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The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1971

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Striking workers
may picket campus
By SHANE McCUNE
UBC is using "hot" duplicating material and may be picketed as a
result.
Many faculty and administrative offices at UBC use office
supplies manufactured and sold by A.B. Dick, an American-owned firm
which is a major supplier of office equipment in Vancouver.
The A.B. Dick local of the Retail, Wholesale and Department
Store Clerks Union is on strike against the company. The union is
asking customers to stop using A.B. Dick supplies for their machines.
Simon Fraser University has agreed, but UBC has not.
John McLean, director of personnel for the UBC administration,
told The Ubyssey he has no power over the use of office equipment.
"There is no A.B. Dick equipment used in the administration
building," he said.
Asked about the use of copiers and mimeograph machines
elsewhere on campus, McLean said: "Each faculty decides what
machines they use. They buy their own supplies."
The question now is whether or not the A.B. Dick local will
picket UBC. This cannot be done without the striking union giving 48
hours notice to the university local of the Canadian Union of Public
Employees.
Bill Morrison, president of the university local of CUPE, said the
A.B. Dick local has not contacted his union on the matter.
The strike is an important one to both union and management.
The Vancouver office of A.B. Dick is the only unionized branch of the
company in North America.
Red Visser, spokesman for the striking union, explained the
history of the strike to The Ubyssey.
"Working conditions aren't that bad," Visser said. "But we want
an increase in wages. There is nothing down in black and white about
wages or working conditions."
The workers at A.B. Dick became unionized on Sept. 1. Visser
immediately began pressing for higher wages and guarantees of working
conditions.
"The Vancouver manager is anti-union, but he doesn't have any
negotiating rights anyway," said Visser. "They've sent in a man from
head office in Chicago by the name of Gene Unterschuetz.
"He has made arrangements for several meetings, only to phone
and say he can't show up. He is treating the whole affair quite lightly.
continued on page 2: see JOBS
Nerve-wracking,
no breaks on job,
say bus drivers
Computerization loses
UBC will not change over to computer registration next
year, an administration committee has decided.
The decision follows an attempt this year to computerize
time-tables for pre-registering students. The computer goofed and
the timetables of about 5,000 students had to be revised at the
last minute.
Assistant registrar Kenneth Young, a member of the
computer registration committee, said Thursday: "In view of our
experience using the computer last year, we decided that a little
more work on computer registration is needed before it can be
used for the entire university."
The majority of registration except pre-registration, will be
done by hand next year, he said.
The administration hopes to have full computer registration
by 1972-73, Young said.
By SHARON BOYLAN
"The job is nerve wracking. I
know guys who hauled a transport
across the country. But after six
months driving a bus they had
stomach trouble from tension."
The speaker was a striker
picketing at 16th and Cambie
Wednesday afternoon. He was
describing the conditions which
have propelled the transit workers
into their first strike since 1947.
A union spokesman described
the union demands as primarily
economic. They are asking for a
10 per cent increase over one year
or 10 per cent plus 10 per cent
over a two year period.
Wages now range between
$2.75 to $4.35 an hour, spread
over 50 different job
classifications. Drivers get $3.75
an hour as a basic rate.
"One of my neighbors is a
plumber, the other an
electrician," said another picketer
interviewed Wednesday.
"They make maybe six or
seven dollars an hour. But when I
go the grocery store, the owner
doesn't   sell   me   stuff   cheaper
because   I'm   making   $3.75   an
hour."
B.C.   Hydro  has  offered  an
increase of 13 per cent spread out
over   two   years.   This   offer   is
continued on page 3: see GOV'T
Quebecois
hold teach-in
How much do you know about
Quebec?
January 20, 21 and 22 will give
you a chance to discover how
Quebecois .look at the events of
the past three months.
Simone Chartrand, wife of
imprisoned Confederation of
National Trade Unions president
Michel Chartrand, will be here
January 20 for a discussion of the
reasons for his imprisonment.
Theo Gagne, steel worker
organizer in northern Quebec
arrested under the War Measures
Act, will speak January 21.
The final speaker January 22
will be noted Canadian historian
Stanley Ryerson, author of
Unequal Union, a history of
confederation.
—brett garrett photo
HISTORY HAS BEEN MADE. After long and ardorous negoitiations and much general discussion. The
Ubyssey and the administration reached an agreement — on what's garbage and what's not.
Mdster teacher award
'not popularity contest'
By SANDY KASS
UBC will have a master teacher this year.
After much concern by the master teacher
award committee over the refusal of the Alma Mater
Society and Graduate Student Association to be
represented, the committee has recently opened
nominations for the 1970/71 master teacher.
Nominations may be made by any student, and
close January 20th.
In a surprising move at the end of October, the
AMS student council voted 18-5 in favor of
declining to co-operate in the selection of UBC's
master teacher.
The move followed a refusal by the GSA
executive to participate in the committee's
selection,   which   urged   the   AMS   executive   to
"similarly decline to co-operate with the master
teacher award committee.
"I do not question their motives or their desire
to promote better teaching on this campus," said
committee head and UBC academic planner Robert
Clark.
"However, I do regret their unwillingness to
co-operate."
Clark then contacted other committee members
who urged him to go ahead.
Clark cited the main student objection as last
year's committee's refusal to grant the award to
nominees professors Brian Mayne or David Powell.
Mayne and Powell were finally refused tenure
last spring.
continued on page 6: see MASTER
The real Centennial story Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971
Jobs in danger
if line honored
from page One
"We've been on strike since Oct. 27, and the equipment was
declared hot by the B.C. Federation of Labour in the first week of
November."
Visser said the machines are not hot, but the paper and other
supplies used are.
"We're not asking much," Visser said. "We only want people to
buy their supplies from union shops and, where possible, to cancel their
contracts with A.B. Dick."
There are 16 men involved in the strike, but A.B. Dick has hired
more than 16 strikebreakers.
John Howe, Canadian vice-president of A.B. Dick, said he is not
willing to negotiate with the striking union.
"We are not prepared to negotiate with the union until the men
have returned to work," said Howe.
He described A.B. Dick working conditions as "ideal, with a
homey atmosphere. Everyone knows each other on a first name basis."
However, Howe admitted there is no written guarantee of working
conditions.
Howe said both Unterchuetz and the Vancouver plant manager
have been empowered to negotiate with the union.
On Dec. 2, a B.C. supreme court injunction prevented the union
from obstructing traffic, throwing objects at the building or demanding
that A.B. Dick clients stop using supplies.
Visser said the union has complied with the injunction and is only
requesting that clients stop using the equipment.
CUPE is left in the middle of the dispute. The union has no strike
clause in its contract with the UBC administration and university
employees who refuse to cross a picket line could be fired.
"I don't think the administration would fire any employees for
that reason," Morrison said. "But I can't instruct CUPE members to
cross or not to cross picket lines. I could be put in jail for that."
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and
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ERA EJMjEIIV "       by Tennessee Williams
Directed By Irene Prothroe
January 13-18   -   8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
Special Student Performance
Thurs., Jan. 14 - 12:30 p.m.
Reservations: Room 207 Frederic Wood Theatre
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FPB   UBC   22 Friday, January 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Halfway house for Indians, Metis
By MIKE SASGES
The Allied Indian Metis Society has set up a halfway
house in Vancouver to help the many Indians coming out
from behind the walls of B.C. penitentiaries.
There are 500 inmates in Oakalla prison farm — 120
of these inmates are Indian. There has never been a place
for an Indian to go after his release. AIMS is trying to
change this.
At the moment there are ten people living in the
house situated at 3457 East 27th Avenue said Jim
Anatole, an AIMS member.
"They are living on welfare, going to school or taking
on part time jobs."
Anatole and Fred Smith, also of AIMS, discussed
AIMS work with The Ubyssey Thursday.
"The idea for a residential centre came from people
—david bowerman photo
UBC's NEW SEDGEWICK LIBRARY has already won its first award. One judge said that the design was "The
most sophisticated of several entries of this nature . . ." and another commented that it was "A most impressive
solution ...". You be the judge and then decide what those judges have been smoking.
Triple swing-shift system
being considered for UBC
UBC may someday be divided, into three seperate
schools, with classes beginning at 8 a.m.
An administration committee is currently
investigating space utilization, rescheduling of classes
(possible 8 a.m. noon and evening classes), space
conversion and revision of booking procedures.
Alma Mater Society vice-president John Scott
Mitchell said the AMS is planning its own committee to
study the matter and present a brief to the administration
committee.
Mitchell said there has been one suggestion under
which each student would attend classes in only one of
three time periods - mornings beginning at 8 a.m.,
afternoons or evenings.
"At the moment, most courses are scheduled from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday," he said.
"In effect, the new proposal would mean three
seperate schools. It's a pretty wild proposition."
Mitchell said the three-way division would require a
larger staff, but said many universities will probably be
adopting such a plan in the future.
Assistant arts dean Robert Will, chairman of the
administration committee, refused to comment.
'It's a matter of principle. I'm not going to talk to
you before the committee finishes its business," he said.
Canadian science dean wanted
The president's committee to recommend a
replacement for retiring dean of science Vladimir
Okulitch has decided to place a strong emphasis on hiring
a Canadian for the post.
"It's a Canadian first," said Peter Kennedy, the only
student member of the nine man committee. "As far as I
know all Americans have been dropped from the list of
nominations."
Student assistance was solicited by the Science
Undergraduate Society Kennedy said, but "response was
very poor."
"We sent letters to all student science clubs asking
not only for nominations but also for selection criteria."
There was only one letter in reply he said.
Dr. Robert Barrie, physics professor and committee
member said, "most people think it should be a Canadian
university experience."
He said the majority of the committee didn't want to
bring in someone from industry to fill the position.
As yet, the committee has not advertised the position
in Canadian academic journals, or in any other
publications, however, Barrie did not discount this
possibility.
Nominations to date have been accepted from both
faculty and students.
Of the thirty names being considered for the position
most are Canadian, however, about one quarter of them
are currently outside Canada, Barrie said.
"We hope to be able to attract Canadians back to
Canada," he said.
The committee is made up of four faculty members
elected by the science faculty, four faculty members
appointed by the president, including the chairman, and
one student.
The committee hopes to have its recommendation
ready by July 1, when Okulitch retires.
Aid for Pakistan
The UBC Pakistan Student Association presented a
cheque for $492 to Oxfam on Monday.
The money is to buy relief supplies for the victims of
the East Pakistan typoon and tidal wave, and was raised
by a tag day and variety show on campus during
December.
behind the walls, namely the Indian Metis Educational
Club. This centre has been in operation for three
months," Smith said.
There are three steps to rehabilitation - staying in
the environment after release from jail, going to school
and then getting a job he said.
Anatole said, "We want to get into things, we don't
want to go back to skid row.
"The house gets Indians into society, so they can do
their own thing."
"The house is for Indians, only," he added.
Isn't that a drawback, however?
"No, not really. It's our way of getting the Indian
back into society," said Anatole.
When asked what's wrong with the existing half-way
houses, such as X-Kalay ? he answered , "It's white
oriented and we feel that these centres are not helping the
Indian."
Smith added, "There are no rules in our house. Each
person is responsible to the others. If someone gets drunk
one weekend, we're going to give him a babysitter for the
next week to straighten him out. We're not going to kick
him out.
"We want people who want to grow up and get out of
their hole. We'll take any Indian regardless of their
record," he said.
"This is not a government organization. It relies on
businesses for financing.
"Briefs have also been presented to the Vancouver
Foundation and we have also applied to the First Citizen:
Fund (government agency concerned with Indian affairs)
for a grant. There's no money yet."
How can people on the campus help?
"We don't want your money, we want your support
— come out and participate," said Anatole.
"We would be interested in using the facilities on the
campus," he said.
"All we want to do is help the Indian just out from
jail. We want him to clean himself up.
"We can't solve all the Indian problems. But it's a
start."
Government
stacks deck
from page One
within the bounds set by the now defunct federal Prices
and Incomes Commission, headed by former UBC dean of
arts John Young.
But there are other points of contention, including
holidays and overtime.
"Often we work an eight hour shift without breaks
for lunch or coffee. Some guys work split shifts of four
hours each with two hours off in the middle," said one
striker.
The strike began Sunday morning at 3:10 a.m., after
negotiations since the end of August produced no effect.
A spokesman for the Amalgamated Transit Union said it
hasn't been directly approached by the company since the
beginning of December.
The spokesman said that mediator Gus Leonidas had
been appointed on Nov. 2, but was unable to co-ordinate
a settlement.
The B.C. Mediation Commission, set up under Bill 33
in 1968, entered the act last week. B.C. Hydro went to
both meetings called by the commission, but so far the
union has refused to attend.
Said the union spokesman: "There's no point. That
three-man commission is appointed by the government.
And who owns B.C. Hydro? Think we'd really get a fair
shake out of them?"
B.C. Federation of Labor policy has been to avoid
appearing before the commission whenever possible. The
commission's decisions are binding only in certain cases.
John Sexton, public relations man for B.C. Hydro,
said in an interview: "I don't want to discuss our offer to
the union while the commission is operative."
At the commission meeting Wednesday, Harry Lyon,
superintendent of the transit system and a former bus
operator, testified in favor of the B.C. Hydro position.
A striking picketer said: "Why should Parker make all
the people in the city suffer like this?" (John Parker is
chairman of the commission.)
Also on Wednesday, Vancouver travel club operator
Mike Allen, proposed to set up a limited bus service for
old age pensioners. But this met with disapproval from the
president of the Old Age Pensioners' Organization,
Vincent Yates, who said that he would not support a scab
bus service.
There are 1,800 men working in transit in Vancouver
and Victoria. Of these, 1,200 are drivers and 600 are
maintenance men. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971
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Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising
228-3977.
JANUARY 8, 1971
The transit strike
With the bus strike less than a week old, the
government-industry propaganda mill isn't yet in full
swing, but it will get there.
We'll soon be hearing all about the selfish bus
drivers who have deprived the aged and infirm of
transportation, forced small children to leave themselves
prey to molesters while hitch-hiking and clogged the
downtown streets with traffic — all for their own greedy
ends.
We'll hear all about kindly B.C. Hydro, working
day and night to restore its wonderful service to the
public.
We'll   hear   still more   of   that   all-too-familiar
anti-labor     rhetoric and     more     suggestions    that
"something has to be done to put these overpowerful
unions in their place."
What we won't hear about is the fact that $3.75 an
hour (current basic wage for bus drivers) is no longer
enough to support a man with a family.
We won't hear about the nerve-wracking working
conditions that B.C. Hydro imposes on its employees.
We won't hear about bus drivers who work eight hour
shifts with no lunch or coffee breaks.
We'll hear no end of criticism of the transit union's
refusal to appear before the B.C. mediation commission.
We won't hear about the reason for the mediation
commission's existence — to force compulsory
settlements on unions and strengthen the already heavy
hand of the employer. We won't hear about Bill 33
(which created the mediation commission) — Canada's
most repressive labor legislation.
Students, many of whom depend on bus
transportation, will probably be prime targets of the
propaganda campaign, resulting in another wall between
students and workers. We can only hope that it fails.
This isn't a time for grumbling about the lack of
transportation, but for supporting a group of workers in
their just demands.
Besides, forgetting political considerations for the
moment, can anyone who strikes against B.C. Hydro be
all bad?
Once in a hundred years
Our first New Year's resolution this year
was to avoid the B.C. Centennial as much as
possible.
After living through the "once in a
hundred years" celebrations of 1958, 1966
and 1967 and with anticipation of more
centennials in 1968 (incorporation of
Vancouver) and 2000 (birth of W.A.C.
Bennett) we really couldn't take any more
"Beautiful B.C." bullshit.
Our resolve snapped on seeing a
centennial committee press release detailing
how each municipality is spending its share
of the $5.5 million in centennial project
money.
The list includes such vital projects as
the writing and publishing of the history of
Mabel Lake, construction of the Riske Creek
rodeo arena, the construction of a "natural"
DAVIES RAVIES
stone slab with historic explanation at
Cortes Island and North Cowichan's efforts
to "locate and mount" a locomotive (they
don't say precisely who will be mounting the
locomotive).
It also appears that the major
contribution of the 1971 centennial will be a
huge increase in the number of B.C.'s unused
community centres and poorly maintained
parks.
Of course, all of these projects are of
the utmost importance. In a crucial time like
this we can't waste money on frills like
housing or hospitals.
Yes folks, it's going to be a fun year. We
can't wait to hear the voices of thousands
singing the B.C. centennial song while
waiting in line at the welfare office.
BY JIM DAVIES
Civic election re-visited
Ho-hum.
It's the same old faces in city
hall again this term.
The voters picked the
incumbents from among the
unknowns in the 40-candidate
aldermanic slate. Their choice was
aided by the fact that the same
old names were largely located at
the beginning and end of the
ballot.
Their choice was also heavily
influenced by the media which
most certainly served as a vehicle
to publicize those who had the
funds.
Voters also must have
considered that things have been
fairly quiet under the current
administration. The only issue
which cropped up that drew
publicity — the youth issue — was
dealt with to some extent by the
council.
With the incumbents, the
citizens of Vancouver had
security. After all, the city was in
good hands, wasn't it?
What's going to happen now?
Probably not much. Rapid transit
will no doubt be a dream for the
next two years. Housing will
probably maintain its current slow
rate of expansion. Employment in
the city will, if predictions hold
true, hit a low point in February,
then begin to improve.
The  youth issue will emerge
again next summer and it will, no
doubt, be handled in much the
same way.
The difference in popular vote
this time — TEAM members
Walter Hardwick, Brian Calder,
Art Phillips and COPE's Harry
Rankin doing so well — will
probably mean that these
individuals will be more powerful
on council.
It is probable that these four
aldermen may gain committee
chairmanships, now the sole
property of the NPA councillors.
There will no doubt still be the
polarization between NPA
councillors and the TEAM
members and Rankin. However, I
look for the polarization to be
somewhat lessened as Phillips,
Rankin, Calder and Hardwick gain
experience and power.
Next election should see a big
change. If past political trends
continue, three NPA councillors,
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City      Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire     John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Uncorking his lunch, The
Magnificent McCune surveyed the
battlefield. Among the casualties were:
Sandy  Kass, Gary Enns, Bill Gillespie,
probably Ernie Broome, Halford
Wilson and, perhaps, Ed
Sweeney will not be endorsed by
the electorate while Earle Adams,
who will be 72, may not seek
re-election.
Tom Campbell will probably
not seek re-election, leaving the
field open for a real race.
It is improbable that Rankin
will run for mayor — however one
of the TEAM aldermen, perhaps,
Phillips, will likely contest the
position.
The     1972    election    should
feature   gains   for   TEAM   and
COPE-NDP, enough to swing the
balance of power away from the..
NPA for the first time in 30 years.
1972 should also signal the
beginning of rapid transit in the
city .. . better late than never.
But for the next two years the
keynote in Vancouver civic
politics will be the maintenance of
the status quo.
Paul Knox, Sharon Boylan, Kathy
Carney, Bruce Curtis, Mike (perfidious)
Finlay, Diamond Jim Davies, Ken
Lassesen, the stunning and beauteous
Jinny Ladner, (who helped uncork
Shane's lunch) Mike Sasges, Elaine
Bougie, John  Lingley and Dick Betts.
Causing the casualties were: John
Ewan, David Lee, John Sims, Chris
Krawczyk, Dave Schmidt, Judy Hall,
pretty city Jan O'Brien, Thorn Wescott
and jumping Josephine Margolis.
Recording the casualties on film
were: Jim Gorman, Brett Garrett. Dave
Enns, Kevan Perrins and (lest we forget)
David Bowerman.
On his first attempt at jocking off,'
Keith   Dunbar   was  assisted   by  Tony
Gallagher. Friday, January 8,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Grow your own growlies
Moving out of the city to a
commune or a collective?
Do you want to learn how to
survive and live off the land?
The MacMillan Planetarium is
offering a course on "Food
Resources From the Land and
Sea". The four week series of
lectures will discuss basic
techniques of gathering, preparing
and storing food that is readily
available in B.C.'s wilderness.
The series begins January 8, at
8:00   p.m.   in   the   Centennial
Museum. The  cost  is  $3.00, or,
$1.00 per session.
Anti-abortion
discussion
British MP Dr. Norman St.
John-Stevas will argue against
abortion Monday noon in the
SUB ballroom.
St. John-Stevas, a Conservative,
is internationally known for his
stand against abortion. UBC
Health Services arranged for his
visit.
Earn money painlessly on campus by marketing
travei programs. For details write with persona!
resume to:
Travel Co-ordinator
5 Boylston St.,
Cambridge, Mass. 02138
Now that you Ye in
university what are
your plans?
Under our plan you
continue your studies
right where you are.
You'll have no summer
employment problems
as ROTP pays you while
you train to be an officer.
And you'll get 30 days
-paid vacation each year.
For more information
on our plan, contact your
You need a plan. So        local Canadian Forces
you know where you're       Recruiting and Selection
going. Financially. And      Unit at:
academically.
We have a good career
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Chaplain
Bernice Gerard Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971
Master teacher award fives
into a campus-wide course refused, saying the award was a-
evaluation, and dismissed us as financial one which the university
little boys and girls incompetent   had already accepted, and had no
from page One
Student objectors feel the
award could have helped their
jeopardized careers said Clark.
"The committee agrees that
both men are good teachers.
"However, it was the
unanimous opinion of the
committee that other nominees
were better."
He said the committee honors
and encourages good teaching
above all else.
However, AMS president Tony
Hodge does not agree with him.
"If      good      teaching      is
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SUNDAY 10-7:00
Calendar-
a dull town until
Sheriff McCullough
took over
SUPPORT
LOCAL
SHERIFF"
continually supported financially,
and if the administration were to
provide optional teacher training
available to all teaching staff, then
the award would be legitimate.
"I'm strongly in favor of
council's decision, and no one is
changing my mind," Hodge said.
An outstanding teacher is
recognizable by his colleagues
without student support for the
committee, Clark said.
"The award is not a popularity
contest."
Commitee members include
faculty members from various
MMMMMMMMW
faulties, so as to maintain a
balance between respective fields
of interest.
Former   GSA   president   and
senator Art Smolensky is a major,
supporter of the moves taken by
the AMS and the GSA.
Smolensky said Thursday,
"They have neglected student
suggestions to change the award
to determine what is the best
method of improving teaching at
UBC.
Smolensky and Hodge
previously asked Gage to join in
speaking to former board of
governors chairman and award
financier Walter Koerner in hopes
of reviewing the validity of the
award.
Smolensky   said   Gage   flatly
right to change.
When asked by The Ubyssey
why he refused, he replied: "It's
nobody's business but my own."
He said that he has no reaction
to students refusal to participate,
and called the moves invalid
because only the executives had
made the decisions, and not
students at large.
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George Segal
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WARNING:   Some   swearing  and
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WARNING:   Frequent  swearing  and
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—B.C. Director
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Showtimes: 7:30, 9:30
One Complete
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FILMS
Fortune's Friend
Apart from its zany title, there are
three things that distinguish Quackser
Fortune Has a Cousin in the Bronx,
which premiered in Toronto, Vancouver
and Edmonton last week. One is that the
film is one of the most delightful comedies in recent years (Time, July 20,
1970). Another is the remarkably controlled performance of Gene Wilder as
Quackser Fortune, the last manure
shoveler in the streets of Dublin, a primitive who is.at once simple, inarticulate
and wise. The third is the presence of
Margot Kidder, a young Canadian
actress with freckles, green eyes and an
almost complete lack of affectation.
Given the mores of movie promotion,
Margot Kidder should have been shuttling across Canada last week, peddling
both the production and her personality.
Instead she preferred to stay away. "I
can't stand myself in it," she said. "I
suppose it will go down well, but I hate
the thing." Indeed, her reaction to the
appearance of Quackser Fortune was to
go to New York and enroll in the first
serious acting lessons of her career.
For a 22-year-old with no formal
training and a visible absence of ambition, she has had an interesting career.
Margot is a mining engineer's brat, born
in Yellowknife, educated at a dozen
schools and raised in more mining towns
than can be stuffed into a National Film
Board travelogue. At 17, as a bored
student at the University of British
Columbia, she jumped into acting "full
of blind conceit. I figured, hell, I can do
it, so I went and did it." Her first stage
role was in a road company version of
Oliver. She played a cockney slut, and
thereafter was cast in a succession of
CBC dramas as either a sweet young
thing or a sexually disturbed teen-ager.
There was a slight change of pace with
the NFB's The Best Damn Fiddler from
Calahogie to Kaladar, in which she portrayed the poor but honest daughter of a
man too proud to accept welfare. Says
Margot: "I think it's the best thing I've
ever done personally, and the best film
I've ever made." But her real chance to
attract attention came in 1968 when
Director Norman Jewison signed her for
a role in Gaily, Gaily, a farce about the
youth of Journalist Ben Hecht. She
played a whore with a heart of gold.
Gailw Gai!\ may not have challenged
audiences, but to Margot it posed a
problem: whether to enter the Hollywood half-world of starletdom. Without
much difficulty, she opted to stay in
Canada. She now has a house in Peach-
land in the beautiful Okanagan valley,
where she likes to ride around on a
horse named Chester. It is a place where
in summertime she can go barefoot, and
where, to the delight of B.C. motorists,
she occasionally hitchhikes. "Hollywood
is all too tinselly," she says. She also
hates New York. "It's nauseous, full
of paranoids. You never see the sky
and the air is full of crap."
Staying in B.C. did not prevent her
from getting the co-starring role in
Quackser. Surprisingly, the film's critical
success has done nothing to soften her
dejected feelings about her own performance. After seeing the rushes, "I lost
all my confidence," she says. Partly as a
result of this, Margot has spent much of
her time since last spring in the Vancouver CBC film labs and at the feet of
Director Bob Altman, learning the technical side of moviemaking. She regards
a behind-the-camera career as a fallback
"if acting becomes too much of a hassle.
Why not give up acting? It's no great
dramatic decision. I'm no glamour girl—
I'm not in this for the glitter."
Despite that disclaimer, Margot has
been spending some time trying to raise
money for a movie version of Margaret
Atwood's The Edible Woman (Time,
Nov. 21, 1969), to star herself and to be
directed by George Kaczender. And
recently she has been hanging around
Vancouver's skid road talking to prostitutes and drug addicts in preparation for
a segment of the CBC's The Manipulators, in which she is to play a reformed
whore. There must be something different about this role because Margot says
"it's the first time I've played something
not completely me. It's got me all enthusiastic about acting again."
Varsity
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1973 &   '74   GRADUATES:   Kraft  and   News-print   Operations
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Mechanical Engineers:
1972 GRADUATES    -    Project   and    Maintenance  Engineering
1973 & '74 GRADUATES - Mechanical Trades Helpers
Interview dates — January 13, 14 and 15
(Appointments can be made by contacting the University Placement Office 1  'F5ov»lDa)C-W which ^
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B.C. HYDRO and
POWER AUTHORITY
requires
COMMERCE
GRADUATES
for its
COMMERCE GRADUATE-IN-TRAINING
PROGRAM
The trainee, who reports to the C.F.O., is given regular responsible assignments under the
supervision of experienced managers, in various financial division departments, such as insurance and
credit, budgetting, office of the comptroller, purchasing, revenue accounting, plant and cost
accounting, etc. This offers the young graduate excellent opportunities to show his qualifications or
interests for different accounting and administrative positions within B.C. Hydro. This basic training
usually lasts 1 to 2 years after which the graduate-in-training is placed in a field of activity which best
meets his desires and the needs of B.C. Hydro.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS: JANUARY 14
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
GRADUATE-IN-TRAINING PROGRAM
The trainee is given assignments or projects in various Industrial Relations functions such as
recruitment, employment, job evaluation, salary administration, labour relations, manpower planning,
etc. This offers the young graduate excellent opportunities to show his qualifications or interests for
different Industrial Relations, jobs within B.C. Hydro. This basic training usually lasts 2 to 3 years,
after which the graduate-in-training is placed in a field of activity which best meets his requirements
and the needs of B.C. Hydro.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS: JANUARY 19
PLEASE ARRANGE APPOINTMENTS THROUGH YOUR STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
§nV*'7d
I did this all by myself.
You should see our cartoonist. So should I. So
should the editor. Where is he? Who knows?
Poof! I sit contemplating Nirvana, and it happens.
First installment or our cartoon happens. "The Saga of
Rhombus McFizz". Fine say I. Mr. Smith does it again.
But where is Mr. D. Smith?
Off and running. Hiding. Writing and creating the
next episode of our Saga series.
* * *
I have just bitten into a very rotten apple. The
piece of rotten apple is sitting in my mouth. Very much.
I am chewing it. I swallow it. Not bad.
The rest of the apple appears to be good. What a
letdown.
•k    *    *
Smith.
Probably a pseudonym.
Mr. D. Smith is undoubtedly, in reality, the son of
a Bavarian nobleman. A Bavarian Baron. He wished to
remain fairly anonymous because, if it is discovered that
his talents are being exhibited, he will be denied his
inheritance, his title, his lands, and will be banished
forever from his family.
And so, Mr. D. Smith, the cartoonist, under his
cloak of anonymity, continues cartooning.
And we sit and wait. And read. And wait for
more.
* * *
OUR COVER this week is a graphic
representation of the inside of my head.
-Grant Dickin
Mastead
NOW it can be told!
Running, screaming and
crawling, the assembled group
groped and grimaced its way to a
STARTLING CONCLUSION!
HEAR the horrors of
harrowing happenings as Tim
Wilson edits his way through
evildom.
SEE the terrors of
tongue-tied trashmen as Nettie
Wild stands fast against the
seething hordes of mediocre
journalisms.
FEEL the stomach-turning
trepidation of tortured talismans
as Mark Fawcett befriends a
beleaguered bootlegger.
TOUCH the untouchable
usurpers as they fling themselves
upon a fearless Thorn Westcott.
TASTE the sweet succulence
of  serenity   as   Grant Dickin,
(me), blathers and blunders into
a believable bog.
Today on Page 8, we have a
special treat for those who really
appreciate the finer, more
philosophical aspects of
literature.
A GOOD THING
The Canadian Universities'
Arts Festival — Renaissance 71
opens this February on the
University of Toronto campus.
The Renaissance is a multi-media
concept which will present
original works in all the arts.
Conceived and directed almost
entirely by students, the Festival
will present painting, sculpture,
design, and creative writing in a
stimulating manner. The purpose
of the Festival is to bring
together the best examples of
Canadian university students'
talents to the public and
university  audiences'  attention.
Page Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971 Sawchuk Recollection
Wood No. 13
Wood No. 1 Subconcious (closed)
Josephine   Margolis
When the artist brings the forest, the
(de)humanized forest, to the gallery aestheticized
trees can become anesthetized trees.
When ecology is sacrificed to aesthetics; when
one environment is made to suffer for another, the
gallery becomes self-contradictory.
Trees with addresses and doors, and
dedications-in-gold, trees with dictionairies and
black fur, not moss, and trees with mirrors and
spliced and laminated comprise this sculpture
exhibition at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery.
An artist who deems labour and nature the
educators and his education as mining, building,
fishing, working in steel foundries, shipyards and
freighters, has failed to grasp the lesson. Who
would use the life of the 'stuff whose very life he
is asserting?
To George Sawchuk everything is duplicated
in nature from the self-image to the subconscious.
If the  observer somehow tails to identify with
—photos jim gorman
tree-sculpture, faild to see any
microcosmic-macrocosmic relationship in nature,
the artist compensates by offering him his
reflection. Mirrors are implanted in this tree.
The wonder, the mystery, the completeness
inherent in nature is real only in man's relation to
nature.
It is the absurdity of removing the mystery,
by cutting trees, only to implant an artificial
mystery — a symbolic restatement of what was.
Sawchuk leaves the key in the lock, the ultimate
anti-mystery. This particular tree has a built-in,
seashell and concrete, subconsscious.
Nevertheless his artistry and conviction in
composition cannot be denied, it is only his
philosophy that is subject to criticism. A pick, axe,
and shovel epitomize Sawchuk's statement:
'labour educates'.
Sawchuk's axe is anachronistic. Yesterday's
symbol of labour is today's threat to existence.
Friday, January 8,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
NEW and USED
BOOKS
• University Text Books * Quality Paper Backs
• Pocket Books *' Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
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YOU ARE EXTREMELY SATISFIED
WITH YOUR HAIRSTYLE!!!
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GERMAN AND FRENCH MASTER STYLISTS
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Phone 224-6622
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
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Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates,
FRI.8&SAT. 9
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a dull town until
Sheriff McCullough
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The Engineer
and PHOTOGRAPHY
- Introduction to Creative Engineering
INSTRUCTOR: Mr. DENES DEVENYI, P.Eng., Special Lecturer
in   Creative   Photography,   Assistant   Director   Department   of
Physical Plant and Planning, Simon Fraser University.
TIME:   Commencing  Saturday,  January  16,  1971, 9:30-11:30
a.m., 10 sessions.
PLACE:  Room 308, Civil Engineering, The University of British
Columbia.
FEE: $40.00.
COURSE  OUTLINE:  The course  is designed  to help graduate
engineers and engineering students to improve their power to
communicate through the visual media. It will explore areas that
are normally beyond the engineering education and experience.
By doing this it will lead engineers to a more creative approach to
their profession as well as to teach a greater awareness of the
world around them.
Lectures, picture analysis and group discussions are part of the
program including a number of picture-taking assignments.
REGISTRATION: As enrolment is limited to 25 persons, advance
registration    is    advised.    To    register,    please   complete   the
registration form and mail,.together with your remittance, before
January 8, 1971.
Page Th'e< Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
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Summer Employment Opportunity
FIELD SUPERVISORS
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Several vacancies exist for the summer of 1971
The Field Supervisor has broad experience in aquatics, holds the Red Cross
Water Safety Instructor Certificate, is a self starter able to work without
supervision, works well with volunteers and has a flair for public speaking.
Apply detailing qualifications and experience to:
Director of Water Safety Service
THE CAN AD I Af\f RED CROSS SOCIETY
4750 Oak Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Applications should be received by January 15th, 1971
GRADUATE STUDIES IN HISTORY
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY
MONTREAL, QUEBEC
The Department offers graduate instruction leading to the M.A.
and Ph.D. degrees in European, Canadian, United States and Asian
History.
Student programmes are keyed to individual needs with a minimum of bureaucratic specifications. Both thesis and course work
options are available for the M.A. degree. The Ph.D. programme
is largely tutorial. A limited number of assistantships at $2,400 will
be awarded.
For further information, contact:
The Director of Graduate Studies
Department of History
Sir George Williams University
Montreal 107, Quebec.
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The following secret communique has been intercepted from a usually reliable source.
MEMO
FROM: Water H. Gauge
TO: Board of Directors of B.C. University Ltd.
In our continuing drive to efficiently produce a finer and better product,
management has recently taken the following steps.
A grass area in front of the library had become infested with wild trees, inciting
products to engage in uncompanylike activities such as sunning, girlwatching, and
necking. After consultation with the Psychology Department, management took
decisive steps to penetrate to the core of this problem. The Clock Tower was erected,
hopefully to subliminally instill a sense of inadequacy in the boys, and implant a fear
of assault in the girls.
Expansion of Sedge wick Library will further utilize this waste space. In keeping
with our deep concern for the conservation of natural resources, the trees along the
boulevard will be saved by enclosing them in large flowerpots of unusual design. It is
hoped that this will also help alleviate the serious problem of dogs urinating on the
clock tower. *
Another wooded area near Place Vanier was so overridden with wild trees that
it hindered products from reaching work stations on time. This has now been
converted to a parking lot. Initially there was some argument within management
about destroying a natural area for a student parking lot. This problem was quickly
solved by top officials of the company, who quickly pointed out that the lot was for
profs — not students.
Installation of traffic lights at the factory entrance will allow more control of
products on the way to the marshalling yards. There have been several small traffic
jams out to Blanca Street, but our efficiency experts predict that throughput will
increase greatly once the traffic lights on Chancellor Boulevard are installed.
The erection of eye-catching guide signs has helped tremendously in getting
factory tours off the ground. However, our lawyers are presently considering putting
up additional signs warning tourists that the company will not be responsible for neck
strains from reading signs sideways. There has also been some complaint received
from the Department of Transport concerning the risk of aircraft accidents due to
people looking for the Information Office.
Consultant fees have been somewhat of a problem, especially a rather large one
by the firm of Hook, Rook, and Crook Associates, Ltd. We feel, however, that their
clear conception of our factory's future and their obvious concern and creative ability
make us indebted to them.
Management contemplates many more changes to increase factory productivity
and efficiency. The Board will be immediately notified as our thinking on each of
these matters solidifies, and concrete proposals are submitted.
Sincerely,
H. Water Gauge,
President, B.C. University Ltd.
Page  Four
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8, 1971 Film
Love Story
AM MacGraw and Ryan
Love Story is a fantastically tearful film. In many ways it is
a horror story, surreal and terrifying, but at the same time,
poignant, beautiful, and quite often outrageously humourous.
The horror lies in our knowledge of the death of Jenny (Ali
McGraw), a Radcliffe music student who marries a Harvard
student, Oliver (Ryan O'Niel). The film begins with the end, that
is, the reflections of Oliver on the death of his wife, reflections
that lead us through the story of their love. The horror lies in our
expectation of Jenny's death, we don't know when or how she
dies, and every scene seems fraught with impending doom
because of our foreknowledge.
At one point Oliver has an argument with Jenny, she runs
off and Oliver goes out to look for her. Oliver's search through
The Harvard campus is surreal, especially when he opens door
after door in the music building trying to find her. With the
opening of each door we are assaulted by the surreal sounds of
different instruments that are playing in each of the different
practicing rooms.
The poignancy comes from the beautiful playful snow
scenes, where the lovers tumble about in the snow.
The humour comes from the witty snappy dialogue that
passes between the two, and the admittedly situational comedy
that results when Oliver, a millionaire's son, approaches Jenny's
father (John Marly), an ardent, catholic, baker, with the intention
of marrying his daugher in a "Do it yourself ceremony", a
ceremony that lacks any reference to God. Comedy arises again,
when Jenny meets Oliver's father (Ray Milland) in his palatial
mansion.
All through the film, we realize that the love that grows in
Oliver and Jenny is going to be torn from them. This knowledge
makes their lives and their love incredibly sad. If it weren't for
the generous use of humour in the film, I doubt that many people
could stand the emotional strain for more than half the film.
The characters and scenes are believable, and each in their
own way, likeable, so much so that it is difficult to find fault
with the film on the basis of its acting or its story and scene
development.
Perhaps the scenes and the characters were designed to
clutch your throat, but they are not overdone, the film never falls
into the trap of being maudlin or in the least melodramatic. The
film score is really quite beautiful, it is subtle and does not (like
many musical scores) interfere with the development of drama in
the film.
Cromwell
Cromwell is a sad film. It is made sad, not by the dragged
out downfall and decapitation of poor King Charles, but by the
dullness of the film as a whole.
Richard Harris as Cromwell is so busy with his'
imitation of Richard Burton that he doesn't have time to give
anything more than a caricature of the man Cromwell. Harris in
true Burtonese style, yells out every line that he has in the film,
and when he isn't yelling, he maintains a sulky angry expression
on his pilgrim hatted mug.
Alec Guiness as King Charles does an adequate job of
playing the weak, wife dominated king, but the portrayal is
narrow and the director obviously doesn't make enough use of
Guiness's considerable acting ability.
O'neal, from Love Story
After two and one half-hours of endless British parliament
scenes, with Harris yelling out his lines and sulking in between
while Guiness prances around and poses portrait-like every time
he stops moving, you begin to feel restless; then with horror you
realize that there are two more parliament scenes to be endured.
I suppose that the film is meant to be a historical
document, and to this extent, it does serve some purpose. The
battle scenes were realistic in that they did not attempt to glorify
the battle action, instead, they showed what these wars were
really like, with confused men hacking away at each other with
pointed sticks and swords. Perhaps in a few years, the film will be
much in demand for screening in high school history courses.
Cromwell is acceptable as a historical document, but as a
respresentative of the filmakers art, it just doesn't make the
grade. The narrowness of the character portrayals and the lack of
creativity in scene development cripple the possibilities of the
story itself. "y wr
Act of the Heart
Genevieve Bujold, as Martha Hayes in Act of the Heart,
gives a fine portrayal of a young woman eventually destroyed by
a conflict about self-identity. She movingly acts out the problems
engendered by the ambiguity involved in her national origins.
Throughout the film it isn't clear if she is French or English and
this lack of identity creates her compulsion to find her own
unique personality.
Bujold's performance is ingenious. She manages to convey,
with clarity, the impression of a young woman emerging from
adolescence. The ambiguity of her identity is expressed through
her fluctuating accent in the different scenes throughout the
movie. She is especially good in the drunken scene where she has
to be put to bed.
Donald Sutherland, on the other hand, wears a vaguely
befuddled smile throughout his performance. We never sense any
deep religious motivation in his priestly character. Neither does
he seem to undergo any particularly passionate change either with
the death of the young boy or with his decision to leave the
church to be with Martha.
Some of the reality of Quebec life is skilfully portrayed in
the interludes with "Ti-Jean", the hockey coach and friend to all
the kids in the neighbourhood. Martha's reaction to the news of
his arrest is to once more re-assure herself an d the young boy of
their identities. She is never troubled by his arrest, again
indicative of her schizophrenia.
Monique Leyrac gives a good performance as the lonely upper
class widow who loses her son. She seems a bit wooden initially,
but then redeems herself by her performance in the scenes in the
hospital and with Martha.
But none of the events preceding Martha's self-immolation
lead us to expect it. It is not clear why she would even
contemplate death, even though her lover speaks of the need for
the one act which people can respect. Perhaps her death seems so
odd because her passion is contained and framed in terms of her
love for him and because the priest seems more absorbed in
worldly tasks than good deeds. There seems to be a schism
between Sutherland's interpretation of the part, and the need for
an obsessive figure to make the film come together.
Her death is only explicable in terms of Catholic theology.
She has sinned by seducing a priest, and thus must punish herself.
But that act of self-sacrifice and punishment is an even greater
sin.
Paul Almond's portrait of the crisis of self-identity of
young Quebeckers is good, although weak in resolution.
Sharon
YEAR-END
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Friday, January 8,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  Five Marque Jaques
Symphony
Ovulation Unwarranted
"Aha," said I, your benign critic, "it's time to look into my
symphonic crystal ball and see what looms in the way of musical
events both come and gone," so I did just that, and here's what
resulted:
Before Christmas, we were treated to an exceptional work,
the Benjamin Britten Violin Concerto. Erich Gruenberg soloed,
while guest conductor Charles Wilson led the VSO. Not only was
the piece fascinating (very similar to Alban Berg's concerto, but
not written in a twelve-tone idiom), but the performance was one
of the most impressive I've heard at a symphony concert in years.
It's strange that this concerto has been given only one recording,
and on a very obscure label, at that.
Also before Christmas, we heard Yehudi Menuhin in
concertos by Elgar and Bach. Much to my great surprise, I
enjoyed the first of the two (especially its slow second
movement), but Menuhin's playing almost threw me a few times.
The man has lots of emotion, but his technique is often weak
(he's in his mid-fifties), especially in fast passages. Much to my
disgust, there were several standing ovulations during the concert
which seemed entirely unwarranted.
To look ahead doesn't bring too much musical delight, I'm
afraid. There's a fantastic-sounding concert coming up in
February, featuring works by Stravinsky, Mahler, Bartok andSFU
composer Murray Schafer. And in the spring there are going to be
three concerts devoted to "young people", one of which may
feature local rock groups, another contemporary ballet and
another maybe a folk singer. We'll have to wait and see what
happens here, though the symphony seemed awfully reticent
when I asked them if there would be any works like those
performed at the avant-garde Sounds of the Century concerts
here two years ago. More likely we'll get a watered-down version
of the schmaltzy DuMaurier Pop Concerts (featuring heavies like
Mitch Miller) which are also taking place in the next few months.
This weekend's concerts may be of interest, though.
Canadian composer Pierre Mercure's Triptyque (which I believe
was commissioned and premiered by the VSO back in the 502) is
featured, as well as two works by Beethoven — the Triple
Concerto, featuring three local musicians, and the Eroica
Symphony, which I think will be the first major Beethoven
symphony Meredith Davies has conducted here in a long time. So
if you're a Beethoven fan like myself, you'll probably be found in
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre this Sunday afternoon or Monday
night.
Yehudi Menuhin exercising his sensitive fingers.
Also coming up on Saturday, Jan. 16 is an
evening of complete insanity with P.D.Q. Bach,
a spoofy put-on of music by one of Bach's
"lesser known sons" by Peter Schickele. Pieces
to be featured include Schleptet in E Flat, Eine
Kleine Nichtmusik, Echo Sonata for Two
Unfriendly Groups of Instruments, and
Concerto for Piano Vs. Orchestra. The last of
these features movements titled "andante con
Mr. Moto" and "Vivace Liberace". Don't be
frightened off by the musical esoteria, though,
because much of P.D. Q.'s humour is visual as
well as musical. It should be interesting to see
of Meredith Davies and the and the V.S. O. can
perform the whole concert with a straight face.
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Page Six
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971 Annie Scarfe as Desdemona and Arthur Burghard as Othello
Theatre
Othello at the Playhouse
Shakespeare's Othello, the next production of the
Playhouse Theatre Company, opens January 8. The cast includes
Arthur Burghardt as Othello, Alan Scarfe as Iago, and Annie
Scarfe as Desdemona. Performances are at 8:30 p.m., except
Sundays, and there are matinees at 2:30 on Jan. 3, 20 and 27.
Student night is Tuesday, January 19.
John Brockington, head of UBC's Theatre Department, will
direct Neil Simon's comedy, Plaza Suite, the Playhouse Theatre
Company's fifth production of the 1970/71 season. The play
opens February 3.
The Dorothy Somerset Studio (back door of Freddy
Wood), presents a double bill January 13-16. The two plays, The
Orchestra, by Jean Anouilh, and The Gnadiges Fraulein, by
Tennessee Williams, start at 8:30 every night, with a student
performance on Thursday, January 14 at 12:30. Tickets are
available from Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207. Student
prices.
*  * *
Those  people  who  brought vou The Bovs in the Band
are back again with another production at the Magic Theatre,
603 Granville Street. From now to the end of the month, Actors'
Contemporary Theatre will be producing the musical, The»
Fantasticks. Starring in the comedy will be Pat Rose, Christine
Anton, and Glenn MacDonald. Performances are Tuesdays to
Saturdays at 8:30, with special matinees Saturdays at 2:30.
Students get in for half price on Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Thursdays, except opening night and Saturday matinees.
Santana
In case you were worried, the bossa nova is alive and well.
It's living in California, and calls it self Santana. Seriously,
however, there's much more to Santana than at first meets the
ear. They started with the Latin American beat, but they've built
on it, and it's now only an undercurrent in their music. Their
fusion of rock with Latin American rhythms is unique and
exciting, and makes for many nice effects. It's hard sometimes
not to notice the beat and associate it clinically with formal
ballrooms, and the smooth Belafonte-type voice of their lead
singer only adds to this impression. My spies tell me that Santana
often does in fact perform at conventional ballroom happenings.
Evidently they're second in demand only to Blood, Sweat and
Tears among the so-called "in" groups for lucrative
hundred-dollar-a-plate over-30 type gatherings. Their music,
however, is not limited to cha-chas.
A Primeval Throb
Santana's awareness of the power of rhythm lets them turn
it into a primeval pulse throb which carries the listener with it.
"Soul Sacrifice", on their first album, is one example of their
understanding of the primitiveness of the beat and the deep-down
sensuality of the Caribbean rhythm.
Free-form Jazz
One of Santana's biggest problems is a sameness of sound
from song to song. This is a problem, of course, with most rock
groups, but with Santana it's more obvious because of the
distinctive rhythm. This is glaringly evident on their first album,
but on their second album, AbraxaJ(KC 30130), they have moved
a little further away from the Caribbean. Only occasionally does
the listener feel guilty because he is not sambaing. Santana are
good musicians, and besides attempting to develop a distinctive
sound of their town, they have borrowed a few things from
various sources, with interesting results. They have turned a blend
of songs by bluesman Peter Green and jazz artist Gabor Szabo
into (you guessed it) a fairly good cha-cha, and you have to admit
that only Santana could to that. More successful, and much more
interesting is the use of free-form jazz techniques such as those
being developed by Miles Davis and others to create a tapestry-like
flow of sound out of which one or several instruments make
improvisational forays. "Singing Winds, Crying Beasts" sounds
like a cut off Davis' In A Silent Way, and leaves me more
convinced than ever that what is now free-form grew largely out
of John Coltrane's "sheets of sound" techniques.
Santana's great realization of the power of primeval rhythm
is evident again in the throbbing native chant of "El Nicoya".
Santana himself, a fairly competent guitarist, and really adept at
adding wildness to the beat by hovering around it, shows he's
capable of more than this on Samba (what else?) Pa Ti. And
young drummer Gregg - Rolie, for me one of the stars of
Woodstock, injects a good dose of solid rock into the otherwise
Latin rhythms with a couple of thumping-good compositions of
hisown by Bill Storey
COMING FILMS:
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Friday, January 8,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Seven Love in the OR
by Rebecca Quirk
Dr. Lance Sterling opened the door to the OR, strode in
and yelled out "Nurse White, I want to speak to you at once."
Nurse White, a tall platinum faced girl looked up in surpirse and
replied, "Yes Doctor I'll be right with you." She threw the
forceps that she was holding into the sink and scurried over to
the tall dark haired Sterling. He motioned to Nurse White with his
index finger, "Follow me," he said.
They left the operating room and walked down the
antiseptic smelling corridor to Sterling's office. Sterling shut the
door and locked it, then he turned to Nurse White and grasped
her in his arms. "Angel," he said, "Angel I just couldn't stant it
anymore, I just finished an appendectomy, and as I was sewing
up 1 thought of you, and the last time that I made love to you,
and after when I zipped up your uniform over your milky body,
"Oh, Angel I must have you now, I can't wait any longer!" "Oh
Lance!" replied Nurse White, I feel the same way, today in the
OR when I put your rubber gloves on for you, I wished that it
could be me that you would be touching," "Shall we," whispered
Lance. "Yes, Oh God yes!" Sterling leaned over and pressed a
button, a hideaway vibra bed lowered itself, from the wall with a
whirr of electric motors and gears. They leaped on the bed and
savagely tore at each other's clothes, in a moment it was over, Dr.
Sterling was dressing, Nurse White was lying prone on the bed,
immobile^ with her sweet ruby lips parted, murmuring, "Lance,
Lance .. . Lance?"
Two days later Pops the janitor was sweeping the floor
near the administration office, he overheard Allan Gay, the
hospital's chief administrator talking excitely over the phone.
Pop's listened carefully, but he missed much of what was being
said because of Allan's pronounced lisp, "He reminds me of
Truman Capote," thought Pops.He put his ear to the door and
managed to make out some of the conversation. Gay was saying*
"But that's absolutely impossible, we can't have an epidemic
here, not in my hospital, I just won't stand for it, now you just
stop it, you meany." Allan's voice reached a crescendo as he spoke
these last words, and Pops heard the phone slam down in its
receiver. Before he could move, the door burst open, knocking
Pops across the hall where he landed in a heap with his head in
his mop bucket: "Pops!" yelled Gay, "Get your silly head out of
that bucket, right now!" Pops didn't respond so Gay went to him
and pulled him out. Pops lay on the floor unconscious, gasping
for breath. At that moment, Dr. Sterling came sauntering down
the hall, Allan staring after him. "Sterling!" screamed Allan, "Fix
Pops, he's broken," Sterling turned around and walked slowly
back, "You know I'm on coffee break Allan, can't it wait a bit."
Allan was angry, but Lance's physical presence quieted him, and
he whined, "Lancey please fix Pops, good janitors are hard to
find these days." "Oh, all right," said Sterling grudgingly. He
rolled Pops over with his foot and began stepping on Pops'back,
Pops wheezed, and his eyes opened, then Lance and Gay put him
on his mop pail rollers and wheeled him down to the OR.
Nurse White was in the OR when she saw Pop's being
wheeled in. "Oh No! What's wrong?" said Nurse White. They
soon found out, Pops had a mild concussion from Gay's office
door handle, they shot him full of morphine and wheeled him
into the broom closet for recovery. As they closed the door to
the closet, Pops was murmuring "Purple haze, . . . mmmmm . . .
the White Lady, riding through my brain . . . mmmmm."
Nurse White, Dr. Sterling and Allan went into the hospital
coffee shop to finish Lance's break. When they sat down, Gay
told them of the epidemic. "Apparently," said Gay, "it is an
unknown disease that affects only males, most of the male
hospital staff already has it, they're dropping like flies, I just
don't know what to do. Temporarily, we have named the disease
Galloping Peedink X. We know that it causes males to hallucinate,
and to suffer a great deal of itchness in the testes region." Lance
muttered, "Migod," then Nurse White said, "How fascinating,
have you or Mr. Gay noticed anything unusual Dr. Sterling?"
"Migod, where did that seven foot leprechaun come from?" with
that he collapsed on the floor, clutching at himself. A cafeteria
table on wheels was handy, so Allan and Nurse White lifted Dr.
Sterling onto the table and rushed him to the intensive care ward.
As they left the ward, Nurse White was crying, even Allan was
sniffing, "Gee whiz," said Gay, "What are we going to do?" Nurse
White replied. "I don't know Mr. Gay, I just don't know ..."
***********
Does Pops ever live to see another freshly waxed floor?
Does Dr. Lance Sterling recover from his dread disease, and what
about Allan Gay, can he cope with the epidemic that has crippled
his hospital? Will Nurse White ever feel Dr. Sterling's rubber
gloves again? Tune in next week to this space for another exciting
chapter in "Love in the OR ".
SUFEKSIHEI1J
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Page Eight
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971 Friday, January 8,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Course evaluation rolling along
Preliminary questionnaires sent:
out in December by the Alma
Mater Society course evaluation
committee are beginning to come
in,   said   John   Mitchell,   AMS
Course unions
starting again
There still may be an answer to
that dull textbook or boring
course.
For the third time in as many
years, another attempt is being
made to organize course unions in
the faculty of arts.
Student senator Gary Letcher
said the new course unions will
provide a forum for students to
air complaints, suggest
improvements and implement
changes within departments. The
changes could include
restructuring of course or
student-faculty liason committees.
Students interested in forming
course unions will have the chance
to sign-up in classes beginning
next week.
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vice-president and organizer of the
committee.
From these questionnaires the
13 man committee funded by a
$2,000 AMS grant will prepare a
final survey to be conducted in
late February said Mitchell.
"The faculty has been
cooperating well," he said.
"We     sent     the     forms     to
professors who then gave them to
a student volunteer in each class.
The student distributed and
collected them and then returned
them to us.
"The results have been good."
Final results will be available to
students in an anti-calendar next
September, Mitchell said.
the
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LECTURER - PHOTOGRAPHER
IN PROPHETIC PERSPECTIVE	
v*&*&*&<*0'
THIS SUNDAY, JANUARY 10th
FREE-WILL SUPPER- 5:30 p.m. and FIRESIDE WITH
LIVINGSTON-7:00 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd. Across from the Administration Bldg. at
Gate No. 1 - Phones: 224-1614 (SUB 228-3701)
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ENDGAME by Samuel Beckett
January 29 - February 6  8:30 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for all performances)
Special Student Performances
Monday, February 1    7:39 p.m.
Thursday, February 4   12:30 Matinee
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207
 SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE	 Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971
PIZZA
PATIOJ
• EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY*
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
VARSITY GRILL
SPECIALIZING IN
Chinese & Western Cuisine
FREE DELIVERY
ON ORDERS 2.50 & UP
Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 10th next to Varsity Theatre
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body.
Eczema, Pimples, Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
relieved by NIXODERM. Antiseptic
action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
Special Events Presents:
Tat Paulsen
Looks At
The  70s
PAT PAULSEN IN
PERSON
SUB BALLROOM
Friday, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets $2.00 at
AMS Office and SUB
Information Desk
The following events
are also scheduled:
«
January 15-12:30
PHILIP DE FEMERY
Classical Guitarist
JANUARY 19 - 12:30
MIGUEL ANGEL ESTRELLA
ARGENTINE PIANIST
•
January 27, 28, 29
CREATION 2
Improvisational Drama
.
February 5 - 12:30
LEON BIBB
History of Soul Music
V
Paul Hann — Folksinger
Date to be announced
THE REAL
HISTORY . .
A Ubyssey centennial special
By Dick Befts
JM.he history of the people who built B.C. begins
before the magic date of 1871 and B.C.'s entry into
confederation.
As early as 1849 miners on Vancouver Island were
striking against intolerable working conditions in the coal
mines. The owners of the mine were the shareholders of
the Hudson's Bay Co. and the man responsible for its
control was James Douglas.
Douglas issued an official proclamation which
pledged to give all support possible to the company and
condemned the workers for their strike action.
Later in the same year miners struck at Fort Rupert.
At the request of the mining company two miners were
placed in irons for six days by the colonial militia. Within
a short period of time most of the initial group of workers
stowed away on a barque out of the country.
This strike set the pattern of cooperation between
company interests and the police forces of the area.
The date of B.C.'s entry into confederation
corresponds with the province's first protracted strike.
Once again the target of the workers' actions was the
Hudson's Bay Co. In April of 1871 delegations of striking
miners went to Victoria to raise support for the strikers.
The owner of the Hudson's Bay subsidiary at Wellington,
James Dunsmuir (of Dunsmuir St. fame) tried to break
this strike with the use of scab labor.
In 1877 the same Dunsmuir used the militia to break
a strike and evict the striking miners. Dunsmuir's partner
was one Lieutenant Diggle of the militia. Thus the
precedent was set in B.C. for the marriage of big business
and military and police force. This pattern continues
today.
w,
"hat were mine workers and other workers fighting
against? The list of casualites at Dunsmuir's Wellington
mine site gives us a large part of the answer.
On April 17, 1879 a mine explosion took the lives of
11 men. Another explosion on January 4, 1881 killed 23
miners. 148 were killed in an explosion on May 3, 1887
and 75 more died in the mines on January 24, 1889.
Fatalities on the labor force, men killed by industry,
continue in B.C. today. Hundreds of men lose their lives
annually in the forest industry. Eighteen were killed in
Prince George in 1969-70 due to the fast pace of the
logging operations.
In 1900 a total of 200 militia and 100 special police
broke a strike of fishermen on the Fraser River in New
Westminster. The men were demanding better prices from
the canneries for their catches. The canneries called in
strike-breakers and armed them even though there had
been little violence, on the part of the strikers.
Frank Rogers, B.C.'s first labor martyr, was arrested
during this strike. He became a marked man and was later
shot while organizing railway workers in 1903 by armed
CPR thugs who were defended by CPR lawyers and later
acquitted.
6«»«R toeowj*
♦
\
n Sty
fttf
■<*#
%
The CPR, as well had always thrived on cheap
immigrant labor. It held the upper hand over people who
had to work or starve.
D
"eath has always been just around the corner for B.C.
loggers since, as in all profiteering industries, the worker's
safety is one of the last considerations. In B.C. our
extractive role in the branch-plant economy has made
most jobs hazardous since the idea behind business is to
get the raw materials out quickly and cheaply.
In 19.12 reports had it that 64 bodies of drowned
workers were seen in the Fraser River. They had tried to
escape from the work camps since companies never
provided transportation out if an employee wished to quit
his job.
In 1911 the men employed at the terminus of the
Grand Trunk Railway in Prince Rupert never received the
wages they had been promised from the company. They
struck in protest and large numbers were arrested. Special
stockades were constructed to hold them.
Unemployment has always been a problem in B.C.'s
economy. Repression against unemployed workers has
also been heavy.
On January 28, 1912 police charged a meeting on
Powell Street in Vancouver injuring and arresting many
unemployed workers. Among them was R. Parm
Pettipiece, an alderman and labor leader who spoke at the
meeting.
In 1912-13 Canadian Colleries, owned by mining
magnate Dunsmuir, was struck. Unemployed Chinese who
spoke no English and who had no history of trade
unionism were duped into scabbing. Police spies were
employed throughout the strike and it was finally
smashed by 300 militia called in by the attorney-general,
Bowser, at the request of Dunsmuir. 256 strikers were
arrested and one died as a result of maltreatment in
prison. This man is one of B.C. labor's many unknown
martyrs.
o
'n July 26, 1918 the life of Albert "Ginger"
Goodwin came to a close.
Goodwin was an organizer for the Mine, Mill and
Smelter Workers. He was suffering from tuberculosis and
his draft classification was D—unfit for military service.
After the 1917 strike at Trail, in which Goodwin
played a leading role, he was reclassified to A status. A
short time later he was drafted.
Goodwin took to the hills around Comox on
Vancouver Island where he lived in hiding for close to a
year. He was finally discovered by Provincial Police officer
Dan Campbell. As Goodwin turned to flee he was shot in
the back by a dum-dum bullet.
Campbell, of course, was acquitted of murder. But
Ginger's story wasn't finished. The day of his funeral saw Friday, January 8,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Behind the pomp, gloss and ceremony of the centennial
celebrations in B.C., the real history of the province is being neglected.
This history concerns the people who built the economic
foundations of B.C. The people who sweated and labored for such
grand institutions as the CPR or the Hudson's Bay Company, who
fought and died in the struggle to better their lives.
Under the Social Credit government of capitalism and
foreign domination the pattern of repression and wide
spread unemployment and poverty continues.
Bill 33 which features compulsory arbitration in
times of strikes greatly weakens labor's tools to fight
against low wages and poor working conditions. And the
pattern of union bureaucracy, complacency and
willingness to bend to coercion by employers and
governments makes labor less able to struggle for control
over industry and production.
JM.n a broader context, confederation of the provinces
of Canada has had sweeping effects for the people.
B.C. is a blatant example of the failure of
confederation. Canada is not an independent, unified
nation but a system of regions whose resources and
productivity can be exploited by outside interests.
B.C.'s extractive economy and the coal, water, timber
and other resource sellouts depicts the most urgent cause
of poverty and unemployment. Work layoffs in the labor
movement plus generally lower wages than, say, in the
U.S. can be traced to the satellite economy.
For instance, on the completion of the W.A.C
Bennett damn in 1969 many electrical workers were laid
off and are still unemployed with no work in sight.
The dam's purpose was to supply cheap power to the
U.S. The Skagit Valley project — perhaps the most
appropriate "centennial project" — will continue this
process.
But out of all this, the toll on the working population
of B.C. is high. B.C. Hydro director Gordon Shrum and
Wacky Bennett do not suffer under this arrangement. In
fact, they profit by it. It is the working people of B.C.
who are fodder for U.S. business in the branch-plant of
B.C.
T
J*, he real enemy of B.C. labor, the unemployed and
minority groups is the U.S. business empire. Bennett, the
colonial Socred government and the barons of B.C.
business are middlemen for this complex. They do their
jobs for U.S. business just as the federal government and
the capitalists in Ontario do theirs.
The result? Canada becomes an association of regions
which are at the beck and call of U.S. interests when they
need them and how they need them. B.C. as a resource
base typifies this state of affairs. Since the profit motive is
supreme among U.S. corporations and their Canadian
friends, more and more people are denied the means to an
existence in the "affluent and just society."
B.C.'s real history shows us the struggle of people to
gain a measure of control over their own lives. It also
shows the efforts of those in power — portrayed as heroes
in 1971 by the government and the commercial press — to
stop them.
As long as we are dominated by foreign and local
interests (serving foreign interests) labor's struggle will be
in vain. The federal scheme is designed to keep people
exactly where they are, the toys of private foreign
business interests.
GINGER GOODWIN
.. . murdered for his cause
thousands of workers marching in the procession and a
one-day general strike in B.C.
His grave on Vancouver Island is still tended by
volunteer workers and the headstone bears the hammer
and sickle.
JM.n 1935 the Longshore and Water Transport Union
struck over the issues of wages, improved working
conditions and union hiring. The companies involved
quickly enlisted police strongarm tactics in forming a
company union.
On May 17 pickets in Powell River were attacked by
police as were pickets in Vancouver.
During these clashes 28 known casualties resulted and
at least one innocent bystander was shot by a police
sawed-off shotgun.
In 1958 police worked with the management of the
B.C. Electric Company (now B.C. Hydro) in the work of
scabbing. The police effort hindered the strike and
showed once again the close connection between the
company and the provincial "forces of law".
A strike at Allied Engineering in 1966 saw the use of
police dogs to attack pickets outside the plant. One striker
was severely bitten by a police dog.
In the same year strikers at Lenkurt Electric were
fingered by police agents working on the company's
behalf. Twenty strikers were arrested for defying an
injunction and a total of $3,100 in fines was levied against
the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
The majority of B.C.'s people have little to celebrate
in'71.
The historical material in this article was taken from
No Power Greater by Paul Phillips, published by the B.C.
Federation of Labor, 1967, and The Builders of B.C. by
William Bennett, Broadway Printers, 1937, out of print
but available in the UBC main library.
R.PARMPETTIPIECE
spokesman for unemployed
J. C. WATTERS
. first B.C. Federation of Labor president
GINGER GOODWIN'S FUNERAL ■ • • thousands mourned, thousands struck in memory of labor martyr Page 18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 8,  1971
FRIDAY
UBC   KARATE  CLUB
General meeting and workout at 7:30
in new gym.
SIMS
Group   meditation   at  noon   in   Angus
410
'tween
classes
WOMEN'S  INTRAMURALS
P.E.   and   University   Program   manager's meeting at noon in SUB 213.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Steve   Fraser   speaking   at   noon   in
SUB 205.
VANGUARD   FORM  —   YOUNG
SOCIALISTS
Steve Fraser speaks on "Philadelphia
Frame-Up" at 8 p.m. at 1208 Granville.
COMPUTER SOCIETY
General meeting  and  films in  Chem.
250 at noon.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
Meeting at noon in SUB 211.
SATURDAY
VOC
Christmas   reunion  party  at  Whistler
Cabin in evening.
UBC  DANCE  CLUB
Party at 9:00 p.m. in SUB Party Room.
UBC  SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
First Gymkhana of the year. Meet in
D lot at 10 a.m.
SUNDAY
CRAFTS  CLUB
General   meeting   at   7   p.m.   in   SUB
251.
LUTHERAN   STUDENT  MOVEMENT
Supper   at   5:30   and   discussion   at   7
p.m.    at    Lutheran    Campus    Centre,
University Blvd.   and Wesbrook Cres.
MONDAY
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOCIETY
General  meeting   at  7:30  p.m.   in  International House.
RAMAKRISHNA  MISSION
Meeting   in   Room   B-9201   of   Science
Complex, SFU.
EL  CIRCULO
Discussion on  Basque  nationalism at
noon in Buch. 204.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   GROUP
Meeting  in   Room  2449  of Extension.
Bio-Sciences bldg.
TUESDAY
BLACK CROSS
Organizational   meeting   at   noon   in
Buch. 204.
UBC  SCIENCE   FICTION  SOCIETY
Election of executive and discussions
at noon in SUB 211.
Free U. wants students
Classes will begin at the free
university next week.
450 people have already
registered for the courses ranging
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB '71
Meeting at noon in Angus 24.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting   and   film   in   Buch.   104   at
noon.
WEDNESDAY
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
General   meeting   at   noon   in   SUB
105A.
from creative lovemaking to
political workshops.
A $5 fee covers all courses for
a six month period.
People from the free U would
like to see more university
students register.
You can register by going
down to 1895 Venables or by
phoning 254-8522.
The University of British Columbia
READING & STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAM
SPRING 1971
Reading Improvement Course for
Students and Adults
The U.B.C. Reading Improvement Course offers individualized
programs for adults, university and college students, senior high
school students and others who wish to improve their reading and
study skills for educational, business, professional and personal
reasons.
Coursework emphasizes: increase in reading speed and
comprehension-previewing, skimming and scanning-study habits
and skills - critical reading skills - flexibility of reading rate -
reading skills in subject matter, professional, academic and special
interest areas.
Classes begin the week of January 25 and meet for Vk
hours - twice weekly for six weeks in  East Mall Annex
(Rooms 116, 118 and 119), U.B.C.
Fees:
Students   $30.00   (Senior   high   school   students,  college  and
university students)
Adults $60.00 (Part-time adult students and non-student adults)
Fee    includes    testing,   materials,   counselling,   use   of   reading
laboratory during current and future sessions.
Class Schedule: Early registration is recommended
SECTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
TIME
3:30-5:00
3:30-5:00
5:30-7:00
5:30-7:00
5:30-7:00
5:30-7:00
7:30-9:00
7:30-9:00
7:30-9:00
7:30-9:00
9:00-12:00
9:00-12:00
DAY
Mon.-Wed.
Tues.-Thurs.
Mon.-Wed.
Mon.-Wed.
Tues.-Thurs.
Tues.-Thurs.
Mon.-Wed.
Mon.-Wed.
Tues.-Thurs.
Tues.-Thurs.
Saturday
Saturday
ROOM
119
119
119
118
119
118
119
118
119
118
118
116
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Adult
Student
Adult
Student
Adult
Grade 8-11
Writing Improvement Program
SPRING
1971
Improve your essay writing . . . This course is designed for those
who wish to improve the quality of their essay writing. The
common core of content for all sections includes the principles of
composition and the study of essay organizations and structure.
The instructor helps identify and deal with individual student
needs and also focuses on problems common to all students in the
class. Meetings consist of brief lectures, writing practice and
seminars.
Classes begin the week of January 18 and meet for 3 hours
once   a   week   for   7   weeks   in   Room   1221,  Buchanan
,    Building, U.B.C. Campus.
FEES:
Students   $30.00   (senior   high   school,   college and   university
students taking 9 units or more)
Adults $60.00 (part-time adult students, non-student adults)
CLASS SCHEDULE:
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Students
Adults &
Sr. Students
Adults
Students
Tuesdays
Thursdays
Thursdays
Tuesdays
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
REGISTRATION FORM
Name of Course   Fee enclosed
Section	
Name (Mr., Mrs., Miss) 	
Address    Phone
Occupation    Employer Phone
Student    Institution    Year ....
Please make cheques payable to the University of B.C. and forward with
this form to Education-Extension, Center for Continuing Education,
University of B.C., Vancouver, 8, B.C. (228-2181).
•■Ti".   :A'"iV
Ombm OmtOSm fc UM, Om <*ar
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
AGGIES FARMERS FROLIC. JAN.
23. SUB Ballroom, 8:00 to 1:00.
Full facilities.
GIRLS — START '71 OFF WITH A
Bang! Dance to the Infamous
Hootch, Kootch, and Gramophone
at the Engineers' Back-to-School
Mixer tonite, 8:30 in SUB Ballroom.   Engineers 75c.  Girls 25c.
FASCHING — COME TO OUR
traditional costume carnival.
Prizes awarded for best costume.
Dancing and great refreshments,
Friday, Jan. 8, from 9-1 at International House. Single $1.25.
Couple |2.00.
CROSSTOWN BUS—PLACE VAN-
IER 9-1. $1.00 res., $1.50 non-res.
Friday, Jan. 8.
Greetings
12
RICK: I DON'T HAVE ANYTHING
to wear but I'll come to the frolic
anyway. Mary.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: BLACK DRAFTING PEN,
early Dec. between B Lot and
Brock. Reward. Phone Ellen 266-
9860.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
SKI 7580'  NIT.   BALDY
AT
OSOYOOS
High powder. 1400' vertical
drop.
No  lineups.   Ski all day —
$4.50.
1600'
and   4800'   T-bars.   5
hours
drive
from Vancouver. Low motel
rates
in  Osoyoos.  Pubs   in
Oro-
ville,
USA.
"SUPPORT TOUR LOCAL
SHERIFF." Don't miss the first
fun show of 1971. Today and tomorrow: 7:00 and 9:30; Sunday:
7:00 in the SUB Auditorium. 50c
for AMS card owners.
CROSSTOWN BUS—PLACE VAN-
IER 9-1. $1.00 res., $1.50 non-res.
Friday, Jan.  8.
UBC MONDAY NIGHT BOWLING
club needs more bowlers especially
girls to bowl this term. No bowling experience necessary. To join
call Walter at 228-8225.
ENCOUNTER GROUP. WEEKEND
Jan.  15.  Phone 228-8164.
THE TAURUS SPA, 1233 HORNBY
St. 687-1915. Guys only. Special
student rates.  Best facilities.
Travel Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other destinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2S56 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-S.
EUROPE FROM $185 ROUND TRIP.
Employment opportunities (U.K.)
Discounts, travel service, low car
hire rentals for members. Anglo
America Assn. 60A Pyle St., Newport, I.W., England.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED 250 LBS. WAX FREE
for Arts One student. Any amount
welcome. 224-9897 Jocelyn Choui-
nard.
LARGE DESK, REASONABLE
condition. Phone 872-7384 after 6
or Local 4630, ask for Peter.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
LEAVING FOR JAPAN MUST
sell. '68 Toyota Corona 4 spd. stick,
34,000 mi. $1311. Rm. 249, BE UBC.
224-9073, rm. 3.
'62 ALFA ROMEO, NEW ENGINE,
new clutch, Michelin X, $850. Ph.
224-0486 after 6 p.m.
'59 VOLVjO; REBUILT ENGINE;
reliable. $200 firm. 731-7101 anytime.
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care 8c Baby Sitting     32A
U. HILL KINDERGARTEN. OPEN-
ings for 3 & 4-year-olds for both
1971  and   71-72.   Phone   224-5990.
Scandals
37
THE   PANTS   FROM   LAST   YEAR
- are    still   around   so    if   you    lose
yours at Farmers Frolic we have
a spare,  sizes 45 & 48.
HOMOSEXUAL COUNSELLING
service: Intended for persons who
are unsure about themselves,
want to know the facts, want to
save years of deprivation. Free,
non-medical, confidential, no obligation. Send details to grad student, 23, Box 6572, Station G, Vancouver 8, B.C.
CROSSTOWN BUS—PLACE VAN-
IER 9-1. $1.00 res., $1.50 non-res.
Friday, Jan. 8.
"SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SHERIFF." Don'.t miss the first sin
show of 1971. Today & tomorrow:
7:00 and 9:30; Sunday: 7:00, in the
SUB Auditorium. 50c for AMS
card owners.
Typing
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
Electric Typewriter, Shorthand.
325-2934.
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
per page. Essays 30c per page —
5c / copy. Fast, efficient service.
Phone 274-3010. Residence Richmond.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. ELEC-
tric typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934.
FAST ACCURATE ELECTRIC
typing. Theses, essays, etc. 35^
per   page.   Mrs.   Duncan,   228-9597.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Ph.   263-5317.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERVICE. Theses, essays, etc. Near
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche,  437-1355.
HOME TYPING, ELECTRIC. Experienced. Reas. rates. 738-7881.
TEDIOUS TASKS, PROFESSIONAL
typing service. IBM Selectric —
days, evenings, weekends. Phone
228-9304. 30c per page.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van.  985-0154.
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING. IBM
electric. 35c page. Call after noon:
733-4708.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
MARRIED GRAD. STUDENTS
with baby need househelp eves.
Would exchange for meals, etc.
Phone 872-7384 eves.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
•3
POTTERY CLASSES at
THE POTTER'S CENTRE
12 Week  Course Starting  Jan. 11
Classes for
Beginners,   Intermediates,
Advanced  Workshop Facilities
One Wheel Per Person
Phone: Gabriele Alfred, 261-4764
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3044—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore,  Thunderbird  Shop
and  AMS  Publications Office
NIKKORMAT FTN F/1.4, CHROME
body, never used. Case and warranty. $220 Firm. 733-8976 evenings, Larry.
MUST SELL — NEW YAMAHA
Spanish guitar, model FG-150, cost
$80 selling for $59. 255-5576 after 6.
RIBKER GIRLS' SKI BOOTS, SIZE
six. Five buckle, like new. $45.
Phone 266-4656,  Terry.
GOOD DEALS — FUR COATS,
jackets, capes, etc., $5 and up.
Pappas Bros. Sell, 459 Hamilton
Street at Victory Square. 681-6840.
Note: We are open only Friday
nights 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FOR GIRL. BATHROOM, SEPAR-
ate entrance. Near UBC. Available
immediately. 224-0650.	
SELLPING ROOM. GIRL. PRIV-
ate entrance and bath. Near gates
and beach. $45.00 month. 224-4165.
2 PEOPLE WANTED TO SHARE
4 bedroom house with 2 males. $65
per month.  2925 W. 8th Ave.
FOR RENT BASEMENT ROOM.
Near UBC gates, some cooking.
Male student.  Phone 224-9125.
ROOM FOR RENT, MALE, PRIV.
ent., priv. bath, 1% blocks from
campus. Prefer third or fourth
year.  $40.00.  224-9769.
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT. KIT-
chen and laundry facilities available. $40 per mth. 224-1678. Handy
to UBC.
4th YEAR ENGINEERING STU-
dent requires roommate to share
apartment on 2500 Block W. 4th.
$55 mo. 732-6965 after 6.
ROOM FOR 1 MALE STUDENT,
shareing kitchen privileges. $40.
5529 University Blvd. 224-1772.
Room & Board
82
FREE RM.-BD. FOR LIGHT
duties. Ideal for study. No children.  Female student.  733-2070.
LARGE CLEAN ROOMS — BEST
food on campus. Deke House, 5765
Agronomy, 224-9691.
MEN ONLY. LARGE CARPETED
rooms. Good food. Color TV. Large
social areas. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
Manager, 224-9620J	
Furnished Apts.
83
WANTED GIRL OVER 21 TO
share apt. with same in Kits.
Phone 733-0519.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85 Friday, January 8,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
SPOR TS
Hoop Men strong,
remain undefeated
The University of B.C. Thunderbirds play two of their most
important games this weekend.
Tonight the University of Winnipeg Wesmen come into War
Memorial Gym looking to end the Birds' 31 game winning streak and
also consolidate their tenuous hold on third place in the WCIAA.
Saturday evening, things get much tougher on the Birds.
The team expected to give them the most trouble in gaining
another WCIAA title, the Manitoba Bisons, will be here trying to avenge
last year's league and playoff losses at the hands of the local referees
and the Birds.
Although the Bisons lost two of the best players in the league last
' year — specifically Terry Ball and Cliff Cornelius — their strength has
not been diminished.
Bob Town, Ross Wedlake and Angus Burr are all excellent scorers
as supported by the teams's six win and one loss record.
The only loss sustained by the Bisons in Conference play came to
the University of Alberta Golden Bears, well before Christmas.
But the Birds should also have some surprises in the form of new
and talented bodies.
As well as the reliables like Derek Sankey, Ron Thorsen, Terry
MacKay and Stan Callegari, Peter Mullins has come up with some
unexpected depth.
Darryl Gjernes and John Mills have developed into dependable
forwards capable of scoring in the clutch.
Jack Hoy could well be a starter except that he and Mullins prefer
that he come off the bench to provide scoring at an opportune
moment.
Bob Dickson proved his ability in the 87-86 win over the Portland
State Vikings Wednesday Dec. 30th. He hit a jumper with one second
remaining to provide that one point margin.
The previous day the Birds performed a brilliant 15-point
comeback as they defeated the same Vikings 94-92.
Ron Thorsen was high for the Birds with 24 points followed by
MacKay with 19, Mills with 13, Sankey with 12 and Hoy with 10.Their
performances have helped the Birds to a season record of 11 wins and 0
losses.
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Intramurals
The outlook for this year's Thunderette basketball team is
promising as the defending Canadian Senior Women's champions have
nine returnees. They include four players from the Canadian National
Women's team: Katie Williams, Wendy Grant, Terri McGovern, and
Joanna Sargeant.
The team, coached by Norm Vickery and assisted by Joe Kainer,
is looking forward to a successful season.
This weekend the team will play in a six team tournament in
INTRAMURAL NOTICES
It is not too late to sign up for
intramurals if you have not already
done so in first term as a whole new
variety of sports is about to begin. New
activities available for this term are
Bowling, Snooker, Skiing, Wrestling.
Softball, Volleyball, Rugby, 2 Mile Walk,
Arts 2 Race, and Track and Field. All
interested should come to room 308 in
War Memorial Gym. The sign up deadline for Bowling, Snooker and Skiing
is January 14. All Tennis players should
play their matches or contact the office.
There will be a Curling Bonspiel this
Saturday.   All   other   continuing   sports
will resume as scheduled.
INTRAMURAL   BANQUET
Plan now to attend the Intramural
awards banquet on March 15. This will
also be an awards night with presentations for all activities as well as individual  participation awards.
CO-RECREATION    INTRAMURALS
Starting this Tuesday at noon, War
Memorial Gym will be available for co-
recreational volleyball. This is on a
non-point basis and is strictly for fun,
so come to see what you get. The nets
will be set up at 12:30 for an hour.
Victoria for the right to represent B.C. at the Canadian Winter Games,
this year being held in Saskatoon from February 11-22. Toughest
opposition is expected from the Victoria Maplettes, who were defending
champs two years ago.
The Thunderettes again will utilize a fast break offence and
multiple pressing defence as their style of play.
Hockey team
goes east
The hockey 'Birds travel to
Manitoba this weekend. On
Friday they tangle with the
University of Winnipeg (0-6) and
on Saturday they meet the league
leading (6-0) University of
Manitoba Bisons, coached by
former UBC J.V. coach Andy
Bakogeorge.
Bob Hindmarch's Thunderbirds
are 5-1 in the Conference, in
second place. A couple of road
victories at this stage of the season
would give the Birds the edge they
need when they return to the
campus for four games — January
15-16 against the University of
Calgary, and January 22-23
against Manitoba and Winnipeg.
The Bisons' Andy Miles is
leading all scorers in the WCIAA
with 12 goals and five assists, but
UBC has four players in the top
ten - Tom Williamson (8-8),
Barry Wilcox and Doug Buchanan
(5-6), and Bob McAneeley (6-4).
Skiers wipe up
Last weekend the Thunderbird
Ski Team showed their strength
against B.C. and Alberta
competitors.
Fresh from training camp they
romped away with most of the
medals at the Snow Valley "B &
C" class open. Alpine team
member Peter Tchir won both the
slalom and downhill races.
In the Kimberley B.C.
Centennial Slalom, Joy Ward
placed first in all four slalom runs
to give her the women's "A" class
combined title. Al Vittery placed
second overall in the men's "A"
category against a field of the best
racers in Western Canada.
This weekend the men's and
women's Alpine teams and the
cross-country team travel to Bend,
Ore., to compete in their first
intercollegiate meet.
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• > Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY-
Friday, January 8,  1971

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