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The Ubyssey May 10, 2011

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Array It's why I'm a little nuts right now SINCE 1918
Our first summer issue!
Read why on page 7. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2 011.0 5.10
May 10, 2011
summer volume xxviii, n°i
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
Managing print editor
Jonny Wakefield: printeditor@ubyssey.ca
Managing web editor
Arshy Mann: webeditor@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan.
news@ubyssey.ca
Art director
Geoff Lister: art@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITOR
Ginny Monaco: culture@ubysseyca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Taylor Loren: tloren@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Drake Fenton: sports@ubyssey.ca
FEATURES EDITOR
Brian Piatt :features@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubyssey.ca
Web Writer
Andrew Bates: abates@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubyssey.ca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubyssey.ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey.ca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubyssey.ca
Ad sales
Alex Ho opes: advertising@ubyssey,ca
CONTRIBUTORS
Andrew Hood Marie Vondracek
Jon Chiang Paul Bucci
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-_*■ qi *--■ University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing, video
production and more. • Sundays-
Fridays, 11am-5pm.
AMS SUMMER MARKETPLACE • The
AMS Summer Marketplace is
back! There will be plenty of
past favourites as well as great
new vendors. Stroll through the
SUB concourse and see what's
hot this summer. • May 10-31.
For more info check out ams.
ubc.ca
NOON YOGA $1 • Led by the UBC
Yoga Club—all skill levels are
welcome. Bring your own mat and
enjoy this invigorating session.
RSVP on the Facebook events
page. • Tuesdays, 12-lpm, UBC
Bookstore, $1.
UBC REC SPRING SHOPPING WEEK
• Spring is here and its time to
get out and get active. Shopping
Week allows you, the participant
an opportunity to try out any or all
of the over 30+ UBC REC yoga,
dance, pilates, health and martial
arts classes for FREE! Checkout
the new additions to the REC
instructional program including
Staff and Faculty focused lunch
hour and after work programs. •
May 14-20, Student Recreation
Centre, more info at rec.ubc.ca.
THURSDAY, MAY 12
ARTS CLUB THEATRE PRESENTS
HAIRSPRAY* Winner of 8 Tony
Awards! Amidst the doo-wop
and sock-hops of '60s Baltimore,
pleasantly plump Tracy Turn-
blad won't let popular Amber
Von Tussle squash her dream
of dancing on a local TV teen
variety show. Can a girl with
big dreams (and really big hair!)
change the world and win the
heart of heartthrob Link Larkin?
Welcome to the '60s! • May
12-Jul. 10, Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage, $29-$79, www.
artsclub.com.
SUNDAY MAY 15
SLUTWALKVANCOUVER* Founded on the occasion where a Toronto Police Services representative announced that women
could reduce their risk of sexual assault by not dressing like
"sluts." Join us for SlutWalk, to
make a unified statement about
sexual assault and victims' rights
and to demand respect for all.
• May 15, 1-4pm, on the Granville Strip.
TUESDAY, MAY 17
HOW DIGITAL ANATOMY HAS
CHANGED MEDICINE • Advances
in the field of medical imaging
have made it possible to look
inside the human body with a
precision that previously was
unavailable without surgical
exploration. Cafe Scientifique
explores how radiology is
changing medical practice. •
May 17, 6-7:3Opm, Cafe Perugia
in the Life Sciences Centre.
SODOKU BY KRAZYDAD
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C0MICMASTER BY MARIA CIRSTEA
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Island Express
Only taking one class?
Write for the Ubyssey.
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 2011.05.10/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITORS Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan»news@ubyssey.ca
Clark ready for Wednesday's by-election
ARSHY MANN
webeditor@ubyssey.ca
When the The Ubyssey went to
speak with BC Premier Christy
Clark in her campaign office, she
arrived talking about an issue
that is generally seen to favour
her NDP competitor, David Eby.
"I am in such a good mood today" she said before discussing
the prayer breakfast she' d just attended with homelessness activist Judy Graves.
"The thing abouthomelessness
is [that it's] a mental health and
addiction issue...in lots of cases.
In order for people to heal, the
first thing they have to have is
a roof over their head," she said
with an enthusiasm that few performers, let alone politicians,
can muster. "So we have to provide people with [that] without
conditions."
It's that seemingly relentless
positive attitude, even when
talking about issues that are
her opponent's bread and butter, that she hopes will appeal
to Vancouver-Point Grey voters
in tomorrow's by-election.
"What I'm now trying to do is
be candidate by morning, Premier by day maybe candidate
by lunchtime and then candidate by night again. And that's
the hard part."
While much of the coverage
of the by-election against David Eby has become a small-
scale referendum on an unelected Premier, the issues they talk
about while canvassing focus
on only one of BC's 85 ridings.
Transportation, as always, is
Christy Clark speaks to The Ubyssey at her campaign office. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
one of those issues. While Eby
argues that rapid transit along
the Broadway corridor could
lead to a Cambie-like disaster,
Clark feels differently.
"This community at UBC
needs that transit line. It's the
busiest transit destination anywhere in the province, so there's
a strong argument for making
it happen."
She however, agrees with
Eby that more consultation is
needed.
"We have time to consult and
we need to consult. We need to
make sure that the transit line
happens in a way that respects
the needs ofthe community and
I think we can do it differently
from the Cambie line."
On easing the student debt burden, Clark unequivocally pledged
to maintain the inflation cap on
tuition rates and said that she
was committed to reforming the
student loan program, but did
not provide any specific ways in
which she would do so.
"So [Minister of Advanced Education] Naomi Yamamoto is thinking about some of these issues,
how we can address in particular how the student aid program
works, because I've heard that a
lot from students," she said.
"We're not there yet for figuring it out, but we're committed to
trying to find an answer."
With regards to how the university endowment lands should be
governed, Clark made no specific mention of students, but said
she was consulting with property owners at UBC as well as the
University Neighbourhoods' Association, and wanted to ensure
that she represented their views.
Clark also maintained that the
UBC hospital, which Eby believes
should return to providing 24-
hour emergency care, should continue operating as is.
"I'm sure it was a really difficult decision.. .but I don't think it's
one that we can revisit. What we
need to be doing is figuring out
how to stretch every dollar as far
as we possibly can because we
have to get the maximum bang
for the buck."
More than just representing
Vancouver-Point Grey on the issues, Clark believes that she has
more in common with the neighbourhood than David Eby does.
"If the two of us were to imagine the perfect street we would
ever want to live on, for me it
would be in Point Grey" she said.
"And for him it probably wouldn't
be." U
Despite long odds, NDP's Eby isn't fazed
MICKI COWAN
news@ubyssey.ca
Meetyour Vancouver-Point Grey
NDP candidate—a community involved, thirty-threeyear old Law
Professor who spends his time
fighting AIDS and homelessness
when he's not singing and playing
guitar in his rock band, Ladner.
This is the self proclaimed "underdog" David Eby who chose
to go up against Christy Clark—
the Liberal candidate for Vancouver-Point Grey and BC's Premier.
Eby said that it was the candidate search committee who approached him and asked him to
run, in order to give voters a credible alternative to Clark.
"I think that one of the things
they were looking for is someone
who would be in the community
and be an advocate for the community but it wouldn't be yet another absentee MLA," he said.
Eby is concerned about Clark's
devotion to the riding, as she has
been neglecting local debates
against her opponents. She didn't
attend the all-candidates meeting
arranged by the Bayview Parent
Advisory Committee (PAC) May
4. He said that he and the NDP
would focus on topics such as the
environment and education—issues that he thinks Clark is not
devoted to.
"I think that this riding is very
environmentally conscious, and
the constituents that I've talked to have placed a huge importance on the environment—issues
of tankers off our coast, the En-
bridge pipeline bringing the tar
sands oil over to load up tankers
and ship it over to Asia," he said.
"They're concerned aboutthose
plans as not being reflective of
a sustainable future for BC, but
rather a significant environmental risk."
Aprofessor of Law at UBC, student debt is something Ifoy is well
acquainted with and while short
of specifics, he pledged the NDP
would keep tuition rates affordable while making reforms to the
student loan program.
Before becoming the executive
director for the BC Civil Liberties
Association, Eby worked for the
Pivot Legal Society on housing
issues in the DTES. He hopes to
bring some of that expertise to
the riding to combat homelessness in the community.
"This is a riding that's very affected by issues of homelessness,
although not many people think
that when they hear the name
Vancouver-Point Grey."
Eby is considered a longshot to
defeat the Premier, but a strong
result could be a stepping stone
in his rise in the party. "I think
I'm learning a lot while I'm out
there about how to do politics
and how not to do politics, and
I feel very confident about the
PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID EBY
approach that we've taken, which
is a grassroots, community based
approach compared to Christy's
approach," he said.
When asked if this election
was a test for Eby's larger future
within the party he was open-
minded about the idea.
"I do think I have a future in
Provincialpolitics, and I certainly
hope it's this election," he said. "If
not, then in the future." tl
NEWS BRIEFS
«5I
IMBlJ
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
UBC NAMED FIRST CANADIAN
"FAIR TRADE CAMPUS"
UBC has been declared Canada's first "Fair Trade Campus,"
just in time to celebrate International Fair Trade Day on May 14.
"There's a lot of interest in
Canada, and UBC just really
picked up the leadership and
ran with it," said Michael Zelmer, Director of Communications for Fairtrade Canada, an
arm ofthe international non-profit which designates products as
"FairTrade". The distinction only
applies to UBC and AMS entities, allowing private campus
franchises such as Starbucks
and Tim Horton's to use—or
not use—Fair Trade coffee on
their own accord.
STUDENTS FROMUBCTAKEN
DOWN IN LIBERAL COLLAPSE
Three UBC student candidates
that were running for the Liberals in long-shot ridings have all
lost, in a federal election which
the vast majority of Liberals
found to be equally unwinna-
ble. Kyle Warwick, Sangeeta
Lalli and Stewart McGillivray,
who were recruited by the Liberal Party to run in ridings where
local candidates could not be
found, all decisively lost.
Of the three, McGillivray fared
the best, with 4,110 votes in
Port Moody-Westwood-Port
Coquitlam, 23,071 less than reelected Conservative cabinet
minister James Moore. "Relative to the expectations going
in, I wasn't overly surprised,"
said McGillivray. "It was disappointing that we went down [in
this riding] compared to 2008,
but that happened across the
country."
SYRIA DETAINS UBC ALUMNI
The UBC Graduate School of
Journalism is calling for the release of reporter Dorothy Par-
vaz, who is being held in Syria.
Parvaz, a Canadian, American
and Iranian citizen, obtained her
undergraduate degree from the
University of British Columbia,
and went on to a successful career as a journalist at The Seattle Times, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Al Jazeera. The
UBC Graduate School of Journalism is urging the government
of Canada to do everything in its
power to bring Parvaz home to
her family in North Vancouver.
"When one journalist is attacked, we're all attacked," said
Prof. Peter W. Klein, who heads
the School of Journalism's International Reporting Program.
"All journalists feel the pain, but
so do all citizens of the world.
Reporters like Dorothy Parvaz
serve as critical eyes and ears
in these hotspots." 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2011.05.10
MOA a national landmark
Museum s resume grows with prestigious award
ANDREW HOOD
ahood@ubyssey.ca
The Museum of Anthropology
(MOA) is again being recognized
as an important part of Canadian architecture—this time making UBC's popular tourist and
student destination into a national landmark through the
Prix du XXe Siecle Award.
"We are so fortunate—here at
UBC, in Vancouver, in Canada—
to be able to share the beauty of
this building with visitors from
around the world," said Jennifer Webb, MOA's communications manager.
MOA was designed by architect Arthur Erickson and landscape architect Cornelia Oberlander and opened in 1976. The
exterior reflecting pool was added in September 2010 as per the
original design of the museum.
Erickson, an internationally renowned architect, was also behind the building design of Koerner Library at UBC, and the
original design of Simon Fraser University.
Gavin De West is a Vancouverite that has visited the museum dozens of times. He considers Erickson one of his architectural heroes. "The great thing
about this building is it justkind
of melts into the landscape. It's
a very open and airy place, yet
it's not huge. You can see everything in one visit, which is
great," he said.
"All the glass at the front is
stunning, I like how there is
hardly any stairs. It's a very accessible building. It's decorated in neutral tones and is sympathetic to the art it shows, as
there is a lot of colour in the
pieces here."
The Prix du XXe Siecle Award
was presented to the museum
by the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC), an organization devoted to highlighting the diverse range of inspirations and concepts in Canadian architecture as well as showcasing talented architects. The
award is given to buildings
Totem Poles in the Great Hall. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
completed between twenty-five
and fifty years ago, specifically
buildings that have established
themselves as important physical or cultural landmarks in
Canada.
This is not the first accolade
that the Museum has received.
In 1983 the Museum was awarded the Governor General's Medal in Architecture for outstanding architecture and the Museum was recently declared a
top tourist attraction by Tourism Canada.
UBC's downtown branch in
Robson Square also took home
the award this year, along with
the University of Regina's heating and cooling plant and the
Ottawa Train Station. Previous
recipients include SFU in Burnaby and Habitat '67 in Montreal.
"It is an honour to receive
such a prestigious award, and
a tribute to the vision of the
architects]," said Webb. "Together, they created a magnificent museum that is both respectful of its natural environment and expressive of truly
great West Coast style."
Sean Tynan, a recent UBC
graduate, visited the museum for his first time on Sunday. "There's that great main
entrance when you come in, it's
really fantastic it feels like a
great open space," he said.
Tynan was pleased to hear the
museum was being given national landmark status. "There's a
great symbolic connection in
displaying this as our shared
Canadian heritage, instead of
as just First Nations heritage,"
he said. "It's the history of BC
and the history of Canada. It's
good to see it." tl
Farm receives grant
ANDREW BATES
abates@ubyssey.ca
A grant for $39,000 dollars from
Vancity Credit Union will help
UBC Farm graduates get started
with their sustainable farming
careers—an occupation which is
greatly in need of newcomers to
battle the current aging and dwindling population of farmers.
"It is making sure that when
someone leaves the program, that
they've got somebody there to
talk to, to meet with, to broker
a new relationship, to set up a
new agreement," said Mark Bomford, program coordinator for the
UBC Farm.
"Right now there's a lot of opportunity out there, but..from our
graduates perspective, it's notpar-
ticularly publicized."
The farm's "Growing Farmers:
Feeding the City" program was announced as one of several recipients of grants from the Vancity's
EnviroFund program.
"The hope is that with the Van-
City money we'll actually have
the dedicated staff money to help
make those opportunities for our
graduates. Rightnowit's just limited at instruction."
The grant, according to Bomford, will fund a staff member,
described as a Partnerships Coordinator, to develop a network
and build relationships between
graduates of the Farm's Sowing
Seeds practicum program and
people who can help them embark on sustainable farming operations after graduation.
"[There are] a lot of fairly significant barriers when youleave the
program, the questions of 'Okay
what do we do next? Who's out
there to help us?' There are a lot
of questions that go unanswered
when it comes to finding land or
facilities or a space."
The funding is derived from
five per cent of the annual profits from Vancity EnviroVisa cards,
which are directed towards
specific environmental issues
based on a vote of cardholders.
"In 2010, the whole area of sustainable agriculture emerged as
the top issue," said Sidney Sawyer, community investment manager for Vancity.
"One ofthe focus areas we were
really concerned about was increasing the production and ensuring sustainable agriculture...
and I think the UBC project was
just seen as meeting both the priority areas for the fund."
The Farm is seeking matching funding from Environment
Canada to fund the program as
a full-time concern. "We wanted
to know whether this was going
to be more of an exploratory program...[or], a higher-impact long-
term program with some dedicated staff," Bomford said. "At the
end of the day what it would allow is a bit more continuity and
a longer time frame."
The funding announcement
will be known in June, and program setup would start at the end
ofthe growing season in November. According to the funding submission, the goal is to connect 35
new graduates, boost 15 new enterprises, and attract 5,000 participants in workshop programs
at the Farm by the end of 2012.
"Farmers are aging and dwindling," Bomford said. "Even if we
want to look at replacing the people who are currendy growing the
food in this province, we need to
begin looking towards urban populations." *U
YOUNG MPs
PAUL BUCCI GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
These new NDP MPs are your age and making $157,731 a year.
Check out what they were doing before taking a seat.
CHARMAINEBORG
Political science student;
LAURIN LIU
Second-year st
MYLENE FREEMAN
MATTHEW DUBE
PIERRE-LUC DUSSEAULT
pplied politics at
rmnor 3n mstor
Universite de Sherbrooke
McGill students
elected to parliament
HENRY GASS
McGill Daily
MONTREAL (CUP) - Three current McGill students and one recent McGill graduate were elected Members of Parliament in the
May 2 federal election.
The students, Charmaine
Borg, Matthew Dube, Mylene
Freeman and Laurin Liu, were
all NDP candidates in Quebec
ridings.
With 102 seats in the new Parliament, Jack Layton's NDP will
form the official Opposition to
Stephen Harper's Conservative
government, which won a majority with 167 seats.
The NDP nearly tripled their
number of seats in the election,
attributable in large part to an
upsurge in popularity in Quebec, where they captured 58 of
the province's 75 ridings.
The explosion in popularity
seems to have come at the expense ofthe Bloc, who slumped
to just four seats in Parliament,
all in Quebec. Bloc leader Gilles
Duceppe lost his own riding of
Laurier—Sainte-Marie to NDP
candidate Helene Laverdiere by
over ten per cent ofthe vote, and
has announced his resignation
as leader of the party.
Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff also lost his riding, Etobi-
coke—Lakeshore in Toronto, va 2 011.0 5.10/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/5
FLYING THE COOP
After up to five years of taking courses and trying for championships,
dozens of UBC's finest student-athletes end their varsity careers with
their graduation this month. We attempted to contact all of them to
get their plans, favourite moment and quote for a retrospective. Those
that replied have their "yearbook moment" online at ubyssey.ca/sports
We hope you enjoy.
MAX GORDICHUK   SHAWN HETHERINGTON     BLAIR BANN
Hometown: Kelowna, BC
Favourite Memory: Too many.
Plans: Real Estate Development.
Quote: "Here it is, here it Tiz,
Alright."
Hometown: Tsawwassen, BC
Favourite Memory: The excitement of playoffs, Storm
the Wall with the boys, athletic events/TAC parties and
the atmosphere of the varsity community
Plans: Baseball, grad school and travelling
Quote: "Don't worry, be happy."
Hometown: Edmonton, AB
Favourite Memory: Receiving the ball from
my 1000th career dig after my final match at
War Memorial Gym as a Thunderbird.
Plans: Join the national team and play
professionally overseas.
Quote: "People who are unable to motivate
themselves must be content with mediocrity,
no matter how impressive their other talents."
^J   UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS
ALPINE SKIING
ROWING
Meghan McLeod
Teena Schneider
Ben Millar
RUGBY
BASEBALL
Sonia Purewal
Brandon Kaye
Jennafer Wilson
MikeElias
SOCCER
BASKETBALL
Graeme Webber
Virginia Watson
Sebastian Crema
Devan Lisson
Caitlin Davie
Arianne Duchesne
Carmen Lindsay
GOLF
SOFTBALL
David Sheman
Jessica Barclay
Courtney O'Connor
CROSS COUNTRY/TRACK
Tanya McLean
& FIELD
SWIMMING
Nicola Evangelista
Shaun Stephens-Whale
Matt Pariselli
Brittany Imlach
Tara Ivanitz
Amelia Rajala
Hanna Pierse
Nigel Hole
VOLLEYBALL
FIELD HOCKEY
Blair Bann
Chris Robertson
Jennifer Hinze
Antoni Kindler
Lauren Whitehead
HOCKEY
Dalton
Pajak
Craig L
neker
Alisha
Choy
Melind
a Choy
Kirsten Mihalcheon 6/U BYSSEY. CA/S PORTS/2011.05.10
UBC takes a pass on the NCAA
Toope proposes structural reform of CIS with other presidents
DRAKE FENTON
sports@ubyssey.ca
After three years of uncertainty UBC has finally made a decisive decision about whether to
move from the CIS to the NCAA-
it won't.
The status-quo will remain
for the immediate future, but
when President Stephen Toope
announced the decision, he
made it quite clear that this was
no longer satisfactory.
"UBC has a proud history
within the CIS as both a founding member and successful competitor," he said. "But we need to
build upon this tradition because,
frankly the status quo is no longer acceptable. Therefore we commit, in affirming our membership, to drive change."
For the past five years the CIS
has been resistant to proposed reforms to its structure. UBC's athletic director Bob Philip has often
said that it would be in the best
interest of UBC's current and prospective athletes to shift its collegiate allegiance to the NCAA.
"A lot of times you see...student athletes from high school
are looking at the NCAA, and a
lot of them are going there," said
Philipin2011. "We just felt it was
time that somebody stepped up
in Canada and offered that opportunity to Canadian students."
Key issues that motivated the
proposal of a switch to the NCAA
were scholarship limitations for
student athletes and the ever increasing growth of CIS membership, which has created an unbalanced competitive field.
Bob Phillip looks on as Stephen Toope talks about the CIS. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Toope said that by staying in
the CIS, UBC will be able to spearhead a movement of change within the organization's structure.
"[With this decision] UBC is
committing to both honouring
and seeking to build upon the
tradition of Canadian Interuni-
versity Sport," he said.
By not joining the NCAA, UBC
has made a commitment to advocate for more flexible scholarship opportunities and restructure the CIS's athletic landscape.
UBC, along with other universities in the Canada West, is urging
a two-tiered system to be implemented by the 2012-13 academic
year, which would see conferences
created based on size, not region.
This proposition, though not
as controversial as the shift to
the NCAA, will provide its own
set of controversies. A two-tiered
system will effectively diminish
the opportunity for small-sized
schools to compete with the likes
of UBC and Alberta. Schools like
Trinity Western, who excel in only
a few sports, may not meet the
requirements to compete in the
CIS's top division. Thisyear Trinity defeated UBC in the CIS basketball semi-finals.
While many student-athletes
expressed disappointment over
Twitter when the announcement
was made, staying in the CIS also
has its share of support from T-
Bird athletes. Nathan Kanya, a
five-year player on the UBC football team, was elated about the
news.
"I'm happy we're staying" he
said. "We need CIS and Canadian
sports to get better, by moving to
the NCAA the ability to improve in
Canada will be halted. CIS sports
and Canadian athletes won't get
better if schools start leaving for
the NCAA.
"CIS athletics needs to improve on its own as an organization. A move to the NCAA will
just be crutch to improve athletic programs. Moving to the NCAA
would be letting down the CIS and
Canadian athletes."
Switching into the NCAA
would, to an extent, Americanize UBC's athletic identity. Staying in the CIS will allow UBC to
retain a Canadian identity but if
changes to the CIS structure are
not implemented, then the validity of this decision will remain in
question. As of now, nothing has
really changed for UBC's athletic department—as it has been for
the past three years, nothing has
occurred but talk. Only time will
tell how this talk will translate to
action. Until then, as it has been
for awhile, athletes and students
will just have to wait and see.
The first steps to changing the
status-quo will take place at the
CIS Annual General Meeting, to
be held June 6-9 in Victoria.
"UBC looks forward to discussing governance issues [at the CIS
AGM], and I anticipate playing an
even more active role in this organization," Toope said, tl
BIRD DROPPINGS
MEN'S BASEBALL
The no. 2 ranked men's baseball team won the 2011 NAIA
Western conference championship with a 13-8 win Saturday over the College of Idaho
Coyotes.
The win secured the 'Birds
an automatic berth into the 45-
team NAIA National Championship next week. Following
a 7-2 loss on Friday UBC was
offensively explosive in Saturday's winner-take-all game.
The T-Birds had four players contribute multiple RBTs
in the contest, with Andrew
Madsen leading UBC's offensive attack with three RBTs on
a pair of doubles.
GOLF
Both UBC golf teams secured
berths to the NAIA championships with victories at the All
conference tournament two
weeks ago in Victoria, Texas.
The men's four-man team finished six strokes ahead ofthe
University of Houston-Victoria
Jaguars and the Cal State Marcos Cougars with a 54-hole total of 910 (310-297-303). Going
into the final round UBC only
held a one stroke lead, but a
stellar two under par round of
70 by senior Andrew Robb was
enough to distance UBC from
its competition.
On the women's side, the
'Birds crushed the competition with a 628 team score,
39 strokes less than the second place University of Victoria. UBC managed to sweep the
individual podium, with Kylie
Barros finishing first (151), Haley Cameron second (157), and
Janelle Samoluk and Vanessa Leon tied for third (161). tl
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OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
YOUTH MATTERED, BUT WHAT DID IT MEAN?
There was no shortage of storylines that came
out ofthe federal election on May 2. Between Stephen Harper finally getting his majority the NDP
leaping forward into the official opposition, Elizabeth May winning her riding and the collapse
of both the Liberals and Bloc Quebecois, political
scientists and pundits will be talking about this
election for years.
But there was also no shortage of stories about
young voters and candidates. Most prominently,
five McGill students were elected to the NDP caucus
in Quebec. This was justly celebrated on campuses
across the country. There is no reason to think that
these students are any less able than many of the
MPs who normally get elected—indeed, the youngest
of them, 19-year-old Pierre-Luc Dusseault, already
speaks with more maturity and intelligence than
many of our "experienced" politicians do.
However, we should be careful about celebrating
this too much. Four of the students did not even
campaign in their own ridings, choosing to help
fellow candidate Thomas Mulcair instead. Another newly-elected Quebec NDP MP has never even
visited her riding and barely speaks French. The
election of these candidates is a sign that individual MPs are largely irrelevant in our political system; it's all about the leaders of the parties. Considering our democracy is built on local representation,
this should be of grave concern to all Canadians.
Meanwhile, CBC comedian Rick Mercer inspired
a series of "Vote Mobs" across Canadian campuses,
including one here at UBC. Media outlets responded by speculating whether the "youth vote" would
increase as a result. But as UBC Vote Mob co-organizer Alyssa Koehn acknowledges elsewhere on this
page, the more important goal was simply raising
awareness, not turnout.
All efforts to raise voter awareness among students are beneficial, and in that regard future Vote
Mobs should be encouraged. But it is doubtful that
the resulting Youtube videos will ever have the capability of broadly influencing youth across Canada. In fact, all Canadian youth need to do some
hard thinking about their role in our elections. A
torrent of Tweets and Facebook statuses from UBC
students on election night expressed apparently
genuine fear of what Harper will do with a majority. Ifyou were one ofthe people who called May 2
"a sad day for Canada," the real question is: what
are you going to do about it?
Social media activism does not swing elections.
700 people signed up on Facebook for the Vote
Mob, and just over 100 turned out. Elections are
ultimately won by the hard work of organizing for
political parties. This involves fundraising, door-
knocking, phone campaigns, and rallies. It's tough
trench work, but campaign organizers put a high
value on the energy and passion of youth volunteers, and rightly so.
If youth really want to make their presence felt
in the next election, the work starts now. tl
WHY WE'RE STICKING AROUND FOR THE SUMMER
What's this, you rhetorically ask? A May issue of
The Ubysseyl? Explain!
Happily. In past summers The Ubyssey would
take a collective three-month break. Editors found
summer jobs, email accounts filled up, and aside
from one or two editors doing some preparation
for the school year, our office would sit mostly empty. This was unfortunate for two main reasons.
First, news does not stop when exams end, self-
evident though that may be. This university goes
on, teeming with people and news, but without a
campus press. Second, by waiting until August to
start up, The Ubyssey has never had proper time
to really train incoming editors. Not only is September the busiest month on campus and the time
with the least number of volunteers; it's also when
editors have to learn how to do their jobs. Yes, it
was stressful.
But no more. For the next four months, we'll have
a smaller staff around the office putting out a summer edition of The Ubyssey every second Tuesday.
We'll also be expanding our web presence, as we
embrace the idea of doing slideshows, podcasts,
blogs and web-only exclusives like it's 2007.
So enjoy this issue, and the ones that follow it
this summer. We hope the work (and reporting) we
put in now will pay off in September. \3
RYAN HAAK ILLUSTRATION/THE MARTLET
OPINIONS
Koehn: Vote Mobs proved their worth
ALYSSA KOEHN
Contributor
The 41st Canadian election saw what
could only be described as a youth vote
phenomenon take place. Stemming
from one of his rants, Rick Mercer highlighted how student voters could scare
politicians by doing something so simple as taking to the polls, something
they never expect our demographic to
do. Students who wanted to see change
in federal politics picked up his message across the nation.
As the momentum was growing behind a grassroots youth campaign, a
group of five girls, including myself,
were inspired to bring the movement
to UBC. This was shortly after Queen's
had released a "Vote Mob" video that
sparked numerous other schools to
share a similar message.
Each of us thought that these Vote
Mobs were valuable for their ability to
inspire and engage young Canadians.
They connected with youth through
social media, something neither the
parties nor Elections Canada was effective at doing. We had a common aspiration that students should be a little louder this election.
Our Vote Mob had two main goals.
The first was to bring more UBC students out to the polls by reminding
them that our votes matter as much
as any other adults and that federal
elections are important. At the time
we had no idea how true that message
would be, with what was to be a tight
race in our own Vancouver Quadra
and a drastically different seat distribution across the nation.
The second and, in my opinion, more
important goal was to connect students
all across Canada to share a unanimous message to those vying for power. Our message was nonpartisan.
The drive behind the Vote Mob campaign was to encourage the parties to
inform students what their plans were
for the issues directly affecting us. We
wanted to be considered as an important target group.
While our Vote Mob turnout was
what we expected, with over a hundred people coming out to help craft
our video, I can't say if it had any affect
on those who were never planning to
vote. We've yet to see if the Vote Mob
movement made any significant impact to the number of youth voting
this election.
Whether or not it did, the youth vote
movement as a whole caught national
attention and I can't imagine a greater
success at our second goal. The collective student action forced itself into the
spotlight this election and, I believe,
changed the way that students will be
perceived in future elections. No matter if our numbers increased or not,
those of us who do vote have shown that
we are an active, engaged part of democracy and will make our voice heard
when it isn't being represented, va
McElroy: Can Toope become the CIS'saviour?
JUSTIN MCELROY
co ordinating@u byssey. ca
Leaders make decisions all the time
that people have to follow. That's the
easy part of being a leader, though.
Harder is making choices—choices
that effect people for years to come.
So it was for Stephen Toope last
month, when after a three-year consultation process, he finally had to
make a choice on whether to join the
NCAA or not.
Thathe chose to stay in the CIS was
a surprise to most of the media at the
press conference. In retrospect, it
shouldn't have been.
Choosing to stay in Canada was the
safe choice for UBC. The campus is divided. The ten-year window the NCAA
opened for international schools to
join isn't even half-way through. Despite years of public lobbying in support of moving by the Athletic department, those who were against the NCAA
three years ago were still against it
last month.
In rejecting the NCAA though, Toope
now faces a new set of challenges. For
three years UBC has flirted with the
NCAA, only to now go back into the
waiting arms ofthe CIS. But there was
a reason UBC was playing the field: the
relationship with the CIS had soured.
There were three main areas of contention. The first was governance ofthe
CIS, which, due to a one-member one-
vote system, had favoured the needs of
smaller schools. Second was competitiveness—as more and more bite-sized
campuses joined the CIS, UBC has increasingly been stuck playing games
where their athletes aren't challenged.
And third was the issue of scholarships,
where there has been an ideological resistance to supporting anything other
than tuition since the dawn of time.
At last month's press conference,
Toope proudly announced that negotiations on these issues had yielded results. By which he meant, there would
be motions to improve governance and
competitiveness at the next AGM, and
scholarships were still off the table.
But still, progress!
Toope has said that he isn't satisfied yet, and he will continue to work
with other likeminded presidents
to reform the CIS. But now that UBC
has announced they will stay in the
CIS fold, what leverage do they have?
They're a big school—but there are other big schools, mostly in Ontario, happy
with the status quo. They could threaten to leave—but they've already threatened to leave once. And what are the
consequences if UBC fails?
If the rumours are true and the NAIA
folds in the next fewyears, UBC will be
without a place for the baseball, soft-
ball, track and golf teams they have
poured millions of dollars into. If the
CIS remains static and full of uncompetitive games, UBC's hockey team will
continue to play to 95% empty seats at
Thunderbird Arena. If reforms aren't
made, staying in the CIS could well
mean the slow decline of UBC's athletic program. And reforming the CIS has
been historically tantamount to doing
synchronized swimming in quicksand.
Toope did not become President of
UBC five years ago with reforming Canadian university athletics as one of
his top priorities. But with his decision
to keep UBC in the CIS, it will become
part of his legacy—for better or worse, tl 

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