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The Ubyssey Jan 6, 1972

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Array Tenure cases gain review
The anthropology-sociology department Tuesday
voted 30 to eight in favor of fully reconsidering the
tenure cases of sociology professors Matt Speier and Ron
Silvers.
The decision meant a departmental repudiation of
the policies of anthrosoc head Cyril Belshaw, who had
opposed reconsideration of the two cases.
Speier and Silvers have been the centre of a three
month controversy that began in October when the
anthrosoc promotions and tenure committee narrowly
More Anthrosoc page 8
recommended the two for tenure, only to have their
decision undercut by a negative recommendation from
Belshaw.
The department's graduate students responded to
the situation by issuing a lengthy report on Oct. 29
which suggested that the way in which the P and T
committee had made their decision on Speier and Silvers
was puzzling and irregular.
The decision to reconsider was also a major victory
in the struggle for student voice in selection of profs and
course content.
On Tuesday, in the first full department meeting
since the crisis erupted, the graduate students,
represented by Jim Bledsoe and James Heap, moved that
the cases be reconsidered.
The student motion was seconded by former
department head Harry Hawthorn.
Discussion of the motion followed, in which
professors Bill Willmot, David Aberle and Hawthorn
argued in favor of reconsideration. Opposition came
from professor Kenelm Burridge. The department then
voted by secret ballot on the issue.
Moments later the 30-8 vote was announced by
Belshaw. The unusual — perhaps even unprecedented —
decision brought to a climax a major phase of the long
fight.
The crack opened by the persuasive student brief of
two months ago, followed by weeks of tense, often
bitter secret debate and factional manoeuvering had
culminated in the student position carrying the day.
Both grad student representative Jim Bledsoe and
undergrad representative Colin Portnuff said they were
pleased with the outcome of the vote.
Said Bledsoe: "This should be an indication that
students have a keen interest in the goings-on in the
university and want more than a peripheral role. It was
the work of students that initiated the reconsideration."
Both Bledsoe and Portnuff expressed their hope
that students in other departments would be encouraged
by the anthrosoc action to organize in their own areas.
The decision to reconsider in no way means that the
issue is resolved. The focus of attention now shifts to
arts dean Doug Kenny who must decide whether or not
to return the cases to the anthrosoc P and T committee.
Kenny's role in the dispute has been a suspect
matter for many members of the department.
In early November, Kenny released, through
Belshaw, a letter in which he offered the opinion that
the political atmosphere in the department was too hot
to permit reconsideration to take place.
It was widely interpreted by department members,
who compared statements Belshaw had made to
strikingly similar passages in the letter, as a document
mutually contrived by the two for political purposes.
Whether Tuesday's sober display of democratic
procedures will convince Kenny that the situation in the
department has sufficiently cooled is not yet known.
If Kenny accedes to the anthrosoc request and
returns the cases, the anthrosoc P and T committee will
then begin a new evaluation of the Speier and Silvers
cases.
The Ubyssey
has ears,
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. Llll, No. 33     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1972     o^^,«      228-2301
doesn't it
Wally?
OTEU signs
first contract
with AMS
By SANDY KASS
With the aid of a professional negotiator, the Alma Mater Society
successfully completed negotiations with the Office and Technical
Employees Union Dec. 21 for the unionization of its staff.
However,     negotiator    Ken    	
—daryl tan photo
THERE'S SOMETHING FISHY going on here, says Sheila McKay, AMS office steward, as AMS treasurer
David' Dick and what's-his-name sign Office and Technical Employees contract. Council later ratified the
expenditure of $550 for a professional negotiator.
'Publish and you perish,'
warning in Wally's memo
By MIKE SASGES
The university's lawyers have decided that a
person who gives confidential memos to The
Ubyssey is committing an act of theft.
That's the verdict contained in a memo from
administration president Walter Gage to all faculty
members and administrative heads on Dec. 9.
In the memo the lawyers said: "A person, be he
an employee or a stranger, who takes documents"
which he knows are of a confidential nature and
delivers them to some third party, commits an act
of theft..."
The memo said certain exceptions to this rule
exist especially where a person takes them to
disclose a crime or fraud.
"All I was doing was quoting a legal opinion,"
Gage said Wednesday.
Gage said he asked the university's lawyers to
consider the problem of publication of confidential
information at the request of several faculty
members.
"I would say that part of their general concern
might include the publication of confidential
memos in The Ubyssey," he said.
The Ubyssey published four confidential
memos on Dec. 2 involving tenure disputes in the
English department.
The memos arrived in the editorial offices in
plain brown wrapping by campus mail.
 SeepageS: GAGE
Martin of Management Research
Western Ltd., was not authorized.
to complete his task until
Wednesday night.
Acting independently of both
the AMS finance committee and
student council, AMS treasurer
David Dick retained Martin for
$200 a day Dec. 2.
When finance committee was
approached on the matter Dec. 8,
it gave approval to Dick's action.
AMS council voted 14 to nine
Wednesday in favor of ratifying
the move.
A $550 cheque was mailed to
Martin in payment for two and
one half days of work before the
matter was brought before
council.
In opposing Dick's action, arts
representative Kathy Carney said
she resented Dick's lack of regard
for council by taking matters into
his own hands without approval
from council or the finance
committee.
Dick later claimed he was
acting on advice given him by
AMS lawyers.
"Given the fact none of us had
ever negotiated a union contract
before, we felt we needed
someone with more experience,"
Dick said.
The union had earlier retained
professional negotiator Bill
Swanson to meet with the B.C.
mediation commissioner Ed
Simms, and AMS officials in
negotiating the contract.
See page 2: OTEU
ONE    CHUGGED   while   most
guzzled the free refreshments at
The Ubyssey party Thursday,
Dec. 3. The party was held in the
Ubyssey offices to encourage
students to come in and observe
the source of its tri-weekly
newspaper. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6,   1972
Disposable cutlery disposed of
as Ruthie Blair back to dish washing
By JOHN SYDOR
Increased costs and complaints
have stopped the complete use of
disposable dishes and cutlery in
the SUB cafeteria.
"We are still using disposables
where take-out orders are
concerned. Also, places such as
the Barn and Old Auditorium
Cafeteria are still using them since
they have no dish washing
facilities," said Ruth Blair,
director of food services, in an
interview with The Ubyssey.
The use of disposable cutlery
started as an experiment in
September. It was then hoped
that spiralling costs, due to labor,
theft, and breakage would be
eliminated.
"Theft and breakage in the
non-resident cafeterias alone cost
more than $4,000 in a period
between April, 1969 and March,
1970," Blair said Wednesday.
"We felt that much of this cost
would be eliminated by switching
to disposables, which were
supposed to be cheap and
reliable."
The cost factor was decisive in
making the switchover to
disposables. Food services must
operate on a self-supporting basis,
and any profits that are made
must be used to repay a
$1,154,000 loan that was used to
construct food service facilities on
campus.
But the switch to disposables
did little to eliminate this debt.
"We found the paper plates we
initially used unsatisfactory," said
Blair. "They were too absorbant
* .y-
REASON
FOR
DISPOSABLES
Sfr
'-u
N0ISE DECIBLES REDUCED BECAUSE
DISPOSABLES ARE SILENT
QUIETNESS...
ft C A UltW F<K     DISPOSABLES are handled less REDUCES
WXMNLHicoa - - [xp0SURt m Rmm m CONTAMINATION
Cmi AAV DISPOSABLES ARE BIODEGRADABLE AND
CWLVA' ' ELIMINATE WASHING Willi DETER6CMIS
PrnMOAAY 6Ll0ws WEWODS THAI SliKIML'F FOOD
aw,1u'        COSTS -THEFT- BREAKAGE ETC
SERVICE ...
PRACTICAL.
DISPOSABLES i
ICfctA
J FFF
10 E
LESS WAITING
DISPOSABLES
APE
IGH'I
TO
CARRY
—garry gruenke photo
GOT ANY MORE good jokes, Ruthie?
and could not be used for some of
the purposes we had planned.
"This resulted in a changeover
to plastic coated paper plates,
which cost 5.3 cents apiece;
considerably higher than the 1.2
cents we were paying for plain
paper plates."
Other unexpected problems
arose from the changeover.
"We also had difficulty in
filling our orders for plastic
knives, forks and spoons," SUB
cafeteria dietician Mary Stovell
said Wednesday.
"Then we had complaints from
people who pointed out that our
disposables were not as
bio-degradable as we had
assumed," Stovell said.
One campus group called ECO
— the Environmental Crisis
Operation - went as far as writing
a report on the use of disposables.
"As far back as October our
group decided to do something
about the disposables," said ECO
member Randy Frith, arts 1.
"We had interviews with Ruth
Blair and we pointed out that
plastic cutlery and dishes were not
as disposable as one would think,"
Frith said Wednesday.
"Plastic material is difficult to
produce and it is not
bio-degradable, as a result it is
detrimental to the environment,"
said Frith.
He said ECO concluded that
disposable items are not as cheap
as ordinary dishes and cutlery.
The SUB cafeteria is now back
to using its two dishwashing
machines and has hired extra
people to care for the porcelain
and the steel utensils.
"There will be no increase in
food prices because of the return
to ordinary cutlery," said Stovell.
"It appears that it is just as
efficient to employ people and
use the dishwashers," she said.
OTEU contract
Whafs up, doc?
Non-Specific Urethritis
Once in a while a young man goes to a doctor complaining
of a discharge from the penis with pain and itching. The doctor
gives him some pills and says he has non-specific urethritis. What
does this mean? It means the kid has a discharge from the penis
with pain and itching.
It also means the doctor does not know what the hell is
causing it. It also means the kid does not have clap, gonorrhea,
syphilis or any of those nasty infections that can leave you sterile.
Non-specific urethritis means an infection of the urethra
(the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside) with
any one of a number of bacteria. Frequently it is impossible to
tell which one, even in the laboratory. The bug may be one of the
"normal flora" that normally dwell in the male or female genital
tracts.
The disease is usually thought of as a venereal disease,
spread by sexual intercourse, but no one really knows for sure.
(Will any male virgins suffering from non-specific urethritis please
report to this column.)
Burning on urination and the feeling of constantly having
to go are commonly seen in gonorrhea (clap) but not so often in
this disease. The discharge may be watery or may contain pus.
Itching of the tip of the penis is the usual thing. If you've got it,
you'll know it.
Cure is simple: several days of tetracycline pills, sometimes
with other antibiotics added.
Once in a while the cause is Trichomonas vaginalis, a little
animal that lives — now don't all raise your hands at once — in
the female vagina. Cure of this requires an expensive drug called
metronidazole (Flagyl). If the doctor says you've got
Trichomonas, tell your woman so she can be treated too.
If untreated, non-specific urethritis could theoretically
spread up the urinary tract. There is a very rare syndrome,
possibly caused by a virus, composed of urethritis, arthritis and
eye symptoms. Don't worry about it. If you get severe joint pains
soon afterward, go back to the doctor: you might have an
overlooked case of gonorrhea.
The Merck Manual (a medical textbook) claims that
"excessive sexual activity and heavy drinking of alcohol are
believed to be precipitating factors." Anyone who screws and
drinks more than his doctor is screwing and drinking too much.
From page one
"We needed someone of
Swanson's calibre to deal with
them," Dick said.
AMS general manager Brian
Robinson said the money used to
pay Martin came from his office
expenses.
When asked why he did not
call special meetings of council
and finance committee to
consider the matter, Dick replied
that it is not "normal procedure"
to do so.
"I feel my actions are in the
best interests of the society,"
Dick added.
AMS president Grant Burnyeat
said the treasurer has to have
council authorization for all
expenses over $100.
"But this sort of thing goes on
all the time," Burnyeat said.
Negotiations between the
OTEU and the AMS began Aug.
11,. when the B.C. government
certified the union to represent
the AMS employees who voted in
favor of becoming unionized.
The 30-month contract, signed
by Swanson, OTEU
secretary-treasurer Opal Skilling,
Burnyeat and Dick, gives AMS
employees salary increases ranging
from 12 to 21 per cent of their
non-union pay scale.
Salary increases are retroactive
to October, 1971, and further
increases are expected in June,
1972, and June, 1973.
"We are slowly bringing our
salaries up to what normal union
scales are," Robinson said.
Dick said the monies used to
pay the increases will come from
the $20,000 AMS budget margin
available this month.
"Future increases will of
course, come from future
budgets," he said.
The contract which comes up
for renegotiation May 31, 1974,
gives AMS employees a 50 per
cent prepaid dental plan,
workman's compensation,
overtime rates of time and a half
for the first two hours and double
time for every hour thereafter,
and an increased vacation scale of
three weeks after three years and
four weeks after seven years.
Robinson said anyone receiving
a salary from the AMS, including
part-time student workers, is now
eligible for workman's
compensation.
"Having this contract as a
frame of reference for the girls
and for management is really
helpful," Robinson said.
A clause in the contract
instituted by the human
government executive, which
called for every woman having a
child or children in a co-operative
day care centre to have one
afternoon a week off with pay to
work in the centre, was removed
by the new executive.
"There was only one person on
the staff affected by the clause,
and we didn't want to hold up
negotiations because of it," AMS
office steward Sheila McKay told
The Ubyssey.
Dick said the clause had been
removed from the contract
because of "the cost factor."
"We could not afford to pay
employees to work in a day care
centre when they should be
working in the office," he said.
The AMS executive is presently
planning an on-campus day care
centre for three to six year-olds.
Beautiful
clothes «.
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
RECORDING ARTISTS
MARTY GILLAN
and
KAREN O'BRAY
Appearing Nightly
from 9 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
with THE
TOWN PUMPERS
Described by Leisure Magazine as
THE BAND OF THE YEAR
Their new Stereo L.P.
"WE DID IT OUR WAY"
NOW AVAILABLE AT LOCAL
RECORD STORES
THE
TOWN
PUMP
WE ARE
STILL NO.
1
The following
reasons
explain why
a) we carry a complete stock
of most parts conducive to
repairs for VW, Mercedes,
Porsche and Volvo.
b)We   have   5   fully   trained
mechanics on duty 5 days
a week,
c) We have been  in business
10    years    (6    years    as
Henneken Auto).
d)We    offer    the     lowest
possible   prices   consistent
with   the   highest   quality
workmanship.
e) We fully guarantee all our
work.
f) We now fix B.M.W.s too.
We want to be Number one
10 years from now too . . .
Drop in today for a free
estimate. Thursday, January 6, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—garry gnnnk* photo
AN ADDED ATTRACTION to the law school is the latest branch of Osmundsen's alternate food service.
As students stare in amazement — or is it apprehension — Bonnie Dawson prepares to ring in the sales.
AMS blue-blazer boys
perpetrate political purges
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Both the SUB management committee and the
finance committee of the Alma Mater Society have
been arbitrarily restocked following the election of
the new AMS executive.
"A whole new SUB management committee
was set up for no cause and with no explanation,"
said Colin Portnuff, arts undergraduate society
president and a former member of the SUB
management committee.
"We didn't know about it until the last council
meeting in December when the minutes of the new
committees were presented to council," he said.
"The committees are appointed by the
executive and with the resignation of the old
executive these committees also became vacant, so
the new executive met to fill them," said AMS
co-ordinator Rick Murray.
"The AMS code does not specify that council
must ratify members of these committees," Murray
said.
However, the SUB management committee
bypassed council and authorized the expenditure of
$400 towards the expansion of the information and
concession stand on the main floor of SUB, which
was one of the items in the unapproved minutes.
The money was used to build a wall in the
middle of the old human government general office,
so that a part of it could be used for the concession
stand.
Concession stand staff members, however, are
not pleased about the expansion.
"That wall is completely useless. We were
already hopelessly overcrowded in the stock room
and during the weekly stock-taking and this is going
to make it more difficult than ever. We wish some
of the staff had been consulted before this-
expansion took place," a staff member told The
Ubyssey.
The executive bypassed council and the finance
committee in hiring a professional negotiator to
assist them in their negotiations with the Office and
Technical Employees Union. Though the
expenditure was later approved by the finance
committee, its minutes were not approved by
council until last night.
If it is approved, the money will probably come
out of the margin, as will the increases obtained by
the union.
However, Dick did not yet know exactly how
this would affect the margin and how much of it
would be spent on clubs and services.
The margin is part of the current budget that
was not allocated in the fall and is to be allocated
some time this month.
"We have asked the clubs and organizations on
campus to submit budgets to us and when we have
received them we will determine how to spend the
margin," Dick said.
At Wednesday's council meeting, the AMS
suspended the university clubs committee budget at
the request of several former UCC executives.
"We took this action to prevent (UCC)
chairman Edward Beauregard from appointing an
entirely new executive as the result of the
resignations of the rest of the members of the
executive," said Ken Lassesen, former UCC
treasurer.
"The decay in the executive, which eventually
led to the resignations, started a week before the
human government referendum when one executive
member put out a slander sheet and signed the name
of the UCC and several other groups and people
without any consultation with the UCC or other
persons," he said.
"Though the member in question later resigned,
Beauregard refused to allow a motion expressing
regret for the human government defeat, and
another motion condemning the irresponsible
actions of the executive member," Lassesen said.
Lassesen also accused Beauregard of raming
through the UCC budget.
Joshua wins
two battles,
loses one
By SANDI SHREVE
Joshua Co-operative,
Vancouver's free re-cycling
service, has won its battles with
the Unemployment Insurance
Commission and the Vancouver
zoning department.
"But the federal government
has refused our application for a
winter works grant," says
marketing manager Lynn Vickson.
Vickson said Wednesday that
Joshua applied to the Local
Initiatives Program, which is
operated and funded by the
federal Manpower department, for
a $500,000 grant early in
December and received a refusal
later that month.
Joshua had proposed to use the
grant to establish a system of
collecting office wastepaper and a
recycling service which would
cater to householders in the
Lower Mainland area.
"Had we received the grant we
would have employed 230 people
at $100 per week for a period of
six months," said Vickson.
Joshua expected their
expansion plans to be lucrative
enough to enable them to
permanently retain more than 30
of its intended employees at
$75 per week.
The refusal notice said Joshua
had applied for too much money
and that the Local Initiatives
Program did not consider the
service to be provided would be of
immediate benefit to the
community.
The notice also alleged it had
received complaints from other
Vancouver recycling groups such
as the Salvation Army and the
Boy Scouts expressing concern
over being put out of business by
Joshua.
"When we contacted these
groups concerning the complaints
they denied any knowledge of
them," said Vickson.
Joshua modified its request by
omitting the expansion plans and
asking for $30,000 which would
be used to employ 15 additional
persons for six months and "to
continue the operation at the
present marginal level," she said.
"However, there is little hope
that the new request will be
granted because Rebearth
Resources, a Burnaby recycling
service, was denied a similar
request in December," she said.
Rebearth Resources folded as a
result of their grant refusal but
Vickson said Joshua will continue
to operate even if its grant is
refused.
"Becuase they are now
receiving unemployment
insurance our 15 official
employees will be able to
continue the operation on a
voluntary basis," she said.
She said the UIC contacted
Joshua at the end of November
and told them they had reviewed
their applications again and were
now convinced their claims were
valid.
The UIC earlier in November
had flatly denied claims for
insurance by Joshua employees
who had received wages during
the summer from an
Opportunities for Youth grant
because their status of
unemployment failed to meet the
necessary requirements.
The UIC did not explain why it
reversed its previous decision.
"The employees concerned
each received $500 in back pay
and are now receiving regular
unemployment benefits," said
Vickson.
As well, the city zoning
department has responded tc
Joshua's appeals against a
November notice to evacuate its
East Second Avenue warehouse
because it failed to meet with the
requirement for 10 off-street
parking spaces, by giving Joshua
until June 30 to rectify the
situation.
Volkoff gets
science pest
The board of governors has
appointed physics department
head George Volkoff as the new
science dean.
Volkoff, 57, succeeds his
brother-in-law Vladimir Okulitch
who retired in June, 1971.
"I've just arrived in my office
and its going to take three weeks
to a month to find out what the
hell the job is all about," Volkoff
said Wednesday.
He told The Ubyssey he does
not foresee an increase in student
participation in the faculty.
"I don't believe the dean's
committees involve students in
any large number," he said.
However Volkoff said he is
meeting with science
undergraduate society
representatives Friday.
He said he believes he was
appointed to the position because
he has been around UBC for many
years.
Volkoff began his association
with UBC when he enrolled here
in 1930. He received his B.A. and
his M.A. at UBC and his Ph.D. at
the University of California at
Berkeley.
During the Second World War
he instructed at UBC and then
worked for the National Research
Board.
In 1961 he became the physics
Apartment head, succeeding B.C.
Hydro chairman Gordon Shrum.
Milton Miller of the University
of Wisconsin is the new head of
the psychiatry department.
Miller, 44, was the head of the
psychiatry department at that
university.
Prof. Kenneth Mann is the
acting head of the physics
department as of Jan. 1. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6,  1972
The artist
"Art is a lie that makes us realize the truth.'
-Pablo Picasso
Wise words. And as we must charitably describe
the continuing song and dance of Cyril Belshaw as art
(albeit somewhat gauche), it is impossible to deny the
veracity of Picasso's observation.
Belshaw, in his position of head of the
anthropology and sociology department, has adamantly
— for reasons as yet unknown to us — recommended
against tenure for two of his professors and steadfastly
refused to make public the inner machinations of his
department.
In these efforts, Belshaw has shown the
determination, drive and, apparently, inner faith of the
artist. Alas, he has been somewhat lacking in the talent
corner.
For despite his admirable back-against-the-wall
resolve, the poor man has been defeated by a growing
mass of concerned students and many of his own
faculty members who want to see some sunlight in the
dark and damp bowels of the anthrosoc department.
Logically, this is what should have inevitably
occurred. From the start, professors Matt Speier and
Ron Silvers were recommended for tenure by the
departmental committee assigned to decide such things.
But Belshaw, apparently demonstrating his
individuality in thought — the artist again —
recommended against tenure.
Strange you say. A little bit of intrigue, perhaps.
Cyril conspiring with Belshaw, who is in cahoots with
the head of the anthrosoc department, maybe. Hmmm.
The conspiracy, whomever it comprised, then
attempted to hush things up and refused to reopen the
Speier and Silvers cases, even after consideration of the
articulate graduate students' brief on the subject.
This is where the artist — poet, painter, musician —
began to lose his touch and be transformed into
versifier, doodler, honk-tonk piano banger. Unable to
keep the lid on the departmental dustbin, he (Good
God, no) allowed, however unwillingly, the general
population of this university to step vicariously
backstage.
The result was seen Tuesday when, in the face of
mounting student concern and out of respect to their
own consciences, the department members voted
overwhelmingly to have the tenure cases reviewed.
Now it remains to see how arts dean Doug Kenny,
whom some reviewers consider no mean artist himself,
handles himself now that the spotlight has fallen on
him.
With any luck and a certain amount of sense, the
issue will be resolved justly and we will be treated to
slightly more interesting and worthy cultural activities
in the future.
And hopefully we are learning from this current
experience: that we can realize the truth from another's
lie; that we can, in the first place mobilize ourselves to
reveal the lie.
In the meantime, sit back and watch the show,
remembering always the makeup, costumes and lights
and that the most interesting conversations are the real
ones, the ones held in the darkened backstage area.
-MF
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 6, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
V
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Sandy Kass, not to be confused with Sandl Shreve (the difference is
Nate Smith), told her enraptured listerners about trains, Natcups, and
other schmaltsy things like the students coalition against dogs while Tricia
Moore, on indefinite loan from Page Friday looked helpful. John Sydor the
Eco freak was in periodically as were Kent Spencer, Jim Moly, Murray
Kennedy, Gary Gruenke, Gord Gibson, Pat Fitzgerald and MikeGidora.
These periodically prolific creative writers vanished as 'da pit emerged.
Mike, Sasges, that little ole fastest telephone dialer and best refreshment
smuggler this side of mudcreek was as buzy as fast as he cud dial, guzzle,
and puff. Mike Finlay stared glassy eyed out at the snow humming
sometin' like snow blind friend while Sharon Smith (on loan from the
Gauntlet in Calgary) also stared glassy eyed at the telex not hummin' a
thing. John Twigg of model fame did his artsy-fartsy thing with layout
while David Schmidt did his thing which is yet to be discovered. Daryl Tan
who lives in the darkroom was reminded of the Page Friday meeting to be
held at noon in the rest of the office today by John Andersen of Page one
and big steak fame.
Letters
Orgy
The following prose was
written during The Ubyssey's
now-notorious Christmas orgy
Dec. 2. The writer, an anonymous
guest, was clearly a crummy typist
or very impaired. The piece
appeared under the title Orgy in
Progress.
The most incredible things
were happening on this memorial
day. Here in the depraved bowels
of the legendary Ubyssey, actual
scenes of benevolency were taking
place. Amidst the roar of the
Stones and amongst the
stonerambles Ubyssey staffers,
their groupies, lookers-on,
hangers-on and even (!) engineers.
Yes, those red-jacketed nemeses of
democracy, good order and
upholders of decency.
Hand-to-hand, shoulder-to-
shoulder, staffers and gears fought
together into the depths of the
darkroom to grope for beer. I had
come in the hopes of seeing one
those illusive (sic) and almost
extinct species of the lower forms
of excrement known commonly
on campus as Reporter. I searched
about the room looking for some
characteristic features which are
attributed to the staffer. Baggy
eyes, rumpled clothing, swollen
tongue, shoeless, hair askew. Wait,
there in the corner, it must be
one. I approached timorously.
Excuse me, hoping that being
grovelly, I wouldn't offend him
and thus scare him off. Are you
one of them? Huh, he replied
sucinctly. Thinking that he must
have been developing in the
darkroom too long, I explained
slowly and clearly what my search
was for. No, man, like I'm in Civil
Sci. I in turn asked if that was
some sort of reviewer's column.
Well, you know, like Sci. Fi. No,
man, more like Bi. Sci. and, well,
don't let it out, but Poli. Sci. Oh,
the light dawning, like Comp. Sci.
Yeah, man. I looked at him with
disgust for having deceived me so
grossly and disappointed me. I
continued in my search as did the
other people who were obviously
searching for different things. To
coin a phrase, there were
group-gropes going on in the
corners and on desks amidst
archaic typewriters. Red arms
creeping up the legs of panting
staffers, one of whom I was told
later was Michael Finlay in drag.
Mass movements to and from the
bar. Little brown stubbies
clutched in calloused little hands
when they weren't occupied by
beer bottles which were
alternately strewn around the
room with plastic corks and wine
bottles of inferior grades. One
gear tried to wash out his cup in
the dark room, turned the wrong
tap on and developed the
styrofoam. Dancing turned the
room into a shaking whirling
dervish. I looked up. The music
was still playing but where were
all the people. AE the red had
gone. I looked to the wall and saw
that it was 2:30. All the beer was
gone and with the disappearance
of their raison d'etre, the
engineers had all turned into slide
rules and computer print-outs.
Staffers went out muttering you
can't count on them damn gears
when the going gets tough.
Let us note that more beer
arrived forthwith and that the
true and conscientious drinkers
continued to imbibe for some
time.
Arghl
f
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The little minds in
adminstration have done it again,
only this time they've done it to
me! For four and one-half years
now I have slaved and sweated to
get that insanely invaluable (?)
scrap of bullshit paper (B.Sc.
degree) that people have been
telling me about. Now, after
completing all the courses
required to get the hell out of
here, the money-grubbing finance
department wants to stop me
from graduating because of a
mistake they made at one of their
mundane tasks.
In September, I arrived back
from Toronto after working and
registered late. The assessed me an
additional $25.00 on top of my
partial program fees for registering
late Fine. I had accepted this so I
paid my fees and late fee all at
once. Then, a pleasant surprise!
At the end of October they sent
me a cheque (with no
explanation) for $25. I thought
that maybe for some bureaucratic
reason, however obscure, they had
made an exception in my case. I
also thought that the finance
department would know what it
was doing, so I, poorer after
paying back in full my $1,200.00
worth of student loans all at once,
cashed it unquestionably. Now,
they have sent me a Christmas
present (or headache) in the form
of a statement of fees. They are
now assessing me (after I've
finished my university program
completey!) for the late fee of
$25 which I paid in September
and which was returned in
October.
I went to see those responsible
for the error on Monday and they
agreed that they do make a lot of
financial mistakes with the
students always getting the
short-end of it and usually the
student just has to take the loss
because this is the way their
system works, unfortunately for
us! They said that mine is just one
of a number of cases (apparently
this mistake had been made
several times by an employee who
is still working there) and that I
was obligated to give back the $25
which they had refunded to me in
October. I explained that (A) this
wasn't my problem since they had
made the mistake, and not I; (B)
that I was now finished university
entirely, was not returning after
Christmas, and was graduating in
the spring; and (C) that I had paid
back all my loans, had paid my
rent for this month, had no job,
am trying to get unemployment
insurance benefits, and if I am to
continue eating, that I could not
pay the money anyways since I
haven't got enough right now.
Insanely enough, they said it
was too bad but I would have to
return the $25 before Jan. 15 or
else I would be assessed an
aditional $25, and if I didn't pay
them in full $50 then I would not
graduate! Shock and disbelief!
This blew my mind, so I gave up
talking to them and went home to
wonder.
How much is a degree worth to
you, students? $25, $50, or
thousands of bucks? To me now,
it seems worthless, if individual
rights are shunned and not
respected. Is there no justice in
this up-tight, money-oriented
outfit! I would be interested to
hear someone else's thoughts on
the matter.
Derek Moule Thursday, January 6,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Council coughs up dough
The main problem facing Alma Mater Society
councilors Wednesday was the future of the AMS
alternate food services.
And they decided unanimously to give the food
service run by Lyle Osmundson sufficient funds to
improve the kitchen facilities on the bus
Osmundson used before he moved the service into
SUB in October.
AMS president Grant Burnyeat said health
inspectors could close down Osmundson's present
kitchen facilities on the second floor of SUB.
AMS co-ordinator Rick Murray told council the
SUB management committee was scared of the
possibility of food poisoning occuring in
Osmundson's food.
"Our food is totally clean whenever it is
served," said Osmundson.
He said the second-floor kitchen the food
service operates from cannot be brought up to
provincial and city health standards.
And AMS president Grant Burnyeat said a new
kitchen could not be built this year for the AMS.
"I hope we can continue to push the food
service because the administration claims it is
hurting their business," said Burnyeat.
Grad student association rep Julian Wake said
council should do all in its power to make the
service viable.
"I want cheaper food and better food — you
members of the student coalition executive
promised to give students what they want," said
Wake.
Osmundson claimed Murray threatened to take
the kitchen facilities away on three occasions.
"I'm tired of signs that the new executive is
taking these kind of steps," said Wake.
Burnyeat ruled that the other GSA council reps
Tony Grinkus and Gina Quijano could not vote at
that meeting because they have not paid their AMS
fees.
"There is a need of clarification on this matter
between the GSA and the AMS and it will be going
to student court for a ruling," Burnyeat told The
Ubyssey.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121
CLOSELY
WATCHED
TRAINS
U.B.C.
the award-winning Czechoslovakian film
HEBB THEATRE
FRI. JAN. 7, SAT. JAN. 8        7:30PM
9:30 P.M.
only 75c
Gage sends own memo
toooooeooooooooooooeoo
From page one
Two department heads told The Ubyssey
Wednesday that they support Gage's memo.
"I don't think the president would send it
around unless it was necessary," said
anthropology-sociology head Cyril Belshaw.
"I think we've been very lax in our security and
you people would know better than anybody else,"
Belshaw said.
Classics head Malcolm McGregor said he thinks
the letter is a good letter.
"Faculty business is private business," he said.
"I won't make any comment except that I
support the president's action," said McGregor.
English department head Robert Jordan was
unavailable for comment.
Anthrosoc professor Wilson Duff said he was
surprised to receive Gage's memo.
"I'm a little surprised he sent it around," Duff
said Wednesday.
Assistant English prof J.R. Doheny called the
Gage memo "curious".
"I think they want to intimidate a lot of people
including The Ubyssey," Doheny said Wednesday.
The memo said: "The person who receives the
documents can be charged with possession and must
give an explanation as to how they came into his
hands."
Doheny said he likes the publication of
confidential memos.
"I expect there will be more (of them), like a
continuing chapter of a book," he said.
Anthrosoc prof Martin Meissner said the
publication of the memos is a violation of
administrative customs.
"If I was on a committee such as a promotions
and tenure committee where I had to write a report
on a colleague I would now assume that the
information could be made public," Meissner said
Wednesday.
Meissner was the department assessor for
embattled sociology profs Ron Silvers and Matt
Speiers who have just won a new investigation into
their tenure cases.
"There is no question that the president's
memo was in response to the publication of the
confidential memos," Meissner told The Ubyssey.
He said confidentiality is necessary to protect
people, especially in tenure and promotions cases.
"However I wouldn't mind having open
discussion on other business in departments," he
said.
Anthrosoc profs David Aberle and J.E. Kew
refused to comment on the Gage memo.
"I wouldn't want to make any generalized
statements on the publication of memos," Aberle
said Wednesday. "I've no reaction on the president's
memo at this time."
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A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
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Select from a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We will
finish:
• One  8"  x   10"  portrait  in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
• One  8"  x   10"  portrait  in
natural color (group) $24.95
Ask about our special reduced
prices on additional portraits
ordered at the same time.
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.»
736-0261
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Thursday 6 - 7:00
Friday 7 & Saturday 8
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 9 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE -50c
Cannes Film Festival-
Special Jury Prize;
International
Critics' Prize;
Academy Award-
Best Foreign Film
"One of the year's ten best."
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
John Simon, New York Times
Director: Elio Petri
'Power tends to corrupt, absolute power corrupts absolutely."—Lord Actin (1887)
But, even more insidious in its development, the wielder of uncontrolled power
eventually discovers that his entire psyche has been unrecognizably subverted—
and what remains is nothing less than complete and irreversible schizophrenia.
Beyond the psychological and political merits of the film, "INVESTIGATION"
rates as a first class detective story complete with sufficient macabre details to
satisfy even the most demanding purist of the genre. Page 6
THE       \J B Y S S E Y
Crane Library
gets readers
Crane Memorial Library for the
blind will employ 10 persons from
January to May under a $28,000
federal Local Opportunities grant.
The people will supplement the
library's     audio-taped     book
'tween
classes
THURSDAY
NFB
Films, upper lounge.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting in St. Mark's music
room at noon.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Film Behind the Lines, Bu. 106 at
noon.
KARATE CLUB
Workout in Thunderbird Gym, 7:30
p.m.
CCF.
Meeting at noon in SUB 215.
GAY PEOPLES' ALLIANCE
Organizational  meeting in SUB 224
at noon. Also meet in I.H. at 7:30.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting in SUB Lounge at noon.
UBC WARGAMERS
Meet Nero at noon in SUB 111.
FRIDAY
UBC BICYCLE CLUB
Meeting in SUB 215 at noon.
COMMITTEE FOR AN
INDEPENDENT CANADA
Organizational     meeting     in    SUB
105B at noon.
ANSO UNDERGRAD UNION
Meeting at 1 p.m. in Bu. 107.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Party reminder, see Cathey.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
BEER GARDEN
Upper Lounge, 4-8 p.m.
PHRATERES
Meeting at noon in Bu. 203.
SUNDAY
TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Workout   at   6   p.m.    in   new   P.E.
Bldg., gym 13.
MONDAY
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice   in  SUB   Ballroom  at  4:30
p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
N.B.   Poet  Alden   Nowlan   reads  in
SUB Art Gallery at noon.
SPEAKERS
Dr.     Minchinton    on    Patterns    of
Demand   jn  Europe,   1500-1750  at
3:30 TJ.m. in Bu. Penthouse.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Prof.    Minchinton    speaks   on    the
Atlantic slave trade in the 18th C. at
noon in Bu. 100.
ANTH-SOC UNDERGRAD
UNION MEETING
FRIDAY, JAN. 7
1:00 p.m, BUCH. 107
(will prooably move to 106
for more space)
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
Rebates
Discontinued
Until Jan. 17th
Final rebates on all purchases
up to and including Dec. 31,
1971, will be given Jan.
17th-Jan. 31, 1972.
the
bookstore
Hot flashes
collection by adding 400 English
and Quebecois texts and novels.
This temporary addition to
staff will not affect the current
reading program which has about
160 volunteers reading into tapes
at their convenience.
Money business
Four UBC graduate commerce
students have received Seagram
Business Fellowships worth
$4,600.
Brent Bitz, Kenneth French,
and Michael McAfee, all grad 7,
received $1,000 awards.
James Bennett, grad 7, received
a $1,600 fellowship.
CEA money
The Canadian Educational
Association is offering a
scholarship   to  the  Eliot-Pearson
department of child study at
Tufts University in Medford,
Mass.
For additional details and
application forms, candidates
should write to the Queen
Elizabeth Scholarship Committee,
Canadian Education Association,
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto 5,
Ont.
Performance
During   the spring   semester
Simon    Fraser University    will
present the Walter Zuber
Ensemble.
The free form jazz group
includes flutist Walter Zuber
Armstrong, the ensemble's
creator. The program will feature
performances beginning
Wednesday, at 8 p.m., in the SFU
Theatre.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD  ^  ^
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
■ FRI. &SAT. 11 a.ra to 4 a.ra - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
ROYAL
BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
Deposit Accounts-General Banking Services
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Manager
10th at Sasamat 224-4348
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
$1,500 - 9 months
Educational Summer Employment Arranged
to students wishing to enter the first or
subsequent professional year of a degree
course in Mining Engineering
For applications contact:
The Secretary
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation
1600-44 King Street West, Toronto
or
The Dean of Engineering
Applied Science
CLOSING DATE 15 MARCH 1972
Thursday, January 6,   1972
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30e; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadlim is 11:30 a.m., th& day before publication.
Publications Offce, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8,BJtZ
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
START THE NEW YEAR OFF ON
the right foot. Dance, Place Van-
ier,  9-1,  Jan.  7.	
DANCE TO UNCLE SLUG AT
Totem Park on Saturday, January
8 from 8:30-12:30. Admission: $1.00
res.; $1.25 non-res.; $1.75 res.
couple.
Greetings
12
INEXPENSIVE. RECYCLED PUR
coats and general fur access. Pap-
pas Brothers, 469 Hamilton Street
at Victory Square. We trade. Open
Monday through Saturday 12 noon-
5:30 p.m.,   681-6840.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: GLASSES, OVAL GOLD
wire frames in cloth case, last
Monday. Phone 732-7034.	
COULD THE PERSON WHO
found a 12" Hemmi slide rule in
Buchanan 212 on 15th Dec. last
year please phone 733-8024 after 5
p.m. Good reward.	
YOUNG GREY WHITE FEMALE
cat, UBC Campus between Christmas-New Year. CaU 731-0301 or
731-7586.
Rides & Car Pools
14
PAYING PASSENGER FROM WEST
Van. 15th Ave. Can leave anytime
between 9 a.m. and noon. 922-6917.
Special Notices
15
  3 FOR $1.00  ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics ?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver,  B.C.
Wanted—Information 17
ANYONE KNOWING OP IRREGU-
larities in A.M.S. by-election held
Nov. 24 please contact R. Broom,
Faculty  of Law,  Campus Mail.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
35 Sports Cars
& CompacJs
M.G.'S, T.R. 4's, Toyota Triumph,
Volvo,   Porsche,   Volks,   Mini,
Pinto,   Mustang,  Chevell,
Mercedes,  Cougar,  XR7,   Rover
& many more.
IMPO AUTO
6th & Main
873-1608
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
33
DANCE TO LONG TIME COMIN'
Friday, January 7, 9-1. Place
Vanier.
Photography
35
Scandals
37
IT ALL HAPPENS AT PLACE
Vanier this Friday. Nxm-res. $1.25,
res-chicks   751,   res-guys   $1.00.
RECORDS—WE HAVE THE LAT-
est releases in rock, folk and
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
Drop in and listen to the music or
play a game of scrabble. Joy
Music Sanctum, 6610 Main (at
50th).  11 a.m.-7 p.m.	
DO YOU DRIVE A MAZDA, TOY-
ota or Datsun? Does Henneken
Auto service it for you? If not —
you're going td the wrong place—
phone us for a free estimate at
263-8121 or drop into 8914 Oak St.
(at Merine Drive).
Typing
40
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on short essays.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Sharl
at  738-8745—Reasonable  Rates.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—THESIS,
Essays, etc. Mrs. Brown. 732-0047.
Typing—Coni.
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work, Reasonable
Rates.   Phone 263-5317.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, Manuscripts, Term
papers, etc. Mrs. Troche;—437-1355.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
STUDENTS WANTED: $400 MTH.
part-time in management and PR
of Anti-Air & Water Pollution
Control Products. Open for male
and female who qualify. Send resume to G. W. Oijen, 81 Howe St.,
Victoria, B.C. This is ground floor
of a $100,000,000.00 Ecology Co.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
CLASSICAL GUITAR INSTRUC-
tion at The Guitar Centre. Semester plan; group; private lessons.
Phone Chris Jordan, 688-3816.
Special Classes
62
LEARN TO POT! — — — — —
PEG'S PLACE POTTERY SCHOOL
Near   U.B.C,   2780   Alma   —   —   —
Still    space   Mon.    Sat.    9:30-12:30
am.   Thurs   1-4   p.m.   Phone   738-
2912.
YOGA  FITNESS  INSTITUTE	
Classes start Jan. 10th for all
levels of instruction from 7 years
and up. Call Dr. Bima Nelson, 731-
6320 for registration and information.
POT at Porter's Centre
another   12    week    session
to   start   JAN.   10
Register   early
wheel work, hand building, etc.
for   details   phone:    261-4764
G.   ALFRED
STUDIOS VITARIUS, 760 WEST
22nd Ave., offering following Fine
Arts courses: Sculpture, Oil Painting, Ceramics, Batic. Advanced
classes after live model. Open
house and registration, Jan. 8th
and Jan. 9th, 1972 from 2 to 6 p.m.
Artist: Rozika Vitarius. Phone
879-8570.
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
64
JAN. 7, 9-1, LONG TIME COMIN'
comes to Place Vanier. Dance,
Dance, Dance.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKIS: FISCHER ALU 215 cm.
Salomon competion bindings $90.00
Camera: Ricoh underwater case
$80.00. Call Phil, 874-2537.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CAMPUS ROOMS WITH KITCHEN
privileges $60/month, co-ed. phone
224-9549. 5745 Agronomy Road, behind village.
Room & Board
82
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS, FLEAS-
ant surroundings. Also meal
passes. Call 224-9841.
ROOM & BOARD—$110/MONTH —
sauna, colour T.V., excellent food.
5785 Agronomy Rd. 224-9684.
HALF DOUBLE ROOM ON CAM-
pus residence;  St. Andrew's Hall;
224-7720.
DO YOU NEED A PLACE TO
live? Wa offer large rooms, comfortable lounges, colour T.V., and
excellent food. Sigma Chi Fraternity, 5725 Agronomy Rd. Phone
224-9620.
Furnished Apts.
83
NEEDING    WARM    SINGLE    AC-
comm?     Cosy     s.c.     suTEe,     well-
equipped kitchen, sep. thermostat.
Suit 1 student. 263-4019.
SELF - QONTAINED,   FURNISHED
basement   suite,   suit   one   or  two
students,   south   Granville,   available now. $80/mo. Phone 266-6568.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86 Thursday,  January 6,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
Swimmers frozen out of pool
By MIKE GIDORA
You could never tell by looking at Empire Pool
in its present frozen state, but UBC has one of its
strongest swim teams in years.
Coaches are traditionally ca.utious when asked
as to how their team will do. Swim coach Jack
Pomfret is no exception.
"We'll certainly be better than last year. We've
got a good bunch of swimmers," Pomfret said.
As Pomfret's "good bunch of swimmers"
includes Olympian's Bill Mahoney of New
Westminster and Carl Waterer of Saskatoon and
strong holdovers such as Andy Keir and Aldy
Meinhardt, his prediction for improvement looks
pretty safe.
The key to UBC's success for the upcoming
season will be the team's depth. This year's team of
18 men and 11 women is strong in all of the strokes.
But that's necessary if UBC is to win.
"We give away 16 points before every meet
because we don't have any divers.
"Where can we dive? We can't use that,"
Pomfret said, pointing to Empire Pool.
Empire Pool is a sore spot with Pomfret.
"No, it isn't adequate for training purposes.
"Yes, we've tried to have it replaced."
Pomfret answers the question as a matter of
routine. He's been asked the same questions for
years and by now anticipates the questions, almost
answering them before they are asked.
It is a compliment to Pomfret's coaching that
he attracts swimmers of the calibre of Mahoney and
Waterer to UgC, because it isn't the facilities that
attracts them. There are no facilities.
UBC is one of two Canadian universities
without an indoor swimming pool. The University
of Victoria is the other. But then it wouldn't do to
admit that the universities in the "California of
Canada", as our Premier is fond of calling it, need
indoor swimming pools.
So without proper facilities on campus,
Pomfret has done what has become traditional for
UBC swim teams to do, rent a pool. The one they
are now renting is the four lane, 25 metre pool at
St. George's school.
That of course costs money and is an
inconvenience to the swimmers.
Still, the rented time isn't enough, so the team
works out on pulleys that have been rigged up in the
basement of the gym.
It isn't exactly on a par with the Pan-Am pool
in Winnipeg which the University of Manitoba uses,
but Pomfret has decided that you have to use what
you've got. And that's what they've got.
This weekend, Pomfret takes his team south to
Tacoma where they will do battle — if that's the
right word for a swim meet —with the University of
Puget Sound.
Pomfret rates them as "very tough" and it will
be interesting to see how the landlocked 'Birds will
fare against this top competition.
PAYMENT OF FEES
The    Department    of    Finance,    General    Services
Administration Bldg., wishes to remind students that
the first instalment is due on or before
Friday, January 14,1972
Intramurals
FIRST INTRAMURALS
MANAGERS meeting will be held
Friday at noon in room 211, War
Memorial Gym.
The men's intramural curling
bonspiel will be held on Saturday
starting at 8 a.m. at the Winter
Sports Centre.
'Birds' holiday rough
Hockey 'Birds
win tourney
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey
team emerged as victors in the
Hockey Canada tournament held
here over the holidays.
UBC beat Sir George Williams
University 5-4 in the first game
and then defeated the University
of Alberta 5-2 in the final.
Friday and Saturday, the 'Birds
take on the University of Alberta
in two scheduled games at the
Winter Sports Centre.
The basketball 'Birds had a
relatively rough time of it over the
Christmas vacation as they played
through the toughest part of their
schedule to date.
In all, the 'Birds played six
games, dropping four of them.
Two of the losses were against the
extremely tough Portland State
Vikings where they were out
pointed 94-60 and 104-64.
The rest was better as they
then went to Edmonton for the
University of Alberta's Klondike
Classic. This tournament, a
round-robin affair was finally won
by Alberta 91-85 over UBC.
On the .way to the final against
Alberta, the 'Birds lost to
Montana Tech. 89-86, beat
Laurentian University 96-76 and
topped Alberta 73-69.
Coach Peter Mullins was
pleased with the way the team
performed and said he expects
that they will do quite well for
the remainder of the season.
This weekend the 'Birds are off
to Edmonton again for two
conference games with Alberta.
UBC is undefeated in conference
play to date.
W3
arsity Sports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
John Wurflinger and Staff
wish A Happy
and Prosperous New Year
to all our customers on UBC Campus
4510 W. 10th AVE. 224-6414
OPEN 9-6MON.-TUES.-WED.-SAT.
9 a.m. - 9 p.m. THURS. & FRI.
THE
PRINCE GEORGE
School District Recruiting Team
will be interviewing
the beginning and experienced teachers for positions for the
1972-73 school year as follows:
Vancouver — The Holiday Inn, January 11-15
Victoria - The Imperial Inn, February 2-4
Interested applicants may arrange for appointments by writing
the District Superintendent of Schools before January 5, or by
calling the Holiday Inn January 11-15
D.P. TODD
District Superintendent of Schools
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
1891 - 6th Ave.
Prince George, B.C.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
ANNUAL
Hamber Cup Series
FRI. JAN. 7 — SAT. JAN. 8
"UBC THUNDERBIRDS
vs. Univ. of Alberta GOLDEN BEARS"
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE - 8 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION TO UBC STUDENTS
THUNDERBIRD
BASKETBALL
5th Annual
BASKETBALL CLASSIC
UBC — SFU
MONDAY, JAN. 17 — PACIFIC COLISEUM — 8 p.m.
STUDENTS $1.00 - RESERVED $2.00
TICKETS at Athletic Office & Vane. Ticket Centre Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 6,   1972
ANTHROSOC REPS GET VOTING PRIVILEGES
Undergrad students in the anthropology-sociology
department are once again represented by two votes at
department faculty meetings.
Faculty and graduate, students voted almost
unanimously Tuesday at# department meeting to accept
SILVERS .
the union of undergraduate anthrosoc students as
representative.
The two undergrads join two graduate student
representatives and more than 40 faculty members in full
voting privileges.
Earlier, department head Cyril Belshaw told
representative' Colin Portnuff that the union had not
satisfactorily demonstrated that it is in contact with
undergraduate students and that it is not in fact a
representative group.
Belshaw said in a letter that he had received
representations by students saying that the union had
made no attenpt to reach them in their classes and could
not be considered representative of them.
The union position was that Belshaw was not in a
position to evaluate the status of a student group, and
that if there was disagreement, it should be addressed to
the union. The union did not reply to Belshaw's letter,
resolving to attend the next department meeting.
Representatives Portnuff and Kevin Busswood were
met at the meeting by Belshaw with a request for a
written reply to his charges.
The union reps drafted a quick letter, countering
Belshaw's arguments with the information that the union
had met several times in meetings publicized by The
Ubyssey, by leaflet and by poster, and was in touch by
mail with about 230 students in the department.
Belshaw presented the union letter as the first item of
business at the meeting, and after a brief discussion,
faculty and graduate students decided to accept the union
as the representative body of undergraduate students.
Anthrosoc undergraduate union spokesmen report
that the growth of the union has been steady and
encouraging.
Busswood also said the department voted to establish
a committee to review tenure and promotions procedures.
One undergraduate and one graduate student will be on
the five-member committee.
The next union meeting will be Friday, at 1 p.m., in
Bu. 107.
AND FRIEND
Be/show get equal recognition
Two of UBC's department
heads have received Canada
Council fellowships valued at
$7,000.
The fellowship winners were
announced late in December and
include both research and leave of
absence grants.
Cyril Belshaw, department of
anthropology and sociology head,
said Wednesday he intends to use
his grant to complete two books,
one on the anthropology of
development and the other on
Canadian research strategies and
ethics.
"I also hope to revise a book
on university organization," he
said.
His grant, like the others, is
valid for the academic year
1972-73, and he says he "will
accept the fellowship" but has not
yet arranged for a leave of absence
with the university.
English department head
Robert Jordan said he will take a
leave of absence in Britain next
year and use his fellowship to
research medeival literature.
Ronald Silvers, assistant
sociology professor, received
a $5,000 grant.
He said he intends to accept
the fellowship if he "can get a
leave of absence next year" and
plans to do a study of the North
American counter-culture.
Other UBC fellowship
recipients include E.A. Bird, F.G.
Grover and H.C. Knutson of the
French department; P.G. Bradley,
A.M. Moore and P.A. Neher of the
economics department; S.C.
Coval, J.C. Dybikowski, H.O.
Jackson and Edwin Levy of the
philosophy department; former
Ubyssey chess columnist N.J.
Divinsky of the mathematics
department; M.D. Goldberg and
S.W. Stevenson of the English
department; Andrew Gruft of the
architecture department; H.B.
Hawthorn of the anthrosoc
department; KJ. Holsti of the
political science department; E.J.
Hundert of the history
department; D.J. MacDougall and
E.C. Todd of the law faculty;
G.N. Sandys of the classics
department and R. C. Tees of the
psychology department.
Vallieres abandons 'nonfunctional' FLQ
Nick Auf der Mar of Last Post
News Service analyzes
Pierre Valliere's bombshell
and the subsequent reactions.
MONTREAL — Pierre Vallieres, Quebec's leading
ideologue of revolutionary violence, has made a dramatic
decision to abandon the FLQ and "armed agitation".
The move has been generally well received by
Quebec's opposition forces, and reflects the growing
desire for unity of the left. His announcement, delivered
in a long analysis published by the Montreal daily Le
Devoir, comes at a time when progressive groups — labor
unions, citizens' committees, students and unemployed
— are beginning to band together, pledged to work for
the overthrow of capitalism and the establishment of
socialism.
Vallieres' designation of the Parti Quebecois as the
"party of the masses" and the only alternative to the
present system, raised some eyebrows in the radical left.
But others, notably trade unionists, say Vallieres is
merely hastening the creation of a veritable coalition
"front populaire" needed to liberate Quebec. The PQ,
they say, seems the only viable institution to contain
that coalition.
The analysis, actually one chapter of a soon to be
published essay entitled "The urgency to choose", states
Vallieres' belief that FLQ violence can now only serve to
bring on repression against other groups and
organizations which are the actual opposition forces.
"In Quebec," he says, "there can be no doubt that
armed agitation has nothing to do with armed stuggle,
which is mass struggle."
The FLQ, a splinter group lacking cohesiveness,
means of control and, worse, mass support (as opposed
to sympathy), has no function, Vallieres says, since
Quebec is not in a revolutionary situation. This situation
doesn't exist since all the other means of liberation,
particularly the electoral struggle of the PQ, have yet to
be exhausted.
"Since October 1970, the 'FLQ menace' has
become a political argument which more and more
easily justifies clubbings, search warrants, bugging,
promulgation of anti-demonstration by-laws, exceptional
laws, grand army manoeuvres throughout Quebec,
rumours of plots, conspiracies, imaginary selective
assassinations, frame up political trials, etc."
The authorities, he says, use this repressive process
not so much against the FLQ but against those it knows
to be the real threat: the PQ, the unions and citizens'
groups. The War Measures Act of last year was directed
against these organizations.
Within hours of Le Devoir's appearance on the
street, all copies had been snapped up and the great
debate on the merits or demerits of Vallieres' arguments
had begun. It should be remembered that Vallieres was
an intellectual and political force in Quebec even before
he embarked on the FLQ course in 1966. In the late
fifties and early sixties he had been an associate of Pierre
Elliott Trudeau, Gerard Pelletier, Michel Chartrand and
others arguing the future of Canada.
When his analysis appeared on December 13, many
on the radical left were deeply incredulous and they still
are. Some people refuse to believe the document is
authentic.
Vallieres, who has spent four of the past five years
behind bars, failed to show up for trial last September
and announced through £n FLQ communique soon after
that he had been kidnapped by a police group, similar to
the Brazilian police's "death squad".
Some disillusioned radicals, mostly far out CEGEP
students, believe that the document is a forgery or that
Vallieres was somehow forced to write it. But those who
know Vallieres dismiss such theories.
Charles Gagnon, Vallieres' long time revolutionary
associate and prison partner, agreed with the argument
against "armed agitation" but denounced the call to
rally behind the Parti Quebecois.
"Pierre Vallieres," he said, "doesn't know anything
about the class struggle ... his position is objectively
reactionary."
Far from rallying behind a "bourgeois party,"
claimed Gagnon, the working class must build a new,
revolutionary but legal party.
Vallieres' argument in favour of the PQ is intended
to prevent the opposition forces in the province from
dividing themselves along "national" and "social" fronts.
Any such separation, he says, "constitutes in reality
a division within the same struggle and would
compromise its chances for success and reinforce the
present regime."
The desire for unity, something Quebec's opposition
forces have always lacked, is so strong that it appears
most revolutionaries will come to accept Vallieres' new
position while the rest of the left welcomes it.
Within days of the statement the Louis Riel call of
the FLQ issued a communique renouncing its own use of
violence and hailing Vallieres as "the thinker of the
Quebec revolution."
Reaction from the Parti Quebecois, naturally was
more restrained.
PQ leader Rene Levesque praised Vallieres for his
"courageous gesture" and "lucid reflection," adding that
he hoped it would help to bring about a more peaceful
climate, amenable to democratic change.
Le Devoir publisher Claude Ryan, who printed the
document on almost three full pages, said Vallieres'
self-criticism also contains certain lessons for the
authorities.
"If the call of Vallieres is heard," he wrote, "the
established power will no longer be able to fall back on a
phantom to justify its own abuses and impotence. It will
finally have to face up to its real adversaries, in
democratic debate."

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