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The Ubyssey Nov 15, 1966

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Array _}
CAVORTER CATCHES
By LIN TSE-HSU
Two UBC co-eds were injured over
the weekend after separate attacks by
a man described as wearing a Scottish
kilt and a white T-shirt.
The attacks were identical to an
incident two weeks ago when science
student Winona Ford was accosted and
grabbed by the bottom. She escaped
into a barn.
Latest attacks occurred late Saturday
and late Sunday. All three attacks have
taken place in the northern end of
B-lot.
Saturday's victim, Rita Hallyer, arts
2, was still recovering Monday when
interviewed by a Uibyssey reporter.
"I was cutting across B-lot to Totem
Park when I saw this man in a skirt
running toward me.
"I stopped and looked at him and he
came up and grabbed me on my bottom
with both hands," she said.
Miss   Hallyer,   a   romance   studies
major, said as the man grabbed her
he yelled: "Yummy.''
"It was terrible . . . terrible," she
sobbed. "He seemed to be hysterical—
he started laughing in a high, shrill
voice. Then he ran away."
Miss Hallyer, a five foot, three inch
blond, said the man was barefoot.
"When he was running away I heard
him yell, 'Ow, my toe.' He must have
stubbed it," she said.
The arts student said she is unable
to sit down without discomfort since
the attack.
"It's still sore," she said. "And my
boy friend says there's a bad bruise."
Second weekend victim was Jennifer
Sanders, arts 1.
Miss Sanders, also pinched in B-lot,
said she fainted when her attacker
yelled "yummy," and bruised her ankle.
"I only fainted for a few seconds,"
she   said  Monday.   "The   pinch   itself
UMWARE
NovZtWJ-
WINONA FORD
. identifies evidence
I was wearing a
In anotherjsjfeyelopment Monday,
Op ft authorities ■a'-Jsro^ a Ubyssey reporter-
7^ff*Slfei€9-_er^am to view a piece of
'*'l_-_t tepn—ffom the phantom pincher a
week last Thursday. A physical education co-ed had chased the man after
recognizing him from a Ubyssey description.
She was left with the piece of tartan
as he disappeared over a construction
fence.
Authorities had refused permission
for a press viewing of the cloth all last
week.
"It's an important clue and we had
to study it," one said. "We are expecting word this week from an expert in
Victoria on what clan the kilt represents.
Authorities say they can't account
for the man's use of the word "yummy."
—kurt hilger photo
THE  ONLY  BAD  THING about  smoking   pot   is  the   rap
mumbles attractive coed as she views poster, produced
by Nov. 11th committee as part of program to educate
an unbelieving public that pot is not harmful.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 25 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER  15,   1966 -*3^'R 224-3916
Mass march plans
pushed by BCAS
By RON SIMMER
BURNABY (Staff) — A united front of B.C. students
will inarch on Victoria January 27.
Students   from    universities,
secondary schools, vocational
institutions, and nursing
schools will speak together on
the steps of the legislature as
the B.C. Assembly of Students.
The assembly has named
Jan. 27 Education Action Day.
Meeting at Simon Fraser
Academy this weekend in the
first annual BCAS congress,
120 delegates drafted resolutions to be presented to education minister Leslie Peterson
when the budget comes down
in the legislature in January.
"We are drawing up four
briefs based on these resolutions from each area of education — technical, nursing,
secondary, and university —
and will drop them in the lap
of the provincial government,"
said BCAS co-chairman Paul
Williamson.
"The Victoria march is a
part of our program to actively  promote   the   improvement
Lower Mall men petition
to free residence coeds
UBC male residents are demanding fewer restrictions for
resident females.
A private petition initiated
by Lower Mall resident Martin Dunn, arts 3, is presently
circulating mens' residences.
The petition reads:
"We   the   undersigned   men
COUNCIL
GOES RIDING
(SEE PAGE 3)
in residence petition the housing administration for an end
to the inimitable attitude in
local parentinsis.   (sic)
"We request that the women in residence be under no
greater restriction and obligations without their consent or
written instruction from their
parents than the men."
The petition makes specific
reference to late leaves, signing in and out, and access to
buildings after their securance
for the night.
Dunn hopes  to present the
petition to Students for Democratic University.
"I hope they will accept it.
I don't expect much opposition," he said.
Dunn said if refused he will
ask student advisors to bring
the petition to their next
meeting.
Reaction to the petition has
been varied.
"Student advisor Mike
Chapman, Acadia camp, is in
favor. The other advisors feel
the petition will have very
little consequence," he said.
of education in B.C.," said
Williamson, former student
council president at University of Victoria.
"BCAS tries to involve all
students in the province because we believe education is
a continuum, and must be provided for en masse," he said.
Delegates at the congress
came from six nursing schools,
two universities, SFA, Notre
Dame College, BCIT, Vancouver College, and 39 high
schools  in B.C.
The congress was marred
when delegations from over
25 high schools in the Vancouver and Burnaby area
failed  to   appear.
Vancouver and Burnaby
school boards told John Mynott, student council president
of SFA, he should have approached them before mailing
invitations to high school student councils.
Mynott said in an interview
Sunday   most   Vancouver   and
(Continued on Page 3)
See: MARCH
Contest winners
up for hanging
Prize winners in an art
contest sponsored by the
faculty of arts will be announced at an International
House  reception today.
The competition, entered
by 25 students, was to find
two paintings, to be purchased by the faculty, for
display in new seminar
rooms in the Buchanan
building.
Dean of arts Dennis Healy
will make the awards at
3:30 p.m. in the IH lounge.
PAUL WILLIAMSON
. . . tromp, tromp
United users
acidly deny
pot is habit
Marijuana and LSD users in
Vancouver are  organizing.
The current police crackdown on the circulation and
use of marijuana in the city
has prompted a group of users,
mainly students, to organize
themselves to combat what
they feel is widespread ignorance of the real facts about
such drugs as marijuana and
LSD.
The November 11th Committee or C-ll met last Friday
to discuss strategy for a drive
to change legislation against
and inform the public about
the nature of the drugs.
Committee chairman, Jamie
Reid, a graduate of UBC, says
there are about six hundred
"grass" or marijuana users in
(Continued on Page 2)
See: HABIT Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 15, 1966
—powell hargrave photos
HAPPINESS IS A LONELY BEACH, a jug of wine, — but the third ingredient seems to be
escaping back to the dirty, soulless city. Nevertheless, we will sit here and soak up
mood, paying no heed to Christmas exams, approaching three weeks hence. Omar
Khyaam knew what he was talking about.
Seven universities get
bills for CUS services
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
seven universities which quit
the Canadian Union of Students this fall will be billed
for services they received up
to the date of their withdrawals.
The union's board of directors, meeting here at the weekend, voted unanimously in
favor of charging the seven
for services they received
from Aug. 1 through their departure dates.
The seven instiutions would
have added about $12,000 to
CUS coffers this year, and the
organization's lawyer said
Saturday he believes CUS
could still take legal action to
recover the entire amount.
The lawyer also said he
feels University of Alberta
students have "a good case"
for breach of contract action
against their union, which
withdrew from CUS Sept. 19.
Such an action, he suggested, would be based on the
assumption   that   U of A   stu
dents were entitled to receive
CUS services such as its life
insurance plan throughout the
current fiscal year.
Said CUS president Doug
Ward: "Legally, they (UofA)
owe us $7,000. We're letting
them off with $1,000.
Council to improve
teaching, research
UBC dean of graduate studies Ian McMcTa.ggart-Cowan
has been named head of the new Biological Council of
Canada.
The council, which aims to
improve research and teaching
in biology, was formed at a
recent Ottawa meeting.
McTaggart-Cowan said the
council will also attempt to
show to young people the career opportunities available in
biology.
He added that such problems as pollution, health and
environment maintenance will
be examined.
"Pretty well everything
that is going on in first year
university biology should be
done in high schools," he said.
The council will approach
the problem in a manner similar to that of the American
Institute of Biological Science,
whose three-year study produced a series of new texts
and curricula.
McTaggart-Cowan said that
the council was not formed
as a pressure group, but recognized a growing need on the
part of biologists to speak
with a common voice.
Habit
(Continued from Page 1)
Vancouver and that nearly all
of these use '1acid" or LSD.
He outlined the committee's
three-point program: procur-
ance of legal defence for persons arrested during the
"crackdown"; education of the
public; and communication
with members of the federal
parliament.
Over two hundred dollars
has been collected for defence
of the twenty-one persons
charged with possession of
marijuana in the past two
weeks.
Union Carbide Canada Limited
Interviews for 1967 graduates
Monday        November 21
Tuesday        November 22
Wednesday November 23
Thursday
Friday
November 24
November 25
Complete Descriptions of Positions at the
Placement Office.
Our Representatives: G. W. HATFIELD and G. W. VENABLES
Set your sight in College
with glasses
OPTICAL DEPT.
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THE CANADIAN
METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE
offers
professional careers to bachelor graduates in
MATHEMATICS - PHYSICS
(GENERAL, MAJORS, and HONOURS COURSES)
METEOROLOGISTS — (about 15 graduates required). Successful candidates are
enrolled, at full salary, in a 2 year Master's degree course in Meteorolgy at
McGill University, the University of Toronto, or the University of Alberta
(Edmonton).
and
METEOROLOGICAL OFFICERS — (about 50 graduates required). Successful candidates are given a 7 month in-service training program and then posted to the
various civilian and National  Defence weather offices across Canada.
These opportunities offer good pay, challenging work and numerous employee
benefits.
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS:
NOVEMBER 16, 17 and IB, 1966
Full details, applications and interview appointments available at your Placement Office. Tuesday,  November  15,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—powell  hargrave photo
BLISSFULLY OBLIVIOUS of painting display i n Buchanan lounge this week, arts types
spend their free time playing cards and hustling girls. Two paintings to hang in
Buchanan forever after will be chosen at noon tomorrow.
COUNCIL WRAPUP
Mounted cowboys rally
The AMS task force to the
Cariboo will dress in academic
gowns and ride horses at a
send-off rally for them Thursday noon.
The rally will take place on
Main Mall, just before Don
Wise, of Williams Lake, Dave
Zirnhelt, of 150 Mile House,
and John Appleby of West
Vancouver depart for the Cariboo, where they will try to
make higher education an
issue in the by-election.
They will tour the Cariboo,
and speak to voters about the
needs of higher education.
Attorney - general Kobert
Bonner will try for a legislature seat in next weekend's
by-election.
"We want candidates for
public office to commit themselves to making higher education a priority," said Alma
Mater Society president Peter
Braund.
The students, appointed
Monday night by AMS, will
campaign for a three-point
program:
The immediate reduction of
tuition fees in post-secondary
institutions;
Equalization grants for out-
of-town students;
The establishment of an independent grants commission
to establish formula financing
of B.C. universities.
The Cariboo students will
not take a partisan stand nor
support any particular candidate, but will urge voters to
choose the candidate who supports higher education's demands.
In other business, council
passed a motion to rescind a
finance committee policy
against subsidizing faculty editions in The Ubyssey.
Engineering president Eric
Newell made the motion, arguing that the EUS Red Rag was
of a higher standard than most
faculty inclusions and should
receive funds from the finance
committee.
The   policy   was   approved
several weeks ago while Newell was out of town.
AMS   second   vice-president
Carolyn Tate reported on AMS
committee Students for a
Democratic University.
"More students must be informed of important issues,
and to this end we would like
about 50 members to form a
speaker's bureau to disseminate information on campus,"
said Tate.
Interested students are asked
to attend an open seminar on
student representation on governing bodies Thursday evening at 7:30 in the grad stu
dent centre. A faculty member
will address the group.
Science Undergrad Society
president Frank Flynn was
named president of the B.C.
Assembly of Students at last
week's meeting.
"Four UBC students sit on
the BCAS executive," Flynn
told the council.
BCAS plans an education
action week next January to
present educational problems
and demands to the public and
the provincial government.
Redcoats offered brush-up
to become competent again
A brush-up course in engineering is to be offered
at UBC, to keep pace with modern technological development.
The program, jointly sponsored by the faculty of
applied science and the extension department will accept
all engineers, no matter what their year or degree level.
Dr. Geoffrey T. Matthews, formerly with Columbia
Cellulose will head the new program.
The program is designed to regain engineering
competancy.
University blind
to student needs
By BONI LEE
The  co-ordinator of  the  UBC  blind  students  organization   charged   Monday   the   university   is   sympathetic   but
apathetic toward blind students.
"When   it   comes   down   to
brass tacks or dollars and
cents that's when the sympathy ends," Paul Theile, grad
studies 2, told The Ubyssey.
"We have one permanent
room in Brock for 16 students.
People are trying to study or
read braille while others are
reading aloud to other students," he said.
Theile, who is partially
blind, feels that specialized
facilities are necessary.
"For students who use
braille, it's pretty difficult to
use library facilities. Many of
us have to carry braille typewriters and tape recorders."
Theile said the group approached Alma Mater Society
co-ordinator Jim Lightfoot for
improved facilities.
"He says he can't see any
way out of it. People are sympathetic but that's as far as it
goes," Theile said.
The blind students have
been given five rooms in the
Go WUSsed,
young man
UBC World University service is inviting applications
from students who want to
take in the WUS seminar this
summer.
The seminar, to be held in
Canada this year, is a gathering of students from all over
the world, for the purpose of
achieving a greater understanding of the problems and
cultures of other nations.
There will be froty Canadian students participating and
two of those will be chosen
from UBC.
The deadline for applications is Nov. 28.
The seminar will run from
the middle of June to the first
week in August.
The cost to the individual
will be $250 with the remainder of the $1,950 tab being
picked up by WUS.
Applications for the conference can be picked up in the
WUS office in Brock Extension.
east mall annex but only for
pre-arranged reading  classes.
"Blind students need a place
to dump their books and hang
their hat," he said.
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson said the new student union
building will not provide specific facilities for the blind
students.
"AMS policy does not provide study facilities in SUB,"
he said.
"We've established quite a
few unassigned areas. The use
of the building is up to the
students."
An administration information officer said the blind students situation is under active
study.
"Dean Gage and medicine
dean McCreary are actively
engaged with CNIB and blind
students on campus," he said.
MARCH
(Continued  from  Page   1)
Burnaby student councils did
not receive his correspondence, and others were told not
to attend.
University students in a
resolution called for abolition
of fees, equalization grants for
rural students, open Senate
meetings, establishment of a
grants commission as recommended in the Macdonald report, and financial assistance
for post secondary institutions
such as Notre Dame.
Nurses demanded they come
under the department of education and be considered students instead of hospital labor.
Senior secondary school students favoured sex education,
better vocational counselling
and more educational opportunity  in rural  districts.
The newly-elected implementation committee, chaired
by Frank Flynn, 3rd year,
science, UBC, will meet regularly and co-ordinate Education Action Week, January 23
to 27.
1
.a
«*■
IT STARTED just like a high school dance. Everyone
watched, but nobody danced for the first half hour of
the sock hop in Brock lounge Thursday.    But the band
—kurt hilger photo
played on, and eventually the floor was jammed with
gum-chewing, frugging a*»d jerking teeny boppers. rut umsH
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
byithe Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
th* editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorbjed
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
Thd Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
i excellence and editorial writing.
NOVEMBER  15,  1966
ram
flow to lose
For biting off the hand that could help it over the
cliff, you've got to applaud the Vancouver and Burnaby
school boards.
The helping hand that's gone maybe forever, belonged to the students in Vancouver and Burnaby.
Here's what happened: a month ago B.C. Assembly
of Students' planners sent invitations to all high school
student council presidents, with copies to their principals, for last weekends' founding convention.
The purpose of the assembly was and is to unite
students in B.C in a common effort for common goals:
better schools, better teaching, better education.
But the school board people, piqued because the
invitations were not cleared through them first, said
no, children, you may not take your weekend and
spend it on sunny Burnaby Mountain. You might get
subversion or or something from those bad university
students who didn't ask us first.
We always thought better education for everybody's
child was the goal of the whole school system, especially
of school boards. And we thought it might be nice to
have all the support possible for that goal, especially
from the students themselves.
The mere fact that high school students from all
over B.C. did attend indicates the ha.te school — bleahh
— attitude is gone, and education is appreciated by
those being educated.
We can't believe the Vancouver and Burnaby
people are as petty as their action looks at first glance.
We hope the lack of communication between the
school board and the students is repaired, soon. Otherwise, students and teachers are doomed to bumble along
as the^ are, and B.C. high school education will remain
as bad as it is.
Job interviews
Stewart Goodings is a funny kind of employment
representative visiting UBC's campus with job offers
for students.
The jobs he's got pay $35 a month plus room and
board, involve almost no supervision, and are located
almost anywhere in Canada.
The employer is a crown corporation with a $1
million budget and a board of directors that includes
Liberals, peaceniks, priests and even students.
It's the Company of Young Canadians, Lester
Pearson's answer to the Peace Corps and the Great
Society.
The jobs Goodings offers are maybe the toughest
going in  Canada, today.
The pay is the worst.
The  conditions  are  worse,  yet.
But for the bitcher with an idealistic streak, the
chance to do something about what's wrong in Canada
makes the intangible rewards the greatest going.
Goodings will harangue in front of the library
today at noon, and loath as we are to plug anything, we
plug the company. We suggest you hear him out.
cv
Maple
I 9oes* vi
is incest/
O-uui^jcun
g$o'  r,r*w?
.»>_?""*» .   •.«:.?
POLITICAL FRINGES
Stripes for all occasions
By MIKE COLEMAN
There are four basic political attitudes. In
accordance with the prevailing campus custom, these will be defined with glossy capsule
comments, substituting jargon for thought
where possible.
1. The liberal — one who believes both
Communist China and South Africa should
have UN memibership. Epitomizes the rational principle of universality as the criterion.
2. The conservative — one who believes
neither Communist China nor South Africa
should have UN memibership. Epitomizes the
rational principle of traditional morality as
the criterion.
3. The radical leftist — one who believes
Communist China should be allowed into
the UN, while South Africa should be kicked
out. Epitomizes the emotional subjectivity of
the "those I don't like can't play" criterion.
4. The radical rightist—one who believes
there is no Communist China, only Chiang
("I shall return") Kai Shek. South Africa
should be in the UN, if there has to be a
UN. Epitomizes the Neanderthal criterion.
These are your choices. To date, you are
still free to make your own decision. As can
be seen, some attitudes may require more
on your part than others — because some
necessarily involve a basic knowledge of the
facts.
But don't let this hamper you; many students make their choice first, in order to
save themselves the necessity of considering
any knowledge which contradicts their reactions.
Go ahead, make your choice. As the little
bird said when his wing was shot off, "it's
only a matter of opinion."
View from the East
»  ■■&,£ aJSC/ V*Sf/
;?Ji. if'J^kA,'' 'X?'4& -*     */,A,
An editorial from the Nov.
13 issue of the Dalhousie
Gazette, Halifax. N.S.
Maritimers are narrow
minded.
For that matter, so are
Westerners, Upper Canadians
and Quebecers.
This is just another way
of saying that regionalism is
a disease common to the
whole of Canada.
It is so far advanced that
in these last two months before we begin centennial
celebrations, the condition
indicates the malady is incurable.
Canada may well be a 100-
year-old nonentity.
There are many ways of
coming to know the problem.
The best way is to live in
each region for a few years
— long enough to study the
habits of the natives, but not
long enough to identify with
them.
In Western Canada—better
known as "Empire Country"
— you quickly learn the correct view of Canadian affairs.
The West is the 'promised
land', and all that has held
it back for the past 50 or 60
years is Eastern Canada.
(To a Western Canadian,
east means anything the
wrong side of Winnipeg and
if you are from British Co
lumbia you might draw the
line just the other side of the
Rockies.)
There is no reason to doubt
the 'Word'. It is preached to
you by everyone. School
teachers frighten little children with stories about the
Ogres of Toronto's Bay street
that bleed farmers, give away
grain and raise freight rates.
Now that Western Canada
has—sold its birth right to
the United States to develop
oil and potash resources —
China and Russia have suffered crop failures — the federal government has built
the South Saskatchewan Dam,
and there has been rain for
two years in a row, they don't
need the rest of Canada.
'Friendly' Ross Thatcher,
'Holy' E. C. Manning and
'Wild' Bill Bennett are
spokesmen for the new breed:
rugged individualists that are
going to stand on their own
two feet . . . unless there is a
good crop in China, a poor
crop in Canada or they need
another dam.
Central Canada is the home
of the holy innocents. Here
the people will tell you their
only sin is being successful.
They have slain the 'fatted-
calf and now they must share
it with their have-not brethren.
On top of this they have
the added burden of having
to give leadership to the rest
of Canada and receiving nothing in return for their "Ontario know-how".
Quebec is a unique case.
They see themselves as an
island of French culture in
an English wasteland. Unlike
the other provinces, however,
they do not pretend to believe
in the glories of federalism.
This brings us back to the
Maritimes where no one has
been satisfied since confederation. And today everyone
knows there is a giant conspiracy afoot to retard the
growth of the region. It is
spearheaded by Upper Canadians like Paul Hellyer, Mitch
Sharp and Lester Pearson.
There might be some reason for hope if we could write
off the current mood as the
product of a senile but dying
generation. Unfortunately,
the youth of today appear to
be sent on playing a game of
'one-upmanship'.
The 'IN' game this year is
called "isolation". The idea
is to break free of all national student organizations. The
debate rages not over whether
we have any national goals
demanding collective action,
but whether there are such
things as national goals.
Anyone willing to bet that
we will last another 100? Tuesday, November  15,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Appreciation
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In the letters to the editor
in your current issue (November 8) there were a number of letters correcting previous mistakes in reporting.
I wish to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for your willingness to
admit that mistakes occur,
and for your willingness to
offer all the interested parties to express their own version of the story.
This is, indeed, a welcome
change from the treatment
handed out by the previous
editor.
Last year, any corrections
or opposing views in the letters section were nearly always followed by some sarcastic comment. If no suitable sarcasm could be produced, then the letter was
seldom printed either.
It is quite refreshing to find
that this year's Ubyssey is
following a policy of truth
and free speech.
DONALD R. GUTHRIE
Grad studies
'Marijuana
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The report carried in Tuesday's Ubyssey about the
activities of the Quadra Insti-
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing       Richard Blair
News   -        .   _,   Carol Wilson
City  .. —      Danny Sroffman
Photo        Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    _       ....       Claudia Gwinn
Focus        Rosemary Hyman
Sports    Sue Gransby
Ass't News   -.   Pat Hrushowy
Ass't City  Tom Morris
CUP      Bert Hill
tute needs to be corrected
(we're the ones responsible
for the mis-information, not
The  Ubyssey).
The Quadra Institute is concerned about the recent arrests of more than 20 people
for possession of marjuana.
What we want to do is as follows:
(1) warn marijuana users
of the current intense police
pressure and urge them to
avoid putting themselves in a
position to be arrested by a
self-imposed moratorium on
marijuana use,
(2) aid   the   various   civil
Lin tse-hsu slanted cool eyes
at the pinching scene. Yummy,
he said. Dave Cursons, Boni Lee,
Ron Simmer, Norman Gldney,
Mary Ussner, Pat Lidkea, Charles
Bovary, Murray McMillan, Angela
Ottho, and John Appleby reported.
Picture persons were Derrek
Webb, Al Harvey and Chris
Blake.
Applications wanted for Montreal
trip. All staffers—including new
ones—eligible.
liberties groups who are helping the people arrested by
publicizing their activities
and supporting their information programs,
(3) provide UBC students
with access to sound information about marijuana.
As I understand it, we
could not legally be a fund-
collecting group, nor do we
want to. be. There is, however, a committee of concerned people who are collecting money for the defense
of those who have been arrested. The institute would be
pleased to direct potential
donors to this committee, and
we will support this committee in the ways legally available to us.
Because of the experimental nature of the Quadra Institute structure (informal, non-
bureaucratic), we're faced
with the dangers of mis-information about our activities.
Please accept our apologies.
STAN  PERSKY
Chairman
We// pleased'
On behalf of the International Meditation Society I
would like to thank the special events committee and the
students' meditation group for
the splendid meeting arranged
for Maharishi when he lectured in Brock on Wednesday.
The capacity audience gave
Maharishi a genuine welcome
and their questions were objective and interesting. Maharishi left well pleased with his
reception.
RON HUGGINS,
International Meditation
Society.
"°~ Frederic Wood Theatre . .
THE MOST EXCITING PLAY EVER SEEN ON CAMPUS
The Persecution and Assassination
of Marat as Performed by the Inmates
of the Asylum at Charenton Under
the Direction of the Marquis de Sade
By  Peter Weiss
Directed by John Brockington
November 18~26,~8:30 p.m.
Special Student Performances: Monday, Nov. 21  — 7.30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 24, 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets are Available for All Performances.
Due to the elaborate production student tickets for this play only will be $1.00
BOX OFFICE: RM. 207 FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
There ha» been a tremendous advance interest in  this play. You are advised to get your tickets early.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
cordially invites all
Overseas Students
to the
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS'
SUPPER
at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Oliver
6170 Blenheim St., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Saturday, Nov. 19, 1966 - 6:30 p.m.
R.S.V.P.  263-7718
224-5637 Entertainment and Speaker
WHEN
WE
WERE
21
IT WAS
A VERY GOOD YEAR
IN 1907 - GRASSIE JEWELLERS was 21 years old. It was
a big year for Cameo Broaches — Watch Fobs —Jewelled
hat pins and pocket watches known in those days as
"Turnips". In 1907 Grassies supplied their patrons with
these items but now 59 years later although styles have
changed you probably can still buy a "Turnip" at GRASSIES on SEYMOUR — come in and ask for one by name.
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271
Employment Opportunities
(Regular and  Summer)
are available  in
■*„*If.'*'
GEOPHYSICS
with
Pan American Petroleum Corporation
(Calgary)
Interviews will   be held
Tuesday and Wednesday, November 22 and 23, 1966
with
Postgraduates,  Graduates and  Undergraduates
in
GEOPHYSICS
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
HONORS PHYSICS
HONORS MATH
HONORS GEOLOGY
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
Pan American, a member of the Standard ~Oil Company
(Indiana) Organization is an expanding major oil and
gas exploration and producing company offering excellent salaries, benefits and opportunities for advancement.
Company and position information is available at your
Student Placement Office. Register there now and learn
how you can be part of Pan American's future. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 15, 1966
—powell hargrave photo
NUDE TREES STAND LEAFLESS but proud, g uarding, as they have for decades past, the
glory and grandeur that is UBC. Comes spring, and rain, buds then leaves then seeds
spring forth. The May wind, which blows students afar, spreads seedlings among the
blades  and  leafy   hollows.   Comes  fall,  students come tromping back. Exeunt seedlings.
The Huberman Educational Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
"Knowledge  and   success  through   learning  power"
Director: M. HUBERMAN, B.A., LL.B., B.C.I.C.
3601  West 16th Ave. 228-8028-263-4808
an invitation to
Graduating Engineers
from a long-established leader in Canada's
number one industry: for career excitement, see
your Student Placement Office about opportunities at
Q.
OLUMBIA
e.
ELLULOSE
1111 WEST HASTINGS STREET, VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
CYC orator
soapboxes
noon today
It you are mature, tough, and
care about other people, the
Company of Young Canadians
is coming to recruit you.
Stewart Goodings, CYC's
associate director, will soapbox in front of the library at
noon today to explain the functions of the company and talk
to interested students.
CYC was established by the
federal government in 1966.
Its purpose is to assist individuals and communities in
Canada in tackling their problems.
The company is governed by
15 people — ten elected toy the
volunteers and five appointed
by government.
There are now 12 persons
directing projects in B.C., and
70 more across Canada.
A meeting will be held tonight for all those who are interested. The place will be
announced at the noon discussion .
0 • ^od*'
V-NECKS
The most practically
popular sweater in:
pure lambs wool
$15.95
Lambs wool and
Orion
$9.95
4445 W. 10th
near  Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at  Mackenzie
It's happening on
NOVEMBER 23, 24 & 25th
That's the day the man from Great-West Life will
be on campus. He'll be here to inform you about
the many avenues for success that are available to
you through Great-West Life ... a leader in the
insurance industry in North America. In one interview you'll find out about such exciting and promising fields as: Research and Development, Investment Management, Sales Management, Data Processing and Actuarial Management.
Graduates who are looking ahead are looking into
Great-West Life. Discuss your career plans with the
man from Great-West Life on your campus.
Arrange for an appointment with your Placement
Officer and be sure to pick up a copy of our careers
booklet.
THE
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE • WINNIKG. CANADA FOCUS ON CANADA
Student loans
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canada Student
Loan Program has been both damned and
praised by university students across the
country since its 1964 inauguration.
Nova Scotia students say they don't like
the idea of having to prove they really need
the loans, and have labelled the means test
"objectionable".
The University of New Brunswick students'
council on the other hand, says it would like to
have loans abolished and replaced by free
tuition.
University of Saskatchewan Regina campus
French CYC?
MONTREAL (CUP) — Quebec students are
looking to the provincial government for aid
in setting up a "quiet revolution" version of
the Company of Young Canadians.
Robert Nelson, president of l'Union Generate des Etudiants du Quebec was quoted in
University of Montreal's student paper Quartier
Latin recently as saying his organization is
opposed to any CYC action in Quebec.
"The only means of keeping the CYC out
is quick action on the Action-Jeunesse," he
said, referring to the group he wants established.
The Quebec education ministry has asked
UGEQ to furnish names of students who
would attend a meeting, probably in January,
to consider formation of a provincial student
social action movement within Quebec, called
1'Action Jeunesse.
Meanwhile, Perre Theoret, general coordinator of TEQ (Travailleurs Etudiants du
Quebec) explains his organization has made
plans to create a permanent structure for itself.
According to Theoret, the Action-Jeunesse
project suggested by UGEQ doesn't look as
though it will be ready for next summer. TEQ
will be disposed to co-operate in the Action-
Jeunesse if the organization's structure isn't
too much under the Quebec government's
control.
"We don't want to become provincial civil
servants," he said.
Profit probed
WATERLOO (CUP) — The Univerity of
Waterloo book store made so much money last
year that students' council has called for an
investigation into the store's operations.
Upon learning the book store store cleared
about $60,000 last year, council fired off a
motion directed at university vice-president
Allan Adlington.
The motion asks for an account of expenses
and profit, distribution of profits and an explanation of university policy allowing profit
on sales.
students claim the loan scheme is unfair to
out-of-town students whose expenses are
higher than those living in the city where
the institution is located.
But aside from minor beefs of this nature
a cross-Canadian survey reveals most provinces with the exception of Ontario, are relatively pleased with the program.
The loan plan permits students to borrow
up to $1,000 a year to a maximum of $5,000
for their full period in university.
The federal treasurey pays the 5% per
cent interest on the loans, made by banks,
until the student starts repaying them six
months after graduation.
Students on the whole have accepted the
plan with only a small amount of grumbling,
except in Ontario where criticism has been
broad and the protests organized.
For last spring the Ontario government
adopted a formula which puts bursaries and
federal and provincial assistance into one pot.
A student applying for a loan is assessed
on his ability—and the ability of his parents—
to pay. The difference between this amount
and the estimated cost of a year at university
is provided by a loan of $150 and an additional
sum split in a ration of 60 per cent loan and
40 per cent bursary.
Now that scholarships have been lumped in
with loans, students say they feel relatively
little emphasis is placed on academic standing.
Prairie unity
BRANDON <CUP)—Education history was
made here Nov. 5 when delegates from Manitoba's four post - secondary institutions of
higher learning met for the first time as members of a provincial student association.
The association, tentatively dubbed the
Manitoba Union of Students, was the first
body to meet after the Western region of the
Canadian Union of Students was dissolved
as a legislative body in favor of separate provincial organizations.
The MAS delegates, from the University
of Mantioba, United College, Brandon College
and St. Boniface College," drew up a skeleton
constitution to be presented to their respective students' councils for ratification.
The association will seek to co-ordinate
student activities in Manitoba, to represent
students' interests at the provincial level, and
to advance the cause of education in Manitoba.
Although the association's originators —
U of M, Brandon College and United College—
are CUS members, association membership is
open to all post-secondary institutions in Manitoba.
The next meeting of MAS has been scheduled for Dec. 4. This will give the members'
students' councils time to ratify the proposed
constitution and allow MAS to contact the
Manitoba Institute of Technology and nursing
schools.
or not?
Ontario students have rallied in protest
against the controversial provincial student
awards program. In late September more than
2,000 students marched on the Ontario legislature to draw attention to their cause.
In Quebec the situation is a little different.
Finance minister Jean-Jaques Bertrand has
proposed a new program which would be
similar in some respects to the plan in operation in the rest of Canada.
It would provide for a graduated series
of loans from banks and caisses populaires,
guaranteed by the government, plus scholarships.
Students in first, second and third year
would be eligible for $700 in loans plus $1,100
in scholarships. Those in fourth and fifth years
could get $800 and $1,200. Married students
mights get an extra $400.
Students in pre-university level, or those
taking professional courses, would be eligible
for $500 loans and $1,000 scholarships.
In each case 60 per cent is considered a
gift, with the remaining 40 per cent to be
repaid  within 10 years.
But the French-speaking students' union—
l'Union Generale des Etudiants du Quebec—
says it will accept the new loan system as a
"temporary measure" until free education is
instituted, and only on the condition the loan
ceiling be reduced to $500 and be supplemented
by bursaries, and that the government integrate the new plan with a free education and
student salary policy.
Thus the government, provincial and federal, faces a very real problem in student discontent with the present loan schemes.
But is the free tuition advocated by the
Canadian Union of Students and UGEO really
the answer? At Newfoundland's Memorial
University where tuition is free to first and
second-year students, there is still a large
demand for loans — more than 850 were approved by the beginning of November.
Protest choice
LETHBRIDGE (CUP) —A dispute is still
raging over the appointment of the University
of Lethbridge's board of governors.
Seven of the 14 board members appointed
Oct. 17 by provincial education minister Randy
McKinnon are members of the present Lethbridge Junior College board.
The college's students' union president,
Hugh Campbell, claims the choice of board
members will seriously hinder the new university's development.
Students, faculty and community members
have sent petitions protesting the appointments
to Premier E. C. Manning.
A front-page editorial in the Lethbridge
Herald said the selection of board members
indicated Lethbridge would have a "parochial
college" rather than a "true university of
which Alberta can be proud".
pT^^^^p^
X&Mzd-t
4t^_i__&_-_
.%! *-8
£i®J_L,J
EMPLOYMENT  OPPORTUNITIES
(Regular and Summer)
are available for
ENGINEERS
r with
PAN  AMERICAN  PETROLEUM   CORPORATION
(Calgary)
Interviews will be held
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday      November 23, 24, 25, 1966
POSTGRADUATES        GRADUATES      UNDERGRADUATES
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Com pany (Indiana) Organization is an expanding major
oil and gas exploration and producing company offering excellent salaries, benefits and opportunities
for advancement.
Company and position information is available at your Student Placement Office. Register there now
and learn how you can be part of Pan American's future.
WHY BE GRAY ?
HAIRCOLORING TREATMENTS
-   HAIRSTYLING  -
UPPER TENTH BARBER
4574 W.  10th Ave. by the Gates
PEEKAI-OO!
Our frmoii- perm-neat mm
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KiilM Ii S-ka      Snavr Urn
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msn
Tuesday,  November  15,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 15, 1966
SUCCESSFUL MEET
Records beaten
in competition
harvey photo
DORIS BROWN SMASHED the record in this women's open event. The race was a highlight  of  the   PNW  Championship  cross-country meet held on campus Saturday.
The Pacific Northwest Cross
hosted by UBC, was named
field coach Lionel Pugh.
A superb army of helpers
gained the compliments of all
participating clubs for the
meet's flawless organization.
Growing interest in cross
country running was reflected
by the large field of 300 competitors.
Doris Brown, world indoor
mile record holder, added
another record to her name
and points to the Seattle Falcons Track club. She won the
new women's open event in a
time of 8:04.8, far ahead of
second place Pat Mills of
Richmond, who posted a time
of 8:36.
EMPLOYMENT  OPPORTUNITIES
(Regular and Summer)
are available in
GEOLOGY
with
PAN  AMERICAN  PETROLEUM  CORPORATION
(Calgary,  Alberta)
Interviews will be held Thursday and Friday, November 24 and 25, 1966
with
POSTGRADUATES IN
GEOLOGY or GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES IN
HONORS or ARTS GEOLOGY or
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Com pany (Indiana) Organization is an expanding major
oil and gas exploration and producing company offering excellent salaries, benefits and opportunities
for advancement.
Company and position information is available at your Student Placement Office. Register there now
and learn how you can be part of Pan American's future.
Country Championship meet,
a. model meet by track and
Rick Ritchie, Victoria Secondary School, broke the senior high school record with
an 18:28.6 time.
The third record fell to
David Wigbton in the inter-
college and senior race. His
time was 27:57.4.
The Vancouver Olympic
Club retained its trophy for
the senior division, with 28
points. Washington followed
with 36, leaving UBC behind
with 50 points.
Pugh said the loss was the
result of the lack of one more
runner in the senior section.
He said a fourth senior runner
would have helped challenge
VOC well for first place
standing.
Seattle Pacific club led the
junior men with 12 points.
UBC placed second here with
30, Washington came in third
with 48, and SFA lagged behind with 72 points. Pugh feels
that the SFA athletes have a
long way to go yet. It was
their first  track   competition.
Richmond Club took the
women's event, chalking up
27 points. Seattle Falcons and
Washington Angels raced to a
single point difference as the
runners up.
An unusually close ending
marked the junior high school
race. Churchill, Sentinel, and
Banting fought to 60, 61, and
63 scores.
The senior high school event
went, to Shawnigan Lake, as
Burnaby North failed to defend its title.
Graduating Engineers
in the Mechanical, Engineering Physics
and Metallurgical options:
You will find challenging engineering work,
recognition, and above average advancement
opportunities with United Aircraft of Canada
Limited.
For over 35 years, United Aircraft of Canada
Limited has played a key role in the growth and
development of the Canadian commercial aviation industry. As a member of the United Aircraft Corporation, it manufactures, sells and
services in Canada the products of United's
Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Sikorsky Aircraft,
Hamilton Standard and Norden Electronics
divisions.
In 1957, the Company formed the nucleus of a
design "and development organization which
has since expanded into a 400-man engineering
force. Among this group's many accomplishments are the preliminary design of the Pratt &
Whitney Aircraft 3000-lb. thrust JT12 (J60)
engine. They have also developed the now mass-
produced PT6 (T74) free turbine engine for
aircraft applications and its ground-based counterpart—the ST6, used in CN's new Turbotrain
for example, as well as in oil well equipment,
turbine-powered boats and other industrial
applications.
This engineering team is now embarked on what
will be a world first... the design and develop
ment of the gas turbine power plants and propulsion machinery for four new Canadian
destroyers. These will be the first destroyers in
the world to be exclusively powered by engines
of this type.
United Aircraft of Canada now employs approximately 5200 in its manufacturing, overhaul, supply, research and development operations. In addition, the Company's long-term
plans and its pre-eminence in the gas turbine
field have created exceptional opportunities
which will prove to be well worth the detailed
consideration of graduating engineers. For
further information, please contact your Placement Office.
Our recruiting team
will be on campus Nov 17 & 18
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AT
United
Aircraft
OF CANADA LIMITED
Is your eye offended by distasteful
padding and exaggerated lapels?
The revival of the double-breasted
blazer need not spell a throwback
to the unlamented 30's. Our slim,
natural shoulder D.B. emphatically
says 1966. Flattering youthful, with
its deep side vents and slightly
suppressed waist.
Only 49.50
4445 W. 10th
near Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at Mackenzie Tuesday, November 15, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Football club bids
stadium farewell
It was no way to say goodbye to an old friend.
UBC's Football Thunderbirds, Saturday, lost their historical perspective in the football game to the University of
Manitoba Bisons, 34-0.
Playing their last game at
Varsity    Stadium,    the    Birds
—powell hargrave photo
HARD-HITTING TACKLES like this one didn't do a thing for
the Football Birds on Saturday. Plenty other Bisons got
away to score a grand 34-0 at the Birds last game of the
season. .
Molsons bombed
by hockey Birds
500 fans cheered the UBC Hockey Thunderbirds on
to an 8-2 victory over North Surrey Molsons Saturday night.
It was their second win of
two games played this season.
So far the squad is living up
to the bright future season
predicted by ice hockey
coach Bob Hindmarch.
Playing at the Thunderbird
Arena     Miles    DesHarnais,
JV hoopsters
sink Saints,
lead
leag
ue
The junior varsity basketball team refuses to lose.
Thursday night's win over
the CYO Saints brought the
Jayvees' record to 13 straight
wins during the last two years.
It was their fourth consecutive win of the season.
The final score was a high
91-67 for UBC.
Sam Vandermeulen led the
scorers wtth 19 points. Rick
Inrig and Larry Donaldson
followed with 14 and 12 points
respectively.
Ten players scored, shooting 51 per cent from the field
and 86 per cent from the foul
line.
The Jayvees still top the
league standings, having won
all their games this year. Kerrisdale and CYO also have
eight points apiece, with records of 5-4 and 6-4.
Kevin McGladery and Mickey
McDowell each scored two
goals. Singles were added by
Tom Koretchuk and Lenny
Bousquet.
Period scores ran 2-0 in the
first, 4-2 in the second, and
8-2 in the third.
McDowell and DesHarnais
also scored in the strong
season opener, in which Vancouver Carlings took a 6-0 defeat from the Birds.
The next game will be played Nov. 19 against Victoria.
Action starts at 2:30 p.m. in
the Winter Sports Centre.
UBC judo
black belt
wins title
One grand championship
wasn't enough for UBC's Yoshi
Okita.
Judoka Okita, outweighed
by 50 pounds, defeated J. Phillips to take the lightweight
and black belt trophies for
the second straight year.
The fifth annual Pacific
North West Judo Tournament
drew 240 participants, and almost an equal number of
spectators. It was held Saturday in the Memorial Gym.
Doug France and Neil
Crouch of the UBC Judo Club
fought to the third round. Paul
Musgrove reached the quarter
finals before losing on a decision.
K. Taniwa took the senior
lightweight division for Steves-
ton. S. Takeuchi, also of
Steveston, won second place.
T. Amadatsu (Steveston) led
the senior middleweight division and B. Barsalowe took
second place.
In the heavyweight section,
D. Milligan (YMCA) came out
on top for the New Westminster club, with J. Lennox
(Nippon) coming second.
gave up two quick touchdowns in the last quarter, had
their quarterback ejected for
fighting, and proceeded to end
their string of victories over
western Canadian universities.
Next fall UBC football, soccer, and rugby teams will play
at the campus' new $2 million
stadium, now under construction south of Totem park residences.
Varsity had three consecutive wins over western Canadian teams before Saturday.
The loss gave them a season
record of five wins, three
losses and one tie.
Coach Frank Gnup labelled
it "a miserable game in a
pretty good season."
Quarterback Dick Gibbons,
who took on a 250-pound
Manitoba tackle, was replaced
by inexperienced Kent Yaniw.
Bisons scored the winning
touchdown on the second play
from scrimmage when quarterback Nick Laping combined
with halfback Tom Feasby on
a 70-yard pass-and-run play.
Yaniw slipped in the mud,
allowing Feasby to get into the
clear.
Feasby and John Davidson
scored two majors for the
Bisons.
UBC helped by giving up
two fumbles and a pass interception, each of which resulted in a Manitoba touchdown.
The win for Bisons gave
them the Western Canadian
championship, with five wins
in seven games.
Eastwards, St. Francis Xav-
ier defeated St. Mary's Huskies
27-15 Saturday and qualified
to meet Waterloo - Lutheran
Golden Hawks in next Saturday's Canadian College Bowl
in Toronto.
Rugby: U. of Alberta loses,
Meloramas wipe UBC sides
The University of Alberta rugby side fell 16-10
Saturday before a combined UBC Totems and Tomahawks team.
But the other single sides didn t fare as well.
The Braves lost 12-3 to the Meralomas. And the
Tee Pees were crushed 29-0 by the Meralomas second
string.
CONTINUOUS 9 AM TO MIDNIGHT WEEKENDS; 2 PM TO
11 PM WEEKDAYS- RETURN FARE $2.50, FAMILY $6.50-
DINE AND DANCE IN THE ELEGANT
GROUSE NEST RESTAURANT,
RESERVATIONS 985-7188
SPECIAL UBC RATES
The "Top of Grouse" offers a unique
and glamorous setting for Fraternity,
Sorority, and all Club functions. Full
dining and dancing facilities at Grouse
Chalet for parties up to 200. Inquire
now about special UBC rates.
FRANK   GNUP
. . . miserable
Hockey tops
with victory
The Field Hockey Birds
won 4-2 over Pitt Meadows in
wide open play Saturday.
In a previous game against
Pitt Meadows, the score was
tied 2-2.
Throughout this match, the
Birds dominated the play
showing superior speed, endurance, and more effective
positioning.
Whipping their way across
the field, Bruce Hogson, Doug
Harrison, Jamie Wright, and
Paul McMillen scored the
goals.
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exhilarating
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 15, 1966
SAY MARXISTS:
'Quebec police
kidnap, torture'
Police kidnap, beat, and torture innocent civilians in
Quebec, according to two young MaTxist-Leninists visiting
UBC this week.
Jean-Guy Allard, agent for
the Progressive Workers
Movement of Quebec and
Serge Khamouff, secretary of
the Socialist Youth of Montreal, are presently on a goodwill mission to the west-
coast.
They will speak in Brock
Lounge at noon Wednesday,
sponsored by Special Events.
"The story of police brutality in Quebec is long and complicated and would shock
you," Allard said.
"At present, there are 400
political prisoners in Quebec—
100 of these are members of
the Quebec Liberation Front."
Allard claimed the Quebec
government had built a con-
centraton camp at Val Cartier
for potential political prisoners.
Allard, translating for the
French - speaking Khamouff,
said Khamouff had been picked off the street in Montreal,
taken to police headquarters,
held and beaten.
The Socialist Youth was
formed in mid-September and
now has 300 members, he said.
They are mainly young workers.
"We are affiliated with the
World Democratic Youth of
Czechoslovakia," Allard said.
"We are . Vancouver trying to commence relations
with China ''..rough the Canadian-China Friendship Association."
"Socialist Youth is anti-Sov-
4333 W. 10th Ave.
224-1711
iet, anti-revisionist and pro-
China. We are for an independent Quebec and the self-
determination of all people."
"We eventually want a
workers state of Quebec," Allard said.
Allard and Khamouff will
speak on Quebec as a Police
State Now, Wednesday.
iM*<f:
™   WILD!!
JUST  FOR  LAUGHS
&*>
4445 W. 10th
near Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at Mackenzie
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
1967 CANADIAN  UNION OF
STUDENT NATIONAL SEMINAR
CO-ORDINATOR:
Applications are now being received for the Co-ordinator of the 1967 Canadian Union of Students National
Seminar to be co-hosted by the Universities of British
Columbia and Simon Fraser in August-September,
1967. Please state interest, experience, faculty and
year. Further inquiries and applications should be
directed to Miss Daphne Kelgard, Chairman, Canadian
Union of Students Committee, Box 153, Brock Hall.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEES:
Applications are now being received to select students
to sit on joint student-Administration advisory committees concerned with:
1. Food Services
2. Traffic and Parking
3. The Bookstore
4. Student Residences
Applications in writing stating interest, experience,
faculty and year should be submitted to the A.M.S.
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
PROCTER
&  GAMBLE
OFFERS
CAREERS  IN
BUSINESS
MANAGEMENT
A career in business management can offer you unsurpassed opportunities for personal
achievement, responsibility and growth if you select a company to join after graduation that strongly believes in the value of its -people.
The success of Procter & Gamble in Canada and throughout the world is made up of
the individual successes of each of its employees. Because the Company recognizes
that personal achievement is a major source of individual satisfaction, every opportunity is provided for its realization.
At Procter & Gamble you con expect:
1       To be able to develop your  business education  in a  program  of
■       individualized, on-the-job training.
A      To be challenged daily with  new ideas and  new problems in a
**       stimulating   environment   where   intelligence   and   enthusiasm   are
recognized.
3      To be given responsibility based on your capacity to absorb it, and
to advance based on your abilities to do a more demanding job.
A       To   be   encouraged   and   rewarded   with   continued   opportunities,
™      increasing income, and  an  uncommonly  sound  program  of  profit
sharing and other benefits.
You will want facts on which to make an intelligent choice of your career- To learn
more about Procter & Gamble ask your Placement Office for a descriptive brochure
and arrange for an interview on
November 23, 24, 25
for positions in
Marketing. Purchasing,  Finance, Systems Analysis,
Transportation and Sales Management.
Graduating  students from  all  academic disciplines  are  invited   to  apply.
PROCTER & GAMBLE
BIRD
CALLS
Be sure of your copy — BUY TODAY
Limited Quantity I
Available at Bookstore and  Publications
Office, Brock Hall. Tuesday, November  15,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   11
More national concern,
minister tells students
Canadian students should
concern themselves with Canadian problems, a young cabinet minister told students Friday.
"There is not enough concern
and involvement with national problems," said John Turner, mintster without portfolio
in the federal government.
"I want to know what UBC
students feel about national
problems because as a Canadian MP this is my concern,"
he told 100 students in Bu.
102.
Environmental and economic
barriers to equal opportunity,
education, housing and transportation were among problems   Turner   touched   on be-
Advanced group
gets Killam cash
UBC   will   receive   $13.5   million   for   advanced   studies
from the estate of the late Dorothy J. Killam.
The money is part of a $30
million benefaction from the
estate of Mrs. Killam, wife of
Canadian financier Isaac Killam, divided among five Canadian institutions for the establishment of Isaac Walton
Killam Memorial Funds for
Advanced Studies.
UBC president Dr. John
Macdonald said the proposal
for awards has been approved
by the trustees of the Killam
Estate and will be submitted
to both the UBC Board of
Governors and the Senate.
The interest from a $4.5 million fund be used to establish
three categories of awards at
UBC, said Macdonald.
These will be the Killam
Senior Fellowships for faculty
members who wish to devote
full time to reseach, the Killam Postdoctorial Fellowships
for doctorate students who
wish to pursue advanced studies at UBC, and the Killam
Predoctoral Scholarships for
students of outstanding ability
pursuing a doctorate at UBC.
All awards will be administered by the UBC scholarship
committee in accordance with
the regulations of the trust
and the UBC senate.
Along with the fund UBC
has accepted two additional
bequests amounting to about
$9 million, $4 million of which
will be used to pay teachers'
salaries and $5 million for
general endowment funds to
be used at the discrimination
of the Board of Governors.
fore opening the meeting for
questions.
He said he thought improvement in communications
would make a big step in the
direction of more unified Canadian people.
He urged immigration barriers be dropped, not only for
the skilled, but for those capable of learning.
Asked about the continental
water supply and water shortages in some parts of the
U.S., Turner said: "The word
continental is not part of my
vocabulary."
Turner, a Rhodes scholar
and graduate of UBC in 1949,
said: "Students in those days
were just as active in demanding a voice in running UBC."
Asked if this meant student
representation on the board
of governors he said: "I don't
feel it is the job of the students to set financial policy.
That is the job when you are
alumni.
"The first job of students
is to get elected to the Senate."
We Need Foresters
Our woods divisions are rapidly expanding and we
require energetic foresters to assist in Northern and
Interior operations. If you are interested in assuming
individual responsibility and accepting professional
challenges, make an appointment now to see our
representatives who will be on campus November
24 and 25.
Q.
OLUMBIA
Q.
ELLULOSE
1111 WEST HASTINGS STREET, VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
PRESENTS
PENN JONES JR.
"The
Assassination"
Mr. Jones is the Dallas newspaperman who first discovered
the mysterious deaths of people
connected with Jack Ruby and
patrolman Tippit. His story was
picked up by RAMPARTS magazine and carried in an exclusive
article in their November issue.
Today-Auditor ium -12:30-35c
Coming
John Handy Quintet
IMPERIAL
ARTS
ARTISTS' MATERIALS
PICTURE FRAMING
ART GALLERY
4458  West   10th  Ave.
224-3933
|   GRADUATING   <
STUDENTS
Thank You For Your Co-Operation
FOR THOSE WHO DID NOT HAVE
THEl R GRAD PHOTOGRAH TAKEN
IN THE MOBILE UNITON CAMPUS
OUR STUDIO FACILITIES WILL BE
AVAILABLE AT 2580 BURRARD AT
10th. FOR AN APPOI NTMENT
PHONE 736-0261 - HOURS FOR
SHOOTING 3 P.M. TO 5:00 P.M. -
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, AND
FRIDAY.
This Service is Covered by Your Grad Fee
CAMPBELL STUDIOS LTD.
10th & BURRARD       736-0261
We market products and services in four essential segments of the
economy: steel and steel products, engineering, power and transportation
equipment. In our divisions and subsidiaries, you will apply your skills
and  knowledge  in  a  stimulating  environment  of challenging  work,
responsibility and rewards.
We would like to meet you on the campus in order to discuss your
career plans, our graduate training and development programs, and the
opportunities with Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd.
Please consult your Placement Office for position descriptions, reference
materials, and interview times.
Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd.
Hawker Siddeley will be interviewing graduating students
at the Bachelor and Master's levels on
NOVEMBER   16  and   17 Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 15, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Warren criticism aired
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special Events presents Penn
Jones Jr. — the man who discovered the mysterious deaths
surrounding the Kennedy
assassination, and exposed the
Warren Commission as a hoax.
Today at noon in the auditorium, 35 cents.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Jean-Guy Allard and Serge
Khamouff, two militant separatists speak on Quebec as a
Police State Now. Wednesday
at noon in Brock lounge, admission 10 cents.
EUS — ED — HOME EC
Mixer Friday at 9 p.m. in
Hallmark Hall, with The Painted Ship,  Girls 75  cents,  men
$1.25, 9 p.m.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Mrs. Misewich speaks on cat-
loguing, Wednesday at noon in
Bu. 225.
BRIDGE. CHESS CLUB
Meeting Wednesday at 7:30
in Brock TV lounge.
ECONOMICS SOC
Dr. Montague discusses labor
relations  1966, today at noon
in Ang.  213.
UCC
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
202.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Baritone   Bernard   Turgeon
sings today at noon in Bu. 106.
Admission is 25 cents.
UBCSCC
Noon  hour  rally Thursday,
at the top of C-lot. A city map
might help.
DESERET CLUB
Meeting Wednesday, in Bu.
216, a special tape recording
will be played.
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Philip Theil presents Sights
and Sounds of Tokyo: The Urban Experience of Today, Wednesday at noon in Las. 102.
COMMUNIST CLUB
William Kashtan discusses
Possibilities of a Peaceful revo
lution in Canada, today at nOon
in Mildred Brock.
GOSPEL STUDENTS
Moody   Institute   film,   Windows of the Soul will be shown
in Bu. 104.
AIESEC
A meeting of economics and
commerce students interested
in job exchange programs will
be held Wednesday at noon in
Bu. 2225.
NOON  CONCERT
Stravinsky's Story of a
Soldier Wednesday at noon in
Bu. 106.
NDP
MLA   Dave   Barrett   speaks
today at noon in Brock lounge.
Dr. Ray Parkinson speaks Wednesday noon in Bu. 202.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Josh McDowell speaks on
Christ and Prophecy, at College
Life, Thursday night at 9:01,
in Salish House lounge.
UN
Dr.   J.   Solecki   of  Slavonic
Studies   will   speak   on   Sino-
Soviet Relations today in Bu.
219 at noon today.
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack discusses The
Moral Apple, Wednesday at
noon in Bu. 223.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
The Mouse That ROARED!
WITH  PETER SELLERS
AND JEAN SEBERG
4 SHOWS
AUDITORIUM
50c
LEGION  OF  DECENCY RATING A-l
THURSDAY
NOV.
17th
Get Yours Today
It's the handiest book on campus
BIRD CALLS
UBC Student Telephone Directory
AVAILABLE AT THE  BOOKSTORE
AND PUBLICATIONS OFFICE,
BROCK HALL
ONLY 75 CENTS
ENGINEERS
civil
electrical
mechanical
industrial
chemical
metallurgical
mining
engineering
physics
An engineer's career in the Government of
Canada features . . .
* Planned Career
* Promotion Based on Merit
* Competitive Salaries
* Training
* Modern Equipment
* Technically Trained Support Staff
* Broad Scope and Challenge for
Professional Development
INTERVIEWS
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
NOVEMBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER
16 17 18
You are invited to meet Mr. C. E. Lowthian, P.Eng., APPLIED
SCIENCES STAFFING PROGRAM on the above dates. Arrange
your appointment today through the Placement Office.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST: TUES. ON THE GYM.
Football Field, a green and white
agate ring with gold flurentine
finish. Reward offered. Vince,
RE   8-0493.
LOST — BROWN BRIEFCASE
containing whole years notes plus
text books left Nov. 9 noon Fort
Camp Dining Hall — please return notes call — Bob, 266-8824
for reward. $25 for return or Information.
Greetings
12
HAPPY 21ST TOMORROW GUN-
derson Kid! — with love from
U.   of   T.
Coming Dances
12A
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
THIS    SAT.    NITE
TWO GREAT  BANDS
at
ONE   GIANT   DANCE!
Swing to  the  Nightrain Revue  and
the  Stags — 8:30  -  12:30 — U.B.C.
Fieldhouse. Hope you've saved your
pennies for this one!
Special Notices
13
WOULD THE PERSON OR GROUP
which was interested in the film
"Snakepit", contact Film Soc or
20th Century Distributors.
FOLLOW-UP MEETING MAHAR-
ishi talk Academy of The Arts,
2695 West Broadway, Nov. 20,
8:00 p.m.
SKIING COMPANION WITH A
car needed by newcomer to Vancouver will split costs. Phone Lee
after 7:00 p.m. at 878-0432.
SEE PETER SELLERS AS PKIME
Minister Thursday In Auditorium
for 50c.
SEE PETER SELLERS AS GRAND
Duchess in Auditorium  Thursday.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED 49th AND WEST
Boulevard for 9:30's RON. AM 6-
2602.
RIDE NEEDED URGENTLY ED-
munds and Kingsway call Ann-
Marie  522-9008.
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:30's
Mon. - Fri. vie. of 45th and Blvd.
Ralph AM 1-1281.
Travel Opportunities
16
ANYONE WISHING RETURN
ticket on AMS charter flight. Returning Aug. 25 from London.
Contact Joy,  AM 1-2718.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
19 5 8 PLYMOUTH EXCELLENT
transportation. New brakes. Must
sell. View at 2408 Pearkes Rd.
Acadia.
1956    CHEV.,    NICE    BODY,    STD.
$300.   Phone  731-8497 after  6.
1959 RAPIER — MAKE AN OFFER.
Phone   733-5776  after 6 p.m.
TEST DRIVE REBUILT '57 CHEV,
6-auto., 5,000 mi. Then buy motor
and   trans.   327-4874.
1960     AUSTIN     HEALY.     EXCEL
lent condition. Will take older car
or  good  motorcycle  as   part  payment.  Call  Doug,  RE  8-9317.
1952 CHEV. 4-DOOR, GOOD CON-
dition. Must sell $100.00. YU 8-
5125,  236 E-6th, N.  Van.
Automobiles Wanted
25
HAVE   CASH   AND   '58   TR-3 (2.2
engine,    competition    clutch) for
later model,  any make.  Ron, 731-
7019.
Accessories ft Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them all  at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO   PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%    Student   Discount)
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typing
43
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS    LIMITED
70th   &  Granville   Street 263-4530
TYPING — THESIS, ESSAYS,
notes; please phone 277-8487 after
6:00 p.m.
TYPING IN OWN HOME. 725
West 20th, North Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone 988-3852.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST LOOK-
ing for home work. Please call
277-5640.
WILL  DO   TYPING
255-5541.
MY   HOME
ESSAY AND THESIS — REASON-
able rates.  Call Joan 228-8384.
MANUSCRIPTS, THESES, ESSAYS
accurately typed. Phone 224-5046
after  6   p.m.
TYPIST   FOR   CONVENIENCE   AT
733-6345. Reasonable and accurate.
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESIS,
Stencils, etc. Close to University,
224-3242.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED — DELIVERY BOYS
with own car, $1.10 per hr. plus
20c per delivery. Late evening
work. CA 4-0833 — 4423 West 10th.
DRUMMER FOR FOLK ROCK
group. Phone Kurt 224-7174 or
Dave RE 1-9445 after 6.
Music
63
INSTRUCTION  — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. 736-6923. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish,
German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
Tl
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 75 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,   or  the  Bookstore.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
BOOKS FOR SALE. ENGLISH 420,
429, 440 texts and paperbacks.
Phone  Bernie 266-8702.
BRAND NEW LEAD GUITAR, $100.
4 pick-ups, tremelo, phono adapter, case, strap, cord. Phone Ed,
Bowes,   224-9065   or   228-8415.
WEIDER 110 lb. WEIGHT SET
for sale or trade? Ron AM 6-2602.
LADIES SKI BOOTS FOR SALE;
near new; woman's shoe size 7.
Call AM  1-7026.
Miscellaneous
34
SAVE ON TAILORED TO MEA-
sure salts (men or women). By
expert tailor — hand cut, hand
sewn, hand pressed. Choose from
600 most-wanted shades and patterns. Phone 738-7487 and plan to
be measured now so you look
better on Christmas. 2 pee. suits
49.75, pants 14.75, sports jackets
35.00, top coats 57.75. All tailored
to measure. Guaranteed all wool
cloths. Pure Irish linen. Wrinkle
resistant.
Scandals
39A
TRY     ONE OF     MY     FIFTEEN
bands   for any   engagement   you
may  have. Contact  Ken,   253-2505
after 6.
SASKATOON SEXCURSION RE-
turn trip at Christmas CN chartered car share a berth for lower
rates call Doug Hut 8, Rm. 1. 224-
9055   or   Nels   228-8708.	
LEGION OF DECENCY GIVES AN
A-l rating to Grand Puchese
Sellers   in   Auditorium,  Thursday.
RENTALS   & REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM FOR SENIOR
male student. Private entrance,
shower. Light cooking facilities.
Close to gates $50.00 per month.
CA 8-8814.
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE STU-
dent $35.00 per mo. or weekly
3555 — W. 5th Ave., Van. Ph. 733-
2795.  Eve.  6 to  9  p.m.
MALE STUDENT ONLY. TOTAL-
ly quiet and private room near
Gates. Bathroom and study facilities, phone, breakfast, $45. Phone
731-9437 after 6.
2 BSMT. SLEEPING ROOMS, PRI-
vate entrance, bathroom, toilet.
Cooking facilities available. Phone
224-0524 vacant Dec. 1.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
MODERN      FULI ""■      FURNISHED
trailer   for   two       rls   or    married
couple. Area of Cambie and S.W.
Marine.  Phone 224-9139.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
near campus, Pri. bath, semi private entrance, females only. 733-
7501.
Unfurn. Houses    &Apis.        84
Halls For Rent
85
CLASSIFIED
BUY -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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