  in  his field of preference.
Our career development program, recently introduced
for professional personnel, provides recognition for outstanding performance and excellent opportunity for
advancement within the Highways Department for graduate engineers who desire challenging work is available.
Starting   Salary:   $585  per  month.
Apply in writing to the Personnel Officer, Highways
Department, 1075 Portage Ave.,> Winnipeg, Manitoba.
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with
State Farm's
low insurance
rates for
careful drivers.
See me.
Jack Mellor
STATE   FARM
8455 GRANVILLE ST.,
VANCOUVER 14, B.C.
261-4255
INSURANCE
STATE FARM
MUTUAL
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE COMPANY
CANADIAN HEAD OFFICE
TORONTO, ONT.
5WQ
GOOD STUDENT? 25% DISCOUNT Page 16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 20, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Cohen replies, acidly
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special events presents LSD expert Dr.
Sidney Cohen in a Reply to Timothy Leary,
Monday at noon in the auditorium. Admission 35 cents.
VIETNAMESE SPEAKER
Huynk K. Khanh, a Vietnamese PhD stu-
detn from Berkeley and Dalhousie universities speaks on the Failure of the West in
Viet Nam, today at noon in the auditorium.
(Possible further weekend program — check
with special events.)
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today at noon in IH. Coffee will
be served.
IH
Dance tonight in the Lower lounge of
IH. Admission 25 cents.
SOCREDS
Seminar  with Ralph Loffmark, tonight
at 8 p.m. in Bu. 1221.
VCF
Fritz  Hull  of  Seattle  speaks today  at
noon in Ang. 110.
LIBERAL CLUB
Finance minister Mitchell Sharp speaks
today at 3:30 in Brock lounge.
YUKON PC'S
Meeting for all Yukoners tonight at 7:30
p.m. at 1135 'Howe St.
NDP
Colin Cameron and five other speakers
discuss a Foreign Policy for a Puzzled Canada, tonight at 7:30 in Mildred Brock.
INTERNATIONISTS
Bob Cruise discusses the Radical Middle,
tonight at 8 p.m. at 4454 West 2nd Avenue.
CIASP
Meeting of applicants Friday at noon in
Brock ext. 350.
GERMAN CLUB
The film Vom Sport in Deutschland (in
German) will be shown today at noon in Bu.
203. Also meeting to finalize ski trip plans.
EL CIRCULO
Judy Wood speaks on a Mexican Village,
today at noon in Bu. 204.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Hoi-. Davie Fulton will not be speaking
Tuesday as was previously announced.
GEOLOGY
Geology museum open Monday to Friday,
12:30 to 1:30, in FG 116.
UBYSSEY
Dreaming of being a star reporter? Come
down and work for The Ulbyssey, the first
step on the road to fame. We're in the basement of north Brock.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Movie in Newman lounge,  St.  Mark's,
Sunday at 8 p.m.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Mrs. H. Mowinkle speaks about emotionally disturbed children, Monday at noon in
Bu. 203.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Hon. Marcel Lambert former speaker of
the house and cabinet minister speaks today
at noon in Bu. 214.
CIRCLE K
Meeting with entertainment Monday at
noon in Bu. 2205.
EAST ASIAN SOC
Japan summer  exchange  slide" showing
and display, Tuesday at noon in Bu. 202.
UN CLUB
Profs.   Wilmott,   Solecki   and   Goldman
speak at a China Seminar on the Red Guard
crisis, Tuesday at noon in Brock.
MATH CLUB
Meeting concerning open house at noon
Tuesday in Ma. 204.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPT.
Harvard bible scholar Dr. Ernest Wright
discusses the new theology Tuesday at 8
p.m., Bu. 106, admission 50 cents.
McGill students volunteer
for strikebound schools
MONTREAL (CUP) — About 15 McGill
University students have offered to assist
the  Montreal  Catholic  School   Commission
'Words' sells 700
The first edition of Words sold briskly
Thursday.
Words is the journal of the UBC and
Simon Fraser Internationalists.
A non-profit magazine, it does not accept
adyertising.
"We all chipped in $15 each and if we
sell all 2,000 copies we will break even,"
said UBC editor Rod Wilczak. By 3 p.m.
over 700 copies of the 1,500 on sale at UBC
had gone.
Internationalists are a faculty-student
group which meet to discuss important issues.
Everyone is invited to this week's meeting Friday at 8:15 at 4454 West Second
Avenue. Law student Bob Cruise will discuss
"The Radical Middle".
during the current strike by 9,000 elementary and high school teachers.
They volunteered to cross picket lines
and help strikebound classes continue with
their studies.
Some 200,000 Montreal students in 500
schools are affected by the walkout backing
teachers' demands for an 18 per cent salary
increase, improved working conditions, increased consultation with teachers and security benefits.
The school commission has offered a six
per cent salary increase. Talks between the
two groups remain stalemated.
The McGill offer was relayed to the commission by students' society president Jim
McCoubrey.
McCoubrey said he and the other students are seriously concerned that the strike
will cause lengthy interruption in studies.
He suggested some students would find
part-time jobs and then fail to return to
school after the strike is settled.
SASAMAT    SHOES
CLEARANCE SALE ON
BROKEN LINES
Factory Prices
4463 W. 10th 224-1017
SKI WHISTLER
COMPLETE  FACILITIES
A-Frame, .8  people—$30.
Bunkhouse,
$2.50 per person
For additional  information
Phone Mrs. Sand? Martin, 921-9356
or B.A. Station  (Whistler Mtn.)
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN   CAFE
Bavarian Room    -:-   3005 W. Broadway   -:-   RE 6-9012
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found         11
LOST: PAIR OP GIRL'S BLACK
kid driving gloves last Tuesday,
Angus or Ponderosa. Phone YU
7-0566.
FOUND: 22"x22" COTTON SCARF
at .3:25 p.m., Jan. 18 on crosswalk
between library and bookstore.
Phone Richard, RE 3-1077.
Coming Dances
124
THE
DANCE  OF THE  YEAR !
CAMPUS   A GO-GO      -
returns to the armouries on Sat.,
Feb.   4th.    Details   next   week.   It
will be a must !
NEWMAN BALL, REGAL BALL-
room, Georgia Hotel, Friday, Jan.
20, 8:30 p.m. $6.00/couple ($5.00 for
members). Tickets at A.M.S. or
Newman   Centre.   Dress   formal.
MARDI GRAS CHARITY BALL,
Show Mart. Tickets on sale now
at   AMS   office.   $5.00   per   couple.
WEST COAST SOUND: THE
Painted Ship and William Tell &
the Marksmen ! Fri. at the Afterthought.  2114 W. 4th.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
FENDER JAZZMASTER $290.00.
736-0776   after   6.	
BE A DROP-OUT. WHY NOT 7
Find out, you college students,
at ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM In
Paradise Valley, Feb. 3-5. APPLY
A.M.S.  office or  Brock  206.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and  see  our minerals and fossils.
PROFESSORS WILMOTT, SOLEC-
ki and Goldman speak at China
Seminar, Brock Hall, Tuesday,
Jan.   24 — 25c.
A FEW TABLES ARE STILL
available for group bookings at
Mardi Gras, Saturday, Jan. 28 for
clubs, dorms and other organizations. Call Charlie Graham, 224-
9769 for arrangements.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED WITH CAR
pool. Vicinity Broadway and
Granville.    Phone    Rick,    738-7345.
Wanted
15
MARRIED      STUDENT     PHOTOG-
lapher   requires   a   figure   model.
 Phone   682-4031   after   6   p.m	
STEREO RECORD PLAYER: COM-
ponent parts. Amplifier changer
speakers. Good quality desired instant cash. Phone Don at 224-1540
after 5 p.m.
CARTOON ENTRIES HAVE YOU
tried your hand at cartoon drawing yet ? HURRY—deadline Jan.
23.  Submit at  Bu.   ext.   168.
Travel Opportunities
16
TRAVEL TO BROCK HALL AND
meet China face to face! Tuesday,
January 24 — 25c.	
FEMALE STUDENT WISHES TO
find other girl travelling to Europe ttiis summer. Phone Dot,
224-9945.
BE TRANSPORTED BY THE
beauty of our Light Show. Quiver
to the Strobe at the Afterthought.
2114 W.  4th.
AUTOMOTIVE  &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MUST SELL '63 MORRIS MINI.
One owner. Condition like new.
$695. Phone Don Newton, 224-9956.
1957 VOLKSWAGEN DE LUXE.
Good condition. Radio, new tire,
mechanic's dream, $350. Phone
evenings, _Peter_224-7887.    _
*52 PONTIAC SEDAN 6 CYL.
stafld. shift City tested. Good
transportation.  $100.   261-7166.	
1958 DODGE V-8, auto., $450. 1966
Humber 4-speed. Runs excellent.
$175. 731-1566, Tony, after 7 p.m.
1961 VATJXHAJLL VICTOR. EXC.
cond. First owner, $650. Ste. 203,
2285 W. 6th Ave. 733-2379.
Scandals
39A
UBC HEALTH SERVICE INADE-
quate ? There isn't a health
centre in Santiago. Who helps?
WUS helps. Share with WUS in
Feb.	
LYNNE AND KEN STERLING
had a baby girl Jan. 12.
PHIL M. IF YOU HAD A CHANCE
to live your life over again would
you still fall in love with your-
self.  — Lonely Heart.	
CAUTION D. TERRY H., THE
bells are ringing for you and S. S.
RED GUARDS INVADE BROCK
Hall   Tuesday,   January   24,  12:30.
CUT DOWN YOUR OVERHEAD —
get a hair cut. Campus Barber
Shop,  Brock ex.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
JANUARY CLEARANCE. THE
Campus Shoppe, 5732 University
Blvd. (in the Village) 228-8110
"Where prices are always right."
LARGE OAK CHINA CABINET,
convex glass sides $139.50; Oak
writing desk $14.50; Bed chesterfields $16.50 & up; Walnut bedroom suite $59.60 complete; complete line of unpainted furniture
at reduced prices.
KLASSEN'S USED FURNITURE
MART
3207 W. Broadway RE 6-0712
Also Beer Bottle Drive at Rear
Scandals
39A
FRIDAY   FREAKOUT
to the sound of the Painted  Ship
and  William  Tell  &  the  Marksmen !   The  Afterthought,   2114  W.
4th.
WANTED, INFORMATION ON
psychedelic usage in Vancouver,
for publication. Phone 732-2686
(days)  or 987-1284  (nights).	
THE GIRLS ARE BETTER-LOOK-
Ing on Saturday night at Mardi
Gras. Will you be there ?
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE   EF-
ficlent,   any   time.   224-5621.	
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8684   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays  and   thesis at  home.   Mrs.
Hay,   3963   Bond   St.,   Burnaby   1.
433-6565  after  6:00  p.m.	
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST    AVAIL-
able     for    home    typing.    Please
phone   277-5640.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
Essays and Theses. Reasonable
rates. I.B.M. executive typewriter.
Telephone:   263-4023.
EXPERT TYPING. FAST. REAS-
onable. Experienced in term pa-
pers,   essays.   Phone   736-0538.
STUDENT — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, theses, etc.,
low rates. Phone 733-0734 anytime.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
HELP!  RED GUARDS  MARCH ON
Brock Tuesday,  January 24.	
STUDENT WANTED: RECORD
librarian for UBC radio. Typing
and general knowledge of records
helpful. South Brock basement.
Work Wanted
52
VERSATILE GENIUS AVAILABLE
Fridays & Saturdays. Will accept
any wage offers. Phone Jack, 988-
4564.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Music
  63
WANTED — EXPERIENCED
drummer and experienced singer
for rock groups. Phone John, rm.
250,   224-3112.
64
Instruction-Tutoring
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
WANTED: STUDENT TO TUTOR
Grade 9 math to girl. $2.00 per
hour.   224-7196.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
'65 MODEL FENDER BASSMAN
Amp. Special heavy-duty speaker
system. New condition. Student
must sell. Phone Pete eves, 224-
5958.
10-SPEED RACING BIKE BAR-
gain at $50 or swap for tape recorder. Ron, HE 4-4585.	
MEN'S SHOES. SIZE 8V.-9. SHIRTS
15%. Suits 38-40, etc. Bunk beds,
desks. Any reasonable offer, 5612
Holland St., near Dunbar.	
FOR SALE SKIS USED, COM-
plete boots size ten new, poles
new. Total price $85. Phone 266-
7278,  Gordie.
RENTALS  It REAL ESTATE
Rooms
11
1 SINGLE BEDROOM WITH BATH,
telephone $46 mo. 2606 W. 33rd
Ave.  263-8428 after 6 p.m.
Room 8t Board
FABULOUS ROOM AND BOARD
for male student, 49th and Marine
Dr. Ph. AM 1-5454.	
BOARD & ROOM FOR MALE STU-
dent. Non-smoker, non-drinker.
224-7174.	
ROOM AND BOARD FOR $80 ?
Would you believe $40? Call 224-
9660 for the real cost. Five minutes
from  classes.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Good food and comfortable accommodation. Phone 224-9662 after 5
p.m.	
PRIVATE ROOM AND BOARD
for quiet male student. 4595 West
6th.  Phone 224-4866.
BOARD AND ROOM AVAILABLE
as of Feb. 3 at PSI Upsilon. Phone
Ross   Little,   224-9665.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
WANTED ONE MALE STUDENT,
21 yrs. to share basement suite.
Private entrance, kitchen, share
bath, $32 per month. Start now.
Phone 261-6120, ask for Bill.
STUDENT WOULD LIKE TO
share her apartment with
another girl over 21. Call 738-6411.

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