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The Ubyssey Nov 2, 1982

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Array Health grants investigated
By CHRIS WONG
The provincial ombudsoffice is
investigating the shortage of bursaries for UBC health science
students in response to a student's
complaint.
Greg Cassap, rehabilitation
medicine 4, lodged the complaint
on behalf of himself and other
health science students who will not
receive their bursaries because the
program is $250,000 short.
The health science administration
and the awards office is also
pressuring the government to increase bursaries for health sciences
students.
"We are here 12 months of the
year and we're responsible for our
own transportation and living expenses. No one picks up the tab
other than the loan and bursary
programs," Cassap said Monday.
He said he was not sure the ombudsoffice investigation would lead
to increased bursary funds, "but
we're hoping to at least bring attention to the problem."
Cassap said only the earliest applicants of the eligible students who
applied for health science bursaries
will receive the funds.
"The (other) students were put
THE UBYSSEY
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 2,
228-2301
on hold, so to speak," he said.
Cassap said he thought the funds
could come from the $8.7 million
the Social Credit government
recently committed to the B.C. Student Assistance Program to meet
the increase in applications for student aid.
The education ministry funds the
student aid program, but the health
ministry provides funding for the
health science bursaries.
"1 have reason to believe that
they (the health ministry) have
avenues through education by
which money could be channeled
for funding the (health science) bursary program," Cassap said. "I
would like to believe there is
$400,000 tucked away somewhere."
Cassap also criticized the way the
health ministry distributed the bursaries. "I think the funds have been
dispersed in an arbitrary manner."
Cassap said he lodged the com
plaint with the ombudsoffice
because several rehabilitation
medicine students rely on the bursaries to finance their education.
Health sciences director Gordon
Page said the health sciences administration is also fighting for
more bursary funds by writing "a
strong plea" to the health ministry.
"We're just going to keep
pushing them," Page said. "I think
if there is a substantial amount of
pressure put to bear, they will
change.
"The award office has written
them, I'm sure other institutions
have fired missiles to them."
The provincial government failed
to budget for the dramatic increase
in requests for financial assistance
this year. The education ministry's
grant program fell $8.7 million
short, but the government finally
agreed to increase that much to its
program after public outcry.
Faculty sends
decision back
-craig brooks photo
"WHICH WAY IS life going?" asks the weary student leaving B-lot photographing the deep moral dilema
represented by sign. "I must stop now, and I have choices ahead of me but I can't ever go back." Tune in next
photo for solution completely irrelevant to the problem at hand.
By CRAIG BROOKS
In an unprecedented move, the
UBC faculty association is appealing a provincial government agency's rejection of a faculty wage increase.
Association president Jonathan
Wisenthal said Monday an appeal
against provincial Compensation
Stabilization commissioner Ed
Peck's refusal of a recently arbitrated wage settlement was "in
progress."
Peck ruled Oct. 14 a nine to 12
per cent wage settlement for the
association was too high, and
should be reconsidered by the
original arbitrator in light of "the
university's ability to pay."
This is the first such appeal under
the restraint act since the: board's
inception four months ago.
Peck said that since the original
settlement did not consider UBC's
Five per cent tuition rise coming today
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
The board of governors will increase tuition fees five per cent at its
meeting today.
Student board representative
Dave Dale said Monday the board
will likely rubber stamp the administration's recommendation to
raise fees after it was reviewed by
the board's finance committee
Monday.
Dale said the board will also in
crease bursary funds by five per
cent to make more funds available
for students who need assistance to
attend the university.
The board raised fees for 1982-83
to help finance a predicted annual
deficit of about $7.5 million.
Tuition-fees went up 32.8 per cent
last year, but the university ran a
budget surplus of $6.4 million.
The board wants to set an example  of restraint  by  holding  fees
Refugee cuts hit
TORONTO (CUP) — A leaked immigration ministry draft proposal to dramatically reduce the number of refugees allowed into the
country has sparked angry opposition from the NDP.
According to NDP immigration critic Dan Heap (NDP-Spadina),
the ministry wants to reduce the number of refugees admitted to
Canada to 10,000 in 1983 from 14,000 this year.
Despite "miserable unemployment" in Canada, Heap said
refugees are better off here than languishing in refugee camps or trying to escape death squads in war-torn countries.
"How can we be helping their well-being by cutting the quota
from 14,000 to 10,000?" asked Heap.
"Slamming the door against refugees is just the government's way
of finding a new scapegoat for its ruthless full unemployment
policy," said Heap.
"One of the aspects of (immigration minister Lloyd) Axworthy's
action that bothers me most is that it highlights the idea that these
refugees are coming and taking our jobs.
"In hard times there is a tendency to look for scapegoats and the
government ought to know better than to encourage this idea
because the facts don't bear this out. The facts indicate that immigrants and refugees over the years have created more jobs than
^they've taken. They've been very productive," said Heap.	
down, Dale said.
"This is the first item of the
1983-84 budget that is confirmed.
Tuition is part of a bigger picture,"
said Dale, referring to wage
negotiations which usually are completed during the fiscal year.
"Ron Krause (the other student
board rep) and I ran a zero per cent
increase at them but the board
thought students should show some
leadership," said Dale.
"My tactic became that bursaries
should be increased the same level
or perhaps have more added.
"You have a two headed beast,"
said Dale. "The more you increase
fees, the more aid you pay."
"I think five per cent is great.
You can't complain about five per
cent," said Alma Mater Society
president Dave Frank.
"Let's hope the student aid isn't
stuck at five per cent as well. Aid is
behind the times," he said.
Frank said provincial and federal
aid should carry more weight and
that university aid should only fill in
the gaps.
After the upcoming AMS fee
referendum student aid would
become his top priority, he added.
At Simon Fraser University, the
board delayed its decision on fee increases until early in the 1983-84
fiscal year when the operating grant
from the province is known.
SFU administration president
George Pedersen said the future
looks   dismal   for   funding,   with
rumors from the universities
ministry that '83-'84 operating
funds won't increase from current
levels.
$7.2 million budget cut, it must be
reconsidered.
Peck suggested an eight per cent
increase in his report.
Wisenthal declined to state the
reasons for his association's appeal
of the decision, saying only they
were "inviting the Compensation
Stabilization commissioner, to
reconsider various aspects of his
ruling.
"Since the whole matter is under
consideration, that's as specific as I
can get."
But CSB legal counsel Peter
Owen said Monday the Compensation Stabilization Act does not
specifically allow for an appeal procedure. The commissioner does,
however, have the right to change
his mind regarding any decision at
any time, Owen said.
If Peck decides against the reconsideration, there is no further appeal procedure, Owen said. "That
is it."
Wisenthal said the association executive decided to send the written
request after carefully examining
Peck's report. If the appeal request
is turned down, the association
"will have to consider" their position, he said.
Student slays giant
By KELLEY JO BURKE
A UBC student has made Beaver
Foods eat their words.
Kevin Annet, anthropology 4,
reached informal settlement with
his former employer Beaver Foods
through mediations with the B.C.
Labour Relations Board.
Annet told The Ubyssey Oct. 21
he was filing a complaint with the
LRB against Beaver for anti-union
activities.
On Friday, Annet met informally
with Service, Office and Retail
Workers of Canada union representatives, Beaver's district
manager Brian Houlihan, the company's lawyers, and an LRB
mediator.
Beaver agreed to give Annet pay
for the period August 6 to 25 and if
possible, find him a new job with
Beaver.
Beaver hired Annet as a
dishwasher at the Vancouver
School of Theology July 5, promising him part time work for the coming year, only to lay him off a
month later.
His lay-off coincided with his
near successful attempt to unionize
the cafeteria staff.
Management cited economic
duress to explain his lay-off, but
within two days of his departure
Beaver hired a replacement, Annet
said.
"For all I know, this could be a
run around. They can say they just
don't have a job for me because the
economics are too bad," Annet
said.
If Beaver fails to re-employ him
Annet will take his case to a formal
hearing.
But Annet said he thinks Beaver
is feeling pressured because of the
Local Hotel and Bartender Union's
attempt to unionize Beaver workers
at Simon Fraser University, and will
follow the informal agreement.
"They don't want it to go formal. They'd rather keep it under the
table," he said.
Beaver was also not pleased that
he had spoken to the press about
the case, Annet said.
"They had a patronizing attitude, sort of like this was
something to be solved within the
family," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Grads centeralize control
Tuesday, November 2,1982
Negotiations that started in May
culminated recently in the UBC
Graduate Student Society gaining
complete control of the Thea
Koerner House and Graduate Student centre.
The graduate student council
signed the agreement with the administration on Oct. 8.
"The (Graduate Student) society
now has complete management
rights to the physical facilities,"
GSS acting president Godwin Eni
said recently.
"With the new constitution the
graduate student council is now the
new board of directors," said Eni.
Before the GSS constitution was
amended in March, three quarters
of the board was appointed by the
administration, Eni said.
"They were in control, even
though we were the ones paying
fees," said Eni. "We had to amend
the constitution to get it back."
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
The negotiations with the administration were "very smooth,"
and there were "no problems," said
Eni.
The GSS loan covering the rest of
the Grad centre will be paid off in
two years, Eni said. Each of the
4,000 grad students pays $25 to the
society, $14 of which goes to paying
the debt and $11 of which goes
towards the operation of the
building.
Accusations aired
Student court hears evidence and
receives submissions on infractions
which allegedly occured during Oct.
14 and 15's administration director
election Nov. 4.
The court will convene at 5 p.m.
in SUB 206.
Notice of attendance at the hearings and submissions should be
given to Alma Mater Society Ombudsperson Grey McMullen in advance.
Former first year committee vice
chair Scott Ando won the election
but he and candidate Alan Pinkney
violated rules, according to the election committee.
Poll clerks campaigned for Ando
at open polls, a polling station went
missing several hours, only to have
gone to the wrong location, Ando
campaigned after the deadline to
stop, a newsletter and an EUS circular were distributed during
voting, and Pinkney's poster exceeded regulation size.
Student court is constituted
under   the   AMS   bylaws.
SKYSAVER
mm inc.
1V»»
-Vancouver to Tokyo (R.T.)    $ 964
-Airfare and Railway Pass   $1050
-Special Low Fare to Asia:
Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore, Manila,
Penang, Bangkok, Jakarta, Columbo
e.g.: Vancouver-Kuala Lumpur(R.T.)    $1260
-Special  Group  Fare to  Many Oriental  Cities for
Education Programme
1719 Davie Street
(604)682-7212
^nn
^
UBC
jsplp^
/v
TRIATHLON
flS
j
MEETING FOR ALL
INTERESTED
/?HB5
| PARTICIPANTS/
/Ma
3U
V   Wednesday, Nov. 3
E^mI
03
f             12:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym, Room 211
Find Out What This Event
Is All About!!
Hillel Highlights
TUESDAY, NOV. 2nd
Lunch — 12-2 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3rd
Shefa Vegetarian Lunch — 12-2 p.m.
(bagels, cream cheese, egg salad, vegetable salad)
12:30 — "Rap with the Rabbi" — Rabbi Daniel
The  radical-type  relates  with  the  young  about
meaningful Jewish topics.
6:00 — Renee and Sue are making falafel for dinner. The movie "Apples of gold" will be shown.
THURSDAY, NOV. 4th
12-2 p.m. — Shefa Vegetarian Lunch
12:30 — Network Seminar
A SUMMER IN OTTAWA
UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS
VALUE:
DURATION:
$1,200 (minimum)/month
Travel allowance
3-4 months (May-August) 1983
Reasonable on-campus accommodation
is available to early registrants
PARTICIPATING DEPARTMENTS
REQUIREMENTS:   Canadian or permanent resident
Permanent residence outside of immediate Ottawa-Hull area
Full-time   undergraduate student.
Preference given to those in 3rd and
4th year.
Anatomy
Biochemistry
Geography (Physical)
Biology
Mathematics
Chemistry
Microbiology
Computer Science
Pathology
Engineering
Physiology
Chemical
Physics
Civil
Psychology (experimental)
Electrical
Systems Science
Mechanical
The Summer Research Scholarships will provide research experience
with leading Canadian Scientific investigators in one of the above
fields.
Forward the required information together with your most recent     below. Also request a reference from one professor sent to the same
University transcript before November 15, 1982 to the address     address by November 15, 1982.
1983 Summer Research Scholarships SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA, OTTAWA, ONTARIO, KIN 6N5   Tel: (613) 231-5804
APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
Name
Mailing Address
Permanent Address
province
city province
Currently enrolled in	
•s*€
postal code
Tel. (Area)
postal code
Tel. (Area)
department
Research field of interest
:-mm-f :j■•••:-.......
^.NK*^?.=>>''.-..-
■H'k Tuesday, November 2,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Work study jobs remain unfilled
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
While unemployment runs wild
out in the "real world," 200 student
jobs remain unfilled at UBC.
"We originally anticipated being
swamped," Sheila Summers,
awards office work study program
coordinator, said recently.
About 1,100 people have been
identified as and notified of being
eligible for work study, said Sum
mers. Of those, 425 have followed
through with applications and been
authorized to go and select from the
approximately 400 jobs available.
Only about 220 have done so.
Summers cited several reasons
for the lack of response so far.
"Students who have received the
Canada student loan aren't feeling
the pinch yet and may follow
through later in the term," she said.
. In 1981-82, 43 per cent of the
work study placements were made
in January. "If we go by the typical
pattern last year we are going to use
the funding quickly (in January),"
said Summers.
A lot of single parents are eligible
for work study — "they need the
money but they haven't got the
time," she said.
"Just   because   people  haven't
—alison hoens photo
"REVOLUTION SEEMS UNLIKELY, so I may as weH drink my life away," says despondent student after hearing of yet another tuition fee increase. Lenin prototype had earlier tried to incite students to rebellion, but upon
predictable failure decided instead to take shelter against both weather and reality. "Words alone are not
enough," lamented brew-swigging insurrectionist, who was last seen refilling bottle with another, more flammable liquid.
Armed troops attack students
Special to The Ubyssey
Students protesting funding cuts,
oppression and harrassment at two
Chilean universities were attacked
by armed troops Thursday. One
student was injured and at least ten
others arrested in demonstrations in
Santiago and Val Paraisu.
The Chilean military government
is currently pressuring the universities to become "self-financing."
The students charge the government's funding cuts will ensure the
exclusion of lower and middle class
students, leaving the education
system firmly in control of the
wealthy elite.
Phil Link, Canadian Federation
of Students—Pacific staff person
said reports of the demonstrations
were brought to CFS's Simon
Fraser University office Monday.
The reports said many students
were expelled following the
demonstrations. Expelled students
from areas outside Santiago or Val
Paraisu   were   also   "banished,"
meaning they must return home,
are subject to police surveillance
and must report daily to local
authorities.
CFS-Pacific is requesting cables
be sent to Chilean authorities
demanding the immediate release of
detained students, reinstatement of
students' rights of free speech and
assembly and a proper financing
system to ensure an accessible
education.
Cables should be sent to:
CODEPU, Allameda 1584, Santiago, Chile and Ministeria de
Education, Academia de Ciencias
Pedagogicas, c/o Jose P. Alessandri, 574 Santiago, Chile.
followed through at this date
doesn't mean they won't later,"
said Summers.
If there is a big rush in January,
"the funds could run out," Summers said. "In view of restrictions
and budgetary cuts we feel it is
unlikely that any more money will
be forthcoming."
The B.C. government: is providing about $160,000, roughly the
same amount as last year. All the
provincial money has been spent,
but the board of governors approved a further $250,000 from the
university budget over the summer.
If the money does run out. Summers doesn't think anyone will have
to quit in the middle of the year for
financial   reasons.    "To   our
knowledge, in the past year there is
one bona fide case of someone
withdrawing due to financial circumstances." »
She said there are emergency
loans and other things for people
who run out of money.
The criteria for work study acceptance are: 1) need over and
above the maximum student loan
award; 2) lack of student contribution, i.e. couldn't get a summer job;
and 3) recognition of exceptional
expenses. The successful applicant
gets work study from a minimum
$500 to a maximum of $2,500. The
average is about $1,000.
People who have major assets,
such as savings bonds, are required
to sell the assets.
Police harass
Montreal gays
MONTREAL (CUP) — The gay
community here is charging that
police harassment has recently increased, but city police deny an
anti-gay campaign is underway.
David Cassidy, Montreal's Gay
Info president, confirmed his
organization and other gay support
groups have received an increasing
number of calls reporting harassment and asking about civil rights.
But because the calls aire handled
by many people, he said it is difficult to judge how large the increase is.
Cassidy compared the current
situation to the police "clean-up"
during the 1976 Olympic games
held in Montreal. Although no
raids have yet been made, Cassidy
said "police are visiting bars more
frequently."
Police captain Julien Hivon of
precinct 25, a downtown district
that covers a number of known gay
hangouts, denies that any specific
effort is being made.
"When we make an arrest, we
don't ask who they are."
But Cassidy insists that gay
harassment is becoming a serious
problem, in "shopping malls, on
some streets and especially in
bars." He says police are trying to
"flaunt their authority," particularly because of upcoming
municipal elections.
One member of the gay community, who has worked with gay
support groups but who asked to remain anonymous, described a
specific incident:
Last week, he said, two police officers posing as gays on a
downtown street, picked up five
men within a half hour.
The officers brought the men to
precinct 25. An observer caught up
with them there. He discovered that
they had been read their rights and
told them that they were being held
illegally. After the five men left, the
police, according to the source,
gave him a hard time but could not
detain him.
"Police were playing on people's
ignorance," he said.
"The police can't put you in a car
unless they arrest you and read you
your rights," Cassidy said. This is
in accordance with the new Canadian constitution.
Haitian starved
MONTREAL (CUP) — Just as
public support was growing for exiled Haitian hunger striker Henri
Alphonse and his cause, he has ended it on his doctor's advice.
The Haitian journalist lost 37
pounds during his 35-day fast that
began Sept. 21 at a Montreal ethnic
centre.
Alphonse was protesting the
treatment of Haitian political
prisoners and the proposed Canadian financing of a hydro-electric
project in his country.
Provincial cabinet minister
Gerard Godin recently told
Alphonse the Quebec government
was pressuring the federal govern-
Harcourt threatened with jail
Nuclear disarmament is worth going to jail for, Vancouver mayor Mike Harcourt said Monday.
Former municipal affairs minister Bill Vander Zalm
tried to thwart the planned Nov. 20 Vancouver civic
referendum on nuclear disarmament, Harcourt told 30
people in SUB 212.
"He was threatening to throw us in jail," said Harcourt. "He didn't think it was legal for us to talk about
survival."
Harcourt outlined the civic election platform of his
group of candidates at the meeting, organized by the
UBC NDP club. Running with Harcourt are Erich
Ewert, a local officer for the International Woodworkers of America, youth counsellor Carole Walker,
and lawyer Bill Yee.
Harcourt said job creation, the ward system, transit
and housing are key planks in that platform, but he added heavy emphasis will be placed on the disarmament
referendum.
"It's not much good creating jobs if you're dead. I
think survival is an important issue," said Harcourt.
"To delude people that recovery is possible after
nuclear attack is a farce," he added.
ment   to   recognize   Alphonse's
demands. They include:
• Official Canadian intervention
to press for the release of all Haiti's
political prisoners; and
• Official Canadian action to
block any financing of the proposed
hydro-electric dams at two sites in
Haiti's Artibonite Valley.
According to Alphonse, the
Canadian government is initiating
and partially financing the dam
project. If constructed the dams
would flood one of the few fertile
areas in the impoverished nation.
The General Association of
Quebec University Students has
:sent a telegram to prime minister
Pierre Trudeau asking him to sup-
• port the demands.
La Societe St. Jean Baptiste, a
Quebec nationalist group, sent
Alphonse a telegram of support.
"La Societe St. Jean Baptiste
supports your just cause without
reserve. It asks that the governments of Canada and Quebec
realize the objectives as quickly as
possible," it stated.
Trudeau has yet to respond to a
telegram sent by Alphonse's support group.
The major French newspapers in
Montreal also reported on the
hunger strike. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,1S82
No dass(es)
In our "classless society," why are all the classes for the ruling
classes?
Accessibility is a word often thrown around. "Education cutbacks will result in reduced accessibility . . ." doesn't mean very
much. A" the doors in Buchanan seem to be working satisfactorily. So whaf s the problem?
It lies not with how the door opens, but who it will open to. Post
secondary education has always been the priviledge of the rich.
But in times of plenty, little allowances were made for "minorities"
(in India they call them untouchables) — older women, native
students, the physically handicapped, and worst of all the out-and-
out poor.
When the money goes, so does that little crack in the door.
When the public looks at the campus, and sees the Gucci knap
sacks, and the gold lame Camaros go by, they must wonder what
all the fuss about funding cutbacks is about. The government
doesn't though.
They just smile.
AND   NOW FOR
rAY   NEXT TRic<
Letters
Pro-abortion writer's price tag 'horrifying'
Sheri Dekoven's concern for
women's health in her perspectives
piece (Oct. 29) is commendable.
However, she drastically overlooks
the health of the pre-born. This is
easy to dp when her rejection of
science causes her to term the embryo a "potential life" prior to 20
weeks. This "potential life" has a
beating heart between 18 and 25
days after conception; this "potential life" emits electrical brain
waves at 40 days; this "potential
life" has all his or her body systems
functioning by 11 weeks. This
"potential life" is, rather, a human
being with vast potential.
Dekoven's piece points out that
the "fetus is completely dependent
on the female's life support
system." Note, however, that his
amniotic sac, his umbilocal cord,
and the placenta belong to the preborn. They are developed from his
original cell. Please note also that a
seven pound baby is also totally
dependant on the life support given
him by his mother, or a suitable
substitute.
Dekoven's reasoning would hold
that the post-born is inviable also,
and therefore subject to death at
the mother's will. Dekoven's price
tag on life is horrifying. She
criticizes Pro-Lifers for "placing
the importance of an unborn child
over that of an already productive
human being." We place the importance of a pre-born's life over a
women's displeasure. I suppose
Dekoven would also place the importance of a "productive human
being" over the quadrepalegics,
stroke victims, and the senile. It is
not for us to judge who is more
worthy of life. Instead of charing
Pro-Lifers with imposing their
morality on the public, Ms.
Dekoven, ask yourself who is imposing their morality on the pre-
borns.
Pro-Life groups indeed do not ignore the effects of pregnancy and
carrying a baby to full term on the
mother, as Dekoven claims. Their is
help available to distraught pregnant women. Surely counselling,
comfort, and support for the
mother while the embryo is
developing and preferable to telling
her to get rid of the life she carries,
as though it's some detestable
growth.
Although the women's attitude
after having had an abortion ranges
from satisfied to suicidal, the
physical harm is more easily determined. After one legal abortion,
additional sterility rate reported is
up to 10 per cent (Japan 9.7 per
cent, with, similar results reported
from Holland, Norway, Singapore,
and USSR.) Tubal pregnancy in
U.S. constitutes .5 per cent of all
pregnancies, but after abortion rise
to 3.9 per cent. After one legal
abortion, the increase of premature
births is 14 per cent, after 2 it is 18
per cent, after 3 it is 24 per cent.
The information on increased
miscarriages, RH problems, scaring of the inner walls of the uterus,
goes on and on. These problems exist even in countries such as USSR
which has had legal abortions for
over 50 years. I urge every one considering the value of abortion to
learn all the facts before promoting
abortion on demand.
Ubyssey's debunking of
myth gets Trekie 's goat
The negative tone of your Great
Trek summary article (Troubled
Great Trek Week Runs Deficit,
Oct. 26) was most unfortunate. Not
only does your article tend to belittle the week's events but it also fails
to fulfill the duty ascribed to The
Ubyssey by former staffer, Pierre
Berton: instead of retelling the
Great trek "myth" you have done
the memory a disservice. A more
positive approach on your part may
be the catalyst needed to improve
student support of annual events
commemorating the 1920 Great
Trek, by far the most significant
single event in the history of this
university.
Finally, your failure to report on
the 1983 recipient of Great Trekker
Award also raises a question about
your priorities and motives. The
prestigious prize, presented annually by the Alma Mater Society to the
person who had done the most for
the students and the university, was
this year awarded to  Dr.  Nestor
Korchinsky, our intramural and
recreational sports program director. To Nestor — a salute! To the
Ubyssey — please pull up your
socks and straighten your bowties.
Pierre Berton is watching.
Larry Woods
arts 4
No jacking in past
While on campus, I picked up a
copy of your Oct. 5 edition. I was
shocked by your caption under the
picture of Jean Chretien which
made reference to the prime
minister as masturbating "across
the West."
If this is the level that campus
humor has sunken to since I was at
UBC ten years ago, then I think we,
as the public, have cause for concern over the quality of our future
leaders in Canada.
M. Harcourt
Richmond, B.C.
Perhaps not realizing the physical
dangers to women, Dekoven is
quick to call for lax abortion laws
to reduce discrimination. She is
justly concerned, for she holds that
restrictive abortion laws "are
against fertile women in general and
against the poor in particular." But
abortion promotes a far more
serious discrimination against people based on age and place of
residence; that is, younger than nine
months and living in the womb.
The basic question concerning
the legality of abortion is "When is
the fetus considered to be human
life?" At the First International
Conference on Abortion
(Washington, D.C, 1967),
biochemists, professors of
obstetrics and gynecology,
geneticists, as well as authorities in
law, ethics, and the social sciences
agreed 19 to one that at no time between the union of sperm and egg
and the birth of infant could they
say that this was not human life.
But I ask the readers to judge for
themselves, using scientific precision and honesty. If one judges the
embryo to be a mass of cells, a piece
of meat, then one has a case for
abortion on demand. If, however,
one judges the embryo to be a
human life, then he or she must be
given the most basic right of all —
the right to life.
Naomi Buckingham
phys ed 3
Importance of being International
The best times to take advantage
of the "international" context at
UBC's International House are
weekday evenings at the Gate four
lounge. Mondays, Wednesdays,
and Thursdays have language
themes — English, Romance, and
German respectively. No one is
obliged to speak these languages;
they were chosen to alert language
students about a natural environment where they can talk with
native speakers and fellow learners.
(A tip: mistakes in both grammar
and meaning are expected, so communication insecurities can be
covered up by "language difficulties.")
Gate four evenings have a high
degree of mingling. Compare the
AMS lounge or the Pit with the
Gate four lounge. All kinds of people visit Gate four: foreign and
local students, professors, travellers
(they see the signs at the youth
hostel and community centres), and
even people unconnected with the
university.
Gate four evenings are
unorganized; they are not part of a
club. Enthusiastic individuals,
especially local Canadians, can plan
and organize unofficial outings —
camping and hiking trips, dinners,
etc. All they have to do is pass
around a description and sign-up
sheet, and then make it happen.
IH is fertile ground. Why don't
you help plant it? The harvest
comes quickly . . .
John Kaiser
former UBC student
Abortion argument'absurd'
Some of the concepts presented
by Sheri Dekoven in her article Pro-
Lifers Threaten Basic Freedoms
with Stance Oct. 29 are patently absurd. We specifically take issue with
her statement that the anti-
abortionists - "by making abortion
illegal, will, in effect, be taking
away the individual right of every
woman to make this moral decision
herself." All Criminal Code offenses by their very nature attempt
to limit the parametres within which
a person may make moral decisions.
If Sheri's argument for individual freedoms is taken to its
logical conclusion it would recommend that first degree murder
should be taken from the Criminal
Code since the Code by making
murder illegal attempts to prevent a
person from exercising their
freedom of making a moral choice;
whether to kill or not to kill.
The example just given shows a
fatal weakness in Sheri's reasoning:
it fails to take into account that individual freedoms are not always
paramount even in a free and
democratic society. In our society
individual rights are restricted when
they infringe on the rights of others
or endanger the collective security
of society.
The question then is, does the execution of an abortion infringe on
the rights of another individual? Is
the fetus an individual? As Sheri
openly admits in her article, experts
in our society have not yet come to
a consensus on when the fetus
should be considered a human life.
How then can Sheri so glibly
recommend that the removal of a
live fetus is not an infringement on
an individual's legal right to life.
Surely the prudent course, until the
status of the fetus is established, is
to protect the fetus.
We humbly submit that a rash
decision in favour of the abortions
would not be congruent with the
paramount value which is placed on
human life in our society.
Therefore, in establishing the status
of the fetus it would seem the onus
should lie on the abortionist to pro
ve "beyond a reasonable doubt"
that the fetus cannot be considered
a human life.
Surely in this context the collective security of all unborn children
more than matches the value of the
individual's right to choose abortion. The possibility that the exercise of a right to choose abortion
could infringe on the rights of the
fetus tilts the balance in favour of
protecting the fetus until its status is
established.
Art Bensler
Ralph Hildebrand
Gloria Roberts
law 1
THE UBYSSEY
November 2, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/06. Advertising 228-3977/78.
"Now men, and women, to take over Sedgewick we'll have to cover ell the exits," said
Mark Irwin. "I'll take the record library singlehandedly," said Craig Brooks. Glen Schaeffer,
Jane Bartlett and Victor Wong helped him do it singlehandedly. Mark Irwin told Shaffin
Shariff, Harry Hertscheg and Stephen Wisenthal to throw grenades through the skylights
before Alison Hoens. Rick Katz and Chris Wong went down the lovely spiral staircase and
checked for smoke bombs in the stacks. The battle raged. The defenders struggled, but to no
avail. Arnold Hedstrom and Kelley Jo Burke checked the silent seats, then the quiet seats for
last pockets of defenders. Peter Berlin and Robert Beynon cleared periodicals of several
malevolent dissident factions. The attackers won and Brian Jones, Muriel Driaasma and Robby Robinson hoisted a CUP flag on the roof. Mark Irwin, who doesn't have anything to do
with The Ubyssey, called it a carefully planned campaign well executed, and the rest of the
staffers celebrated the victory with Tequila Sunrises mixed by David Balderstone, special to
The Ubyssey. Tuesday, November 2,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
* I was cheated out of experience'
As a participant in the recent
Great Trek parade, I feel compelled
to voice my dissatisfaction with it.
The turnout of less than 200
students was pathetic. The lack of
organization and the "uncertainty
about the nature of the parade"
(Ubyssey, Oct. 26) were an insult to
the original founders who made the
effort (in some cases travelling great
distances) to be present at an event
which was supposed to be meaningful. Those who did not attend
because they heard it was political,
as well as those who did not attend
for the opposite reason, showed
their true colors; yet they need not
have worried as the pitiful attendance did not permit the atmosphere to shift either way.
To the students of UBC, I ask,
where were you? To the organiza
tions and clubs, I ask the same
question. To the Anarchist club re
their letter Trek is a Political Farce
(Ubyssey, Oct. 22), I suggest a
change of name to the Apathetic
club. To Dave Frank re his comment "I didn't expect any more"
(Ubyssey, Oct. 26), I ask, Is that
so?.
But then what do I know
anyway? I'm just a naive frosh who
expected bigger and better things of
UBC. Charles Lowson
arts 1
Eight per cent ' average'
I am writing with regard to the
article, AUCE to Vote on 6 & 5
Pact by Craig Brooks which appeared in The Ubyssey Tuesday
Oct. 26). The article misquoted me.
It states that the raises for some job
categories were up to 8.1 per cent.
This is inaccurate. I stated that the
average increase for the Association
of University and College
Employees was 8.1 per cent.
The point made by the UBC in
formation officer, Al Hunter, in the
article also deserves clarification.
According to Hunter, the Union
declined an increase offered by the
university during the contract
period. The article neglects to point
out that the increase was conditional on the acceptance by the
union of two conditions to which it
could not agree.
Shirley Irvine
AUCE local 1 coordinator
THUNDERBALL!
Thunderbird Football
Western Championship
#11 Ranked UBC Thunderbirds
vs MANITOBA BISONS
Friday, November 5th — 7:30 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD
STADIUM
Come early to get a good seat!
TICKETS ON SALE DAILY AT
WAR MEMORIAL GYM LOBBY
Hours 11:30-2:30 and 4:30-5:30
Adults $6.00 - Students with AMS Card $3.00
10% OFF
Cuts, Styles, Perms,
Beard Trims, Hennas,
Colors & Streaks
(with student card)
JOHNART
UNISEX
HAIRSTYLING
2691 W. Broadway
738-8011
Bible Study
Knowing &
Experiencing
A Daily Walk
With God
Friday, Nov. 5
12:35-1:20 p.m.
SUB ROOM 224
Sponsored by
BAPTIST
STUDENT
UNION UBC
All Are Welcome
CHARLIE'S
GIRL
Classic and modern
hair cutting for
men and women.
STUDENTS ONLY
Cut, wash, blow dry
Gents $10
Ladies $15
JOICO JOL-GEL
AVAILABLE
3615 W. 4th Ave.
 734-3841	 Page 6
7£m«^*r
TODAY
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Chinese national team in battle of the
decade, 7 p.m., Thunderbird arena. The teams
last met in 1973 when UBC went to China.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Ordinary People, 7 p.m., SUB auditorium. $1
AMS, $3 general.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2 p.m., SUB 111.
PRACTICAL WRITING LECTURE SERIES
M. Bemadet Ratsoy, vice-president of St. Paul's
hospital  nursing  speaks  on  Writing  for  Goal
Achievement, noon, Computer Science 201.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Associate   medicine   dean   Alexander   Boggle
speaks on med school admission requirements.
Bring  membership  cards,   noon,   IRC 6.   Note
room change.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Darn  fine   Eucharist   with  dam  fine   preacher
George  Hermanson,   noon,   Lutheran  Campus
centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner program, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Pit purge, afternoon to?, the Pit.
SWIMMING AND DIVING TEAM
Tickets to Friday's Western football final, SUB,
War Memorial pool,   11:20 a.m.  - 2:X p.m.
Students $3, adults $6.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Weekly meeting, all welcome, noon, SUB 211.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series, 8 p.m.. Gate 4 International house.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICES OF CANADA
Costa Rica slide show and Egyptian summer
seminar '83, noon, Buch A204.
WEDNESDAY
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Vs. B..C. Olympics, 8 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Dinner followed by The Meaning of Pacifism
with William Klassen, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus
centre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 117.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
General meeting  —  letter writing,  noon,  SUB
215.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Inter-faculty bowling tournament, 7 p.m., SUB
bowling lances. RSVP team to 228-7450.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Tennis night, 8:30-1:30 p.m.. Armouries.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance languages,  7:30 p.m..  International.
House.
THURSDAY
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting and issue and policy discussion,
noon, SUB 207.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN CENTRE
Film: This is Bangladesh, noon, Asian centre
auditorium.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Tour of cancer research institute. Meet by 12:30
at IRC GX. All members signed up welcome.
THEATRE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Free noon-hour discussion on B.C. film
classification and censorship with guest speaker
Mary Lou McCausland, noon, Dorothy
Somerset studio (behind Freddy Wood).
THE DINER
Serving U. B. C. and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices — including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8.00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays & Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a. m.
4656 W. 10th Ave. - 224 1912
We accept Chargex
THE    U BYSS EY
Tuesday, November 2,1982
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
General meeting, Skagit Valley controversy and
slide show with Tom Perry, noon, Angus 225.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
TROTSKYIST CLUB
Literature table, drop by for Marxist literature
discussion, noon, SUB.
Imperialism and the current theory of permanent
revolution, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
MATH CLUB
Recreational mathematics, 1:30 p.m.. Math 102-
All interested welcome.
TWEEN CLASSES
Reminder that deadline is 12:45 p.m. the day
before publication.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General   meeting:   Musician   Michael   Green,
noon, Chem. 250.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Table tennis practice (please bring your own
equipment), 6-8:30 p.m., SUB 212.
LEON ft THEA KOERNER LECTURE
French lecture.  Lectures Psychanalytiques de
Balzac, Professor Pierre Citron, Universite de
Paris, noon, Buch A100.
UBC CYCUNG CLUB
Meeting, noon, Bio. Sci. 2449.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion,  1:30-2:30 p.m..  International House,
Gate 4.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
T-cup football game, nurses vs. Home Ec, noon,
Mclness field behind SUB.
NURSING/ENGINEERING/SCIENCE/AGGIES
Chariot race, after t-cup football game, Mclnnes
field behind SUB.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, 7:30 p.m.. International house.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Lecture,   Christianity  and  the  Values  of  the
Eighties, David Walker, noon. Brock 302.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting,  all welcome,   1:30 p.m.,
SUB 212A.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
General meeting, noon, St. Marie's music room.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Mainstreaming    Blind   Children    in   Regular
Physical Education, Charles Buell, Ed. D., noon.,
IRC 6.
FRIDAY
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Sports Day, 3:30-5:X p.m., War Memorial gym,
or gym A.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Alberta Golden Bears in Canada West
Home Opener, 8 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
No. 1 ranked UBC Thunderbirds take on
Manitoba Bisons for the western championship,
7:X p.m. Winner goes to the Atlantic Bowl,
Thunderbird stadium.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Happy Hours: cheap refreshments, 4:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus center.
UBC CHAMBER SINGERS
Fall concert: Music of Gesualdo, Monteverdi,
Morley, Hindemith, free admission, noon and 8
p.m.. Music Building Recital Hall.
WATER POLO DANCE
$2 per ticket, ph. 731-0164, cheap bzzr I, 7:30-1
a.m., SUB 207/209.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beer and Pizza Night, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
LEON & THEA KOERNER LECTURE
Music  Lecture,   Berlioz and  Romantic  Myths,
Professor   Pierre  Citron,   Universite de  Paris,
3:30-5 p.m.. Music Bldg. library, seminar room.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Nursing week dance, featuring the Average Rock
Band, 8 p.m.-12:30 a.m., SUB ballroom. Tickets
$5 from AMS box office.
Intramurals nursing fun run (3 and 5 km in
lengths), noon, SUB. Spot prizes.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion,    noon,    International   house,    main
lounge.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Beer garden, 5-9 p.m., SUB 211.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Physical Activities for Visually Impaired Children,
by Charles Buell,  noon. War Memorial gym,
211/213.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
SATURDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Internationally famous London Contemporary
Dance Theatre's first Canadian tour, tickets $2
AMS Ticket Centre, 2 p.m., SUB Ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC vs SFU Clansmen in annual Grudge Match,
second game in best of three series, 8:X p.m..
War Memorial gym.
FAMILY HOUSING
Ordinary people, 3 p.m., SUB auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Alberta Golden Bears, 8 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
WEST VANCOUVER UNITED CHURCH
Fourteenth annual "Elegant" flea market, 9-3
p.m., Esquimalt Ave. and 21st.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Dance: Theme — Depression '82, Alternative to
the Pit, special drinks, door prizes, dress the
part, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., SUB ballroom.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Special demonstration/performance by London
Contemporary Dance, 2 p.m., SUB ballroom.
UBC JAPAN CLUB
Japanese dinner, sake & beer, tickets at office
SUB 237A, 7 p.m., SUB 207/209.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton  night,  bring  your own  birdie and
rackets, 7:30-9:X p.m., Osborne gym A.
Table tennis tournament,   1   p.m.,  SUB  party
room.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Dance: A Fall Fantasy, 8 p.m.. West End community centre.
SUNDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Cycling ride, everybody welcome!, 9 a.m., meet
between SUB and the Aquatic Centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, everybody welcome, 10 p.m., UBC
Aquatic Center.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Intro-Comp: an introduction to competitive
ballroom dancing, doors open at 7 p.m., program begins at 7:X p.m. SUB Party room.
MONDAY
UBC POTTERY CLUB
Important general meeting, noon, SUB 251.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Guest speaker Harry Guttormson, past president
of the Surrey Access For All Committee on Access for the Disabled and Handicapped, noon,
SUB 208.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening, 7:30 p.m. International house Gate 4.
CANADIAN PROFESSORS FOR PEACE
IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Peace in the middle east: Does Canada have a
role?, noon, Buchanan A203.
tie
Styling for Men & Women
Special prices for UBC
students and staff
For appt., please call
738-7411
3218 Dunbar St.
(between 16th & 17th)
SWAP I
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Cut travel costs and gain valua- m
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•■■■■■■■■
INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY
SPECIAL EVENT
VS
Tuesday, November 2
7:00 p.m.
Thunderbird Arena
GENERAL ADMISSION:
Adults $5.00 - Seniors, Students $2.50
UBC Students with AMS Cards $1.00
GET
CULTURED!
Ballet UBC Jazz presents a special
ON-CAMPUS demonstration
performance by
London Contemporary Dance
Nov. 6, 2:00 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Tickets $2.00 available at AMS Box Office
SUBFILMS presents
"Honor thy wife, and everyone else's."
and
Hollywood bull
at its funniest
and sexiest
Thurs.-Sun. 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00 EACH SUB AUD.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day tt.60; additional
Une*, SOc. Commercial — 3 Kim*. 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads ate not accepted by telephone and are payable In
advance. DeadBne is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Vam., B.C. V6T2A5
11
For Sale — Private
70 — Services
1976 TR6, mint cond., stored winters, rust-
proofed, 34,000 mi., w/extras. $7000.
984-6994.
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER: Olympia Model
XL-12 portable, 18 mo. old, recently serviced. Cash sale only, $250. 738-0855, after
6:00 p.m.
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
FLOWERS BY WENDY - Have wedding designs done in fresh or silk flowers. Professional freelance. 261-3573 or 943-1873.
20 — Housing
85 — Typing
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
WANTED:
30 positive people to earn
big $$$ by national health
product co. — Herbalife
— full or part time
management supervisors
required — training provided for a ground level
opportunity. Phone Mr.
Hayward, at 227-9074.
85 — Typing
Lost
IF ANYONE FINDS a blue & beige
knapsack &/or contents: text & exercise
books & beige Anarac jacket, please contact Susan 224-1470, reward.
LOST: Last May in SUB, gold ring. Plain
band with inlaid brass and copper strips.
Reward. 274-0284.
40 — Messages
SCHLONG   wants  to  know what   colony
received their charter this year.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208. Word Pro
cessing Specialists for Theses, Terrr
Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspond
ence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
FAST. EFFICIENT TYPING. 41st and Marine Dr. 266-5053.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES. Papers,
thesis, etc. W/electric typewriter. Rate:
$1.25/dble.-spaced page. 732-3647.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. Word Processor. Clemy,
266-6641.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further. Resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.
TYPEWRITING. Minimal notice required.
Phone 732-0529 mornings to noon or eves,
till 10. Reasonable rates. Kits location.
SUPERIOR quality presentation of all academic assignments. Experienced, reliable.
$1.25/page. Iona, 985-4929. Tuesday, November 2,1962
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
-- ■■-»-"-*'*'--Ajy'
Peaceniks need bang from Christ
At The Ubyssey showed so clearly
Oct. 26, our generation could be
this world's last. We will likely find
radiation sicness a more serious
medical problem that heart disease
or cancer. To defend our civilization and our personal lives from
fiery extinction, we must repudiate
our government's warped notions
of "defense" and "survival" and
press for prompt disarmament.
Disarmament might well be
necessary for survival, but it is no
guarantee of national or personal
security. In contrast, Jesus Christ
officers his followers both survival
and security. His message also has
some interesting implications for
the disarmament movement.
All Christians agree that God
became man in Jesus Christ as part
of a plan to reestablish good relations with a hostile world. The
Gospels recount the progress of
God's plan: Jesus lived an exemplary life of teaching and service and was soon martyred for his
threat to the social order and his
claims of deity. But martyrdom was
victory, not defeat. God raised
Jesus from the dead to demonstrate
that self-giving, suffering love is the
key to his triumph over sin and
death.
UBC not LASC
about Central
America
I am writing to inform the
students of UBC of the upcoming
Support Week for Central America
which is being organized by the
Latin America Support committee,
better known as LASC.
We will be showing films and
answering questions about Central
America in SUB for a week beginning on Nov. 3. On Nov. 10 there
will be a concert given by Yolocom-
ba Ita in the SUB party room at
12:30. Yolocomba Ita is a group of
musicians from El Salvador who
played at the Vancouver Folk
Festival two years ago.
I would also like to tell people
that a ship from Nicaragua, the
Monimbo, is coming to pick up
supplies donated by Canadians.
If you would like more information please contact Harvey Mackin-
non or Beth Abbott at 736-1717.
Gordon Clark
science 1
Robert Redford's
ORDINARY
PEOPLE
Tuesday, Nov. 2nd, 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 6th, 3:00 p.m
SUB AUDITORIUM
With AMS CARD - $1.00
Sponsored by Family Housing
REMEMBER:
Anybody can win -
unless there
happens to be
a second entry.
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
This has immediate implications
for those who accept Christ's offer
of renewed life, and seek to emulate
his style of peacemaking. When someone slaps our face, we turn the
other cheek: the cruise missiles stay
on the ground. When the oppressor
demands our coat, we offer our
shirt as well: no one jumps to the
Intercontinental Ballistic Missile
(ICBM) firing panel.
Clearly, this appeal for Christian
pacifism takes its adherents well
beyond the affirmation of "no first
use." We must pursue strong
unilateral steps toward total disarmament. Does that sound wildly
idealistic? Of course. But if Jesus
was right, this idealism is profound
realism: it represents obedience to
the one true God. Our prototype,
Jesus Christ, embodied this higher
reality. Even as the Roman soldiers
drove spikes through his wrists, he
prayed for their forgiveness. What
great love he had, even for his
enemies!
Philip Loewen
math 6
iiiwr.ii i
'Nuclear weapons bad, but
testing cruise is educational*
The Ubyssey Editorial Collective:
Oct. 26's disarmament issue suggested that Canada should refuse to
test the cruise missile. Agreed the
cruise missile has terrifying destructive capacities which should apall
any civilized person. But does that
mean it is really safer not to test it?
The chances are Reagan will deploy
cruise missiles even if they have not
been adequately tested.
That seems to me an even more
frightening possibility. In the end, it
may not be evil intentions that start
a nuclear war but uncertainty, in a
world where both sides are frantically double-guessing each other
with only minutes to react. Why increase our uncertainty? This can
only make the situation more explosive.
It seems to me that the cruise
missile offers a unique opportunity
to restart the bilateral disarmament
process. Why not test the missile,
show what a formidable weapon it
really is, and send the results off to
President Brezhnev with an invitation to talk arms reductions?
Arms reduction talks are futile
unless we can convince the Soviets
that they have something to gain by
them. If the cruise missiles are as
threatening as we are led to believe,
the Soviets will be only too eager to
negotiate.
Why waste this opportunity to
see some real arms reductions? I am
as skeptical as anyone about president Reagan's commitment to
disarmament and world stability.
But our energy would be better
spent pressing for serious and
sincere U.S.-Soviet negotiations
than opposing the testing of already
existent weapons.
Dan Treisman
arts 1
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Register in Room 203, WMG Nov. 3-Nov. 10
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,1982
UBC greets revolutionary toilers
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
China's national ice hockey team
comes to Thunderbird arena
tonight at 7 p.m. Vancouver is the
team's first stop on a 16 day and 10
game Canadian tour, which is part
of a sports exchange program bet-j
ween Canada and China.
In 1973 UBC became the first
Western team to play hockey in
China. Chinese newspapers remarked how UBC's hockey players had
big noses and long hair.
The 'Birds won all five games
handily in China. Assistant coach
Fred Masuch, who played for the
Rugby beats
big Vikings
The UBC men's rugby team
scored a 20-9 victory over the
University of Victoria at Thunderbird stadium Saturday.
After Victoria had opened the
scoring with an early penalty, second row Matt Kokan gained a rare
forward's try for UBC. Following a
nine man passing movement, the
ball was brought back to the forwards for Kokan to gallop 25 yards
for the score. Peter McLean converted and then helped set up a try
for John Devlin. McLean kicked a
penalty so that UBC turned the half
13-3 ahead.
In the second half, scrum half Ian
McKay went over for an unconverted try before McLean added
another penalty. Near the end, Victoria scored its only try.
"It was an excellent game," said
coach Donn Spence. "They were
bigger but our speed was better."
Spence was pleased at the way his
forwards had held the big Victoria
pack at set pieces and how his team
had exploited their opponents lack
of mobility by moving the play
around the field.
UBC will play Victoria again in
the spring in the annual 'boot' game
in Victoria.
(SPORTS)
'Birds expects a much improved
Chinese team this time around.
"The players are younger and
bigger now," Masuch said. The
average age on the team is now
about 23 years, compared to 26 nine
years ago.
The Chinese Nationals are made
up of the best players from the
eight-team A league. The team consists of ten teachers, five students,
three technicians and two army
players. Part of the player's occupation is to play hockey.
"Back   in    1973,   the   Chinese
players were good skaters and stick-
ian groos photo
JUMP TO IT. Pleasant Thunderbird Matt Kokan taps back throw-in. Other
sweet UBC rugby boys in lineout are, left to right, friendly Blake Ferris,
gentle Phil Buchanan, and likeable Charlie Foster. They, and their nice
friends from Victoria, had great fun on Saturday playing jolly games and
making mud pies. My mummy really likes them.
Underdog 'Birds beat champions
UBC men's soccer gained some
season end satisfaction at Wolfson
field Saturday, when they defeated
the western champion Univesity of
Victoria team.
"We had a very good first half
and should have scored three or
four goals," said coach Joe
Johnson of his teams aggressive
display against Canada's number
one rated team.
The goal had been scored by midfielder Murray Mollart who seized
onto a rebound and drove a vicious
first-time shot into the goal from 15
yards out.
In the second half, it was the
same old UBC story. The 'Birds
continued to have a very high pro
portion of the possession but
became bogged down with indecisive short passing in mid-field.
And while the offense was failing to
generate any sort of pressure on the
Victoria goal, the hard tackling
defense was occasionally guilty of
ball watching when crosses came in
from the flanks.
On two occasions corner kicks
passed right across the penalty box
without a defender heading clear
before dropping to an unmarked
Victoria forward. On both occasions ferocious volleyed shots
whistled just wide of the goal.
"We sat back on our goal and
tended to wait for Victoria to come
back. I thought it was only a ques
tion of time before Victoria equalized," said Johnson. It was an old
problem for soccer coaches of keeping a team fired up after a good first
half performance, he said.
"I don't like finishing anywhere
else but first," said Johnson of the
season as a whole. But the players
will be wiser for the experience. If
we can beat Victoria we should be
able to beat anybody."
All but two team members will
return next year.
(   'Bird Droppings)
BASKETBALL
UBC men's basketball team continued to win under new coach Bob
Molinski this weekend.
On Friday night, the 'Birds beat
the Melanomas 84-72. Then on
Saturday, in an exciting game, they
squeaked past the Stammers 74-72.
This weekend UBC plays the
Simon Fraser University Clansmen
in the annual Buchanan classic. The
game at UBC will take place in the
War Memorial gym at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday.
UBC women's basketball ruined
a highly impressive record on Saturday. They won.
After   two   totally,   absolutely,
completely, perfectly, triumphantly
winless years they fouled up. The
win however, was only against a
UBC grads team so that really it
hardly counts. After all, one of two
UBC teams had to emerge victorious and the current crop managed a respectable 61-36 win.
Next week the basketball women
take on genuine outside opposition
when they go to the Queen city
classic in Regina.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
The UBC Thunderducks coasted
to an easy victory over Simon
Fraser university Sunday.
SFU didn't show up, so UBC
won by default.
ARTS EDITOR
Requirements:
* insane sense of
humour
* can write
* can spell
If you are an Arts
student and are interested in the position, please apply at
BUCH 107 or phone
228-4403.
handlers, and they passed well,"
said UBC athletics director Bob
Hindmarch, the coach of the 1973
'Birds. "But their tactics were poor
and they were not good with the
body then."
Although the Chinese ice hockey
program is now about 30 years old,
it still suffers from poor equipment
and facilities, said China coach
Zhang Cheng through an interpreter. There are currently only five
covered hockey rings in a country
of more than one billion people.
The team finished second in a
four team tournament in the U.S.
earlier this year — behind the
University of Moncton, last year's
Canadian university champion, and
ahead of Japan and an American
team.
Hockey slips-up
UBC's hockey team has learned
that while they may be able to win
games against some of the best
American university teams that
doesn't mean they'll beat their
fellow Canadians.
The Thunderbirds were winless in
three games in the second annual
Express Cup tournament held in
Calgary on the weekend, but
managed a 3-3 tie against the
University of Regina Cougars in
Sunday's consolation game.
The 'Birds started the tournament off well on Friday when they
took a 1-0 lead after the first 12
seconds in the game against
Calgary. But a poor game overall
led to an 8-2 thrashing by the
Dinosaurs.
In Saturday's game UBC trailed
Alberta 4-1 after two periods before
coming alive in the third to make a
game of it. Greg Cockrill scored
twice in the third period for the
'Birds, but the Bears held on to win
4-3.
The regular season begins this
weekend for the 'Birds with a pair
of games against visiting Alberta.
UBYSSEY STAFF
Fight of the century.     ?
See veteran CUP hacks
battle it out^with young but,
fiesty cub reporters for the
priviledge of attending tfci|
next CUP National conference. Spectators mo%
than needed to heckle tlgfe
contestants. All staff please
show up. Check office
board for times — 24ft£j,
SUB..?.. 31"
ITALIAN-CANADIAN BUSINESS
AND PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION OF B.C.
$1,000 Scholarship Offered to
Students in Commerce or Law
Related Field
(PREFER SOME RELATIONSHIP TO THE
ITALIAN-CANADIAN COMMUNITY)
Contact: ARMAND PETRONIO at
1714 East Broadway, 872-0387
BEFORE NOVEMBER 15, 1982      	
NOTICE OF HEARING
Take note that the Students' Court is convening to hear the
following matter:
Alleged infractions that occurred during the election of
14 and 15 of October for Director of Administration of the
AMS.
The hearing is to be held on the fourth day of November, 1982 in
Room 206, SUB at 5 p.m.
Persons desiring to give evidence or submissions on this matter are
directed to give notice to the Clerk of the Court before commencement of the hearing.
Gray McMullin,
AMS OmbudsOffice
Clerk of the Court
hair studio inc.
Make an appointment today
and give your head a rest.
5784 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
In UBC Village next to Bank of Commerce
224-9116

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