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The Ubyssey Feb 7, 1992

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Array ™iMSSEY
N
University
Breeding
Crooks
- Fondeenl918
Vancouver, B.C., Friday, February 7,1992
Vol 74, No 34
All is not roses for 'geers as UBC
ponders penalty for trophy theft
by Rick Hiebert
UBC engineering students are
celebrating in the media spotlight,
but UBC's administration is considering some form of punishment
for three engineers who stole the
Rose Bowl Trophy from the University of Washington (UW) early
Tuesday.
UBC president David
Strangway may strike a special
disciplinary hearing to punish the
unnamed engineering students.
A small group of engineering
students went into the UW Athletic Department building Mon-
■ day night or Tuesday morning.
They smashed the glass trophy
case and made off with the three-
foot high, 30-pound, $3,000 silver
trophy awarded to the UW football
team for winning the 1992 Rose
Bowl game January 1.
The students brought the trophy back to UBC Tuesday, where
they celebrated the theft. One engineer phoned Seattle police that
afternoon and the police tipped off
the RCMP who told the students to
hand the trophy over.
The engineers gave the trophy to the RCMP Tuesday night.
The RCMP dropped their charges
and the trophy was returned to the
University of Washington
Wednesday morning.
UBC administration spokesperson Steve Crombie said there
might be a special disciplinary
hearing to punish the thieves.
"Although the crime wasn't
committed on campus, perhaps
something can be done," he said.
"We are suggesting to the engineers that they at the very least
pay for the damage that they did
and formally apologize. We are
deciding whether more is necessary."
While UBC's administration
is considering their actions, the
UW police decided Wednesday not
to charge the three suspects at the
r eque st of the UW
Athletic Department.
"We are just
happy to have the
trophy back and
eager to put the
incident behind
us," UW assistant
athletic director
Chip Lydum said.
"We are aware
that these things
happen. Fm reluctant to comment
Sergeant Bern Jansen (right) of the UEL RCMPsafely returns the Rose Bowl Trophy to University of Washington police at the Peace Arch border
crossing last Tuesday. UBC officials are considering disciplinary action against the engineering students responsible. MA chia-nien photo
wasn't any effort made to keep the
trophy. The trophy wasn't damaged and it was returned
promptly," Meisen said.
If convicted, the
students would
have faced
several months
in a state
penitentiary or
a fine of $5,000
to $10,000.
because the more I say, the more
publicity they get."
Captain Randy Stegmeier,
head ofthe UW campus police investigation of the theft, said the
engineers are lucky UW is willing
to let the suspects off easy.
"We are pretty sure that we
know who is responsible. We have
fingerprints and the RCMP has
three suspects," Stegmeier said. "I
think this case would have a good
chance of conviction if it had been
filed."
He said the crime was a felony
and burglary under Washington
State law. If convicted, the students would have faced several
months in a state penitentiary or a
fine of $5,000 to $10,000. In practice, however, first time offenders
would pay for damages, perform
community service and be on probation.
"To have a felony conviction is
the real problem. Many jobs prohibit those with criminal
records...so the UW Athletic Department is being very kind in not
 deciding to prosecute," Stegmeier
said.
UW football
head coach Don
James was not impressed with UBC's
engineers. "My initial reaction to the
theft was that it
was done as a immature prank or by
someone really sick
in the head.
       "The    football
trophy theft was really an insult to
the players who worked hard all
year to bring the team success.
The trophy was really for them
and our fans and supporters to
enjoy and I'd hate to think that it
could have been damaged or gone
missing," James said.
"I don't think that anyone
needs to go to jail, but the ones
responsible really have to be contrite, pay for their damages and
apologize," he said.
UBC Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS) president
Adam La Rusic said Tuesday he
thought the theft ofthe trophy was
"fucking excellent."
"It was a joke—University of
Washington students have got to
believe that," he said. If UW students were upset, he said, he did
not really care.
He said, before the UW athletic department decided not to
prosecute, the engineers would
probably cover up for the thieves.
"The engineers who didn't do
it won't be in a position of legal
indemnity, so I don't think any of
them will tell who did it," he said.
EUS vice presi dent Gary Chan
said Tuesday he thought the UW
would have a tough case if they
pursued it.
"I'm not too fearful, because
the bottom line is who can you pin
it on?"
Engineering dean Axel Meisen
said UBC would probably want to
see what the UW wanted to do
before deciding on any action.
"I don't think that any charges
should be made because there
'I respect the feelings of the
University of Washington and the
Seattle community. Itmay feel very
irate and very upset, but I hope
they understand the spirit behind
what the engineers did."
Seattle and Vancouver newspapers, TV and radio gave prominent coverage to the theft.
Forsythe takes on dual roles
by Charlie Gillis
Carole Forsythe has been
deeply involved in UBC student
politics in the past. However, some
student politicians say she now
risks over-extending herself in her
dual capacities of AMS vice president and senator-at-large, while
others say she could even wind up
in a position of conflict.
Forsythe won the vice president position in last Friday's
council election. She was also re-
acclaimed for the Senate seat she
has held since last April.
Orvin Lau, who will sit with
Forsythe on the Senate in the upcoming year, said he and AMS archivist Bruce Armstrong were reluctant to give their approval when
Forsythe asked them whether she
should run for AMS.
"There is no real conflict of
interest, because Carole can't benefit personally from being on both
bodies," he said. "What concerned
us is that Senate itself can be a
full-time job, if you want to put a
lot into it. It would be hard for her
to do both jobs well."
Forsythe admitted she may
have to abstain from certain votes
in both bodies.
The Senate contemplates
mainly academic issues, whereas
council debates a broad spectrum
of student interests. Forsythe acknowledged the potential for
council to take positions on academic issues that could arise in
Senate.
"If it came down to a situation
where I had to take council's view
or my own view on a Senate vote, I
would abstain," she said, "and I
would do the same for AMS."
Neither Senate nor AMS
guidelines address the possibility
that one person might occupy both
positions. What constitutes a conflict would therefore be left to
Forsythe's own discretion.
Amin Janmohamed, who ran
for the pharmaceutical science
Senate seat, said the system is
inadequate.
"The Senate, as a body, has
more power than the AMS," he
said. "[Carole] has great influence
over what happens, and her position as VP introduces the possibility of a conflict.
"Even for the sake of a possibility," he added, "she should not
be able to sit on both bodies. I think
the guidelines should be changed.
It's veryimportantthat we make it
clear a candidate can only be eligible to run for one or the other."
Tina Louie, who ran for the
commerce Senate seat, saidhaving
the two positions would give
Forsythe additional insight. "She
would certainly have contact with
more people. I think it would make
her a better senator." r~"
Free
Spring Flowersf
(Bring this card and a friend
toS.'U.'B. between 11:30 ■ 1:30 pm
and you wifltach receive a potted narcissus.
Vakntint 's fair
Student Union 'Building
JeBnmry 12,13,14th.
Open from 9:00 a.m. until5:00 p.m.
(Limit aru pUau pa person uAU tvpplus lajtj
Classifieds 822-3977
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60 cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines
75 cents. (10% discount on 25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4.-O0p.m., two days before'
publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A7, 822-3977.
^++5k
*J
V////////////////////////////////7/////////////////A
V
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
The AMS is now accepting applications
for the position of Assistant Director of
Finance. Applications are available in
SUB Room 238. Any inquiries can be
directed to Bill Dobie in SUB Room 246,
822-2361 or Ranjit Bharaj, SUB room 258,
822-3973.
Applications are due in SUB Room
238 by Wednesday, February 19 at 4:00pm
'///////////////M^^
Z
J
Copy Right
The Alma Mater
Society of UB.C.
WINTER SESSION HOURS
EFFECTIVE JANUARY 6, 1992 - APRIL 5, 1992
MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8:00am - 8:00pm
8:00am - 6:00pm
12:00am-4:00pm
CLOSED
MIDTERM BREAK,
Thursday and Friday February 20 & 21   10:00am - 5:00pm
HOURS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
LOWER LEVEL - STUDENT UNION BUILDING
PHONE 228-4388       FAX 228-6093
d
05 - COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Feb. 8
Dean Patricia Marchak
Faculty of Arts, UBC
on
THE INTEGRATED CIRCUS: THE NEW
RIGHT
AND THE RESTRUCTURING OF
GLOBAL MARKETS
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15 pm.
10 • FOR SALE - Commercial
SPECIAL VALENTINES on sale to Feb 28
at Festive Fabrics, 3210 Dunbar at 16th.
This Vancouver Guild of Fabric Arts SHOW
and SALE features cards, silks, sculpture &
wall pieces. Open Thurs, Feb. 13 - 7:30 - 9 &
Mon-Satll-3. 736-1016.
11 - FOR SALE • Private
TIRED OF THE BUS? For $600 you could
be cruising in a 1977 Volks Rabbit, great
cond, fuel ignd. Denise 9 822-5274.
77 TOYOTA COROLLA. Excellent condition in and out. $950. 224-0776.
20 - HOUSING
ROOMMATE to share large 3 bdrm home.
UBC Area. Avail, till end of June. $500.
Views. Call Francois 228-8824.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Kerrisdale
house, $120 per mth, 261-6944.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LEARN FLUTE OR PIANO for fun & relaxation in your spare time or follow the
Royal Conservatory Program. 266-1096.
Between
SAILING INSTRUCTORS.
Sea Wing Sailing School is seeking candidates for the 1992 SpringC.Y.A. Instructor's
clinic. Successful candidates will be offered
emp. with Sea Wing. Call 669-0840.
INTERESTED IN RUNNING a business?
Student Sprinklers still has openings in B.C.
Last year our average manager made $7-
12K. For more info, call 944-6397.
ZALKO SPIRIT, 2660 W. 4th Ave. opening
B.C.R.P.A. aerobic inst course. Feb 13th,
job guaranteed. Call 736-0341.
• AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING *
DONT PANIC — ON CAMPUS
Don't waste your time running all over
town!
APA, MLA, theses, resumes ...
No problem. Miracles performed upon
request
Room 60, Student Union Building
Or phone: 822-5640
Mon-Thurs: 9 - 6; Fri: 9 - 5
H
35 - LOST
REWARD OFFERED for return of lost
Haida Beaver carving, about 1 1/2" tall, on
black leather string. Lost around UBC or
Spanish Banks. Please call Renee at 925-
1623 or 251-6172.
 70 - SERVICES	
CLOTHING ART— spruce up old jeans, t-
shirts, sweats et al. with hand-painted designs. Pick-up and delivery. Call Andrew L.
734-1787.
 80-TUTORING	
ESL/ENG 100Tutor, British trained, UBC
grad. Exp. Europe/Asia. Call Joanne 261-
7470.
PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING
Fast, accurate, reliable   .
Enhanced laser printing... 224-2678        «.
WEST END WORD PROCESSING/,
Desktop Publishing from $2/double spaced
page. Fast and reliable, IBM compatible.
Scanning and graphics too - typeset resume
& 10 copies $25. Phone/fax Michael - 683-
6340.
CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING.  Laser^
print. Fast Professional service. Excellent
results. $2/pg. Phone 224-7860. <
JEEVA'S OFFICE SERVICES
Special Student/Faculty Rates
($2.50 ds reports & thesis only)
876-5333 — 201 - 636 West Broadway
685-7303 — Harbour Centre Downtown
Visa & Mastercard accepted
WORD PROCESSING
$1.50 per page
Call 224-9197
85-TYPING
Deadline for submissions; for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm, for Friday's paper,
Wednesday at 330pm.
NO LATE SUBMISSIONS
WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon"- 12:30pm.
Friday, February 7th	
21       IRSA. Bzzr Grdn 4:30, Buch A200.
Pre-MedSociety. Gymnite,7-10pra,
U-Hill Secondary.
Ax\l/// INJURED IN
mJA  AN AUTO
Wfr ACCIDENT?
ICBC Personal
Injury Claims
Fee payable only on recovery of funds
DEREK D. WIENS
Barrister & Solicitor
731-3416
310 -1070 W. Broadway, Vancouver
Sat. & evening appointments
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years exp.,
WD Process/typing, APA/MLA, Thesis. Student rates. Dorothy, 228-8346.
WORD PROCESSING ON LASER
736-1517
Papers, theses, resumes
Also tables, charts & graphs
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. Bzzr Garden. 4-7 pm, SUB 215.
Student Counselling&ResouroesCtr.
Combatting Student Blues. Noon-
1:20pm, Brock 200.
Saturday, February 8th
2ndannualpubhcinterestlawconfer-
erK»%3oalition-Building". Panels: 1st
Nations: Reclaiming the Justice Epstein, Women in Unions • Domestic
Workers, Environmentalists & 1st
Nations: Natural Allies?, & Free
Trade: Ttmefccasecondlook? 9-4pm,
Speakers: Darlene Marzari, MLA &
Roealee Tizya, UnitedNativeNations.
Curtis Law.
Sunday, February 9th
HUlel/JewishStudents'Assn. Moudon
Laila (Israeli nightclub) light dinner
& traditional & contemporary Israeli
Music. 7pm, Hillel.
SongsofEarth & Heaven, Quartetfor
the End of Tune. Recital Hall, 2:30.
Pre-concert talk, 1:45.
Monday, February 10th
Pre-Law Club. Lecture/questions on
law & faculty w/ Prof. Marlee Kline.
Noon-l:30, Buch B230.
WORD PROCESSING - Fast, accurate,
competitive rates. 875-0807.
99 ■ PERSONALS w Jk
LOVE FOR SALE. *.^,
The Ubyssey is now accepting Valentine
messages for the Special Feb. 14th Valentine
Issue. Deadline is Feb. 12th. AVOID the
rush! Book your love now!	
Imaginus- the Valentine Show.
9:304:30 (M-F). SUB Concourse.      •— -*
Art Exhibit: Robert Goodall. 9:30-   * - *
4:30 (Mon-Fri). AMS Art Gallery.
Women grad studentssupportgroup.
Noon-l:30. Women StudentfsLounge
-Brock.
Student Counselling & Resources
Ctr. Notetaking. Noon-l:20pm,   <-j
Brock 200.
Tuesday, February 11th	
Inst of Asian Research, "Planning
for Hong rfbng's Future: The Role of
Port & Auport DeveL in this Strat-
egy."EdwamG.Pryor.Noon-2>Asian v—-
Ctr 604. 0
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Prayer mtg. 7:3Qam, SUB 211.
Drop-in support- Mature Women
Students. 1:30- 2:30 (TUes)orNoon-
l:30(Wed).  Women Student's  ^„_
Lounge-Brock.
Lesbian Survivors of the Mental
Unhealth Industry. Mtg, 7pm, SUB
130.
Black History Month. Video: *Sis- ,
ters in the Struggle." Noon, SUB ♦ -. ^
241K (Ubyssey Office).
GRADUATION
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate in May or November 1992 are requested to submit
Graduation application cards to the Registrar's Office by February 14, 1992 for
graduation in May, and August 14,1992 for graduation in November.
Spring graduation ceremonies will be held May 26-29. The fall ceremony is scheduled
forNovember26,1992. Further information regarding May 1992 graduation will be sent
by late March-early April to applicants.
PLEASE NOTE: EVERY STUDENT WHO EXPECTS TO GRADUATE MUST MAKE
APPUCATION BY THE GIVEN DEADUNES. STUDENTS WHO DO NOT APPLY
WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED FOR GRADUATION!
2/THE UBYSSEY
February 7,1992 NEWS
$220,000 computer heist hits bookstore
Suspect charged with fraud
by Jonathan Wong
Students who have recently
bought computer hardware may
want to check whether it is hot.
After an annual audit, the
UBC Bookstore has uncovered an
elaborate computer theft ring.
Campus RCMP jail cells are
teeming with hot hardware after
police seized 171 unsold computer
items worth more than $125,000.
The RCMP are still searching
- 7or missing computers and have a
complete list of serial numbers.
About $220,000 in computer goods
has been heisted.
John Melvin Hill, 34, of John
Hill and Associates, has been
charged with fraud.
- A UBC spokesperson said the
huge heist was made possible by a
"forged" signature.
"A fellow was representing
himself as a staff member for Campus Planning," bookstore director
Debbie Harvey said. "He was forging a signature on a requisition
cheque."
The computers never arrived
at Campus Planning.
Campus Planning had hired
Hill as a computer consultant and
paid him $4,000 for eight weeks to
help them buy computers.
Harvey said Hill had used the
signature of Robert Orth, a new
development manager for Campus
Planning.
"As atransaction, nothing was
wrong. At least it seemed so,"
Harvey said.
"Somehow [Hill] got his hands
on the account number and requisition checks.
"We're certainly taking a look
at our system," Harvey said. "To
my knowledge, this is the first time
it'sever happened. Fm calling other
bookstores and taking a look at
their systems."
1
'- *:
">*•  %
; V "- -
Constable Greg Bishop stands next to about $125,000 worth of computer hardware stolen from the UBC
Bookstore. Several computers police believe were sold at bargain prices are still missing,    ma chia-nien photo
Do you know about the Tat?
Northwestern BC river wilderness threatened
by Sharon Lindores
"Imagine the most spectacular place you've ever seen on the
planet. The Tatshenshini River is
that and more," Ric Careless, executive director of Tatshenshini
Wild, said.
The river, in the northwest
corner of BC, is the centre of a
large environmental controversy
in North America.
Geddes Resources, a Toronto-
based company, wants to mine
Windy Craggy Mountain, in the
heartland ofthe Tatshenshini wilderness. They have claim to the
mountain said to contain ten billion dollars worth of copper.
The Tat runs through the centre of three world-famous national
parks in Canada and US (Kluane
National Park, Wrangell-St. Elias,
Glacier Bay National Park). The
entire area is 9.3 million hectares
of which 931,500 hectares in BC
are unprotected.
"When the Tatshenshini is
preserved in BC it will complete
and link the largest international
wildlife reserve in the world,"
Careless said.
The area called "The Ice Age
Wilderness" is abundant with
wildlife and has survived in solitude for 10,000 years. Rafting began in 1976 and more than 200
rafters visit each year. Fishingand
hunting are also popular in the
Cof-Utf form
EUPHRATES:/(rutioey{tr<*t)!
ZkMS^'Z.I  Cja-mbia,
area.
Geddes Resources wants to
build a road and pipeline along the
river to mine the mountain. The
project will create 600jobsfor about
20 years and
will produce
30,000 tonnes
of sulphur-
rich copper
rock a day.
The original proposal
wasrejectedin
January 1990
by the BC
Mine Development Steering
Committee,
because it did
not ad
equately address the
problem of
acid rock
drainage.
Cabinet is now
considering
another
Geddes proposal.
TheTatis
257km long and over 1.6km at its
widest. Itflows by Mt. Fairweather,
BC's highest mountain (4,663m).
The area has the highest year-
round density of grizzly bears, dall
sheep, wolf, baldeagles and salmon
in the world. The largest non-polar
ice shield has glaciers everywhere,
right down to the waters edge. Here
you can see glaciers break into
icebergs.
"Thereis not anotherriver like
,n/DU5
Cftlc fete i-O
IMAC  Ofe-o
"glo-Sio (CM
yar\r,WAru,r^AWA&rHi
o
r"
fAlasKaZ/uk^/gf^
XoLUMNt"  Xs).
Coi-o^AIiO.
THE   WoftidbX    10  Ia/ilP PiiveRS
this on the earth," Careless said.
In December 1990, the International Union for Conservation of
Nature recommended it as a World
Heritage Site.
When the mining ends, Ge ddes
has proposed that buildings and
equipment be removed, natural
drainage be restored and reveg-
etation undertaken.
But environmental groups
claim the open pit mine road and
the 241.5km
slurry pipeline—which
transports
waste mixed
with water—
are dangerous and the
sulphuric
acid will
threaten the
water. "There
is the potential to poison
the entire
river, and
wildlife depend on it.
There is no
means of controlling acid
mine drainage; it has the
potential to
poison the
areafor 1,000
plus years."
Careless also saidit threatens acid
pollution in Canada and US.
Debby Ianson, a physics
Masters candidate at UBC, volunteers for The Canadian Parks and
Wilderness Society. "This is the
biggest issue for us now. It is a
world-class river with an incredibly diverse ecosystem.
"There is no comparison between the value there now and
what mining will do and stand to
gain. It will never be the same."
Ianson claims many people do not
know about the Tat.
The Geddes project needs approval in Canada and the US.
Tatshenshini Wild initiated
Tatshenshini International, consisting of 50 major environmental
organizations with five million
people in Canadaand the US. They
have launched the largest campaign: a speaking tour across
Canada and the US.
"It is critical for the public to
get out, let others know and to
urge the provincial government to
use their ability to put a hold on
it," Careless said.
"I am convinced that enough
public support will stop the Geddes
project and preserve the
Tatshenshini for all time."
The tour will include a slide
show and a presentation from Ken
Madsen, who has kayaked the
area. "People will see what's at
risk and what can be done," Careless said.
The speaking tour will be at
Robson Square Media Centre February 13, 7:30-9:30pm.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
The AMS is now accepting applications
for the Student Administrative Commission. Applications are available in room
238 of SUB. Any questions or queries can
be directed to Tim Lo or Caireen Hanert in
SUB Room 246 or 822-5466.
Applications are due by Wednesday, February 19 by 4:00 pm
SUB room 238.
OMBUBSPERSON
71ITIS1 Applications   for   the
T     ■ 1992/93 Position for the
the
Vj|Lf Ombudsperson at
^^^ AMS Obudsoffice are
now being accepted.
Applications are available at
room 238 of SUB and any
questions     can     be
directed to Jerry Olynyk
(822-4846). Applications
are due by February 11,
by 4:00pm in room 238
THIS
w
FACT OR FICTION
presented by
United Church Campus Ministry and
the Student Christian Movement
EVERY TUESDAY 1:30 - 2:30 pm
Feb. 11 Virgin Birth?
Feb. 18 Jesus Sinless or Human?
Feb. 25 Jesus'Followers: Called for What?
Mar. 3   Healings/Exorcisms
Mar. 10 Jesus vs. the Pharisees?
Mar. 17 Kingdom of God: What is it?
Mar. 24 Arrest Trial and Crucifixion
Mar. 31 Resurrection?
AN INTELLECTUAL AND
OPEN-MINDED INQUffiY
INTO THE PERSON OF JESUS
WHO WAS HE?
Tuesdays, Lutheran Campus Centre
1:30- 2:30 All Welcome
For information: call 224-3722
February 7,1992
THE UBYSSEY/3 THE 1991-92 UBYSSEY EDITORIAL ELECTIONS
DEADLINE
for posting position papers for editor is
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18.
 Late papers will not be aceepted. No exceptions!
FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 14th   £
Tickets at
A.U.S. Office BUCH A107
HURRY! TIX
GOING FAST!
WU u
OAZZMANIAN DEVILS
&T CECIL GREEN
Save on your favourites
LnJLnj
"Save over 35% on your
Delly favourites!"
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
SUB LOWER CONCOURSE
"T-
Boy 1 oamoca at
Ine regular price,
gel another For
em
Present this coupon when
ordering a Samosa and
you'll get a second Samosa
for 69*
VALID MON., FEB 10
TO FRI., APR 3,1992
LIMITED ONE COUPON PER
CUSTOMER PER VISIT.
NOT VAUD WITH ANY OTHER
OFFER. NO CASH VALUE.
EXPIRES APRIL 3,1992
Buy 1 damage Holl
at the regular price,
get another For
em
Present this coupon when
ordering a Sausage Roll and
you'll get a second Sausage
Roll for 69*
VALID MON., FEB 17
TO FRI., APR 3,1992
LIMITED ONE COUPON PER
CUSTOMER PER VISIT.
NOT VAUD WITH ANY OTHER
OFFER. NO CASH VALUE.
EXPIRES APRIL 3,1992
Buy 1 iSpinkn Pie
al ike regular price,
gel another for
99«
Present this coupon when
ordering a Spinich Pie and
you'll get a second Spinich
Pie for 69*
VALID MON., FEB 24
TO FRI., APR 3,1992
LIMITED ONE COUPON PER
CUSTOMER PER VISIT.
NOT VAUD WITH ANY OTHER
OFFER. NO CASH VALUE.
EXPIRES APRIL 3,1992
Buy 1 fresh ready
Sandwich al Ihe
regular [nice,
get a pop for
am
Present this coupon when
ordering afresh ready made
Sandwich and you'll get a
pop for50*
VAUD MON., MAR 2
TO FRI., APR 3,1992
LIMITED ONE COUPON PER
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Shadowy streets
byAnnaDupas
/V PTER directing the critically acclaimed Sex, Lies and Video
tape, then 26-year-old Steven Soderbergh Was hailed as a boy
wonder. Those anticipating an equally impressive follow-up might be
disappointed.
FILM
Kafka
now playing
ARTS
by Ben Levine
' PTER hearing so much about the emerg-
L ing grunge-rock sound from Seattle, due
to the success of Nirvana and Soundgarden, I was
curious to check out The; Screaming Trees, one of
the acts often associated with this scene!
CONCERT
The Screaming Trees
The Town Pump
January 28
Despite its potentially misleading title, Kafka is not a biographical account
ofthe writer's life. Instead, elements of fact and fiction are woven together; the
effect is that Franz is transported into the sinister world he created in his works.
Kafka (Jeremy Irons) is an intense, withdrawn man, enduring a dull existence
as a clerk at an insurance company. A loner by choice, his spare time ig^g^gywning
his writing skills.
He gets involved with a group of rebels who attempt to convince hi
society's most trusted and powerful members are engaged in an evil
conspiracy. They ask him to write some propaganda, but
denouncing them as "petty rebels,"
Kafka flatly refuses. He has no   	
intention of entangling himself in a    PXdXXXXX/Xdff^XdBy
web of danger for rebel s sadly
lacking a cause. Or so he believes.      ';■■■        'dXXXX'yyXdX:
I Until various events—including   ■;. ::
a gruesome murder by a loping, cXf
squealing, festering beast that
appears to have once been human—
convince him evil is indeed prowling
the shadowy streets of Prague. He
then launches a dangerous investigation.
Although Kafka offers an
interesting premise and a few
chilling moments, it fails to sustain
either suspense or my interest.
Nevertheless, it contains some
noteworthy features. X
The cinematography creates a
haunting, brooding depth which XJXtXyXdXXddXX::,
reflects the film's dark mood. :.-:dXXXXXiX':"":''"::i
. The acting was equally impressive— with one exception. Theresa
Russell, as a member of the under-.
ground, was jarringly inept. For a
film to be emotionally affecting, the     dXXXdXX
audience must pretend it is real. ::$XXX;yXddsd^dyd\yyyddyii
This temporary suspension of reality
is quickly shattered the. moment we
■witness Russell's clumsy attempts
at acting. Frustrating.
As the Trees began their set, I was surprised
by the abscence punk/metal riffs common to Nirvana
or the high-pitched screeches characteristic of Chris     i
Cornell of Spundgarden.
Instead the" audience was treated to the psychedelic barrage of sounds by the guitar and bass
players. Coupled with the music was the brilliant
voice of Mark Lanegan, whose chameleon voice mixed
both Jim Morrison-like drone with the fluidity of a choral
tenor.
Unfortunately, where their music
excelled their live performance flopped.
The one attempt at innovation, which
occurred at the end of the concert, was a swashbuckling sword fight between the bass and guitar
players. They smashed the necks of their instruments together, but even this was too reminiscent
of Sonic Youth to be of any creative merit. But at
least they tried.
The same cannot be said for lead singer
Lanegan. Although his voice remained flawless
throughout the show, he produced little stage excitement. His lack of enthusiasm lent the show a degree
dullness which was too much for the silly antics of the
circus-like guitar duo to overcome.
Perhaps the Trees should have taken notes from
the opening band, Babes in Toyland. Remember the
all-girls metal band from the '70s called Girlschool?
Well the Babes are louder, wilder, and better.
The trio from Minneapolis was the
highlight of the evening. The drummer's tribal
beats and the lead singers angry, intense voice
combined to produce an intoxicating sound.
The crowd responded with much more
enthusiasm than most opening acts beginning at 9:30pm ever receive. I highly
recommend catching this band the next
time they are in town. X
XdyXX':X^. XX:X As for The Screaming Trees, listening to
■■XX.X :::yy::yXX^ their album at home would surely
provide as much excitement as their live
performance.
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GSS Elections
The GSS Executive is composed of the directors of each GSS working committee.    Elections
will be held for the positions of :
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Secretary, 4) House Director, 5) Finance
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Nominations for the GSS Executive Committee
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Polling will take place February 24-28.
The Annual General Meeting will be held
March 27 at 5 pm.
For more information, contact the GSS Office at 822-3203.
Big Deal
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6200 University Boulevard
Tel 822-2665 Fax 822-8592
er      Offer available to UBC
faculty, staff and students at
the UBC Computer Shop.
Sale ends February 29,1992
We are open to serve you:
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Wed 8:30 am - 8:30 pm • Sat 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
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Dec. 311992
4/THE UBYSSEY
February 7,1992
February 7,1992
THE UBYSSEY/5 University Breeding
Criminals
Early Tuesday morning, as part ofthe Engineering Week festivities, some unidentified engineers stole the Rose Bowl Trophy from the University of Washington (UW).
This action crossed the fine line between
innocent fun and criminal negligence.
In the past, engineering pranks have been
just that: imaginative, funny, and intelligent
pranks. The annual placing of the Volkswagen
Beetle around Vancouver pays homage to the
ability of UBC engineering students to creatively
solve seemingly insurmountable problems, like
getting a car onto a clock tower or hanging it
under a bridge.
When these sorts of pranks are done, UBC
students can laugh at the humourous antics of
the engineers and the engineers can smile at
their ingenuity. The community at large cannot
take offense at these actions when the engineers
do work for charities putting their skills to work
helping others on campus and in our community.
However, the theft of the Rose Bowl trophy
implies engineers are thoughtless and uncaring
of how their actions affect others. Students may
recall two instances of engineer vandalism just
last year: destruction ofthe 'Artsmobile' in the
homecoming parade and ofthe mural on the AUS
office door—destroying the hard work of the
artist.
The engineers are just as unrepentant now as
then.
How much engineering ingenuity does it take
to smash open a trophy case and steal something?
Though the culprits have not been identified,
and no charges are pending, the theft was illegal
and wrong.
Readers should also note EUS president Adam
La Rusk's statement that the engineers who
stole the trophy would be safe as the others would
probably be silent. Is it the policy ofthe EUS to
condone mindless theft and vandalism?
Members ofthe UW community no doubt see
the humour of the theft, and no doubt see the
engineers as scholars of science and industry
rather than common criminals and fools.
UBC may have to do much to alleviate the
effects ofthe heist. Ensuring the engineers pay
for the damage and apologize to the University of
Washington is the first logical step and the administration is considering a special disciplinary
hearing. This is still far short of the criminal
charges that could have been laid.
Theft isn't funny, it's stupid.
the Ubyssey
February 7,1992
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the
Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is Room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
822-2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279
The Ubyssey is a founding member of
Canadian University Press
Rawly "Peskier" Peschiera needs a haircut. Carload
Maftechuk covets a bandaid for her ear and page one. Paul
"Dayboy" Dayson craves a change of clothes and a colour
analysis by fashion consultant Matthew Johnson, who
wears long Johns all year. Charming Lindores hankers for
a minimum wage job (in metric, please) and a colossal,
gooey, chewy rice krispie square. Cereal "Miami" Niamath
itches for more lace doilies for homemade valentines. Rick
Hiebert longs for a drum kit for quiet Friday nights. Paula
Wellings pines for a poetic psychotherapist and a ruby-red
fire truck. Ted Young-Ing stipulates a passion so great it
will occupy all his voids. Don Koo desires someone to chop
down the willow tree growing out of his forehead. Anna
Dupas requires a sinister conspiracy of hormonal proportions. Don Mah yearns for a ticket to Malaysia and a bike
tour ofthe Great Wall of China. Matthew Martin searches
for a drag queen date for Feb Fourteenth. Girma Jemal
thirsts for a magic trick solution because Ben Levine is
sawed in half. Jonathan Wong invents the answer to math
question number fifty-four. With aquatic life in her tub,
Effie Pow fancies more happy, happy, happy.
Editors
Paul Dayson • Sharon Lindores • Carta Maftechuk
Raul Peschiera • Effie Paw-
Photo Editor • Paul Gordon
f WHAT DOES AfA ENGLER
LooK LIKE?
6/THE UBYSSEY
Letters
Selective
correction
I would just like to point
out a couple things in Jennifer Vigano's otherwise
clear article "Clearcutting
has Alternatives" (Jan. 28).
The SELECTIVE logging you describe and advocate is otherwise known as
HIGH-GRADING, a destructive method used in the
cut-and-run era of logging.
Takingonlythebiggest trees
out of a forest at each harvest leaves a poor quality
forest behind. This is because the trees underneath
the taller trees are accustomed to the protection of
the overstory (taller trees)
from the sun and wind, and
often are slow-growing.
Taking all thebig, sheltering
trees out causes shock to the
understory, which doesn't
respond well, leaving a poor
quality forest. Also, the trees
that grow under a stand of
larger trees are often shade-
tolerant(i.e. they like shade),
and need the larger trees'
protection from the full sun
to grow best. The biggest
trees are usually shade-intolerant (i.e. they like sun)
on that site. If all the biggest
trees are taken out, the remaining understory will
likely stay stunted due to
shock and be more susceptible to windthrow, plus
there will be no shade-intolerant seed to provide
natural regeneration for the
next generation of big trees.
The SELECTION
method you meant to describe involves taking a full
range of tree sizes and ages
out of the forest, leaving a
full range behind. This
leaves a more diverse and
productive forest, with some
larger trees to provide both
a) protection for the
understory
b) good quality seed for
natural regeneration.
The seeds will have open
patches to grow in while the
understory will have some
protection.
For it to be ecologically
feasible, the selection
method requires a specific
type of uneven-aged forest
with a range of all sizes and
ages of trees, not every forest in B.C. has the required
range, along with this, site
conditions that won't be adversely affected by this
method are necessary. Factors to consider would be tree
species, soil, and slope
among many others.
For economic feasibility,
this system requires a market for all the wood removed
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edittefters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please brirg them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
to at least break even on the
cost of harvesting it. This is
based on a variety of factors
such as proximity to manufacturing plants and harvesting costs.
Ecologically and economically, selection logging
is a SITE-SPECIFIC
method, i.e. it can only be
done in certain situations,
based on the characteristics
ofthe site to be harvested.
Selection logging is one
alternative for B.C., not a
blanket prescription.
Chantal Blumel
Forestry 4
Software
cultures
In a letter (Ubyssey,
January 21), Cornelia
Boytinck wrote, in part:
someone like Gairdner has
to veil his racism with
phrases like "the core heritage and culture of this nation which is...," and "they
should be expected to assimilate...." ...On first grant
glance these expressions
may seem almost reasonable, but, consider again,
their racist implications are
hard to deny!
Well, before referring to
Dr. Gairdner's racism, Ms.
Boytinck should first establish that it exists. I don't
think it does. I don't think
taht the "racist implications"
exist either. If Ms. Boytinck
would be good
enough to say
what they are
and how she arrived at them I
would be grateful. But I don't
think she can do
it, because I can
tninkofaouple
of specific ex-
amplesin which
the quoted expressions do
NOT have racist implications.
As she thinks
about the problem, it may be
good for her to
ponder the following words
from the book
The Great
Reckoning, by
James
Davidson and
William Rees-
Mogg (Summit
Books, New
York, 1991):
"Culture has no
genetic or racial
component.
Human nature
is the same
everywhere...cultures are
like software programs. They
facilitate success of survival
in certain environments but
are dysfunctional in others."
(page 275)
Finally, I believe that
Dr. Gairdner's book, the
Trouble with Canada, is a
threat to the three established parties. Much of the
talk about his purported
racism may thus be just a
red herring, to divert attention away from what he really has to say. People who
want to know what he really
does say shouldread the book
themselves and not depend
on interpretations of others.
Robert R. Christian
Department of
Mathematics (Retired)
Ungrateful
distortion
Israel's apologists like
Dan Levitt (Perspective,
February 4) are fond of calling the UN's "Zionism =
racism" resolution a challenge to Israel's right to exist. This is an exceptionally
ungrateful distortion, given
the essential role that the
UN played in Israel's birth.
In reality, Resolution
3379 no more challenged
Israel's legitimacy than the
UN's anti-apartheid resolu
tions challenged South
Africa's right to exist.
Rather, it was directed
agai nst the exclusionary and
discriminatory practices of
Zionism, which deny full
national rights and freedoms
to Israel's non-Jewish citizens and cruelly restrict
where they may live and
work. Predictably, Mr.
Levitt chose to evade the real
issue, and did not offer a
single reason why we should
imagine that Zionism, as
embodied in the policies of
the Israeli government,
might not be racist.
The UN has an obligation to uphold international
law and respect for human
rights. How misguided it is,
then, of Mr. Levitt to complain that the UN recently
censured Israel for exiling
12 residents ofthe Occupied
Palestinian Territories,
when, as he admits, this
violated the Geneva Convention. He trots out the
label of "terrorists" as a
blanket excuse, a particularly nasty tactic since not
one of the 12 was charged
with personal involvement
in any attack on an Israeli,
and even their right to see
the "evidence" against them
was refused. But of course,
what evidence is required
when the condemned are
Palestinians? Racism indeed.
W. Mark Roberts
Graduate Studies
The following pec
THE 1991-92 UBYSSEY STAFF LIST
>ple have made three
or moie contributions to the
Ubyssey and are c
ligible to vote in the elections for Editors:
Sharlene Azam
Rebecca Bishop
Graham Cameron
Steven Chan
Terrie Chan
Martin Chester
Graham Cook
Franka Cordua-von Specht
Mike Couiy
Sage Davies
Greg Davis
Paul Dayson
Bill Denham
Jana Dionne
Frances Foran
Jan Forder
Yuri Fulmer
Michael Gazetas
Charlie Gillis
Paul Gordon
Sam Green
Anthony Grieco
Elai3ne Griffith
Rick Hiebert
Ted Young-Ing
Lucho van Isschot
Gerry Johnson
Matthew Johnson
YggyKing
Karlyn Koh
Yukie Kurahashi
Hao Li
Sharon Lindores
Robert MacDonald
Morgan Maenling
Carla Maftechuk
Don Mah
Nikola Marin
Andrew Mattel
Matthew Martin
Charles Nho
Cheryl Niamath
Mark Nielsen
Sara Parton
Tanya Paz
Raul Peschiera
Ellen Pond
Effie Pow
Helen Willoughby-Price
Nadene Rehnby
Dianne Rudolf
Martina Scarff
Paula Wellings
Johanna Wickie
Chung Wong
Victor Chew Wong
The following people have made two contributions to the Ubyssey and
are currently ineligible to vote in the elections for Editors:
Sky Anderson
Ellen Antoine
Laurel Bischoff
Sandy Budfal
Stephani Cameron
Jennifer Qiarbonneau
Mark Chester
Dawn Clements
AdrienneCopithome
Tim Crumley
Hiroshi Earle
Doug Ferris
Abby Fitch
Johanna Gislanson
Harald Gravelsins
KenHegan
GayJatsby
Girma Jemal
Suzanne Johnson
TabeJohnson
Lynne Jorgeson
Simon Knight
Wayne Kwan
Chris Lasko
Melissa Lemieux
Yau Soon Loo
BemiceMa
Michelle Mason
Patrick McLouglin
Joanne Nelson
Diya Nijhouse
Nigel Porter
Rose Anne Prokopetz
Nicole Sandinsky
Raj Sihota
Lisa Tench
Hamish Wilson
Karen Young
PhilZirkwitz
February 7,1992 OPINIONS
Reform debate
continues
Mr. Ian Weniger's letter of
January 17 contains a number of
inaccuracies, distortions, and ir-
relevancies. Ubyssey guidelines
don't allow me the space to analyze
the letter in detail, but because
some passages involve a point I
made in earlier letters to me personally, perhaps I can address
myself to these.
In his first paragraph Mr.
Weniger said that I claimed something that I did not claim. He made
the same mistake in his letter of
January 7.1 even pointed out the
error in my letter of January 14!
Can it be that Mr. Weniger doesn't
It is not often that one
is given a decent
reason to mix the
movements of night
and day into one
moment of perpetual
twilight. Do you
awaken in the middle
of the night and have
no one to talk to? Do
you have your deepest and most profound
thoughts as a mixed
up world slumbers in
motionless exhaustion?
If life is passing you
too quickly, too slowly,
too madly, it's time to
change.
Join The UBYSSEY
production Monday
and Thursday nights at
SUB 241K from
5:30pm to eternity.
Rejoice!
Never rest again!
know how to read very well?
Another repetition occurred
when Mr. Weniger said "the implications of defining Canadians as
white Europeans [sic]..." He also
wrote as if the Reform Party defines Canadians in this way. As
with Mr. Don Holmsten's similar
(and, I believe, bogus) claim that
such a definition appeared in The
Trouble With Canada, Td like some
proof, not just a dogmatic assertion.
Next: "Thirdly, you hold up
the paragon of womanhood. [Sic.}
REAL Women opposes publicly
funded childcare..." Here Mr.
Weniger combined a fabrication
with an irrelevancy. I in no way
suggested that REAL Women was
a paragon of womanhood. I merely
said that it contained some intelligent WOMEN who would AGREE
with certain remarks that Mr.
Weniger labelled as sexist. The
position of REAL Women on public
funding of childcare is here irrelevant.
Next, Mr. Weniger said "it is
your Reform Party pals who..."
Well, to the best of my knowledge
I have no such pals! [I hope that
Mr. Weniger will not take this as
an opportunity for further obfus-
cation.]
Finally: "...your rotten politics." Quite remarkable, considering that my letters didn't put forward any political position at all.
They were about evidence and
meaning (traditional concerns at
good universities), nothing else.
To repeat: Can it be that Mr.
Weniger doesn't know how to read
very well? Mr. Weniger can rant
and rave all he wants against the
Reform Party, but I wish that he
would (a) leave me out of it and (b)
stick to the truth.
Robert R. Christian
Department of Mathematics
(Retired)
UBC Student Counselling
& Resources Centre
Room 200, Brock Hall
Mon - Thu:    8:00am - 6:00pm
822-3811
Friday:        8:00am - 4:30pm
FEBRUARY WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
All workshops are from 12:30-1:20 p.m.
February 10
Notetaking
February 11
Stress Management #2 (Session 2 of 2)
General Strategies for Managing Stress
February 13
Interview Survival
February 14
Job Search Strategies
February 17
Overcoming Perfectionism
February 18
Resume Preparation
February 20
Overcoming Procrastination
February 24
Change Your Mind & Manage Stress
February 25
Developing Social Assertiveness
February 27
Skill Assessment for Career Direction
February 28
Reducing Test Anxiety
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February 12
Resume Preparation
February 19
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February 26
Time Management
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Friday February 28,1992 • 7:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m.
Saturday February 29,1992 • 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Fee: $20.00 per couple
The workshop is open to couples in which at least one partner is a registered UBC
student. Registration deadline: Feb. 21,1992
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February 7,1992
THE UBYSSEY/7 Stay In Barcelona
This Summer
With Prices That
Aren't Olympic
Watch Olympic athletes
compete  this  summer
and rest your own tired
muscles at a  Moorish
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NEWS
Atlantic students relying on food banks
HALIFAX(CUP>—Higher tuition
fees, dwindling loans and skyrocketing unemployment have
forced more students to seek their
daily bread from local food banks.
As a result, many student
councils in Atlantic Canadian universities are setting up ad hoc food
banks.
At Dalhousie University, the
mature students' society has already given the idea a test drive.
Society president Russ Pevlin
said the service was informal, but
its success demonstrated a need
for something more structured.
"Whatever food was dropped
off was picked up and used by
someone else," he said.
Beverly Johnson, Dalhousie's
black student advisor, said the
university's school of social work
or the sociology department should
consider setting up a programme.
The student council at St.
Francis Xavier University (St. FX)
in Antigonish is planning a permanent campus food bank.
"Since the number of students
seeking financial aid from [the
university] was increasing, and
there is only so much money to
give out, [we should] provide students with food," said Pierre
LeBlanc, a St. FX student councillor.
LeBlanc said the administration has agreed to refer students
seeking financial aid to the food
bank. Several students have already made inquiries about a
programme, he added.
Dianne Swinemar, the director of Halifax's Metro Food Bank,
said setting up more food banks for
students is not going to solve the
problem.
"Why don't some students
have enough money for food?"
asked Swinemar. "Is it due to substance abuse, the need for counselling, or lack of employment? When
we have answered these questions
then we can start to solve the
problem."
A survey conducted by the
Students' Union of Nova Scotia
revealed8.1 per cent of Nova Scotia
students did not work during the
summer of 1990, and onp third of
St. FX students reported working
either full-time or part-time hours
during the 1990-91 academic year.
Dalhousie and St. FX are not
isolated cases. Montreal's
Concordia University campus
chaplain distributes food stamps,
and the University of Alberta has
a food bank.
The Ubyssey women's caucus
will meet on Thurs, Feb. 13 at 12:30pm
to talk about the Women's issue.
SUB 241K
Bud Kanke, CA: President, Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd.
The restaurant business for many is an expensive
lesson in risk management. Not so for Bud Kanke.
In 1971, with a $900 savings balance, Bud and several
partners gave Vancouver diners the city's first upmarket
seafood experience. The Cannery.
Mulvaney's followed in 1975. Seafood with a dash
of Southern spice. Viva in 1979. A classic supper club. In
1984, The Ninth Ave. Fishmarket. Then Joe Fortes, in
1985. Seafood downtown style.
The menu grows. And now Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd.. with some 300 employees, reels in annual
sales of nearly $10 million.
Along the way, Bud Kanke has earned
the deserved reputation of a man with the skills
to transform the most modest opportunities into
prize catches.
He credits his CA for providing him the base to
develop his entrepreneurial strengths. "It gives me discipline ... going by instinct is one thing, but there's merit
in managing with good, sound numbers'.'
Bud Kanke. CA with a string of seafood restaurant
successes.
If you think a future in chartered accountancy
would serve your career ambitions, write the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher.
Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street. Vancouver. B.C. V6E 4E5
Telephone: (604)681-3264 Toll-free 1-8(10-663-2677
BudKankdsCA
helped him acquire
his taste in seafood
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMOkCASBORD
Unique Traditional Chini'-.r-
>    Cooking <>n Campus        .<•*
LICENSED PREMISES
10"., DISCOUNT
on c.tih pickup orders.
2112 Western Parkway
University Villa**?
228-9114   f—i'
HS    it
Computers
Furniture Scientific
Office Supplies    Audio Visual
UBC
SURPLUS
EQUIPMENT
SALE
Sunday February 9th
11:00 am-4:00 pm
2352 Health Sciences Mall
822-2813
Rock Bottom Prices
oosl*s*=
us
US   DISCOVER THE
*   COMPETITION
US   ' Colour Laser
Print..$1.95
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2nd FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-TH 8-9 FRI 8-6
SAT-SUN 11-6
You've read it!
Now write it!
Join The Ubyssey at
SUB 241k.
8/THE UBYSSEY
Februar ~  199:

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