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The Ubyssey Nov 9, 1967

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Array THE UBYSSEY
/ol. XLIX, No. 22
VANCOUVER, B.C, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER, 9,  1967 -^^>iS
224-3916
r  1
IEE   RQAD    CLOSED
**&tit":'-'": '"'  ""/"''"'
— kurt hilger photo
YOU GOTTA BE KIDDING I! I've got to get into the stacks to write my anthropology 470 essay
and read the 36 books on the culture of crimson blorgs and do my studying and .... what
da ya mean—Road Closed ? ?
Shrum hum makes some glum
Ho hum.
Wires are still humming at the B.C: Hydro
sub-station located beside the UBC health services' new $1 million psychiatric unit.
Complaints were raised in October, 1966,
that a magnetic field around the sub-station
would interfere with psychiatrists' electrical
equipment.
It was also feared by health services that the
hum from the wires would be dangerous to
patients.
The unit is scheduled to open in July.
B.C. Hydro chairman Dr. Gordon Shrum
said in an interview that the station was in its
present position for years before health services
decided on a location for the psychiatric unit.
"The station was placed there at the direction
of the university," Shrum said. "We are prepared
to move the station if the university pays for
it."
Dr. Conrad Schwarz, consultant psychiatrist
to the health services centre, said such a move
would take 18 months and cost $3 million.
"B.C. Hydro assured health services the substation would be moved before work was started
on the unit," he said.
Dr. J. S. Tyhurst, head of the UBC department of psychiatry, could not be reached for
comment Wednesday.
Dow protest
_■ ___^__ir^r_ _■ _■ .'____//
ore
PERSKY
job sessions
Up to 400 UBC students are expected to join a sit-in demonstration against Dow Chemical Company of Canada next week.
To be held Tuesday to Thursday, the action will protest the
presence on campus of representatives of Dow for job interviews with graduating students.
Dow is a manufacturer of polystyrene) a component of
napalm used by the U.S. in Vietnam.
Leaders of the protest say it will be peaceful.
Their plans are for demonstrators to parade
outside the student placement office and to stage
a sit-in inside the building.
"We expect up to 400 persons to join in
during the day," said arts president Stan Persky, one of the organizers. "But we aren't going
to hinder anybody. We don't oppose the right of
of JDow to be on campus, nor anyone who wants
to talk to Dow."
"What we want to do is reach people's minds."
"We want to educate the public, enlighten the interviewer
and the students, and hold a workshop in communication and
non-violence," said Scott Lawrance, arts 4.
Engineering students are planning a protest against the
protest, Persky said.
Several representatives for the protest organizers attended
an engineering undergraduate meeting earlier this week, he said.
"We want to establish human relations with the engineers,
and to try to explain what we were protesting.
"The reaction wasn't encouraging. They didn't seem to take
the whole idea seriously."
Lynn Spraggs, engineering president, said Wednesday he
recognizes the right of students to protest against Dow, provided
they do not obstruct anybody.
A spokesman for the Dow office in Vancouver said students
were free to demonstrate, but that their grounds for protest
were weak.
"Dow of Canada is completely independent from the American company, and we do not manufacture polystyrene for
use in napalm," he said.
He pointed out that making of napalm components accounts
for only one-half of one per cent of Dow's production.
Persky said the Canadian Dow is wholly owned by its
U.S. parent.
Director of student services A. F. Shirran said he did not
know what action might be taken should entrance to the placement office be blocked.
"It is their right to demonstrate, but I hope students will
be mature enough to respect the rights of others," he said.
A meeting between faculty members and the organizers of
the demonstration was held Wednesday noon in Bu. 102.
Chaired by anthropology professor Bill Willmott, the meeting ended without formulating any faculty policy on the demonstration.
It was suggested a committee be formed to determine and
state the feelings of the faculty.
There will be another meeting today to further discuss the
issues concerned.
University RCMP could not say Wednesday what action
might be taken by police in the event of disorderly conduct or
if entrance to the interviews is impeded.
Meanwhile, 26 students at the University of Waterloo Wednesday protested recruiting by companies including Dow who
are selling war materials for possible use in Vietnam.
And at the University of Pennsylvania 100 sitting-in students
Wednesday disrupted job interviews being carried out by both
Dow and the Central Intelligence Agency.
Lest   we   forget
No, there won't be any classes Friday. The university
closes to observe Remembrance Day.
Memorial services will be held in the War Memorial
Gym Saturday, 10:30 a.m. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  1967
Ryerson latest to keep CUS
TORONTO (CUP)—Ryerson students Tuesday
voted 70 per cent in favor of retaining membership in the Canadian Union of Students.
They join two other university student
unions—Windsor and British Columbia—which
have endorsed CUS referendums this term.
Acadia is the only university to vote to withdraw from CUS.
The University of Toronto student council
voted to rescind a motion by last year's council
calling for a referendum on CUS, and the University of Western Ontario council defeated a motion
for withdrawal.
Ryerson council president Janet Weir termed
the referendum results surprisingly good.
"It's good to have the students behind us,"
she said.
Ryerson students were expected by many observers to vote for withdrawal.
In Ottawa the CUS secretariat was delighted
at the outcome.
CUS president Hugh Armstrong expressed
pleasure that the national union was endorsed
so overwhelmingly.
"This is a stunning victory for educational
reform," he said.
Since the September congress CUS field
workers have been hammering at the theme of
basic   educational  reform,  ■which  received  the
Vm..uh..we'll see
The board of governors made no decision
about a fulltime ambulance service at their meeting Tuesday.
Arnie Myers, director of information services,
said Wednesday a report on the ambulance compiled by head of medical services Dr. Archie
Johnson arrived too late for the meeting.
Next meeting of the board will be in January.
first priority after the Declaration of the Canadian Student.
But CUS referendums are not over. Armstrong announced Tuesday that he has received
several letters inquiring about CUS membership.
Prince of Wales College in Charlottetown,
P.E.I, has scheduled a referendum in the
spring; Nipissing College in North Bay, Ont.,
affiliated with Sudbury's Laurentian University,
is also considering a referendum on CUS.
Inquiries have also been received from several
Ontario community colleges, western institutes
of technology, and maritime colleges, Armstrong
said.
He said he is proudest of an application received from Rochdale College, a co-operative
free university in Toronto.
Rochdale has 30 students.
Teacup overflows;
aids sick children
The Children's Hospital is richer by $1,200
after this year's Teacup game.
Dr. H. P. Gunn, children's hospital administrator, said Monday the money would .be used
to purchase a new metabolic unit.
In thanking engineering, forestry, nursing
and home economics students who organized
the annual event last week, Gunn said donations
over 14 years total $15,000.
"After seeing the hospital, I realized what a
great need there was for all this," said engineering president Lynn Spraggs.
"I hope we can continue to make it bigger
and better."
Nurses and home economics students smashed pelvises and tibia practicing for a month be-
for the football game.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Defenders keep the faith
— kurt hilger photo
WITH BOWED HEAD and knitted brow, exam cram is in full
, swing. Home is a library corral until mid-term exam time is
'over and students can leave their hermitage.
Co-op   residence   by   fall,
predicts first veep Munton
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
UBC should have a co-op residence by next September.
By then, a co-op board of directors would be formed and a
suitable house purchased off campus by students, Alma Mater
Society first vice-president Don Munton said Wednesday.
"Our biggest problem is to find a house," Munton said.
"So far, real estate agents have not been much help."
"The residence would cost about $40,000," said Blaize
Horner, residence representative on  council.
Money to start the co-op would come from $20,000 left
over from a previous attempt to establish one at UBC, she
.aid. The balance would be paid off by a loan through the
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation.
Two more houses would quickly follow if the first proved
successful.
Council Monday approved a $500 loan to get a consultant
who would arrange financing with the CMHC and purchase a
louse.
Meanwhile, the committee on residences Wednesday approved using academic funds to help pay the capital costs of residences
when they are used for classes.
"If it's to be a full-fledged arrangement, the university
must pay part of the costs and not bill everything to housing,"
Munton said.
By JADE EDEN
Obscenity can be a justifiable literary technique, according to a former provincial revision
committee on secondary school English.
The committee resigned Friday after education minister Les Peterson decided to have a
story it had recommended revised to exclude
the words "fuck" and "shit."
The story, Defender of the Faith, by Philip
Roth, appears in the grade 12 English text
Story and Structure.
The committee's letter of resignation says in
part: "The words that are judged obscene and
therefore offensive in Defender of the Faith
are known to everyone. Their impropriety is
an aspect of the history of language.
"But in Defender of the Faith they are used,
not by the author, but by one of the characters
the author is trying to portray.
"Here the 'speak that I may see thee' technique required the author to use certain 'dirty'
words in order to show honestly what this character is like.
"When a literary artist seeks to render, as
accurately and clearly as he can — the insen-
sitivity, boorishness, and verbal impoverishment of an unsympathetic character, partly by
the language such a character habitually uses—
the writer is employing a justifiable literary
technique, and one found in the great literature
of all countries."
Roth has agreed to substitute a revision of
the story which omits the objectionable words.
The committee did not resign because its
authority has been questioned, but because "it
has simply been ignored."
Committee members say Peterson made public his decision to withdraw or alter the story
before he consulted them, indicating their only
responsibility was to endorse his decision.
"No committee can function as a rubber
stamp," said the letter of resignation.
-Vs.
''^fS*?*"<  .
Dr. Hare's arrival
delayed until May
UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare will
not assume his new duties this school year.
He will move from England in mid-
May, UBC director of information Arnie
Myers said Wednesday.
The delay is because Hare's successor
as master of Birkbeck College at the University of London cannot take over until
then.
Hare was originally expected to move
here early next year. Acting president
Walter Gage will continue as head of the
university until his arrival.
"It was as hard to replace Hare at Birkbeck as it was to replace former UBC
president John Macdonald with Hare,"
Myers said.
Asked about Hare's arriving in May,
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said: "It's earlier than I thought.
"You're not going to have a university
president coming in the middle of the academic year; it's not fair to him or the
acting president."
Myers said Hare would be here Jan.
25 for the opening of the B.C. legislature
and Mar. 30 for a speaking engagement
at the Vancouver institute.
A Ubyssey interview with Hare appears
today on pages 6 and 7.
Members of the committee are: Philip Penner, UBC associate professor of education; David
Macaree> UBC assistant professor of English;
Dr. Frank Bertram, UBC assistant professor of
education; Mabel Conibear, Esquimau senior
secondary English department head; Mrs. Anna
Cail, Vernon senior secondary school; Phyllis
Dover, Delbrook secondary school, North Vancouver; and Morley Gillander, Carson Graham
secondary school, North Vancouver.
Peterson says he does not intend to try to
persuade the committee to return. He is reported not to know whether or not a new committee
will be selected,
Taylor incensed;
quits over CUS
Law undergraduate president Jim Taylor
resigned Wednesday from student council over
its financial attitude toward the Canadian Union
of Students.
His resignation followed a Monday night
council decision not to pay an extra 10 cent CUS
membership fee at present.
(The CUS congress in September allowed
member universities a year's grace in paying
the fee hike of 10 cents per student.)
Taylor said he felt council had broken faith
with the CUS congress in not paying the 10
cents now, considering the degree of support
UBC gave CUS in the recent referendum.
Taylor, who was replaced by Dick Norton,
law 2, said he felt he couldn't accomplish anything for the Alma Mater Society.
"I don't like the present structure or operation," he said.
In a report to council, Taylor criticised the
AMS for over-working its members and for unequal student representation.
Much of council's business can be delegated to
committees to help distribute the work load,
he said.
They would be the present finance committee and new appointments, minutes, education
action and ad hoc programming committees.
Another committee would deal with the B.C.
Assembly of Students, Canadian Union of Students, and undergraduate societies.
Council presently must consider all items of
business, including subsidiary organizations,
meetings, minutes and appointments at its meeting each week.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said Wednesday the report was intended to spark discussion and won't go to council for formal discussion and a vote.
"It's just a start," Sullivan said. "But it
would take away much of the bureaucracy of
council, and that would be good."
Council should be restructured, he said.
Electing more representatives on a campus-
wide election, consolidating some of the smaller
undergraduate societies, and a bi-cameral council
are some of the changes being thought about
by council executives.
A bi-cameral council, he said, would have a
policy making body composed of members elected in campus-wide elections and a second subservient body of undergraduate presidents who
would handle essentially bureaucratic procedures.
Council now has 20 representatives of
undergraduate societies and student associations,
some with as few as 40 members and others
such as arts and education with 5,000 and 3,000
members respectively.
Council will make recommendations on restructuring in January, Sullivan added.
S_JL__is Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the"! university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23;  advertising, loc. 26. Telex  04-5224.
NOVEMBER 9, 1967
Horsefly House
With as much imagination as a crew of middle-
aged academics can muster, the university naming committee has suggested sources of names for the five new
residence clusters at Acadia Park. Their choices: either
B.C. historical figures or B.C. place-names.
The deans are right in line with a hardy tradition
of dullness in UBC naming policy. Most buildings, residences, and streets honor provincial towns or retired
academic administrators.
We're not impressed with this tradition. Of present
campus names, we prefer the more functional ones. We
are pleased, for example, with the name of our library:
Library. Also appealing is the name of the math building: Mathematics Building. Perhaps the new residences
could be called something like House, Living Quarter,
or even Residence.
But we are reminded of the corny old idea of a
university as part of a universal city of the intellect. We
kind of like that corny old definition, and think UBC
should consider itself a part of a world much wider than
the one that stops at the Rockies. We've got several
thousand years of scientists, poets — hell, even philosophers — to choose from in naming campus structures.
But despite these eccentric musings it is likely that
the deans, anxious to please the Social Credit hickocracy
in Victoria, will choose to label the new residences with
place-names from the hinterlands. If it must be so, we
urge the deans, let's at least make use of some of the
more delightful names our province has been blessed
with.
If we can't have a Plato's Palace, please give us a
Horsefly House.
###©#«#####*######««##«**#«##«$« **»oo4**&««*a««#
Remember
On Saturday we honor those who died in two world
wars.
It is — or should be — a day of remembrance and
of thought.
But, for too many, Remembrance Day has become
a meaningless "break before Christmas exams — just
another holiday.
It has also, for many, become merely a celebration
of the fact that in the two world wars we happened to
be on the winning side.
Remembrance Day deserves better than this. As
well as a day of memory and respect for those who died,
it must be a day of protest against all war.
And it should not be possible, on Saturday, to forget
that our ally to the south, once a staunch resister of
fascist aggression, has now become the world's chief
perpetrator of war.
We must remember, on Saturday, those who died
for freedom in the two world wars. But we must remember also those who are dying now in resistance to
the American attack on freedom in Asia and South
America.
Maple  Leaves
>9^(.vn
lock. £we, sin \^ \\\e
mud-its nofbnurie**
you lie dooon and voallouj
I »AS DOING TO WORK
FOR    DOW CHEMICAL.....
NOW THIS MMOt-SnUTIOH
IS COMING NEXT WEEK	
THEY SAY tlOW IS IMMORAL,
AND If.  CONSCIENCE SHOULD
STOP ME   ...   I DON'T
UNDERSTAND.
ALL MY LITE I'VE  GONE
TO SCHOOL SO  I  COULD
GET A  GOOD JOB AN»
LIVE TILL.
MY TEACHERS TOLD ME
HO*   SE'D .VON WARS  SO
I COULD LIVE THIS WAY,   \  €^
AND THAT I SHOULD  GROtf
UP AND APPRECIATE
SO  I'M A CHEMICAL
ENGINEER AND ALL
SET TO TAKE MY
PLACE IN SOCIETY.
WHERE HAVE  I
FAILED?
imMWWSMM:"::T:^- Fff^'^^fiPN^BO-^
Not yet
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish that your announcement (Nov. 2) that UBC will
have a new art gallery in two.
years -were true. Undoubtedly,
my enthusiasm for this project was misinterpreted by
your reporter, and represented as a fact. What he should
have said, I am sorry to say,
is that I hope we shall have a
new art gallery in the planning stage within two years.
This will be the last of the
buildings required to make up
the Norman MacKenzie Centre for the Fine Arts — a
building that is very much
needed on our campus, and
where we can expand our already excellent exhibition program now going on under
most adverse conditions in the
basement of the library. A
proper building for the university art gallery would enable us to enlarge and improve
our schedule of exhibitions,
and bring, I am sure, a good
deal of new interest and vitality to the life of the campus.
I welcome any participation
from both students and faculty
in our campaign to make the
new art gallery a reality.
B. C. BINNING
professor and head
dept. of fine arts
Pincher playboy
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would like to have one of
your papers with the pictures
out of Playboy. We were too
late getting Playboy and I am
curious as to how bad they
really are. It seems to me that
they make a to-do out of
nothing as a rule. I will send
the cost of same and postage
by return mail.
R. J. GRAHAM
Pincher Creek, Alberta
Mike  displeased
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I take violent exception to
the thesis propounded in a
letter from one Miss Sally
Coleman, published in your
erstwhile estimable journal.
This distortion of historical
fact is such a flagrant breach
of easily verifiable intrinsic
globularity that I am most indignant that you, sir, would
deign to print it without first
referring to a primary source
such as the original Arabic
translation of Virgil's immortal Aeneid (at line 5645).
Be assured that this matter
is not finished; if AMS council
does not demand a retraction,
there will be a petition for a
referendum as to campus opinion on it. Meanwhile, please
assuage my fury by cancelling
my compulsory subscription.
MIKE COLEMAN
law 3
TJ/
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would like to thank
Messrs. Uitdenbosch and Munton for coming to the gym to
speak on the pro's and con's
of pulling out of CUS. I would
also like to apologize to them
for having to cancel the talk
as there were very few students on hand to listen. Seems
nobody over here gives a
damn about the future of CUS
on this campus nor how their
money is spent.
I guess the PEUSS council
had better stick to putting on
dances and the like.
ERNIE "T.J." YACUB
president, PEUSS
'Don't  trip'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
There is undoubtedly still
some amount of LSD on
campus. I plead with all my
heart to those contemplating
taking it for the first time, not
to take it. I believe loneliness,
which is extremely common
among university students,
and therefore the thought that
one has nothing to lose, and
anticipation of the mystical
experience and perhaps the
thought that one's life may be
changed for the good, are the
major reasons that people contemplate taking LSD.
But life as it is naturally,
even though it has its drab
moments, is the best trip of
all. Sure, you may have a good
trip. But who knows the odds
for any given person? The
suicide rate among LSD trippers is three times as high as
that among non-trippers. In
case you don't want to have a
terrifying experience, to feel
what it is like to be nothing,
to have no soul, to feel the
devil coursing through your
veins, to walk with fear for
days and at times have almost
irresisitible   suicidal   compuls
ions,   don't   touch   the   damn
stuff.
Life is worth living.
OUT AND BACK
arts 5
Need  umbrella
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Concerning proposed trans
portation from parking lots tc
various buildings: three ques
tions deserve consideration
Firstly, will the cost of saic
transportation be met by the
user? Secondly, does one wis!
to get to classes more efficiently or avoid exercise and
fresh air which might be more
worthwhile? Finally, will time
be saved by waiting for the
proposed   transportation?
As the vehicle presently
exists, an umbrella would be
necessary on rainy days.
Should the proposal be taken
seriously?
J. M. OZARD
science S
'Highest  regard'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to deny that I ever
called Miss Kirsten Emmott a
"radical bitch" at the science
general meet or at any time.
I have nothing but the highest
regard for Miss Emmott.
JOHN TAYLOR
science 2
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Cray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo     Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports  Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Haire
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't.  City     Boni  Lee
Sadness lined the faces of even the
most cheerful. It might have been because he was feeling stuccoed-up, but
Irving Fetish cemented his relations
and was tried for mortor after the
Crown presented a concrete case.
Meanwhile sturdy scarlet scavengei
salesmen stormed straight south, simpering softly. A Scottish flag flapped
gently in the toronado. and Emizkiey
Scataligoniegysgky yodled in the back-
ground. From time to time he was hit
on the head with a grass hockey stick
by Mike Finlay or Steve Jackson, but
Jade Eden just threw trophies at him.
Paul Knox yawned in between bouts on
a bongo drum.
Norm Gidney, Hew Gwynne, Fred
Cawsey and Luanne Armstrong beat up
Lim Tse-Hsu. Irene Wasilewski was best
of the week. Mark DeCoursey woke up
quickly, and Jane Kennon collected
Cracker-Jack cartons. Richard Baer,
Judy Young, and Alexandra Volkoff
sharpened their teeth. Six people went
on a three-day drunk to Winnipeg to
learn how to make chocolate ants best
of all.
In the snooze-corner were Mike Fitzgerald, and John Twigg. Bob Banno
was erratic.
Lawrence Woodd, Bob Brown, George
Hollo and Chris Blake are all myths. Thursday, November 9, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Black power will triumph soon
predicts South African leader
Tsepo Tsediso Letlaka is a
member of the national executive committee of the outlawed
Pan Africanist Congress of
Azania (the African name for
South Africa).
He is a 40-year-old lawyer
who escaped from South Africa
in 1963, and has recently been
deported from Lesotho, a tiny
kingdom enclave within South
Africa.
He speaks today at noon in
Brock Lounge, and will speak
Friday night at 8:30 p.m. at
3258 West Thirteenth.
He was interviewed for The
Ubyssey by Gabor Mate:
Mate: Mr. Letlaka, why did
you escape from South Africa?
Letlaka: I am one of the
founding members of the Pan
Africanist Congress which was
outlawed in 1960. I had been
active in the underground
movement and I was close to
being arrested by the white
police. I went to Lesotho
where I practised law until
my recent deportation. The
government of Lesotho, however, is largely a puppet of
the South African government
and they had me deported a
few. months ago because of my
revolutionary activities towards South Africa and my
legal assistance to the opposition within Lesotho.
Mate: What is the Pan Africanist Congress?
_- Letlaka: The PAC is the
revolutionary organisation of
the oppressed people of Azania. It was formed in 1959 to
fight against oppression in our
country.
Mate: What is the nature of
this oppression?
Letlaka: The nature of the
oppression in South Africa is
one in which the oppressors
have arrogated to themselves
all political, military, and
economic power to the total
exclusion of the African people. They have stolen the lands
of the African people and they
have herded the entire African
population into small fragments of land amounting to a
mere twelve and a half per
cent of the land surface of the
country. They have attempted
to break up the African nation
into small groups along tribal
and ethnic lines, thus to divide
and better exploit the entire
population. The African people
have been transformed into a
vast source of cheap labor for
the white-owned mines, factories, and farms.
In all these industries the
people are poorly paid — in
the  mines  the  white  worker
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That's 46 cents per day, not
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Working conditions are deplorable, and in many cases the
blacks are forced to live in
mass compounds which they
are not permitted to leave
until after their contract expires. This often means a separation from their families for
long periods.  This practise  is
LETLAKA
causing the breakup of family
life among the Africans.
In order to control the
movement of the African labor
force the oppressors use the
system of passes which mean
the worker cannot freely move
from one part of the country
to another in order to sell his
labor in a free labor market.
This regimentation has the
further effect of lowering
wages. Examples of such oppression are endless.
Mate: You say the aim of
your Pan Africanist Congress
is the liberation of South
Africa. What exactly does this
mean?
Letlaka: We mean the liberation of South Africa from
white colonial domination and
imperialist exploitation, and
the creation of an African,
socialist, democratic state.
This doesn't mean that we
want to kill all the whites, but
the white rule must be over
thrown as a political force.
After liberation those whites
Who accept the right of the
majority to rule Azania will
be considered Africans and be
given equal rights in the state.
Mate: Has such violence already begun?
Letlaka: Yes, there have
been uprisings in places like
Paarl, Queenstown, and the
Transkei. In Queenstown, for
example, a peaceful crowd
was provoked into violence by
the brutality of the white
police. We have found that
revolutionary violence is the
only way to deal with the
brutality of the oppressors.
Mate: What, at the present
time, are the major tasks of
the Pan  Africanist  Congress?
Letlaka: The mobilisation
and the organisation of the
people, the organisation of
guerrilla units within the
country, and the creation of an
effective people's army to
smash the resistance of the
colonial oppressors to freedom
and independence.
Mate: How close are the
Azanian people to revolution?
Letlaka: Very close indeed.
Since the Positive Action Campaign, organised by PAC in
1960 as a series of peaceful
mass demonstrations, suppres-
ed by brutal force culminating
in the massacres of Sharpe-
ville, Langa, and Capetown,
the African people have completely abandoned the road of
peaceful transformation and
are taking the road of armed
struggle.
Mate: How long do you
think your struggle will take
to achieve victory?
Letlaka: The African people
have accepted the fact that
because of the military preparedness of the white colonialist
oppressors in Azania and because of the material support
which they get from Western
imperialist countries, the
struggle for liberation will be
a furious and protracted one.
Mate: What exactly do you
mean by "imperialism"?
Letlaka: We mean the economic exploitation of Azania by
international finance. At the
end of 1962, the total foreign
investment in Azania was $4,-
222 million, contributed in
large part by the U.K. (60 per
cent) and the U.S. (11 per cent).
The foreign companies derive
huge profits from South Africa because of the abundance
of resources and the cheap
labor market. Other foreign
investors are France, Japan,
and West Germany.
Male: Why and in what way
do these countries help the
South African government?
Letlaka: They do it of
course to protect their investments. Their aid to the apartheid regime is both economic
and military. In 1960, for example, as a result of the PAC
Positive Action Campaign
there was a mass flight of
capital from South Africa, and
the South African economy
was facing collapse. The American government buttressed
the economy by sending $52
million in 48 hours as direct
assistance to the Verwoerd
government. Militarily, the
colonialists receive aid from
Britain, France, and West Germany. Germany, for example,
is producing poison gas for the
South African government.
But the Azanian people will
not be cowed nor defeated by
poison gas or any other weapons of destruction, for in the
last analysis it is the revolutionary people with guns in
hand who will determine the
ultimate outcome of the
struggle.
Marble buffs
on the ball
A group of rehabilitation
medicine students are trying
to revive the game of marbles
at UBC.
Numbering six, the marble
buffs met in Rehab Medicine
409 Wednesday to form the
New UBC Marble Association.
"We consider marbles an intellectual activity — not a
sport," said association president Mel Barness, rehabilitation medicine 4.
Another club member, Jean-
ette Gravell, rehab, med. 3,
claimed she has the largest collection of cat's-eye marbles —
5,600 — in Canada.
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G-w Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  196!
INTERVIEW
Hare: the kid who got a degree
UBCs new president, meteorologist Kenneth Hare,
visited the campus last September. At one point during
his week-long visit he was accosted in his office (he
moves in next spring) by Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman, city editor Stuart Gray, and associate editor At
Birnie. Hare declined to sit in the president's swivel
chair, saying it wasn't his yet. Instead, UBC information
director Arnie Myers sat in the chair, wielding a tape
recorder. Following is what it recorded.
Part two of The Ubyssey's dialogue with President
Hare will appear next week.
Ubyssey: What is a university?
Hare: A university is the students and the professors, and there are houses in a certain number of
buildings,and they discuss three things.
They create new knowledge; I think that includes
creating new beauty too. I mean I don't agree with
those humanists who say that isn't scholarship — I
think it is.
Secondly, they disseminate it — both the students
and the staff disseminate the knowledge.
Thirdly, they store it. They have a library to remember it.
Ubyssey: That's a very broad definition. Does a
university have any one overriding purpose?
Hare: Very definitely. I'm sorry, this is going to
be broad too. I think the characteristic thing about
western civilization is that it is an intellectual civilization. I mean, it may have all sorts of flaws, but
it depends primarily on its intellectual content. It has
worked out that the set of institutions that bother
"I   went  to  college  for  job-getting  purposes."
about that and make sure that it goes on are the universities, and I think they've been altogether too
modest and also too sloppy about this. I think that
this is the kind of institution that leads into the
future. I'm sorry, that's still pretty damn broad.
Ubyssey: Former University of California president Clark Kerr discussed the merger that's going
on between society and the university — he said this
was a recent development. There are some people
who wonder whether the university can continue its
historic role as an independent critic of society if
this merger continues.
Hare: I think it perfectly well can. I don't want
you to think I'm a longhair because I use short words,
but a university is an open system or it isn't a university at all. It interacts with society at every level.
If it doesn't, I don't want to belong. I don't belong
in a monastery. I belong in a place that is open to the
four winds.
Now you say, can it be an effective critic. Well, of
course it can. The fact that a drama critic goes to
a play every night doesn't stop him from being a
pretty damn good critic. Some of the very best drama
critics are in fact excellent playwrights, and some of
them are actors. The point is — I think it's better to
"I remember boards of governors. — Canadian
boards of governors which really did try to
censor and interfere, but the boards I know, and
I'm sure this is true of the board here, now
interpret their role very much as trustees."
get your critical base derived from experience than
derived from sitting and contemplating.
Ubyssey: Could not this critical function be better
carried out if the university was autonomous — in
other words, if it wasn't governed by an alien body
that isn't part of the university community? I mean
the board of governors.
Hare: Well in the old days, when boards of governors really did interfere in the intellectual content,
instead of being trustees, I think this may have been
true. But boards of governors have changed. I don't
think you can criticize them in principle. I remember
boards of governors — Canadian boards of governors
— which really did try to censor and interfere, but
the boards I know, and I'm sure this is true of the
board here, now interpret their role very much more
as trustees. I wouldn't work for an institution where
this wasn't so. If I were starting from scratch I certainly wouldn't set up the government structure in
Canadian universities that we've got, but I think you
must have laymen in the university.
Ubyssey: You mentioned hostility. It seems to me
that if there is no hostility, no friction between a
university and society at large, then it can't be doing
its job as a critic. As a critic, it should be provoking
some sort of reaction.
"I was bullied and I was beaten around the head
by the other fellows."
Hare: I know Ubyssey editorials are like this,
they are abrasive and this is one theory of criticism.
I'm not criticising your writing, but I would write
them in a rather different fashion. I don't believe
that abrasiveness is necessary to criticism, but I
recognize that there is merit in the abrasive approach
at certain times. And although I shall hate like hell
when you criticise me and when you call me names
or something like that, I'm enough of a Voltairian
to say that I recognize that it is essential that this
happen if I'm to stay alive.
Now may I take again the drama as a case in point.
What is wrong with much dramatic criticism is that
it is abrasive in the wrong sense, because it's abrasive without any possibility of a reply. An actor can't
go out and write a play about the critics, or very few
of them can, and come back at them, and I don't
object to an abrasive dialogue between the universities and society, but I don't think it's necessary to
be abrasive. I know that there — obviously there is
a lot wrong with modern civilization, but I also know
that in very important sectors of it there has been
tremendous advance without in fact any breakdown
in reasonable cordiality, and I think it's possible for
a university to be — what shall I say? — critical of
society isn't quite the word I want, because the bit
of society that bothers us is the intellect. It is only
the intellectual thing that I'm concerned with at the
moment and having said that if I see, for example —
if I think that the plays being staged in the Canadian
theatres are rubbish, I won't say so as the university
president. It is not my business, but if there's a chap
in the English department that wants to say so, I'll
say three cheers. That kind of thing is O.K. with me.
Ubyssey: Why have universities thought it necessary to establish professional public relations departments?
Hare: I can tell you why I arranged to set up a
public relations consultantship at Birkbeck College.
I didn't know how to cope with the press. I think if
you set up a public relations office to put out a care-
fully worded story in order to try and influence
society to give you more money, that is a prostitution
"My university employs the same public relations consultant as Sveilana Stalin, by ihe way."
of the function of the university and of the public
relations man. But if you use the public relations man
to see to it that the press and the external sources
find out what they want to know and it is genuine and
honest, then I think it is a very good thing. My college employs the same public relations consultant as
Svetlana Stalin, by the way. We didn't know this
when we took them on.
Ubyssey: What sort of research should be done at
a university?
Hare: First and foremost, of course, two things.
The first one sounds like a chestnut because everybody says it, pure research. That is to say, the core
of understanding. New knowledge—new fundamental
knowledge without any regard to its application. Secondly — the word research is a bad word here because it doesn't cover the whole thing. It's just a loose
word and that is why I avoided it when I said what
the purposes of a university were. I think I said something about advancing knowledge — I think' the
second thing is — here I probably will be criticised
by the humanists, but I feel very strongly about it—
I believe that creation in the arts is overwhelmingly
superior to criticism. I believe that a humanities department, which concerns itself exclusively
with criticism and is not open to creative work in
its own field is missing a trick. I'm not saying that's
true in the B.C. departments, I literally don't know
any of them, but I do know it was true in some departments of McGill. It's certainly true in Britain.
Some of the arts departments think that their duty is
to be scientific about the past; in other words they act
as historians of art. I don't agree.
HARE a man of vision
I think that the second aspect of this is that tht
universities ought to concern themselves with ere
ative work in those art forms that are genuinely intellectual. I don't really think that all art forms are.
For example, music. Music faculties ought not just tc
be places where you learn to play and musicology
The third thing is, of course, development type
research. There are certain kinds of applied research
which are valuable to the university in its training
programs. You can't train people in computer science
— and I would like to see computer science done in
a university and not somewhere else, because it's
vital that this be done by the best people. You can't
do computer science training courses, master's degrees in computer science, unless you also have
people involved in making computers, in advancing
computers.
Ubyssey: Well, is there any difference between research projects that are done in, say, RCA Victor's
lab and the project that is done in that university.
Hare: Well, we don't work for the profit motive
In the long run RCA Victor do. And the best research
is done by people who have students.
Ubyssey: Why do you think students in Canada
go to university and do you think they go for right
reasons?
Hare: In many cases the answer is no, they don't.
I was dean of a very large faculty and I was on
excellent terms with the arts and sciences undergraduate society. They were a very fine bunch ol
"The  student  won't   get   anything   out  of   the
university unless he does it himself."
fellows. We asked ourselves this question, we went
all around the faculty asking what the motives
were. The first striking thing was that at least a
third of the students couldn't tell you why they
come, they literally could not articulate what the
reason was. Then there are people who identified
exclusively with job-getting functions. I think the
number that go for the very obvious reason that
they have an insatiable thirst for finding out about
things is very small and I think this is the real
reason for going to college. It's why I went. You
don't want my life history, but I came to college
in a most unusual way. It isn't a bad story. It illustrates some of the defects of the British educational system. I was at a British high school and I
was doing reasonably well. In fact, let's be honest
about it, I was doing very well. So I was pushed,
and I was three and one-half  years younger than Thursday, November 9,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
'A university is an open system or it isn't a university
at all. I don't belong in a monastery. I belong in a
place  that  is  open  to  the  four  winds.'
to get a job became a president
the average age groups and I was bullied and I was
beaten around the head by the other fellows, but I
didn't have too bad a time, but I got ill so I left
school when I was 13. I came from a very poor
family which didn't have the resources to do anything about this and it was never diagnosed. So I
was away from school for three years, and during
those years I took correspondence courses. I had
been almost ready to write the university entrance
examinations when I left at 13, but I sort of
blew up — physically, not mentally — and I then
did a correspondence course with people to whom
I've been grateful ever since. And I taught myslf
"If I were starling from scratch I certainly
wouldn't set up ihe government structure in ihe
Canadian universities that we've got."
to play the piano during those three years and
thank God I did because it's been my chief joy ever
since. And I just passed the university entrance
exams and I went to college when I was 16.
But I didn't go with the idea of getting a university education. I didn't think that was possible
-because I had no resources, I had no money and I
also had no scholarship and no possibility of getting
one because I hadn't been at school and in those
days you couldn't get a grant or a scholarship if
you weren't at school. So I was lent the money to
go to college for one year, but I passed and to my
astonishment I was then given the opportunity of
finishing the next two years by an old lady who
just lent me the money. I had become absolutely
fascinated by one of the disciplines that I was studying, which I had taken because it was necessary to
get the job. I went to college for job-getting purposes, in other words, a one year course, but one
x>f the subjects interested me a great deal and when
she offered to put me through two more years I did
honors in that subject and that's how I got started
and I didn't give a thought from then on on what
job I would get. Partly because it was the 1930's
and I thought there was going to be a war. I had no
thought actually that there would be any future.
It is hard for the present generation of — well,
for example, the activists, who object to the structure of society and so on, to understand. Well, if
they could go back to the 1930's, it was fundamentally different. Society was just as lousy from the
point of view of the — the slums were there, there
was   unemployment,   but   there  was   Hitler   and   it
"The failure rate in Canadian universities is
just disastrous."
was obvious there was going to be a war and none
of us thought that this was avoidable. We were
certain it was coming and it dominated everything,
so I took the course I wanted to take, on the basis
of eat, drink, and be merry, tomorrow we die, it was
as simple as that.
Ubyssey: There are a lot of students with absolutely no academic interest at all.
Hare: I know.
Ubyssey: Why do they come here?
Hare: God only knows. The financial problems
of the universities are very largely created by those
who come without real motivation. You see the
failure rate in Canadian universities is just dis-
sastrous and it isn't due to the stupidity or the lack
of ability of the people who come in, it is because
of the lack of motivation, or warped motivation.
The real point is that the student won't get anything out of the university unless he does it himself, and the thing that struck me so much about
the best students I've had is that every single one
of them was entirely self-sustained and self-propelled. They all say they got a lot out of what I did
for them and I don't agree. I think they would have
done just as well in any circumstances and on the
other hand, there are so many students who are
only dimly aware that — I think most of them
come to university for — because although they
haven't reasoned it out, they know that this is a
good thing to do, but what they haven't done is
articulate the reason. But all my good students,
without exception, have fully articulated reasons
for coming to college.
Ubyssey:  How do  you  think  a  university   can
encourage the right kind of people to go to university and discourage the wrong kind.
Hare: Well, it's a question of public education,
isn't it, and public criticism? I don't know how you
do this. I mean, in my feeble sort of way I try to
do it by never refusing an opportunity to make a
speech. I try to discourage people from allowing
a youngster to come to college, unless he knows
why he wants to come. That's one way of doing it.
I think that the student body can play an immense role in this and I think that the student newspaper can too by criticizing those who don't really
belong, and for God's sake, that's what student
apathy really is. Student apathy is essentially a
question of the students who just never did join
the university. They just can't.
Ubyssey: Do you think, then, that the faculty
plays a role in trying to encourage genuine intellectual activity?
Hare: Well, what's the faculty for if it doesn't?
Ubyssey: Do you think that in many cases the
faculty perhaps isn't encouraging the activity it
should be?
Hare: Well, I don't know the UBC faculty. I
know various individuals on it, some of my oldest
friends are here. But if you ask that question of
the whole academic profession, clearly the academic profession is built up of a very wide spectrum
of people.
There will be some who will be only interested
in   molecular  biology   or   something   of   this   kind,
"I  believe  that   creation   in  ihe  arts  is   overwhelmingly superior to criticism."
and you have to have molecular biologists. There
will be some who are equally interested in God or
in non-God or in pot or in whether it's addictive or
in subjects that are in popular debate of the day,
and they help to stir things up without a question.
There are some who are no good at their academic discipline but who spend all their time talking about other things than their academic discipline. There are very few of these, as a matter
of fact. I haven't found much irresponsibility in
the academic profession of that kind.
Maybe you'd find incompetent teaching. It took
me a long time before I convinced myself I could
teach. Maybe I'm wrong now, but at any rate there's
a lot of them that clearly don't make this test to
themselves.
But, it seems to me that if you say the faculty
is to do it, it really misses the point. The faculty
ought not to have to. This really is where the student body comes in.
I don't know whether you ever looked up Osbert
Sitwell's entry in "Who's Who." It's a famous one.
Under education it says: "In the vacations from
Eton."
I should have said that a university education
is to be had if everybody who belonged to the
academic community is informed and willing to
talk about not only their subject but other questions
that matter both to society and to the individual. I
mean, if a student comes along and asks me what
I think about God, I am not restrained from answering because I am not a theologian.
On the other hand, if I go over into the department of theology I expect to hear expert discussions
of this question. This is rather different. And there
are many subjects that are not in fact discussed in
any academic discipline that ought to be discussed
on a university campus.
Ubyssey: What are some of these?
Hare:   Well,   politics.   Political  science isn't   a
matter of politics, it's political institutions. Politics
ought to be discussed, religion ought to be discussed, morals ought to be discussed.
Ubyssey: There should be a social conscience?
Hare: Yes. I mean, this is what university communities do, in fact. It isn't their central objective.
The central objective, as I said before, is always
basically intellectual.
But you've got to keep the intellect alive. It
needs a bit of a spark and it gets sparked by this
kind of thing. For example, Walter Bagehot is a
great political theorist and basically a political
pragmatist. Well, Bagehot wrote The English Constitution after years and years and years and years of
nattering about politics to people and not by delving
into the classical writers on politics, but by talking
to other people every day for a great many years.
It's like making a lawn. You've heard the old
gag about the only way to make a British lawn is
to sow it, then roll it, then seed it, roll it, cut and
go on doing it for 400 years.
Well, you get to be a profound scholar by doing
the donkey work in the library or the lab hard, but
in many fields and politics is one of these (political
science is what it's called here, I believe, politics
it's called in London, or government), economics is
"The 18-year old is just a wee bit clueless when
he arrives . . ."
one, sociology is one, in which if you just try to get
a scholarship going solely on the basis of what you
do in the library or in the lab, you miss something,
because in fact a lot of it springs right out of being
aware of society itself.
Ubyssey: Back-tracking just a little bit, sir, frequent student criticism which is sometimes shared by
faculty members is that students are often strait-
jacketed by required courses well into their later
years at university. This is particularly true in the
arts faculty. Would you have any comment on this?
Hare: Yes, I have a long comment. I was a dean
of a faculty that had such a requirement.
There's two sides to it. On the left, clearly I believe in the maximum possible degree of freedom and
I really mean that, and I think that there is a positive benefit to be had from a lack of control. I am one
of those much despised people of liberal views, with
a small '1', who think that in fact you get the highest
energy response out of a maximum possible freedom
of exchange.
Well, that sounds like a lot of high-faluting nonsense but I didn't mean it like that. I just think that
it's good that the student should be free to pick as
many different subjects as he can.
But he is only in the university for three or four
years depending on where he is. The 17-year-old, the
18-year-old is just a wee bit clueless when he arrives
about the content of these disciplines. The way we
have set up our courses, perhaps wrongly, is that the
first year course is a survey course. It is easy for a
student in a completely free system to end up four
years later having taken nothing but survey courses,
in which there is no depth at all.
Now, I should have said that the crucial thing
about an under-graduate degree is that it develops
the critical faculty to distinguish between true and
false, black and white, right and wrong and so on. I
don't believe you get that way out of survey courses.
I think you have to go in depth into one discipline
or maybe two, certainly not more than two. If you're
going to find out how the true or false answers are
"Politics ought lo be discussed, religion ought lo
be discussed, morals ought lo be discussed."
got in one field, and I don't think it matters much
which you do and here I sound exactly like a British
civil service commission, whether you do this by
studying Virgil or complex numbers or nuclear physics or molecular biology or theology or what you
do it by, if you go sufficiently deep (let's say, now
I'm just a cow at a venture — not less than six
courses out of 22), into one discipline, you get
something out it.
And the regulations of good arts faculties — they
aim at that, don't they, then they set up a major,
and they aim at it because this principle is widely
admitted. But, then, if you do this, you usually put
other restrictions on.
For example, it's not the slightest use studying
French history without French, so if you study French
history then you've got to have a minor in French,
and so on. And this is done to protect the student
against ending up with a weak degree at the end of
it, but I'm sorry that it is necessary to do it, because
I would in principle much prefer him to have complete freedom. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1967
*    * i    <*"*>  *. **  *S *( *-
v *Ll^_   •*!»_.    l_
Microscope-eye view of eye surgery
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
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SHAKESPEARE'S
HUE FOR HOB
a dork comedy of innocence and corruption
with
Derek Ralston Peter Brockington
Barney O'Sullivan Shirley Broderick
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
November 17-25
I
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
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SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
.FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE,
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Med students  taught
advanced eye surgery
Eye surgery techniques have taken a leap forward with the
aid of a surgical microscope.
UBC medical students are being taught the latest eye surgery techniques using microscopes, campus opthamologist Dr.
Eric Smith said Wednesday.
"All eye surgery in the future will be performed with the
aid of a microscope, and automated machinery which will even
remove the instruments from the doctor's hands," he said.
Smith was the first Vancouver eye surgeon to use microscope
techniques to perform a cornea transplant in 1958 at Vancouver
General Hospital.
He said eye surgery is advancing rapidly to the micro-micro
level.
"We are coming to the limit of using our hands to handle
delicate instruments. In micro-surgery the human hand will have
to have something to help it."
The equipment would probably take the form of a machine
which reproduces on a much smaller scale the movements of a
surgeon's hands and fingers.
Microsurgery requires new techniques because the surgeon's
field of vision is decreased and he has no sense of visual depth,
Smith said.
But magnification allows the eye surgeon to perform precision work impossible with the naked eye.
It also allows the surgeon to put in more stitches to ensure
better wound closure and healing in cornea transplants and
cataract operations, he said.
Current eye surgery involves extensive use of microscopes
magnifying the human eye six to 25 times.
"When automated units are developed, the surgeon will be
able to present and control the automated machinery so that incisions will be smaller and other surgical procedures more accurate."
Smith will describe a modification of the glaucoma surgery
procedure that he developed to a medical conference Nov. 19 to 23
in Mexico.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
CUS PRESIDENT . . .
. . . ON RIGHTS
'Power is cold analysis and warm concern'
By ROD MANCHEE
OTTAWA (CUP) — Hugh
Armstrong, president of the
Canadian Union of Students,
thinks that students must develop "student power", like
negro civil rights groups'
"black power".
Student power involves the
concept that since students are
such an important group within the university community,
they should be intimately involved in the decision-making
structure of the university.
Armstrong also believes that
students are the most likely
agents for improving our society, for "they can combine
cold analysis (which is what
they're taught in university)
with warm concern. At the
same time they can, or at
least, should, honestly and
critically evaluate our society,
for they do not as yet have a
large vested interest in maintaining the status quo.
"The university should be a
moderately liberating environment since it is a place of
ideas, but most students are
not interested in our society—
they're interested in getting a
meal ticket to success. Therefore I think it's up to the student government and any other
student bodies to develop social awareness to facilitate
flow of information, freedom
and mobility," said Armstrong.
He defends his "anti-meal-
ticket" stand in this way:
"When you're in student government you have to start
thinking about things, which
is   certainly  not   true   in   our
present education. When you
consider the university and
really talk to people about it
you begin to realize how important social consciousness
and the university are."
Armstrong,  24,  worked  out
ARMSTRONG
his ideas on student involvement and action when he was
secretary and later president
of the Carleton students council. Last year he was the
president of the Ontario region of CUS, a position which
involved him in lobbying for
a student seat on University of
Western Ontario board of governors (unsuccessfully) and improvement of the student aid
plan (successfully).
CUS has endorsed a document, the Declaration of the
Student which expresses a lot
of  Armstrong's  philosophy  of
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education. "But," he says, "it
should also talk about Canada; our bi-national culture, our
other domestic issues, American economic domination, this
sort of thing."
At present the Declaration is
CUS's number one priority.
"Student councils should
make a copy available to
every student," says Armstrong.
"Our education system now
produces passive fact absorbers who are ready to accept
authority models. Education
should develop the full potential of all citizens as free,
creative individuals.
"This year we're working on
campus support projects to
implement the Declaration.
We'll do it by intercampus
activities like sending Barry
McPeake, council vice-president, to speak to frosh at
Waterloo, or by having local
campuses reassess their financial priorities, like allocating
funds to a frosh symposium at
Carleton, or any other programs to develop awareness.
"The list of priorities from
the CUS Congress is better
than we've had before. We've
cut off a lot of fat and got it
down to the really essential
material."
The main body of the resolutions deal with the quality of
education and related topics
such as student housing and
universal accessibility.
Two big questions in CUS
are who should control education — the federal or provincial authorities — and should
CUS adopt a syndicalist philosophy, like L'Union Generale
des Etudiants du Quebec, Quebec's student union.
Armstrong has been president of both a provincial and
a federal student union and
confesses that he is uncertain
as to where the final authority
should lie, although "local
groups should be left with a
great deal of latitude".
As for syndicalism, he says:
"It's the people on campus, not
the people in this office who
make up CUS, so I don't think
we can take a stand until more
people have an idea of what
syndicalism is."
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THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  1967
— kurt hilger photo
"OH WHY DO I live in Vancouver?" muses Lyn Worsley, arts 2.
"There has to be a place where it doesn't rain right through
the winter." Well, anyway, it helps with the studying, she
says after resigning herself to her immobility.
'Stone block beats
bell tower'—Blom
By PAUL KNOX
An associate professor of English says UBC's proposed bell
tower should have manual bells.
Thomas Blom said in an interview Wednesday the only
justification for a bell tower on campus would be instructional
value for music students.
"For a university so hard-pressed for funds as UBC to spend
money on the proposed tower would be of dubious value," he
said.
"The money would be better invested with the interest used
to bring travelling arts shows to the university."
The $100,000 tower, to be built in front of the main library,
is the gift of Leon Ladner, a former UBC governor.
When told the money had been earmarked for this purpose,
Blom said it would be in the best interests of the university
to decline the offer.
"We must show gratitude for the public-spiritedness of
people such as Mr. Ladner, but if we accept this offer, there's
no telling what we might have to accept in the future. We
shouldn't set a precedent."
Prof. B. C. Binning, head of UBC's fine arts department,
said in an interview that the question of necessity was irrelevant.
"Medieval cathedrals had bell towers and they didn't really
need them. A bell tower would make UBC a more pleasant,
and therefore a more practical place to work.
"The university also needs a focal point; a place to meet.
The bell tower would serve this purpose admirably."
Blom said the need for a "focal point" doesn't justify the
bell tower.
"A five-foot high block of stone on the library steps would
serve the same purpose."
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McGill libel charge
prompts sleep-in
MONTREAL (CUP) — More
than 200 students slept in at
the McGill University admin-
istraion building  Tuesday.
Students for a Democratic
University (SDU) chairman
Stan Gray, a lecturer in political science, says they will
stay there until charges
against three McGill Daily
student journalists are dropped entirely.
The Daily editor, supplement editor and a columnist
have been charged by the administration with "obscene libel".
Academic vice-iprincipal
Michael Oliver announced
Monday the charges have been
changed. The new charge still
retains the possibility of expulsion for the three, but
drops the obscene libel reference to the Healist magazine
story which the Daily carried
last Friday.
The article, reprinted from
the Realist, contained a fictional account of the events
following the assassination of
John Kennedy.
The reprinting resulted in
Daily staff members Peter Allnutt, Pierre Fournier and
John Fekete being called before the university's senate
committee on discipline to
reply to claims of publishing
an obscene libel.
The claims have now been
changed to conduct prejudicial
to the standards of the university.
The sit-in began Tuesday
afternoon after the senate discipline committee postponed
its trial of the three journalists
until Monday, Nov. 13, after
22 SDU protestors disrupted
the closed meeting demanding
it be conducted in public.
Several administrators, including Oliver and registrar
Carl McDougall, stayed in the
building all night, at one point
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locking themselves into a fifth
floor room.
The students, originally restricted to the first two floors,
soon took over all but the
fifth.
They brought in groceries
and stored them in several refrigerators throughout the
building, leaving administration food to rot on counters.
The sign outside the building proclaimed: "This is the
students' building, not the administration's."
Tuesday afternoon about
400 students outside the administration building watched
as about 40 students symbolically (burned their student identification cards — old ones.
New ones cost $5 to replace.
A four-page tabloid newspaper was distributed on the
campus Monday containing a
reprint of the offending article. A front-page statement
said: "This paper contains
obcene libel."
The tabloid contained the
signatures of 35 students. It
also printed lines from Chaucer containing four-letter obscenities.
The student's council has
voted to order the Daily to
print an official retraction of
the article.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
'School   is  where  we  learn  to   be  stupid
By DONALD ROSENBAUM
Special lo
Canadian University Press
This article appeared in PACE,
the high school supplement published by the Sir George Williams University paper, The
Georgian.
MONTREAL (CUP) — "To a
very great degree, school is a
place where children learn to
be stupid. A dismal thought,
but hard to escape.
"Infants are not stupid. Children of one, two, or even three
throw the whole of themselves
into everything they do. They
embrace life and devour it; it
is why they learn so fast, and
are such good company. List-
lessness, boredom, apathy —
these all come later. Children
come to school curious; but
within a few years, most of
that curiosity is dead, or at
least silent."
So runs John Holt's harsh
indictment of our school system.
Sociologist Paul Goodman
explains that "from 10 to 13
years, every young person is
obliged to sit the better part
of his day in a room almost
always too crowded, facing
front, doing lessons pre-de-
termined by a distant administration that have no relation
to his own intellectual, social
or animal interests, and not
much relation even to his
economic interests." The overcrowding precludes individuality or spontaneity, reduces
young to ciphers, and the
teacher to a martinet.
TEMPERMENT
While psychology recognizes
that we are all different in
temperament, interest and
learning ability, the system
continues to impose one curriculum and expect a standardized result. While kids would
really like to talk about Dylan
or Vietnam or the new 450
Honda, the teacher drones on
about algebra, trigonometry
and French grammar. Then,
three days before the exam,
everyone crams to pull
through. The result of all this
pain and anxiety is that three
days after the exam, no one
can remember anything useful.
The first mistake that the
Protestant board and other administrations make is to set up
curricula which seldom relate
to the students' interests, the
real world, or each other. This
is done in the name of efficiency, with the firm belief
that students must know certain facts about chemistry, history or inter - algebra. The
board protects itself by disciplining those students who
simply aren't interested in the
text-book material that is being presented.
NOT INTERESTED
There are two fatal errors
in this policy . . . Firstly, very
little useful learning will take
place if the students are not
interested. In fact, Holt, a
teacher himself, has said that
schools could well afford to
throw out most of what we
teach, because the children
throw out almost all of it anyway.
Secondly, there is no good
reason why Bob Dylan, Vietnam or anything from any
newspaper can not be a point
of departure for a free, unstructured and relevant educational experience about real
things —• politics, the hippie
phenomenon, sex, literature,
or the bias of the newspaper.
But instead of real learning,
we continue our blind allegiance to correct answers, text
books, lectures and exams.
Students are coerced into
'learning' by threat of failure,
or fear of being wrong. They
are motivated — not by curiosity or a real desire to learn
— but by marks, scholarships
and gold stars.
"Schools give every encouragement to producers," says
Holt, "the kids whose idea it
is to get 'right answers' by
any and all means. In a system that runs on 'right answers', they can hardly help
it. And these schools are often
very discouraging places for
thinkers."
Yet exams are still the standard. Finals, and particularly
matriculations, become the
goals to which the teachers
and the kids must apply themselves. But what kind of goals
are these? What is the point of
memorizing the material which
is recorded far more adequately in the library. The important thing is to know how
to use the library and to want
to.
DIALOGUE
Education, as it was originally conceived, was intended to
be a dialogue between teacher
and learner. Now, however,
teachers are used as tools of
the administration to administer pre-set courses of study
to students from their desks at
the front of the room.
The result is that students,
under pressure to do meaningless tasks which they hate,
will turn off in class and 'go
stupid'. "They deny their intelligence to their jailers, the
teachers, not so much to frustrate them but because they
have other more important
uses for it. Freedom to live
and to think about life for its
own sake is important and
even essential to a child. He
will only give so much time
and thought to what others
want him to do . . ."
The antecedent to Holt's
premise is found in public
school. Children enter grade
one when they are six years
old — full of energy, bursting with questions, ideas and
plans. They are very quickly
settled into nice, neat rows,
facing front, and are given
pencils, paper and their primary reader.
Psychology again tells us
that some have been ready to
read for two years, while
others are still so unsteady in
their sight that they can not
distinguish between a 'b' and
'd'. Nevertheless, each child is
expected to get up in class
and go through the humiliating and discouraging experience of trying to read the
first grade reader out loud to
the rest of the class.
PITIFUL
Similarly, while the child
may not be able to hold a
pencil steadily, he is expected
to write a little composition
about what he did oh the
weekend, using the few words
he can spell and compose in
sentences. The result is pitiful,
messy, and confusing for the
child. The teacher doesn't really want to know what he did
on the weekend or she would
have asked verbally, giving the
Child an opportunity to really
express himself.
Thus he quickly learns that
school has little to do with real
ideas, events, or self-expression. Rather, it is a place you
must go to five days a week
to do meaningless tasks to
please the teacher. And so the
curiosity, interest and vitality
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Composer and Recording Artist
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Tickets $2 to $4.50
From Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St. MU 3-3255
All Eatons stores, Townhouse Electronics in Kerrisdale
Town and Country Electronics in Richmond.
which   motivated   that    child
are sadly lost.
INHIBITED
Nor is high school much of
an improvement. Original
thought, self expression, and
creative activity are inhibited
overtly and by the sheer
weight of boring subject material.
There is a very real world
outside the narrow confines of
the classroom, full of joy,
tragedy, wit, change, originality, and real problems. Ten
thousand people die every day
from starvation, the world
spends $120 billion a year on
military defense, when we
know that there is no hope
of defense against the weapons
that have been developed; a
war is raging at this moment
in Vietnam, where thousands
die in a bloody, awful death
every week. These are the
realities that we all must
recognize and cope with. How
does a high school 'education'
prepare us for that?
NO STRINGS
The teachers who like to
think of themselves as 'progressive' point to the changes
that are slowly being made,
like   subject   promotion.   But
these changes are almost exclusively in methodology or
structure. What is far more
fundamental is that education
become — once again — a dialogue between teacher and
learner. The first prerequisite
of such a change would require the teacher to give up
his or her pedestal and sit informally—no strings attached
—'With the kids. This alone
would give any Protestant
school board supervisor ulcers.
The second change would
make it essential that students
and staff determine the subject material, instead of a
distant administration which
fails to understand and recognize that young people are an
integral part of the real world
with interests and needs of
their own.
Education should nurture
the curiosity with which we
were all born. It should stimulate a love of learning and
equip us to be able to learn
effectively on our own. It
should make us aware that we
are a part of a community, and
that our community and thousands like it make up the world.
It should equip us to cope
with change and finally, to
better that world. Page 12
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  1967
LACKS ART SENSE
Art show draws criticism
By FRED CAWSEY
Hogwash.  Crazy.  Perverted.
These are some student reactions to a display
showing at the UBC art gallery in the library
basement.
Exhibitions involved are Three Innocents,
with works by Winnifred Warters, Esther Rogat-
nick, and Hugh Calverly, and a display of drawings and watercolors by Eric Metcalfe and Maxwell Bates.
A check of an opinion sheet in the gallery
revealed some visitor dissatisfaction. Here are
some verbatim comments:
"Most paintings I found extremely irritating
to all my sense of art."
"Your (sic) crazy. This is real art you can
reckanize (sic). No more of that modernistic junk.
It is perverted."
"Unfair to grade three art class."
"What is the value in trying to express the
art of a four-year-old?"
"La La La La La."
In answer, curator Alvin Balkind said: "Maybe some people should re-evaluate their sense
of art.
"Too many people come to exhibitions with
pre-formed ideas about what art should be.
"Some people feel put down by artists and as
Food folks get barn
The latest addition to UBC's food services is
a barn.
The horticultural barn north of the new
forestry-agriculture building is being transformed
into a 148-seat snack bar at a cost of $67,600.
The barn, one of UBC's original buildings,
was built in 1917 at a cost of $5,000.
The department of music vacated the building this year to move into the Norman MacKenzie
Centre for Fine Arts.
a defense mechanism they become prejudiced
against anything which doesn't conform to their
opinions."
The innocents, or primitives, are artists whose
works display a powerful force though childlike
in scope and technique, he said.
"There is also a strong fantasy in their
works."
The display continues until Nov.  18.
We like it' but,
buses must stop
Chairman of the UBC board of governors
Nathan Nemetz is reported to be enthusiastic
about the student mini-bus.
Arnie Myers, director of information services, said Wednesday Nemetz has expressed
interest in continuing the service.
John Hunter, superintendent of physical
plant, is also enthusiastic about the project,
Myers said.
"I am trying to arrange a meeting with AMS
first vice-president Don Munton and Hunter
about the system," he said.
Munton said he has been approached by two
firms to sell a tractor for the system to UBC.
A Burnaby company is working on modifications of their tractor units and will be submitting further information soon.
"They have already sold one of these units
to the Pacific National Exhibition," Munton said.
The minibus system, meanwhile, stops operating today because no tractor has been found to
replace one that goes back to the Pacific National
Exhibition today.
The system has been operating along the
main mall during UBC rush hours to carry
students to and from B and C parking lots.
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IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED
Has Vacancies In 1968
in the following departments
MARKETING
(Sales, Merchandising and Operations)
Sfudents Graduating with
a B.Sc. or M.Sc. degree in:
1968
Engineering—all branches
Commerce
Arts (Economics)
Science (General)
Agriculture
1969
Nil
MANUFACTURING
(Refining)
Students Graduating with
a B.Sc. or M.Sc. degree in:
1968
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
1969
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
COMPUTER SERVICES
PRODUCING
(Production and Exploration)
Students Graduating with   Students Graduating with
a B.Sc. or M.Sc. degree in:    a B.Sc. or M.Sc. degree in:
1968
Engineering—all branches 1968
Engineering
Honours Maths
1969 Commerce
Honours Geology
Geophysics
Honours Physics
Geological Engineering
Engineering Physics
Honours Geology
Geophysics
1969
Nil
IN ADDITION, PERMANENT AND SUMMER VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS UNDERTAKING POSTGRADUATE
STUDIES IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND CHEMISTRY IN THE RESEARCH DEPARTMENT AT
SARNIA, AND IN THE PRODUCTION RESEARCH AND TECH NICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT IN CALGARY.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR REGULAR EMPLOYMENT ARE ALSO AVAILABLE IN THE CHEMICAL PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT.
Our Representative, MR. R. G. INGS, will be on the campus on
NOVEMBER 20th & 21st, 1967
to make interviewing appointments for students enrolled in the above courses
who are interested  in filling the advertised vacancies.
MR. INGS will be located in the Student Placement Office on the West Mall. Thursday, November 9,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 13
— fred cawsey photo
YES,  THAT'S   RIGHT.   He   is   raking   leaves.   Buildings   and
grounds workers work every day, in all weather and at any
job. What a way to spend the day.
Pennies from heaven?
Prospective preachers will ibe given aid again this year
through the Rockefeller brothers theological fellowship program.
The fellowships cover room, board, fees and personal living
allowance for one year.
They are available to male students under 31 considering
entering the Protestant ministry.
The grants are good for use at any accredited Canadian or
American theological college.
Interviews by a faculty committee will take place Tuesday
afternoon, in the physical plant conference room on West Mall.
Further information is available at math 222, or by phoning
?28-2721.
Press club offering
money  for  hacks
A $250 award for a second
or third year prospective woman journalist has been announced by the Vancouver
branch of the Canadian Women's press club.
Applicants may obtain forms
and more information from
the office of the dean of student affairs. Deadline for applications is Dec. 1.
saIes
MANAqEMENT
That's one  of many
exciting and  rewarding
careers in the field of
Administration with
Great-West Life.
Great-West Life
Will Be
On Campus
November 15, 16, 17
Arrange now to get the
full story and appointment with your Placement
Officer — and be sure
to get a copy of the
Great-West Life Careers
Booklet.
Groat-West Life
ftNCE   CC
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ASSURANCE    COMPANY
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* Go Go Girls
* Shaking With Good Bands
* Just Plain Having A Ball
YOU SHOULD GO TO THE
Kim of Clubs
^1275 SEYMOUR
THIS WEEK FEATURING THE STAGS
Phone MU  1-4010 for information & Reservations
PRINTS
PRINTS
PRINTS
Reproductions, etchings,
woodcuts, brass rubbing, silk
screens, etc.
THE
Print Centre
2760 W. Broadway
10%    student   discounts
on prints and framing
JUST OPENED
New Texaco Station
Govt.    Certified   Mechanics
Tom Beavington
Broadway   &  Alma 224-0616
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
224-4144
4393 W. 10th Ave.
CHEMCELL
will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
on
November 14 & 15
for
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
MASTERS OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Positions available at Edmonton, Alta., Drummondville and
and Montreal, Que.
For  literature  on  Chemceil,  job descriptions and  interview
appointment,  please visit your placement office.
THE CANADIAN
METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE
offers
professional careers to bachelor graduates in
PHYSICS & MATHEMATICS or PHYSICS
(GENERAL, MAJORS, AND HONOURS COURSES)
as
METEOROLOGISTS—(about 15 graduates required)
Successful candidates are enrolled, at full salary, in a 2 year
Master's degree course in Meteorology at McGill University,
the University of Toronto, or the University of Alberta (Edmonton).
and
METEOROLOGICAL OFFICERS
— (about 50 graduates required) —
Successful candidates are given a 9 month in-service training
program and then posted to the various civilian and National
Defence weather offices across Canada.
These opportunities offer competitive salaries, challenging
work and numerous employee benefits.
Interviews On Campus
November 15 & 16
Full details, applications and interview appointments
available at your Placement Office. Page 14
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, November 9, 1967
CROSS-CANADA   ROUNDUP
Revamp of tradition recommended
WATERLOO (CUP) — The
faculty at Univesity of Waterloo has suggested a new university council replace the traditional board of governors
as the supreme governing
body.
In a brief to a committee
studying university government, the faculty recommends
the new 32-member university
council be composed of seven
ex-offlcio members, two members appointed by the Ontario
government, nine members
from a new academic senate,
nine from the Kitchener-
Waterloo community, two students, and two faculty members.
The brief said such a composition would end the artificial division between academic and fiscal affairs.
The faculty brief also
recommended a new senate
consisting entirely of academics, excluding students and
newly-arrived faculty members. It would be required to
hear any submissions from
the student union.
Students sit
with faculty
TORONTO (CUP) — Students at York University's
Glendon College will have
members on the college's faculty council.
The council voted 25 to 3 to
include students in their meeting of Oct. 10. The decision
must now be ratified by the
York senate.
Student council will choose
the representatives this year
only. A committee has been
named to investigate methods
of choosing sudents in future.
b«m______________________________________________________________^^^^^^^^^^
Closed jock board
threatens UVic
council   structure
VICTORIA (CUP) — University of Victoria students'
council has threatened to withdraw from the university's
athletic board unless it votes
to open its meetings.
The council said in a motion all bodies whose decisions
affect students should be open,
so that "people who are affected by those decisions- may
have a chance to participate in
the discussions leading to those
decisions."
Council president Dave McLean said the action was application of policy towards
closed university meetings
adopted by the recent CUS
congress.
He said he was not in favor
of open meetings for all university decision-making boards,
and that each case should be
considered on its merits.
The council policy decision
will be presented to the next
meeting of the athletic board.
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
The university established
the committee last year. Three
students sit on this 22-man
committee.
So far it has received briefs
from the student union and
one private individual.
The faculty brief recommended beefing up of faculty
councils, more autonomy in
staff hiring and in planning a
curricula for the academic departments.
Foul co-ops foiled
LONDON  (CUP)  — Students attempting to set up cooperative houses here are running afoul of local authorities.
After hearing complaints
from a group of citizens, a
London city council committee told students from University of Western Ontario that
the use at a house on Canterbury Road as a co-operative
is a violation of the zoning bylaw.
The decision apparently
rests on the definition of a
family. And the by-law has
been interpreted to exclude
co-ops from areas designated
as residential single-family
zones.
Student council vice-presi1
dent Darragh Morgan said
they don't intend to appeal the
decision.
He says the student council
has dropped options it held
on three houses in the area,
all of which will come under
the same ruling.
He   feels   city   council   will
act one way or the other  to
ensure co-ops are outlawed.
Citizens who lodged the protest claim to be sympathetic to
the students in their housing
problems but are afraid their
property will devaluate if coops move into the area.
Report says Calgary
students need beds
CALGARY (CUP) — The
University of Calgary will require 1,753 more on-campus
beds for single and married
students within two years.
By 1978, the number will
have risen steadily to 6,402
places.
These figures are contained
in a draft report from Evan
Walker Consultants Ltd. to
the Alberta department of
public works.
UKIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE  BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED     |   ST.   ANSELM'S   ANGLICAN
11:10 a.m. Combined Centennial Service of
Thanksgiving and Remembrance at
University Hill United Church
"REMEMBRANCE AND RECONCILIATION"
Speaker: John F. Conway, M.A., Ph.D., Dept. of History, UBC
Les Chansonniers
i«l»«»»^.^-^^_»N_^_^_«»-_»«^»^»««»».1_»^^«__P>^^_»»«_P»*^^
LES CHANSONNIERS
—Claude Gauthier — Composer, Lyricist &
Performer
—Louise Forestier — Recording Artist
—Les Alexandrins — Luc & Lise Cousineau
—A French Variety Package of Outstanding
Singers
SPECIAL EVENTS - TUES., NOV. 14
BROCK LOUNGE - NOON
T\ylGGY,S
TRUE DISCOTHEQUE
IS NOW LOOKING  FOR
WAITRESS AND
JO-GO DANCERS
Opening Friday, Nov. 17
or   apply   795   Seymour
STAFF
Phone 683-9079
DR. LES. PULUS
speaks on
GROUP THERAPY &
MENTALLY DISTURBED
ADOLESCENTS
Tuesday   noon
AMS Council Chamber
Brock Hall
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE  DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
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SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
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pROCESSiNq
?
That's one  of many
exciting and  rewarding
careers in the field of
Administration with
Great-West Life.
Great-West Life
Will Be
On Campus
November 15, 16, 17
Arrange now to get the
full story and appointment with your Placement
Officer — and be sure
to get a copy of the
Great-West Life Careers
Booklet.
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANV
O-n
FUN WORKING
IN EUROPE
Jobs Abroad Guaranteed
BRUSSELS: The Int'l Student
Information Service, non-profit,
today announced that 1,000
GUARANTEED JOBS
ABROAD are available to
young people WA to 40, Year-
Round and Summer. The new
34 page JOBS ABROAD magazine is packed with on-the-spot-
photos, stories and information
about your JOB ABROAD.
Applications are enclosed.
LANGUAGE -CULTURE -FUN-
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send $1.00 AIRMAIL to: ISIS,
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Duty-Free Shopping!
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At this reduced price!
INTERNATIONAL
8 Branches
5700 University Blvd.
224-4391 Thursday, November 9,   1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page  15
—from the peak
Gee, I dunno chief — looks to me like it could get pretty ugly.
Seattle hosts model parliament
UiBC's model parliament will convene under
the stars in February.
The stars and stripes above Seattle Pacific
College, that is.
"The Free Methodist students at SPC want
to learn about the Canadian multi-party system
and democracy in action," said Oscar Johvikas,
parliamentary council president.
SPC invited UBC in September to hold the
annual mock parliament on the Seattle campus
so American students could witness the mechanism of Canadian government.
Fifty participants from UBC's four political
groups will bus across the border for the meeting.
"The last time SPC played host to our em
bryo politicians was four years ago," Johvikas
said.
"Five political groups took part with the
Liberals forming the government and the NDP
acting as official opposition."
Three Communist club members in the group
were allowed across the border only after parliamentary council posted a $25 bond on each of
them, he said.
"This year we're keeping our fingers crossed
so that we won't be required to do services for
Uncle Sam."
There are no Communist club members on the
council this year but an invitation to the club
has been issued.
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Sports, CIA, napalm, incite
week of US. demonstration
WASHINGTON (CUP-CPS)
— Students throughout the
United States last week sat-in,
demonstrated, and obstructed
for a variety of causes.
At Grambling College in
Louisiana more than 80 per
cent of the students struck the
school in protest against the
overemphasis on athletics
there. The strike is still under
way and a 12 man faculty
committee has been appointed
to mediate with the students.
The president of the student
union and the newspaper editor were suspended Monday
for their part in leading the
strike.
Students for a Democratic
Society had an active week,
protesting CIA recruiting at
the University of Maryland,
secret CIA financing of research at Columbia, Marine
recruiting at the University of
Iowa and classified research
at the University of Michigan.
At City College of New York
a student strike broke out
again as construction started
on a temporary building earl
ier   blocked   by   student   protestors.
The sit-in at the Maryland
engineering building Monday
delayed CIA recruiting for a
day or so, but had little other
effect. On Monday when a campus official read the Maryland
trespass act to the demonstrators, they dispersed.
In Iowa City, about 100 persons were arrested when three
school busses were used to
successfully block entrance to
the Iowa memorial union
where marine corps recruiting
was being carried out.
The Iowa incident, where
the local SDS president Bruce
Clark congratulated the police
on their conduct, was the first
time there was significant student violence in a demonstration.
One policeman was pushed
through a plate glass window
and a number of demonstrators received minor injuries
from right-wingers and athletes heckling and roughing up
the blockade.
The Handiest Book
On Campus
- especially at Christmas
BIRD CALLS
1967-!•«•
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Publications Office, Brock Hall
or UBC Bookstore
Pre-Sale Ticket Holders Must Claim Their
Books at Publications Office before Dec. 29 Page  16
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  1967
President
pressured
into quitting
■*.
— bob brown photo
ITS THAT TIME of the year when the dreary weather comes
to stay. Inhabitants of the area retreat to warm, comfortable
buildings but there are a hardy few who believe in staying
close to mother nature.
WINDSOR (CUP) — The
president of the University
of Windsor student council resigned Monday blam-
i n g academic pressures
and lack of co-operation
from council members for
the decision.
In explaining his resignation, Rick Wyszynski
said the patience of nonvoting council members
must be applauded since
they were forced to sit
through "the stubborn,
venomous, and unproductive barrages that cross
the council table weekly."
He was critical of council members who were
continually plotting the
demise of one of the council members. This was a
reference to council's lack
of unity and the feeling of
some members that Wyszynski was not running
council efficiently.
In referring to the academic pressures involved,
Wyszynski said, "I want to
get into an ivy league college. I don't care which
one, as long as it is ivy
league, and I need four A's
to get there."
He said he had already
fallen behind in his
courses and was not prepared to give full concentration either to student
council nor the course
load in the present situation.
ODTSSET GALLERY
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"WHEN UNICORN AND I WERE ONE"
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"POSSIBLY THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR!"
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
"DEFINITE CONTENDER FOR THE BEST FILM
OF THE YEARI'-Wendy Mitchner, Toronto Telegram
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HAGEN'S TRAVEL SERVICE LTD.
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2996 W. Broadway 736-5651
224-4391
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5700 Univ. Blvd. (on campus) Thursday, November 9,  1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 17
NO QUALMS ABOUT CONTRACT
Hopkins condones war lab
By BOB CHODOS
For Canadian University Press
BALTIMORE (CUP)—It is easy to confuse one
building with another at the Johns Hopkins
University here.
Georgian architecture — inspired by Home-
wood House, described in university publicity
as one of the finest Georgian buildings in
America—is  the keynote.
And, therefore, an innocent freshman, as yet
unfamiliar with the university, might wander
in through the front door of Barton Hall, located
on Wyman Quadrangle near the heart of the
campus.
But that is as far as he would get.
There is a guard just inside the front door
who stops anyone entering the building.
Free access to the labs inside is limited to
people with security clearances.
The building houses the Carlyle Barton
Laboratory, founded in 1942 and since 1956 part
of electrical engineering department.
It was opened in 1962; until then the laboratory had been off the campus.
There are three professors, 22 graduate students, and 11 other professional researchers working there, all of them on defense department or
national aeronautics and space administration
contracts.
One thing that is not secret is that the research being carried out in the laboratory is for
military ends.
A 1961 report says: "The research program of
the laboratory continues to be directed to those
aspects of science that may be applicable to air
force problems."
A special report issued to the administration
last year by laboratory director Dr. Ferdinand
Hamburger after someone had painted the word
SHAME on the building in large letters, describes one of the laboratory's contracts as including research in the area of components and
techniques for enhancement of the USAF capa
bility in electromagnetic warfare and theoretical studies and basic investigations of new and
novel physical phenomena for possible application in fulfilling future requirements in electromagnetic warfare.
Two versions of publications resulting from
laboratory research, one classified and one unclassified, will sometimes exist.
The university appears to have had few
qualms about setting up a laboratory devoted to
military research in the first place, or about
moving it to an air force sponsored building on
the campus  later on.
It is part of a network of $80 million in
defense department contracts at Johns Hopkins;
among other contracts is one related to biological
warfare research.
Hamburger is not worried about the ethical
aspect of what he is doing; he would consider
it "an abridgement of academic freedom" if
people could not do classified research if they
wished to.
This lack of concern extends to most Hopkins
students.
Hamburger believes the SHAME painters
were under the misapprehension that biological
warfare research went on inside Barton Hall
and that to deface a building with paint on a
capus as beautiful as this one shows intelligence
of a very low order.
Hopkins is by no means unique among American universities in conducting this sort of research; Stanford and Michigan have buildings
with similar security arrangements.
Because of historical and geographical circumstances however (Baltimore is only 40 miles
from Washington), it is a particularly bad case.
There have been signs in the last few years
that American students, from Berkeley to Pennsylvania, are no longer unconcerned about the
purposes of the university and the ends its
research facilities are made to serve.
ANDY WARHOL'S
THE CHELSEA GIRLS
TOUR DE FORCE
;   OF TECHNICAL
_   AND SEXUAL
INGENUITY'
-NATIONAL OBSERVER
"ONE OF THE MOST
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ANYONE ANYWHERE
HAS MADE!'
-NEWSWEEK
SPECIAL EVENTS  PRESENTATION
Nov. 70 — 7:30 & 7:30 — UBC AUDITORIUM
NOV. 14 — 7:30
Students $1.50 — Adults $2.00
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON ALL SPECIAL EVENTS
LISTEN TO TERRY DAVID MULLIGAN ON CKLG— RADIO 73
SUNDAY 12-4 MONDAY - FRIDAY 9-12
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Public Relations Committee
Students interested in working with on-campus and off-
campus publicity and higher education promotion are
invited to join the Public Relations Committee. People
are needed for the following projects:
—radio and newspaper liason
—poster painting
—content research for radio and television
programmes
—speakers bureau
—compilation of a weekly activities bulletin
for newspapers
—office organization and secretarial duties
Interested persons should contact Kim Campbell. 2nd
Vice-President in the Public Relations office, upstairs,
South Brock, or by leaving their names in AMS mailbox number S3.
FRI. & SAT.
ACTION
AT
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CIRCUS -
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1024 Davie - 8-1 A.M. Page 18
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  1967
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS   —
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS -
SUNDAYS   —'
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
*Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
BACK-T0-THE-
B00KS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If Yoo need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
us.
SPECIAL
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731-3021
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3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENSES
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STUDENTS!
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Do you realize that, if you accept
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your whole Automobile Insurance will
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The cost of avoiding this is nominal
Consult vour insurance agent
immediately!
Published as a Public Service by:
THE  VANCOUVER  INSURANCE
AGENTS' ASSOCIATION
LAST  GAME .
. . . OF SEASON
Bears invade Birds' nest
By  MIKE   FITZGERALD
That favorite old saying "a
helluva game" might aptly describe Saturday's upcoming
football match.
When the UBC Thunderbirds play the University of
Alberta Golden Bears that
afternoon, it will be a nothing
game for one team and an
everything game for the other.
And the other will cause, the
hell. See?
"Well, Alberta has already
won the league championship,"
said coach Frank Gnup, "and
we've won the league base-
mentship. This is going to
give us the incentive to beat
the top team in the west.
"Alberta is big and tough
and they've got a great defense."
Gnup said that a running
back named Cates is the man
to look for. They've also got
a defensive end who has had
a couple of tryouts with the
Edmonton Eskimos.
The Birds will stick with
the same offense and defense
that defeated Calgary on Nov.
4.
"When they start beating the
crap out of us, then we'll
change," said the cigar-smoking coach.
Kent Yaniw will again start
at quarterback as well as defensive back. He missed only
five or six plays in the Calgary
game.
Vic Iwata will be back after
missing the last few games.
So, then, it's the last game
of the season. Cheer if you
want, or jeer if you want.
But come.
— fred cawssy photo
"HEY, YOUR UNIFORM came out of the wash cleaner than
mine," said the tenacious, Thunderbird football player on the
right as he grappled with a teammate in during a practice
session. Birds play for real on Saturday whfen they meet
Alberta at 2 p.m. in Thunderbird Stadium.
ANNOUNCEMENT-
A.M.S. Charter Flight
to Europe
Next Summer
$295 or $375
To: Faculty and Students:
Arrangements have been made for two group flights to London. One leaves about May
13, 1968, the other about June 4, 1968, both returning Sept. 4, 1968. The price per
adult for the round trip flight on a regular scheduled airline will be $375.
The feasibility of a charter flight is under consideration. However, in the past there was
difficulty in filling a plane along with a high degree of slackness by the participants in
making their payments to the A.M.S. The possibility of a charter flight still remains and
to that end this letter is written. In order to attempt a charter I would require a definite
commitment by you in the form of a letter. Receipt of at least 170 commitments by Thurs.,
Nov. 23, 1967 would enable the charter flight committee to plan a charter flight for 180
persons by jet from Vancouver to London, leaving about June 7, 1968, returning Sept. 4,
1968 with the price per person of $295.
With the possibility of this low price I urge you to decide now, and if you decide to take
the charter flight please write me a letter as per the conditions above. If this charter
flight is arranged then you will be required to pay the initial deposit of $100 at the
date of application and final payment due Feb. 1, 1968.
For any further information please contact me by phoning the A.M.S. Office or writing to:
KEN GLASNER,
Charter Flight Director,
A.M.S. Office, Brock Hall,
University  of  British  Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Thursday, November 9, 1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 19
Campus hosts cross country
If you can believe it, the biggest and the best
is getting bigger and better.
The mammoth 20th Annual Pacific Northwest Cross Country Meet, sponsored by UBC,
will take place Saturday on campus.
Looking at the number of entries is enough
to exhaust one. Nine clubs and numerous independents, making a total of 400 runners, are
expected to compete.
"But surprisingly enough," says Lionel Pugh,
UBC track and field coach, "the main event will
be the women's open.
"Five teams are in this year: Seattle Falcons,
headed by Doris Brown, a member of the
American Olympic team, Seattle Angels, Soap
Lake Eagles, Richmond Track and Field Club,
and Vancouver Olympic Club. This has got to
be the premier event on the coast this year."
Besides the women's open, there'll be the
senior men's race. This will cover 5V_ miles
over roads, lanes and a golf course.
Five teams are also entered in this. VOC
is the favorite, but bunched up behind will be
University of Washington, Seattle Pacific College, Simon Fraser, and of course UBC.
The junior men's event is next.
"This should be a cinch for UBC," said Pugh,
"because we have a fine team. A slightly weak
opposition always helps."
There are still two more divisions in the meet:
the high school senior and junior boys events.
"This attracts the best high school runners
from all over the place," said Pugh.
This meet is so big that 50 officials are
needed to look after things, like holding ropes,
shooting guns, and finding stray runners.
"They're getting things down pat at the intramural meet on Thursday," said Pugh. "That way
they'll make all their mistakes Thursday and
leave nothing for doubt on Saturday."
— jay powley photo
THE UBC CROSS COUNTRY trio of Tom Howard (left). Ken  French (centre) and Dave Greening
brought B.C. to a third place finish at the National Championships at Calgary Nov. 4. They
will run again this Saturday in a meet on campus. Coach  Lionel Pugh is pictured behind his
runners.
Talk over your future
with the Bell employment
reps when they visit your
campus on
NOVEMBER
16, 17
20. 21
GRADS-TO-BE-IN:
CIVIL  &  ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING
MATHS &  PHYSICS
HONOURS ARTS
Ask at your Placement Office
for informative booklets and
arrange for an interview now!
Bell Canada
Coach   hopes   history
I repeats itself Saturday
% Will history repeat itself?
'' UBC rugby coach Donn Spence is hoping that it will.
-' Last weekend all four rugby teams won their games
in a spectacular sweep and Spence is hoping for an un-
%   precedented two sweeps in a row.
The big game of the weekend is at 2:30 p.m. on Wolf-
"   son Field, between the undefeated Braves, UBC's second
team, and Simon Fraser University's first team. Both teams
$   play in the same league.
; "We're looking for the Braves to clean up.   I think
they have a good chance," said Spence.
It is a big game for the Braves as a win will give
them undisputed hold on first place. «
The Thunderbirds play North-Shore All-Blacks, also   ~
at 2:30 p.m. on Wolfson. ^.
The Totems play All-Blacks II at 1:15 p.m. in a pre-   >j
liminary to the other games at Wolfson. j
"All the teams have improved every game out. Last   n
weekend was the climax of our work and I only hope that   ~
we can maintain our momentum," said Spence confidently.
weekend ApwtA
ICE HOCKEY
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds open their Intercollegiate
schedule on Friday and Saturday when they host the Notre
Dame University Knights from Nelson.
Both games will be played in Thunderbird Arena. Friday's
game begins at 8:30 p.m. and Saturday's at 2:30 p.m.
On Monday at 7:30 p.m. in Thunderbird Arena, the ice
hockey Braves meet Vancouver Hornets.
WRESTLING
The  UBC wrestling team tangles with  the  Notre  Dame
University wrestlers from Nelson on Friday at 1  p.m. in the
Women's Gym.
ROWING
The Green Lake Fall Invitational Regatta is the destination
of the UBC rowing team on Saturday.
Lake Washington Rowing Club, University of Washington,
Seattle Pacific, Pacific Lutheran University and perhaps Oregon
will also send shells to the regatta.
UBC will send a varsity, a junior varsity and a freshman
eight to the meet.
FIELD  HOCKEY
In campus field hockey on Saturday, the Birds play Hawks
A in the battle for first place, the Braves play Hawks B, the
Tomahawks meet Wasps and the Scalps tangle with Jokers IV.
All games begin at 1:30 p.m. on the Spencer fields.
Telephone 681-2004
336 West Pender St.
VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
CAVE
THEATRE  RESTAURANT
626  HORNBY
RESERVE
NOW!
MU 23677 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9,  1967
'TWEEN  CLASSES
Watch Warhols
Chelsea Girls
SPECIAL EVENTS
Andy Warhol's Chelsea Girls,
Friday    1:30   and   7:30   p.m.,
Tuesday    7:30 p.m.    Students
$1.50, non students $2.
ARTS COUNCIL
Thursday noon JMS Lounge
— important  arts  meeting   on
Dow  demonstration,  community, privacy, dope, love, food.
LIBERAL CLUB
General   meeting,    Monday
noon, Bu. 205.
ALPHA OMEGA
Bowling   party,    Sunday,    7
■*      p.m.  sharp.   Stry.  co-op   (Seventh and Main).
LSM
Atomic ethics with Dr. K. L.
Erdman,   Monday,   noon,   Bu.
106.
IH
Free     tea,     coffee,     chairs,
people,    every    Thursday,    3
p.m., upper lounge, IH.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Field trip, noon today, meet
in Ang. 207. Room for more
members.
PARLIAMENTARY
COUNCIL
Would any members of the
Communist Club please meet
with the parliamentary council executive in Brock Extension office today, noon.
EL CIRCULO
Conversation    group    today
noon   12:30-2:30,   IH   402-404.
Everyone welcome.
IH
Dante's Deligljt, Friday, IH,
9 p.m. Everyone invited.
FINE ARTS
Peter Selz, director, art mu-
.-_,       seum   at   Berkeley,   discusses
German   expressionism,   noon,
today, Ang. 104.
AMS
Anyone interested in helping with the AMS housing survey by filling out a rough
draft and making suitable or
unsuitable comments of criticisms, meet in the first vice-
president's office, today, noon.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Leg auction will be held on
Thursday. All girls please attend. Money made will go towards Christmas party.
AAC
Tsepso Letlaka from the
Pan-Africanist congress of An-
zania speaks on apartheid.
Thursday, noon, Brock lounge.
Admission 25 cents.
HILLEL
Luis   Romero,   well   known
Relax with an evening of
Folk Music
AT
The Village Bistro
From 8 p.m. till 4 a.m.
2081 W. 4th
Tel. 736-9920
STUDENTS   AT   REDUCED   RATES
CHRIS    TOLOS   «•"«.  other:
shape 0
wrestling   chompions   keep
ot  Western  Gym.
HOW ABOUT YOU? •
•   Body  Building   •   WmMing J
•   Reducing   •   Sauna, etc. •
Student. $48 per year •
WESTERN GYM •
135 East Hasting! J
Phone MU 8-1 »3» for Free Trial •
••••••••••••••••••••••••Of
folk   singer   appearing   today,
noon, Hillel House.
SKY DIVERS
Meeting     Thursday,     noon,
chem. 126.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
General    meeting    Monday,
noon, Bu. 214. Guest speaker,
Madleolin Wicksow.
UN CLUB
Meeting  noon,  Monday,  IH
upper lounge.
NDP CLUB
Bob Williams, former alderman, presently NDP MLA, discusses local issues in Bu. 203,
today, noon.
LIBERAL CLUB
Ottawa    commitments    have
forced John Turner to cancel
his speaking engagement.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Members   going   to   New
Haven   today,   noon,   meet   at
Bu. annex. Bring club membership cards.
HILLEL
Paint-in on Hillel Friday, 10
a.m.     Participating     students
please contact Mrs.  Orenstein
at Hillel.
IH
Student jobs overseas—with
external aid. Meet today, noon,'
IH. |
CIASP
Area study day for all members, in Seattle, Saturday,
10:30 a.m. Please come to the
office for transportation and
other details.
VOC
Last qualification hike will
be Sunday. It is the third peak
on Seymour and the leader is
Barb Middlewska (phone 224-
6865). Sign ride list in clubroom.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
No experimental college this
week.
NEW DEMOCRATS
Speech and discussion with
Bob Williams, NDP, MLA, and
town planner on issues in Vancouver, Thursday, noon, Bu.
203.
PHYSSOC
The second in a series of
grad talks for all persons intending to enter grad school
will be given by the NMR
group, Thursday, 1 p.m., Henn.
307.
PHOTO SOC
Important general meeting
for all members, Thursday,
noon, Bu. 202.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
YOU   WILL   LOVE
MY   INDOLE   RING!
At Retinal  Circus Fri.  & Sat. with
Mike Campbell and the Glass House
Band.   Girls 50c.   8-1  a.m.
SAVE MONEY & HAVE FUN.
Avoid the teenyboppers at the
Yardbirds Show & visit Retinal
Circus, 1024 Davie, Fri. & Sat.,
8-1.    Girls  only  50c.   Guys   $2.00.
DANCE TOMORROW NIGHT AT
Dante's Delight, 9:00 P.M. at I.
House. Tickets 1.00 ea. at International House office.
Greetings
12
Special Notices   (Cont'd)
SEATTLE BAND AT ARTS DANCE
Thurs. 16th, 12:30 in Brock. By
donation, Blues Interchange, just
great.
FREE TEA, COFFEE AND SOFT
chairs every Tuesday at 3:00 p.m.,
upper lounge at I. House. Come
today,   bring  your  silver  spoon.
16
Travel Opportunities
Wanted—Texts
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
RETINAL CIRCUS MUSIC IS NOW!
Girls, It's a 50c happening with, my
Indole Ring; Mike Campbell and
The Glass House Band. Really
Great Fun.  8-1 A.M.  Guys   $2.00.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY JUDY! HEY
girl, your a woman now! Best of
luck,   Bill and  Rick.
Lost ft Found
IS
FOUND: ANDY WARHOL'S ''CHEL-
sea Girls" in the Auditorium, Nov.
10 at 1:30 and 7:30 and Nov. 14 at
7:30.   Students  $1.50.   Adults  $2.00.
LOST ONE SILVER PIERCED EAR-
ring Oct. 30 between Men's Gym and
Education Building. Please phone
988-7061.
LOST SILVER RING WITH HEART -
shaped charm, during Fall Fair
Dance. Return to Int. House office.
Reward.
LOST! GREY RIMMED GLASSES,
Oct. 30 (sentimental value: I can't
see a thing). Phone Sheila, 224-9098
Room  683.
LOST
AT
WOLFSON
FIELD
ON
Sun.
Nov
5:
1   Bulova    Stainless
steel
self
wind
watch
and   1
gold
ring
with
family crest,
phone Chris.
224-9900.
On-campus residence design
uses student suggestions
Simon Fraser University students now have a part in the
design of on-campus residences.
An extensive survey form published Wednesday by the
SFU student newspaper asked students to recommend facilities.
The move came after a board of governors housing committee meeting to discuss style and type of housing most needed
on campus.
At the meeting were student society president Arthur Weeks
and graduate society president Ian Spenser.
Results of the survey will guide Arthur Erickson and
Geoffrey Massey, consulting architects for all construction on
campus.
Present design calls for commercial-style apartments to
house small groups or married couples.
The committee considers services for traditional boarding
school housing too expensive.
Construction is due to start in December and be completed
for next September.
OVAL GOLD BROACH WITH 8
pearls. Contact Sandra Crozler,
872-1084.
LOST: ONE GOLD WITH RED
stones Maltese cross-shaped earing
at bus-stop Marine and Chan. LA
6-3037,   Elean.
BILL  HALEY   &   THE  COMETS!
ELVIS   PRESLEY—THE
YARDBIRDS
No 1958 or 1964 sound at Retinal
Circus! Listen & dance to what's
happening now! Girls 50c. Guys
$2.00.    Retinal   Circus,    1024   Davie.
Automobiles For Sale
21
59 PORSCHE GOOD CONDITION
2250 Westbrook. $1,395, best offer.
224-9662.
1954 MORRIS IN GOOD RUNNING
order. Good gas mileage. Phone 224-
9794 after  6:00  for Gerry.
66 HONDA S600, GOOD SHAPE,
radio, must sell, no bull, will sacri-
fice,  leave  message.   325-7782.	
1956   PLYMOUTH   GOOD   RUNNING
condition $125, phone after 6:30 p.m.
'58 RAMBLER SUPER. TWO-TONE
blue, reclining seats, two new snow
tires on, mechanically very good.
$375.00   or   nearest.   733-2650.
NEED MONEY! '60 VOLKSWAGEN
Deluxe. Good rubber, needs body
work.    Phone   738-3057   after   6.
1960 TR3, LIGHT BLUE, GOOD
condition, never been raced, $750.
Phone Mike.  RE  8-4967.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
LOST: WALLET, SHOE, DRESS AT
Armouries Saturday night. Please
leave  at   lost   and   found,   Sharon.
found: problems in refT ser^  Orchestras
vice  by  T.   J.  Gelvin  at  Psysiology	
Office. !	
Copying & Duplicating
31
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone  228-8384  or  224-6129.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  & Granville).   263-4530.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
page! University Typing. Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison Rd. at University Blvd. Mon. to
Fri.  9  to  5.  Phone:  228-8414.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced eassay and thesis typist
Reasonable  Rates.  TR. 4-9253.
'GOOD EXPERIENCED T Y P I S T
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640".
TYPING
Phone  731-7511  — 9:00   to  5:00
266-6662 — after 6:00
TYPING AT HOME — 25e SINGLE
sheet, double spacing. Legible handwriting. Call after 10:00 a.m. Mondays   to   Thursdays,   and   Sundays,
738-6829.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
Help Wanted—Male
SS
Male or Female
       SS
SEX, AGE, ARE IRRELEVANT.
Night part-time earnings, 688-3379
late eves.
Work Wanted
54
BABY-SITTER. GIRL WILL BABY-
sit Monday-Friday. Phone 732-6900
after 6:00 p.m.
Music
62
BEGINNERS IN FOLK GUITAR,
lessons. Flexible schedule, reasonable rates.   Call anythime  224-3975.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
SS
Tutoring
84
Miscellaneous
32
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
6671   anytime.
33
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
WANTED —EDUCATION   STUDENT
to tutor second grader.   224-4445.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
LOST: BLACK PURSE IN ARMOU-
ries Nov. 4. Please return glasses
and  I.D.   Call,   277-7193.
Rides & Car Pools
14
CALIFORNIA RIDE WANTED.
Male share driving, etc., leave im-
mediately.   681-2596.
RIDE NEEDED DESPERATELY
from 19th & Fraser, alternating
mornings for 8:30!! Call Bob, 874-
5454   or   731-1935,   eves.
RIDE FOR 8:30 CLASSES URGENT-
ly required from cambie and 60th
area.    Call  Linda  at   327-7452.
Special Notices
15
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.
CALORY   CORNOR
Tuesday's   quick   Lunches
basement Ed.   Bldg.
— no crowds —
NOV.    21    ERIC   KIERANS    SPEAKS
to  you  about  Canada.
WE HEREBY CHALLENGE ANY
UBC couple to adopt a baby through
C.A.S.—Freedom for Adoptive Children,  1843 Robson.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE VIL-
lage — 3 barbers. Open weekdays
8:30-6 p.m. Saturday 'til 5:30.	
ROWDY RAUCUS BAWDY FILM
Soc. presents Tom, Jones. Aud. 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30  Thurs.   Nov.   9,   50c.
YARDBIRDS ARE 1964 MUSIC!
Vancouver is building its own 1968
music scene—enjoy it at Retinal
Circus, 1024 Davie, its great! Fri.
&  Sat.   8-1 a.m.
PSYCHEDELIC COLORING POSTER
contest happens this Friday at
Retinal Circus. Get in free with
two posters colored by yourself.
Win  door prizes,  giant  surprises.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
ANDY WARHOL'S "CHELSEA
Girls" Shocking! Unusual! Censored! Auditorium, Nov. 10, 1:30 & 7:30
and Nov. 14, 7:30. Students $1.50.
Others  $2.00.   Special events!	
TOM JONES STARRING ROWDY
Bawdy, Albert Finney, Thurs. Nov.
9.   12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   Adm.   50c.
OSCULATE MY INDOLE RING!
Shatter the Glass House Band.
Freakout at Retinal Circus. The
only way to fly! Friday & Satur-
day,   8-1.   Guys   $2.00,   Girls   50c.
SCHICK PRODUCTIONS UNLIMIT-
ed presents Spence's Surrealistic
story. Nov. 11, Gleneagles, 8:30-1:00
$3.00 cpl. Bar,   French Hand Laundry.
PETE — SEE YOU 8:00 P.M. AT
Friday bash at 695 King Georges
Way.   Anticipating,   Sue.	
YA TERRIBLE OLD ROGUE PETER
It's about time. A little pleased to
say  the least.  Piggies  never lose.
ROMANOFF AND JULIET, NOV. 9,
10, 11, 16, 17, 18. Phone 433-5327 for
tickets.    UBC   Students   $1.00.	
DON'T MISS THE EXCITING PRO-
fessional in-door motorcycle races.
Sat., Nov. 11th, 7:30 p.m. Cloverdale Fair Grounds, just 25 short
minutes   from   Vancouver.
D A N T E S DELIGHT TOMORROW
night from 9:00 p.m. at International House, 1.00 per person. Bring
Italian    handbook    or.
FROM SEATTLE: BLUES INTER-
change Arts tribal gathering in
Brock Thurs., 16th, 12:30. Dance.
By   donation.  	
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
WURLITZER ELECTRIC PIANO
with preamp. Perfect working order.
Offers—Call Bob,   738-4241.
TAPE RECORDER. — PHILLIPS.
Fully portable, excellent condition.
Remote control, new batteries, tapes.
Phone   Murray,   224-9662. 	
FOR SALE 1 PAIR ARLBERG 205
skis $20; Henkl ski boots, size 9, $10;
hand-made muckalucks, size 9, $20;
Sim Gar bongo drums; crash helmet.
261-1714.
KEUFFEL AND ESSER LOG, LOG
duplex decitrig slide rule. New condition.   Phone  266-5002.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
SI
ROOMS ON CAMPUS FOR RENT.
Close   to   meals.   224-9662   (male)   @
$40  mo.;  2250  Wesbrook.	
FURNISHED  ROOM  FOR RENT TO
a Filipino or Chinese girl. Near gate.
Bath    and    kitchen    facilities.    $40.
Phone  224-1645  after six.	
FREE   ROOM   FOR   FEMALE   STU-
dent   in   exchange   for   babysitting,
share   kitchen.   733-1253   after   6   or
738-8405.	
LARGE  QUIET  ROOM FOR  2  STU-
dents, phone and  kitchen privileges.
$80,   priv.   washroom.   224-0301,   4078
W.  16th.
ROOM FOR RENT, BOYS ONLY AT
2819 Waterloo St., two blocks from
Alma.   Phone RE 8-4792.
FREE TEASE THIS AFTERNOON
and every Thursday at 3:00 p.m.
Upper lounge of I nternational
House.   Bring   silver   spoon.
1 Typewriter Repairs
39
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE,
2280  Wesbrook.   Phone   224-9986.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
available now. Phone Don, 224-9665,
after 6 p.m.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses ft Apts.
SS
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished apartment near 4th & Alma.
Phone  Judy,  733-6994.

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