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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1966

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Array WING IS JUST SEX AND SILLY PUTTY
By TOM MORRIS
Take a man with long hair, put a
cross in his hand, stand him in front of
a large audience, and let him explain
his views on life and who do you have?
Christ?
No. You have Paul Krassner—satirist,
wit, editor of the Realist, and most recently, society editor of Ramparts
magazine.
Krassner spread the gospel according to Silly Putty to 600 students in
the auditorium Thursday.
Actually the cross was a put-on.
"The last time I carried a cross was
in New York during a Peace march.
I guess we looked like a pacifist lynch-
mob."
The gospel covers everything from
astronauts to pajamas.
On astronauts, Krasser claimed that
the weightlessness experienced by them
causes involuntary erections.
"Can you imagine these  guys in
front of nation-wide television when
they land. Holding their knees together
and all."
What about birth control? Krassner
says the responsibility for birth-control
today is totally in the girl's hands.
"What do they use today? The
teeny-boppers are using saran wrap.
The anti-Viet Nam types are using
baggies.
"Saran wrap is made by Dow chemicals and they support the war," Krassner said.
On LSD, Krassner had this to say:
"Fat ladies now take LSD in sach-
arin.
"I've tried it six times now. My
mother keeps writing these letters out
of fear that I will turn to bigger
things like the weed."
On nudist camps:
"If you have even been to a nudist
camp you will realize that they accept
PAUL KRASSNER/
. . preaches gospel
\
your anatomy but not your physiology."
What about the draft-dodgers coming into Canada?
"I think it's a one-sided cultural
exchange."
And more on sex.
"If a girl wanted to time her periods
after the publication date of my magazine she would think she had been
knocked-up."
Krassner claimed the churches are
in big business and making large profits
which should be taxed.
"They are running wine companies
and bakeries but 'God works in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform',"
he said tapping the cross.
Somebody  asked  him  if  he  wore
t.epaJtLnMI^ ^x
;; Y* "I was given **nitot-shirt once that
came down to my knees, Very feminine,
very prancy."
_Q
In„facVI,,b,egan to Set
£X-2-b i.inb—pus
Vol. XLVIII, No. 19        VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1966
48
224-3916
tries to steal
lost benefits'
AMS president Peter Braund charged ThuTsday that
Edmonton student council is trying to get Canadian Union
of Students services without paying fees.
These services were lost to
the Edmonton campus when
council president Branny Shep-
anovich pulled his university
out of the national student
group, Braund said.
"Branny is a shrewd politician," he said.
—kurt hilger photo
BOTTOMS   UP   is   engineering   president   Eric Newell, after playing footsy with forestry
presidesnt Mike Sywulch. Newell was voted   prize for  worst  roller.
(Story page 3.)
WOULD HAVE ACCESS
He accused Shepanovich of
trying to hold the national administrative seminar for student business managers, treasurers and presidents on the
Edmonton campus to prove that
CUS could not exist without
Edmonton.
"He would have access to all
the CUS services by holding
this seminar,'' said Braund.
Edmonton's offer was turned
down at a CUS conference last
weekend and a motion was
sponsored by UBC to prevent
any of the CUS services going
to any merrtber who had withdrawn from the national organization.
At present there is a pro-CUS
group on the Edmonton campus
which is receiving all CUS
literature.
WITHDRAWAL ILLEGAL?
This group has also brought
a law suit against the student
council charging that the withdrawal is illegal.
The services that are not
available to the Edmonton campus as a result of its withdrawal
are the rights to participate in
the CUS travel plans, the life
insurance program and in the
student discount services.
Shepanovich feels that by
hosting the administrative seminar, he will be able to keep
participating in CUS activities
as a matter of course, said
Braund.
PETER BRAUND
' ... not fair'
Booze legal
in residences
down south
WASHINGTON, D.C. (UNS)
—A rule prohibiting drinking
in dormitories has been reversed by Georgetown University.
Official said the new policy
which allows all men to keep
both beer and hard liquor in
their rooms was "designed to
help students develop personal
responsibility."
Reverend Anthony J. Zeits,
director of student personnel,
said authorities who have
studied the campus drinking
issue have concluded that "the
formation of young men is
facilitated when they are given
the freedom to choose whether
to use or not to use alcoholic
beverages."
Georgetown officials also said
the move was made to end the
pretense of enforcing an unenforceable rule — a primary
consideration, according to several students. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966
OVER CUS VOTE
Dispute splits McGill
MONTREAL (CUP) — Opinions on McGill University's
membership in the Canadian
Union of Students are flying
thick and fast — and only the
January referendum will
settle the matter once and for
all.
McGill's students' society
executive itself is undecided
on which course to take, with
one member in favor of remaining in CUS, one in favor
of joining l'Union Generale
des Etudiants du Quebec, and
a third refusing public comment.
President J i m McCoubrey
said if the issue were simply
one of remaining in or withdrawing from CUS, he would
vote  for   staying in.
However, the upcoming referendum should also take into
account the possibility of joining UGEQ, he said.
"Individual students must
weigh the advantages and disadvantages of belonging to
any union," McCoubrey said,
noting education is a provincial matter while CUS is a national body.
Exact wording of the referendum will be decided at an
open meeting of the student
body at the beginning of
November.
"When asked about his stand
in the referendum, external
vice-president Arnie Aberman
said, "I have nothing to say
for publication at the present
time."
Curiously, the referendum
was called as a result of Aber-
man's recommendations to
council that McGill withhold
its fees from CUS, that discussion take place on campus and
AMS rally bid fails
so forum  planned
AMS plans for a student
for a discussion forum.
AMS executives, who Wednesday planned a massive student rally for today, said they
will instead hold a forum in
front of the library at noon.
They said they decided on
the switch after dean of inter-
faculty affairs Walter Gage
and a board of governors representative refused invitations to speak at the rally.
The rally was planned following   UBC   president   John
rally have switched to plans
resignation    an-
Macdonald's
nouncement.
AMS second vice-president
Carolyn Tate said the topic for
the forum will toe Macdonald's
resignation.
She said this could lead into discussion of student and
administration affairs.
Microphones and soapboxes
will be provided for speakers
at the forum.
If it rains the forum will be
held in Brock Lounge.
a referendum be held on McGill membership  in CUS.
Internal vice-president Ian
McLean strongly favored
membership in UGEQ. His
only reservation in joining
would be the unilingual nature of the Quebec union, he
said.
"I feel the McGill delegates
should speak French, but English should nevertheless be included as an official language."
How Well Do You
Know the USSR?
Now is the time to subscribe for
1967 newspapers, journals and
magazines published in the Soviet
Union. Valuable prizes are offered
in this year's subscription contest.
Catalogues and contest details
available upon request. Something
to interest everyone — technical
subjects, art; magazines for the
student of Russian and/or International Affairs.
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• FOOD * DANCE SATURDAY 9 P.M. TO ?
Swing To The Moonlighters Trinidad Steel Band
Tonight 7-12 p.m.
Saturday 2-12 p.m.
at INTERNATIONAL HOUSE and PAN-HELLENIC HOUSE
Tickets at Door: Students 75c, Adults $1.00, Children 50c Friday, October  28,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—al harvey photo
NEW LOOK IN RELIGION was revealed Thursday by unsuspecting student who apparently blundered into Newman lounge at St. Mark's theological college at noon and
mistakingly  lifted  the  wraps  on  a   leg  auction.
Slippery-footed AMS brass
slide at feet of forester
By JOHN APPLEBY
AMS council met Thursday
noon in Buchanan quad and
came out all wet.
Forestry undergraduate society president iMike Sywulych
bet that no one can beat a
forester when it comes to staying on a refiling log.
He  ditched   seven  other
members of the AMS council
in the Buchanan pool to prove
it.
Eric Newell, engineering
president, joined AMS president Peter Braund, co-ordinator Jim Lightfoot and presidents of four other undergraduate societies in the drink.
Following   the   contest
Van full of goodies
gets here next week
Treasure Van comes to UBC next week.
For all those who iwant
something different for Christmas, such as an opium pipe, a
Korean backscratcher, or a
camelskin lampshade, Treasure Van presents its annual
sale of novel and unique objects at International House,
Monday to Saturday.
Items include jewellery
from Iran, Israel, Germany
and New Zealand; wooden
crafts from Haiti, Hawaii and
the Philippines, antiquities
from Tibet, and koala bears
from Australia.
Also on the list of items
are Greek vases, Indian carved
elephants, camel saddles,
masks from New Guinea, African carvings and Moroccan
wine skins.
The sale provides funds for
the World University Service
of Canada and its numerous
projects, including exchange
scholarships, travel seminars,
and book drives for poorer
universities.
WUSC collects the Treasure
Ideal  for  Christmas
Oil Painted
Portrait
on canvas or velvet from
Life or Photograph by Dutch
portrait artist.
Adrian Nouwens
224-5527
3641   W.   29th   Ave.
Van goods from 30 countries
during the summer and distributes them to 46 universities
across Canada for the fall
sales.
This year, it hopes to raise
$10,000 compared to $7,000
last year.
Admission is free and the
doors are open 12-5 p.m. and
7-10 pjn. each day.
Braund and Lightfoot tried to
duck Sywulych but found
themselves borne under by a
surging green tide who came
to rescue their idol.
Home economics girls drew
against nursing in a rapid five-
a-side conflict which sent ten
struggling girls to the bottom.
Norma Young reclaimed her
faculty's honour by felling
nurses hopeful Allison Rice in
a spirited rally which brought
spectators cheering to their
feet.
The prize for strategy went
to AMS first vice-president
Charlie Boylan who showed
up "late enough so that most
of the burlers had already
left," said Sywulych.
OPEN DAILY from 10 a.m. v
(Noon to Midnight |
Sunday).
Out-of-towners:
Send for
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Tel. MU 5-5814$
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SPECIAL   RATES   FOR   TEAM,   CLUB   AND   OTHER  ORGANIZATIONS
DEPUTIES NAMED
Gap plugged
by two deans
Two top-ranking UBC deans will provide the transition
between retiring president John Macdonald and the new
president.
The two are inter-faculty affairs dean Walter Gage and
applied science dean William
Armstrong.
Gage, in an interview
Thursday, said: ''We will
carry over president Macdon-
lad's work, and be the new
president's aides until he is
settled in his job."
This will ensure that the
future president will not be
left totally in the dark, he
said.
The two deans were named
Wednesday by the board of
governors' chairman, Mr. Justice N. T. Nemetz, to act as
deptuties to the president.
Macdonald, whose resignation was made public Wednesday, will leave his position
June 30.
The deans' duties will be to
confer with Dr. Macdonald on
long term problems that will
need the attention of the next
president.
Gage said neither he nor
Armstrong would sit on the
board of governors.
"We will have no contact
with the board. We are deputies to the president only."
He said Armstrong was in
Toronto and would not be
back until next week.
DEAN ARMSTRONG
. . another deputy
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«8gSSSg^ffiS»JgSig8g8SS8Sffi8.ffiSSSg-6S-SS.SSSS?SSSJ8ffiSS8sS —*%
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER 28, 1966
Education has produced a vast population
able to read but unable to distinguish what is
worth reading.
—George Macau lay Trevelyan
Ottawa, ho!
Think about it — where would a man who just
resigned as president of one of Canada's largest universities go if he wanted to continue working in Canadian
education ?
Right now, nowhere.
But wait — Ottawa is getting more and more
deeply involved in education — traditionally and constitutionally a provincial matter.
One of prime minister Lester Pearson's strings on
federal funds to provinces for education is a hint of
increased federal control.
Health and welfare minister Allan McEachen, speaking to Canadain Union of Students congress delegates
in September, hinted around drastic changes in federal
education policy.
Right now, there is no federal portfolio of education; several cabinet ministers share it in bits.
We p'redict a new cabinet slot — federal minister
of education — to be filled either by backbencher and
top-level advisor or by-election.
In either case, Dr. John Macdonald is it.
Wanna job, Bob?
So ol' John is going.
So it's find a successor time.
Lessee — he's gotta be an academic, or the profs
won't accept him.
He needs to have a large, husky forefinger insertable
in Premier Bennett's ear, or Macdonald's prediction of a
drastically chopped UBC budget next year will put UBC
back into the rag bag.
He must be temporarily unemployed, but still employable.
How about Robert Bonnet, LLB, QC, erstwhile
attorney-general, friend to Bennett and. man, and currently out of work?
Soap, anyone?
Couples whose intelligence ranks with the top three
per cent of the population should be subsidized to make
babies and thus improve the tone of society, says one
Dr. E. O. Dcdson of the University of Ottawa.
Gee, let's do it both ways and penalize couples
whose intelligence is in the bottom three per cent for
producing stupid kids — a reverse baby bonus, if vou
like.
Hell, let's go one further, and make it the bottom
97 per cent — there are too many people in the world
anyway.
Then, maybe a smart biologist will discover the
Aryan race's greatest average intelligence.
Wow, we could advance Dodson's Utopia at a great
rate, with stronger measures than taxation for everybody but  pure  Aryans.
Like gas ovens.
SHOCK AND  DISBELIEF
BY  GABOR MATE
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing    	
News -   -   __
City
Photo
Page Friday
Focus
Ass't News
CUP.  -
Ass't Photo
Richard Blair
Carol Wilson
Danny Stoffman
Powell Hargrave
Claudia Gwinn
Rosemary Hyman
Pat Hrushowy
Bert Hill
-     Dennis Gans
Donovan-hatted Mate fumbled
with a tape recorder and peered
over his typewriter at free-trading Norman Gidney, acid-searching Angela Ottho and Norman
Lincoln Wilczak. Kathl Harkness
wrote about education and walked and worked. Ron Simmer followed Mac. Joan Fogarty, Charlotte Haire, Mary Crozier, Murray
McMillan and John Appleby were
here too. Ann Bishop rewrote and
Tom Morris was realistic. Stoff
went to Edmonton with Kris and
Derrick. Photogs were flash Hilger, Shutter Gans, Darkroom Don,
Lens   Harvey   and   Button   Blake.
Lyndon Baines who?
I was sitting outside the Library humming
the Ballad of the Green Berets and reading
Plato's Republic when a crowd of students
came my way yellng "Shock and Disbelief!
Shock and Disbelief!"
"What are you doing?" I asked.
"Oh, we are greeting the news with Shock
and  Disbelief,'*  they answered.  "What are
you doing?"
"I am trying to think of an appropriate
folk saying," I said.
"How about, no news is
good news?" they suggested.
"Not bad," I said, "but I
prefer, early to rise and
early to 'bed make a man
healthy, wealthy, and
dead.''
"But that has nothing to
do  with  this  topic,"  they
MATE protested.
"Neither does shock and disbelief,"I said.
"We know that," they said, '<but we have
to express them anyway just in case a reporter comes by and asks us our reaction
to the news.''
"What is the news, by the way?" I asked.
They told me the president has resigned.
I immediately expressed Shock and Disbelief.
"Shock and Disbelief!' I cried three or four
times. But there were no reporters around
so it was all wasted.
"Does this mean the war will end?"I asked.
"No, no, Johnson didn't resign, Macdonald
did."
"Oh," I said, "but I thought Johnson was
president."
"No, no, Macdonald is president of UBC
"So why would his resignation end the
war?" I asked.
"It won't," they said.
"Well then, why did he resign. Why doesn't
Johnson resign instead?"
"Because he isn't president of UBC."
"Oh. Well then, would he resign if he was
president of UBC?"
"Yes, probably."
"Well then, why don't they appoint him
to replace Macdonald?"
"Because he is not a dentist," they said.
"Oh. Does the president have to be a
dentist?'
"Probably. Macdonald is."
"Oh, I see. That's why I could never get
an appointment with him."
With that the conversation ended. I joined
the crowd as it marched through the library
chanting, "Shock and Disbelief! Shock and
Disbelief!"
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
immmmr^;'^w%®mim!,mmi &<*■/$'%
Bad teeth
Editor, The Ubyssey:
My story began when I decided to go to the dental clinic
for a minor repair. But to my
surprise the sweet young thing
at the desk told me that they
are booked up for three
months.
So I went to try for an appointment with a dentist on
Tenth Avenue. Again they informed me th_t this would be
a few weeks.
Why does the dentistry faculty require a person to stay
on campus seven years before
he can practice? I think a
person spending three years
on campus would have enough
experience to manipulate a
pair of pliers.
Thus, enough dentists can
be produced every year to fill
the gap.
A SOLUTIONIST
'Serious  error'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Engineers made a serious error when they abducted Gaibor Mate a week ago.
They assumed that Garble
was a rational human being.
Jumping out of a second
storey window while wearing
a strait jacket proves he is
not rational, and landing uninjured proves he is not human.
Unfortunately, this incident
has been enlarged by the left-
wing pot crowd as an attempt
to suppress free speech. The
engineers have abducted
many people in the past (AMS
executives, frosh presidents,
and radio disc-jockeys), and it
has always been without malice.
The prank for Mate was to
be honey and feathers, nothing more. However, Mate's
cronies have now used this
incident as an excuse to venerate their marijuana martyr
as a crusader against the evil
forces of neo-fascism.
Remember, if you hear a
knock on your door during
the middle of the night, do not
answer it. It will be the en
gineering gestapo waiting to
take you to the EUS office for
interrogation.
P.S. I am not responsible
for anything in this letter.
I was only following orders.
VICTOR  HARDY
Wo  Tories'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The story about the Blue
Guard in the Oct. 27th edition of The Ubyssey states
that the Blue Guard is "led
by campus Conservatives"
(capital "C"). This seems to
imply that the Guard is sponsored by the UBC Conservative club.
There is no oficial connection -whatever between the
two organizations. Moreover,
in light of the fact that many
prominent Liberals (anti-
monarchists) are active members of the Blue Guard, loyal
Conservatives would not
wish to have their club or
party contaminated by that
Liberal disease — creeping
republicanism.
OSCAR   JOHVIKAS
President,
UBC Conservatives
being detrimental to the student interest.
Objectively, he had little
choice — unless he were to
allow UBC to slither further
down the slope of mediocrity.
Excellence in a university is
expensive. Excellence has been
Macdonald's consistent goal.
The continual sniping and
back-toting of faculty prima
donnas and the rabid anarchy
preached by The Ubyssey
would, we're sure, carry little
weight with such a man of
principle; ideas were listened
to, but destructive criticism
was a waste of time.
Students realize that this
man has been a first-rate president, and his loss a great
blow to the university.
The Ubyssey's implication
was that Macdonald was out
of touch with student opinion
and attitudes.
We submit that if anyone
is out of touch with student
opinion and attitudes, it's The
Ubyssey.
MIKE COLEMAN, Law 2
Students' Council '62-64
KEITH BRADBURY. Law 2
Ubyssey editor-in-chief '62-63
'Out of touch'       'Thanks,  Mac
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your editorial (bon voyage,
Jack) does not represent student opinion. In our analysis,
Dr. Macdonald has been an exceptionally outstanding UBC
president. By any objective
standard, his leadership has
been a vital factor in the improvement of post-secondary
education in B.C. This university has greatly developed under his hard-driving, pragmatic, yet essentially idealistic
presidency.
The great hindrance he
faced was a parochial and
short-sighted provincial government, lacking the commitment necessary to make a
first-class education available
to all.
From a student viewpoint,
Macdonald was responsible for
a $100 fee raise. This has been
rightly attacked by The
Ubyssey  over   the   years   as
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We are ashamed to belong
to a university body which
lets its opinions be expressed
by such an ungrateful and
self-important news media. We
are referring directly to the
attitude expressed in Thursday's editorial entitled Bon
voyage, Jack.
We tend to think that John
Macdonald is one of the greatest men this university has
ever seen — indeed, among
the greatest this province has
seen. In the last five years, he
has worked conscientiously
and unselfishly for a province,
which to him, was new. It
seems cruel and unthoughtful
that so many people could
agree so much with his ideas,
and yet, offer so little support.
To page 5
See: MORE MAC Friday, October  28,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
The adventures of Actually Josephine      by Rae Moster
MORE  LETTERS
FROM  PAGE 4
Mac: the greatest educator
We find it hard to believe
that our "glorious" premier
can act so "surprised and
sorry" at Macdonald's resignation. It seems odd that he can
boast of great advances in education, and at the same time,
cut the throat of the very man
responsible for these advances.
You planned your election
well, Mr. Bennett!
It is beyond our comprehension that The Ubyssey can ask
such a great man to kiss the
boots and wipe the noses of
our political representatives.
Is it not enough, Mr. Editor,
to cover a man with mud, than
to kick him when he falls?
We are sick, Mr. Editor, sick
to the stomach, with your irresponsible and degrading
comments.
If any time is the right time
to give this man the support
he deserves, it is now. Indeed,
now is the time for the student
body to stand in unison and
say, "Thanks, Mac".
Come out of your rotten
little hole, Mr. Editor, and see
the sunlight!
MIKE S. CHAPMAN
Education 3
wray Mcdonald
Agriculture 4
Vitriolic attacks
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The Ubyssey is renowned
for being the most acrimonious student newspaper on
campus. This is no excuse for
a series of vitriolic attacks on
the president of the arts US,
Don Wise.
Wise is censured tor having
done nothing for arts. Such
disparagement is ridiculous
for  the  following reasons:
(a)   The arts US executive
was non-existent when the
term opened. Elections had
to be held and an office obtained before anything could
be achieved.
(b) The charge may be
applied even more aptly to
the other undergraduate societies. Engineering, science,
medicine, what great achievements can they point to?
(c) Wise is ably fulfilling
his role as president by his
activity in the new arts curriculum debate. What more
can you ask?
What do you hope to gain
by forcing the resignation of
one of the few council members who admits that the
student council and all the
undergrad socities are farcical, and has committed himself to their reform?
ONE FOR JUSTICE
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742 Granville MU  1-5625 Page     6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966
IDEAS
AT
LARGE
By BOB CRUISE
The other day I interviewed
Dr. Shifty Disturbstrom, BA,
MA, SOB, PhD, PS, Berkeley
grad and eminent social critic.
"What is the PS degree Dr.
Disturbstrom after your
name," I asked him.
"That's my post doctoral degree in Permanent Studentship. Berkeley offers it. I get
scholarships and bursaries
every year to talk about my
plans to wreck the system
(democratize the university
we call it)."
"Have many obtained this
honorable degree?"
"Not yet tout it is becoming
more and more popular. It is
the 'in' thing to do. We get a
$200 bonus for a particularly
messy beard. Continual har-
rassment of administration
types and of ed-biz rates an
extra conference in Florida
every seven years."
"Do you ever organize or
demonstrate?"
"■Hell ,no! That is for the
young idealists. I just talk
radical. That is what the system wants. They need us
peaceniks. We make it look
like we are the only alternatives to the system."
. "You are very popular with
the students, I presume "
"Hell yes! I swear in class
and use plenty of Marxist jargon. The idiots really eat it
up."
"Are they bothered by the
fact that you never do anything to back up your radical
ideas?"
"Bah! They only want to get
their degrees and make a
buck. By listening to me they
become even more confident
in what they are planning to
do."
"Do you never feel guilty
about doing this sort of
things?"
"Guilt is a relative term.
Who is to say what is right
and wrong. That is just one
man's opinion."
"Do you tire of knocking
the establishment?"
"Never! They need me. If it
weren't for me there would toe
all kinds of honest little profs
telling the kids what is really
going on in this country."
"Where are you going now?"
"I have an appointment with
the president. We meet each
week to decide what should
be attacked next in the system."
Classical Guitar
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and Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at 2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
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TEXT BOOKS
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Specializing in
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4393 W. 10th Ave.
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Columnist driven
batty by boxes
HALIFAX (UNS) — College
newspapers should "goose
things up a bit", says Toronto
Globe and Mail columnist, Richard J. Needham.
Needham was addressing
delegates at the Maritime regional conference of the Canadian University Press.
"There should be more irresponsibility in college journalism," Needham said.
"You have a unique opportunity to break the grey
pattern that characterizes Canadian society.
"We move from box (home)
to box (work) to box (coffin)."
Formal education is relative
ly useless to counteract this, he
said.
"One masters the intricacies
of Tasmanian stone carving,
Bulgarian metaphysics, and
Medieval Saskatchewan.
"Then to the glue factory."
QUAKER MEETING FOR WORSHIP
SUNDAYS  11  A.M.
FRIENDS' HOUSE, 535 W. 10th AVE.
Visitors Welcome
St. Anselm's W. A.  Annual
THRIFT   SALE
Saturday, Oct. 29th
11:30 a.m. — 3:30 p.m.
at
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
CHURCH
5375 University Blvd.
NO PRE SALE
WANTED
students for the
BLACK MASK
BALL
COSTUME DANCE
October 29th - 8:30 p.m.
Dance Club Lounge - Brock Extension
Admission at the Door
___. **.*_.
'     «     ___________.'  -NtM*""*     «■'    t *•**
"*="__    *_.   ** "*r.--'',"»w'_*l*«i
-w.
*.■-'.'*■-* v/j-...
.'WC-l
What it means to work where things are happening
It's having ability—and using it. It's a feeling of
personal pride. It's doing something really
meaningful. It's challenging and changing the
world. It's living. And doing. And professional
growth. It's excitement. It's now.
What's happening at IBM?
Just about everything under the sun—and
beyond. Twenty years ago, the electronic computer was just getting off the ground. In this
short time, it has come to be called the most
beneficial invention in history.
The pace of new applications is literally
fantastic. Business, government, law, education, medicine, science and the humanities.
All are affected by IBM's information and
control systems. Positively affected.
Chances are there's a place for you in the
growing world of information and control
applications.
Whatever your educational background, whatever your discipline, you could be a part of
what's happening at IBM.
Make a point to investigate the advantages of
this growth company with the IBM representative who will be visiting the campus October 31
through November 4.
Your Placement Officer can arrange an appointment for you. If you cannot attend the interviews, please write or visit the IBM office in
Vancouver at 1445 West.Georgia Street.
IBM
lnttrn«t-on*i Buifn.ss Machines Company Limited  pf
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
v. ^>      s     >   <   *
OCT.  28,   1966
ON THE COVER: Gordon Smith
paintings at the Fine Arts Gallery
through Nov. 12.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants:   judy  bing
bob cruise
sue richter
photo: dennis gans
powell hargrave
kurt hilger
don kydd
go
UBC suffers most from
being an essentially commuter   university.
We come here in the
morning and go home at
night as if university was
a nine-to-five job.
The maximum educational experience is open
only to students in resi-
d e n c e — the education
that comes through independence, through long
nocturnal conversations,
through living with and
really relating to a large
and diverse group of individuals.
For most of us, however, there is no qualitative difference between
our previous schooling
and university.
We live at home as before, under the influence
of the old emotional and
intellectual atmosphere,
for economic dependence
engenders every other
kind of dependence, on
conscious or unconscious
levels.
There are five occasions each year when this
fragmentation in the student body can be overcome: frosh retreat, leadership conference, and
three symposia on selected topics.
Fall symposium this
weekend is one of them.
Those who board the
southward bound buses
in front of Brock will
have an opportunity for
relevant discussion and
debate and for experiencing an intimacy with approximately a hundred
other students that comes
from living together for
two days.
The symposium provides a learning situation
far closer to the ideal
than being lectured at in
a classroom.
It is an instrument for
cementing the student
community and shaping
it into a coherent whole.
So why are you still
sitting there? —JB
pf 2wo
Friday, October 28,  1966
Gospel according
to St. Realist
Paul Krassner, editor of
The Realist magazine talks
with pf's Gabor Mate.
pf: Paul, your magazine
is called The Realist. Who
is a realist, and what is
realism?
Krassner: I've begun to
make a collection of people
MATE
who are realists. It includes
everybody from children to
Nikita Khruschev. But the
word realist is almost meaningless because everyone
thinks he is a realist, and
that's the most satirical
thing in the magazine, the
title.
pf: Is there such a thing
as  an  objective realist?
K: Is there such a thing
as objectivity? I try to be
objective, and I like to think
that at least in some areas
I succeed. But It's a paradox, because you have to
judge your objectivity by
your subjectivity.
pf: Why is that little silly
putty figure with the chicken legs and the worried eyes
your symbol of a realist?
K: Because at the very
beginning I knew that The
Realist was going to make
fun of a lot of things, and
I thought that The Realist
itself, or a realist, should
not be excluded from that.
So the thing is really the
caricature of a realist. He
has no mouth, because as a
realist he knows that that's
the only way to keep his
foot out of it.
pf: Do you think President Johnson is a realist?
Kr: Everybody is a realist according to his own
reality. Everybody meets, his
own needs in the best way
he can, and if his needs are
neurotic, he can still be realistic in providing for them.
In the sense that he gets
what he wants, Johnson is a
realist. But what he wants
is insane.
pf: In a past issue of The
Realist you related the true
story of why Johnson is in
Vietnam. Could you relate
this story now? Is it really
true?
Kr: Oh, this isn't the rea
son why he's there, but it is
an indication of his personality, his megalomania. A
reporter was interviewing
Johnson, and the president
wasn't saying much about
Vietnam, so the reporter
finally asked him about the
war. (The story is true, but
of course the reporter couldn't print it.) Replied Johnson: "Well, what the Commies are saying is f - - k
Lyndon Johnson; and nobody says f - - k Lyndon
Johnson and gets away with
it."
pf: Do the American
people share this attitude?
Do they think the Communists are saying "f - - k Americans?"
Kr: You can't of course
talk about the American
people as one person, but
there are people who agree
with Johnson and take the
war personally. They have a
kind of emotional patriotism.
pf: Why is it so relatively
easy to whip up this kind of
emotional patriotism in the
United States?
Kr: I think it's partly because   of   the   mass   media.
People seem to have a need
for mass identification.
Their lives are so dull, that
they have to enhance it
somehow with a sense of national purpose.
pf: Is there conscious and
deliberate distortion of the
news about Vietnam?
Kr: Yes, but it works on
different levels. There was
the case of the reporters
from Time magazine who
quit because the editors
were changing what they
wrote. It wasn't a question
of distortion by the reporters, but it was conscious and
deliberate distortion by the-
magazine.
pf: Do little magazines
like The Realist and Ramparts and The Minority of
One have any effect in combatting the impact of mass
media, or do they just speak
to a relatively small number
of people?
Kr: I don't have any illusions as to the effectiveness of the minor media. I
think it is essential that they
exist, but .... When it first
began, The Realist was very
anti-clerical.   But   I   became
bored with that, and I knew
that if any changes are going to come about in the
Church, they will come
from the inside, not from
outside agitators like myself. On the other hand,
there is is an escalation of
the peace movement in the
U.S.  It was  started by the
SEE: MORE KRASSNER
(Continued on pf three)
The Great American Tea Ceremony
I don't really enjoy smoking pot,
man—I just dig the ritual...."
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 8 e?\'
Some more Krass
(Continued from page two
New Left, and these magazines helped to involve large
masses of middle-class
people in the anti-war
struggle.
pf: I understood that the
peace movement was foundering, and that many people,
particularly i n Berkeley,
are turning to LSD and
mari-juana as a personal solution to their failure to influence the course of the
war.
Kr: LSD is of course no
escape from reality. It actually brings you closer to
reality, to see what your
own motivations are. You
have acidheads who think of
the peace movement as a
game, and there are people
in the peace movement who
think of LSD as an escape.
But there is another angle.
There are many people in
SDS and SNCC who take
LSD and are at the same
time very active. So the two
are not mutually exclusive.
You can have your acid and
eat it too.
pf: There are those followers of the acid cult who
say that if only Johnson was
turned on to LSD, the war
would be over in five minutes.
Kr: I think that's bulls—t.
All they are doing is projecting their own peaceful
feelings when they are on
LSD. But what really happens is that it intensifies
your own outlook. I am an
atheist, and under LSD I
feel very ' atheistic. Religious people have religious
experiences. Hermann
Kahn who writes on nuclear
game theory and calculates
plans for the criss-cross
bombing of China has taken
LSD, and it hasn't changed
his political outlook.
pf: What does it say about
American society that so
many young people are
turning to the personal involvement that LSD provides?
Kr: It has to do with the
bigness of things, and the
getting away from nature.
It's not so much American
society, but civilization in
general. People begin to forget their place in the universal scheme of things.
They begin to think that
there HAVE to be subways,
that there HAVE to be miniskirts, and they forget that
these are just products of
our contemporary culture.
What LSD does is make
some people realize the artificiality of many of their
values. There are so many
false values in contemporary life, that for many
people LSD helps fill a void.
The unfortunate thing is
that in the process LSD itself may become a false
value, like a panacea.
pf 3hree
pf:   Why   are   LSD    and
marijuana illegal?
Kr:  There   are   several
theories, some of them economic. One says that the
liquor manufacturers are
lobbying to keep them illegal, because if everybody
turned on, their sales would
decrease. It is also an emotional thing. It is also political in the sense thatif a politician wants to get elected,
he will not publicly advocate the legalization of pot.
Pf: Once, when asked if
you were a Communist, you
said that you were a human
ist.  Can you  tell me what
a humanist is?
Kr: Being a humanist is
essentially making a value
judgement, that man is more
important than the cockroach, that progress is more
important than destruction,
that niceness is better than
cruelty. In certain principles there is not much difference between humanism
and Christianity, except that
humanism has no supernatural basis.
pf: Humanism then seems
to be a general attitude, a
feeling rather than a political position. Is it not necessary to have a political position in a particular political situation, like say the
Viet Nam war?
Kr: Well, I think what
happened in the New Left
is that much of it is based
on a humanistic philosophy
rather than any left-wing
ideology. What they say
about Vietnam is that, on a
humanistic basis, it is wrong
for these people to do these
things to those people. It is
wrong, because it is inhumane. That comes first, and
second comes, for some
people, the feeling that it is
say, the economic system
which provides for this inhumanity.
msw^& ^rfs- <\^mmj®mMzmmmmm
Coming:
FELIX GREENE'S
CHINA
Thursday, November 3 — Auditorium — 50 cents
A Film Society Presentation
SUITS!!    40  only
40 to 507o OFF!!
Regularly 59.50 to 125.00 - Sale 39:50 to 69.50
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 5
^V^ 4445 \
MENS WEAR
4445 West 10th Ave.
EDUCATION SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
FROM SAN FRANCISCO
Bruce Baldwin
Now at The Bunkhouse
folk
and The Great White Light  rock
plus
Joe Mock fo|k and b|ues
Has appeared at the Hungry i, and winner of Bunkhouse
Hootenanny Contest
Plus
Gerry Nakatsuka folk and comedy
Has appeared at the Bunkhouse and opened the
John York Music Hall in Victoria.
Education Auditorium Tues., Nov. 1,75c
I
C A N A
Our representatives will be visiting the campus
7th, 8th, 9th and 10th November
to interview graduating and post-graduate students in
the following disciplines who are interested in a career
in industry.
Regular Employment:
Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Mining Engineering
Engineering Science
General Arts or Science
Mathematics
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Physics
Chemistry   and/or   Physics
Commerce  or  Business
Administration
Statistics
Econometrics
An interview appointment can be made at your Placement Office on campus where you may obtain position
descriptions and information about the Company. If
supplies of these are depleted, please fill in the coupon
below and forward to us for immediate attention.
Summer Employment:
We will have a number of interesting openings for undergraduates in chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering, one, two and three years from graduation as
well as for undergraduates in chemistry, commerce or
business administration.
Summer employees, particularly those who will be entering their senior year provide the additional technical
manpower required to carry out many important investigations of a challenging nature.
DU PONT OF CANADA
Personnel Division, P.O. Box 660, Montreal, P.Q.
COUPON
Dear Sir:
Kindly forward immediately information on openings
for 1967 graduates and a copy of your booklet "From
University to Industry With Du Pont of Canada".
NAME
ADDRESS
FAC.  &  YEAR
(please print)
Page $
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28, 1966 UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL ST. ANSELM'S
Reformation  Service
(United)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
"The  Reformation   and  the
Age  of Automation."
Speaker: Dr. R. A. Wilson
7;00 p.m
TALK BACK      St
DEATH OF GOD"
(Anglican)
8:00 & 9:30 a.m. Holy
Communion
11:00 Martins
"A Word Only"
Anselm's
HAROLD  MacKAY
JIM McKIBBON
►
GRADUATING
STUDENTS
I
DON'T DELAY
Last Two Days: Today and Monday
Have Your
GRAD PHOTOGRAPH
Taken Now
The Mobile Studio is at the Stadium
Now and Until October 31
No Cost - No Appointment Needed
(This Service is Covered by Your Grad Fee)
CAMPBELL STUDIO LTD.
10th & BURRARD
736-0261
SPECIAL
EVENTS
Presents
Dr. George Novack
"EXISTENTIALISM
vs. MARXISM"
DR. NOVACK has been the author of countless books
dealing with American and World social and economic
problems. In addition he has published two books on
Malcolm  X.
Tues., Nov. 1st - Auditorium - 35c
COMING EVENTS-
Oct. 31 - Nov. 5 - China Teach In
Nov. 8—Merc and Andre, French Folk Singers. Evening
concert at 8 p.m. Advance tickets at A.M.S. on
Monday.
Nov.9—Maharishi Mahesh Ycgi—Spiritual leader of millions of Indians. 12:30 — Brock Hall — Free.
Nov. 10—San Francisco Mime Troupe —Major Event of
the year. Two shows 12:30 and 8 p.m. Reserved
tickets for evening at A.M.S. next Tuesday. "Through
infiltration we have discovered members of this
band have offensive body odor of the type called
"dirty - - - - smell" and others have strange feelings
toward their mothers."
SLIP AND SAVE
v,«;<<"
*r_r
-J-5^'
Beatles don't care
By MARY USSNER
I dreamt I faced God in my maiden form.
"I perceive, here in my majesty," he thun
dered, "how that all creatures be to me unkind."
"Yes God," I quivered, "they think you
are dead!"
The Almighty flashed a look of holy puzzlement. "These my people can look upon all
things beautiful and deny Me? My sons of
Adam can look upon spring blossoms, fiery
sunsets, and crystal mountain lakes and say
that I am dead?"
"I guess that's how it is, God," I dared.
"Ah! (holy sigh). We trusted overtly that
flesh, in the image of Myself, wouldst know
truth."
"D-d-doo you mean we're traitors? Slightly
iblinded?" I sputtered, blinded by the blinding light.
"Free will We granted to Our sons of
earth; free will to choose," roared God.
"You think we've freely freed Satan
then?" 1 asked.
"Jew and gentile couldst and have forsaken Us. They use the deadly sins damnable,
and thence blame Me for this their misery,"
he said.
"Nah! Don't think that, they aren't blaming you, God. What people really wants is
lots of reassurance. Maybe if You could send
back somebody good, like Jesus. The Beatles
might be more popular, tout they don't exactly care," I whispered.
For the moment I thought He felt unloved.
"Daughter of Eve, do not feel pity for the
Almighty. (Gee, he could even read my
thoughts! Rather understand that Beelzebub
skulks across the corners of the world in
search of souls to destroy.
•    •    •
"Thus I leave the people alone in their
life and wicked tempests. Iti maledicti, in
ignem eternum," (or as the French Canadians
would like to hear it: "Allez loin de moi
maudits, au feu eternel").
"I gather only those who justify my mercy:
Saint Kennedy, Saint Churchill, and . . .
Saint Johnson, who thou must know is soon
' to be so," he pronounced.
"Isn't there any hope for us at UBC, God
. . . isn't there?" I rasped, intimidated by the
severity of the Mostest.
"There is one hope my earthling. Go out
into the world and sow the seed. Convince
the population that it is not that I, in my
power and serenity, am dead, but that Lucifer
lives . . . Lucifer lives.'
"What the devil," I thought to myself. "It
doesn't really matter if God is dead . . . just
so long as that horny devil is dead!"
A servant of two critics
Editor, Page Friday:
I would like to express my
disgust at the arrogant rubbish that Mr. Simon Grabow-
ski wrote in your paper apropos the recent production of
Goldini's "The Servant of
Two Masters".
Perhaps his painful arrogance was deliberate but I
suspect that he was sincere
about his views on the function of the professional theatre. This function he felt was
to disturb the "cultural consumers", to supply puzzling
thoughts and shuddering discomforts.
I prefer to look upon the
function of the theatre as pri
marily that of entertainment.
If we are to believe Mr. Gra-
bowski's own testimony of
an audience with "gratitud-
inously smile - performing
faces and happy ha-ha-ha's",
then it would seem that the
play served its primary purpose.
I disapproved of Mr. Gra-
bowski's description of the
audience as a "large set of
well behaved responsible puppets" who should not be allowed "any threatre-evening
which is spiritually gratis".
MARDI GRAS TRYOUTS
OCTOBER 31 to NOVEMBER 4
MALES: Monday and Wednesday
FEMALES: Tuesday and Thursday
BOTH: Friday
12 - 2:30
STAGE ROOM - NORTH BROCK
This was nothing but irresponsible arrogance and lack
of diplomacy towards one of
the most vital elements of the
professional theatre.
Surely Mr. Graibowski
ought to know that in the
world of the professional
theatre the "cultural consumer" is at the centre. His
giggle or his groan is the
raison d'etre of the actor. If
he enjoys laughing you only
alienate him by forcing him
to cry.
Mr. Grabowski has every
right to sit through "innocent
harmless little amusement"
swearing under his breath
and craving a kick in his own
stomach.
He should not, however,
presume that what is toad for
him is toad for the rest of the
audience.
EDEN A. SHAND
Forestry 7
pf 4our
Friday, October 28,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page   10 Talon is
non-poetic
By MASSIMO VERDICCHIO
To criticize a booklet of
poems by amateur poets is
to ask oneself the question
of whether to praise the effort regardless of the context or to approach it at its
real value thus discouraging any potential drives the
writers  might  have.
I will keep a happy medium by making a distinction
between poems and non-
poems.
The non-poems in Talon
have only the conventional
structure of a poem. These
non-poems distinguish themselves by having nothing to
say, saying it vaguely and
using impressive words joined to one another with no
revelant results. A bad
match.
Many of them, zealously
praise sexual activities,
probably recollections of the
would-be-poets' high school
sexual education.
There are, though, a small
number of good attempts in
poetry that seem to justify
the effort of having them
printed. "Ysidro" is one of
them.
I prefer this poem to the
few other good ones for the
brief, clear imagery that appears throughout carrying
the poet's idea to its desired conclusion.
In "Ysidro" the saint's role
is not only justified but also
his existence as a definite
figure in our society is made
acceptable. C. D. N. Elsted,
the writer, probably
achieves more than he really intended.
It makes one think, and
the resulting ideas are not
at all superficial.
Why are there no more
Ysidros in this collection of
efforts? How could the editors that chose "Ysidro" by
the same judgment include
the others?
These poems show a lack
of conscious examination
on the part of the editors.
They suggest that they have
been chosen for the sake of
filling in space, not for their
merits. Give us a blank
space any day rather than
letting us waste time trying
to read something that is
not there.
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Page 11
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966 j't.'sw™** ***'
■*&';
Babbits in ivory tower
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
Serge Joyale, first president of the Union Generale
des Etudiants du Quebec, in
presenting his analysis of
student syndicalism made
the following critique of the
personalist philosophy typical of most North American
students.
"... the best safeguard
of the traditional school lies
in the cult of individualism
(personalism) .... The present system of aid to students contributes to the social isolation of the student;
student hostels, loans, fraternities or private societies
etc., this specific institutional complex and protection contrasts sharply with
the lack of services for the
rural and industrial working
youth. It shuts the student
in an ivory tower outside
which he never meets other
young people. On the fringes
of active society, cut off
from all social fluctuation,
the student prepares to
confront life .... The stu-
dent's intellectual conditions, like his social condition, make him a passive
and dependent parasite."
This phenomenon is evident at UBC. Students, do
not relate their needs and
demands for tuitionless education and a democratic restructuring o f university
government to people outside the ivory tower.
There  has  been  considerable   discussion   and   action
for  example  in the  outside
c o m m u n -
ity regarding
the   sentence
of four trade
unionists    t o
six   months
in prison for
violating   a n
ex   parte  in-
BOYLAN      junction.
There has been little discussion among students on
this problem. Most are uninformed as to the details of
the case. Most are suspicious
and hostile to the trade union movement. Unfortunately, there is little dialogue
between students and young
workers, thus compounding
our isolation from this major social issue.
At stake in the dispute
between labor and the
courts is the question of law
and social justice in this
age of technological change.
The particular event
which eventually led to the
imprisonment of Tom Clark
(IWA), Paddy Neal (Van.
Labor Council), Art O'Keefe
(IBEW) and Jeff Powers
(Marine Workers) began last
May. At that time, 275 workers, most of them women
i n their early twenties,
walked off the job at Len-
L e n k u r t Electric because
they were being forced to
work scheduled hours of
over-time.
Their grievance itself is
supported by law, contained
in the Maximum Hours of
Work Act.
The Act was never invoked, however. Instead, Len-
kurt management, which is
controlled by the multi-million dollar U.S. owned General Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, applied
to Judge MacDonald for an
ex parte injunction to forbid picketing of their property. The injunction was
granted.
Ex parte injunctions can
be granted at the request of
only one party in a dispute.
At no time were the actual
grievances of the Lenkurt
employees given hearing by
the courts.
It has also been emphasized by trade unionists that
there is no law compelling
judges to grant such injunctions. Some even challenge
the legal right of judges to
issue them.
Yet once the injunctions
were granted and the workers violated them, the
question for Judge MacDonald and Attorney General
Robert Bonner became one
of maintaining public order
and respect for the law.
The conflict thus assumes
a new proportion — law,
justice, the ordering of society. J. C. McRuer, former
Chief Justice of the Ontario
High Court and member of
the Ontario Law Reform
Commission, spoke last August to the Montreal Bar
Association, on this very
topic in reference to his position as head of Ontario's
Royal Commission on Human Rights.
He challenged the suggestion that the average
man has less respect for the
law than his predecessor.
"I am not prepared to admit there is decline in respect for law. If there is a
decline in respect for laws,
legislators, lawyers and
judges have failed to develop just laws and just procedures appropriate to the
social changes brought about
by the scientific developments of this century."
He continues, "Unjust
laws   have   in   abundance;
some of a legacy of other
days when standards of justice were different than
they are today; others forced on us by impatient legislators who are more concerned with rules than justice."
"What is it that we call
disrespect for law? Is it a
disrespect for law or a disrespect for laws? Is it a disrespect for law or a frustrated craving for justice? Is it
disrespect or disillusionment
that has developed into a
sort of rebellion?
"Order, like law, to be
respect must deserve respect. Disrespect for an order that does not deserve
respect ought not to be condemned as degeneration but
commended as healthy regeneration.
"What I am concerned
with is that lawyers and
judges too often regard order as a shield for the protection of privilege through
laws that have prevailed in
another society and procedures that are incompatible
with modern-day living."
This over-view is particularly important in view of
Judge Freedman's report on
automation and technological change in the railway
industry. Workers he claims,
can not be expected to bind
IMPERIAL
€sso
SERVICE
MARKETING
(Sales,  Merchandising
and Operations)
Students Graduating with a
Bachelor or Masters degree
in
1967
Engineering — all  branches
Commerce
Arts  (General)
Science (General)
Agriculture
IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED
Has Vacancies In 1967
in the following departments
MANUFACTURING
(Refining)
Students Graduating with a
B.Sc. or M.Sc. in
1967
Chemical  Engineering
Mechanical  Engineering
Civil Engineering
1968
Chemical  Engineering
Mechanical  Engineering
PRODUCING
(Production  and Exploration)
Students Graduating with a
B.Sc. or M.Sc. in
1967
Engineering — all  branches
Honours Geology
Geophysics
Honours Mathematics
Honours  Physics
1968
Geological  Engineering
Engineering  Physics
Honours Geology
Geophysics
IN ADDITION, PERMANENT AND SUMMER VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS UNDERTAKING POSTGRADUATE
STUDIES IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND CHEMISTRY IN THE RESEARCH DEPARTMENT AT
SARNIA, AND IN THE PRODUCTION RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT IN GALGARY.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR REGULAR EMPLOYMENT ARE ALSO AVAILABLE IN THE CHEMICAL PRODUCTS, BUILDING PRODUCTS, AND COMPUTER SERVICES DEPARTMENTS.
Our Representative, MR. R. G. INGS, will be on the campus on
NOVEMBER 7th, 1966
to make interviewing appointments for students enrolled  in the above courses
who are interested in filling the advertised vacancies.
MR.  INGS will be located in the Studnt Placement Office on  the West  Mall.
Friday,  October 28,   1_?66
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  12 swsJfpyn
come on out
themselves to a two or three
year contracts without having a decisive voice in the
use of new techniques within the plant.
At issue is the powerless-
nes of workers. The same
powerlessness, in fact, that
plagues students. Neither
group has the power to
make decisions which affect its main activities in
life, whether at the job or
in the university.
Both groups have potential forms of negative power.
For the worker, this is his
ability to collectively withhold his labor and prevent
others from displacing him.
Yet the tendency has
been, to deny the possibility of strike action by the
use of the courts and injunctions.
It is natural that workers
view courts and laws which
deny them their only source
of power as unjuest.
They are faced with the
same dilemma as the Negro
in the U.S. — whether to
obey an unjust law or commit civil disobedience. The
workers and trade unionists at Lenkurt chose civil
disobedience.
How do students relate
to this situation? Undoubtedly for many commerce
and law types, Sinclair
Lewis's    Babbitt    mentality
still holds. "A good labor
union is of value because it
keeps out radical unions,
which would destroy property. No one ought to be
forced to belong to a union,
however.
"All labor agitators who
try to force men to join a
union should be hanged. In
fact, just between ourselves,
there oughtn't to be any unions allowed; and as it's the
best way of fighting the
unions, every businessman
ought to belong to an employers' association and the
Chamber of Commerce.
"In union there is
strength.. So any selfish hog
who doesn't join the Chamber of Commerce ought to
be forced to."
Many other students, however, relate the demands of
working people for j o b
security (hence a voice in
management) and better
wages, to the demands of
students for a voice on the
Board of Governors and the
elimination  of  tuition   fees.
In both cases, the demand
is for broader participation
in decision making, for a
more democratic and open
society.
In viewing the situation
of the four imprisoned trade
unionists, the emphasis
should not be placed on the
Tom  Clarke  and  Paddy  Neal
side  by  side
fact of violation of law, but
on the need to change the
laws which do not conform
to the needs of our society.
Laws can be changed; and
not just by electing, new
legislators. When laborers
from Tolpuddle England
were transported for the
"seditious offence" of "administering unlawful oaths"
to members of their union,
public outrage forced a reversal of that decision.
William McCarthy, editor
of The Labour Statesman,
concludes from that experience: "From a multitude of
similar cases it could be
argued   that the   real   im-
petous for legal change is the
man on the street. He more
than any of the ponderous
deliberations of legislator
or scarlet-robed judge compels law to keep pace with
the times.
"If the real goad to legal
change is the ordinary man
... it is because it is he who
invariably must endure injustice most. Hence he is
more aware of injustice
than many of the spiritless
bodies which inhabit the
splendid isolation of our
courts."
We students too are common men. If we share the
analysis   of  McCarthy,   Mc-
Ruer, Frecdman and others,
we should join our voices
with those who demand
freedom for the jailed trade
unionists.
If so inclined, we could
meet trade unionists at the
Court House Nov. 3 when
the appeal of sentence will
be heard.
If we are not that committed, the least we could
do is discuss the issues of
the case. There is no reason
why students have to live in
an ivory tower.
pf 7even
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Page  13
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966 c
A
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CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-  3005 W. Broadway   -:-   RE 6-9012
THE DEATH OF GOD
IN OUR TIME
TALK BACK
St. Anselm's
Church
University Boulevard
Sunday Evenings
7:00 to  8:00
Death of God
- Oct. 30
Short address followed by questions
and  comments  from   the   congregation,   concluding   by   8:00   p.m.
Coffee  Hour  follows  for  those
interested in further discussions
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Honors Mathematics
Company Representatives will be on campus November 7, November 8, November
9, and we would invite you to arrange an appointment to discuss the opportunities
with our Company. Please see the Company Brochure available now at your Student  Placement Office.
Khartoum  doomed
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Basil Dearden used to make serious little problem
pictures in England, which contrived to be simultaneously
melodramatic and dull, while never quite coming to grips
with the problem. The same faults persist now that he has
graduated to the epic. Khartoum is another well-intentioned failure.
What success there is lies mainly in the large-scale
action sequences, which are splendidly staged — but this
may well be attributed to the second unit director, Yakima
Canutt, ex-king of the Hollywood stuntmen, rather than
to Dearden himself.
The film aspires to ibe a serious political study — yet
the basic underlying motives of Gladstone's foreign policy
are never explained; the result is a decided bias in favor
of Imperialism and Gordon. But Gordon is also a shadowy
figure, half vain mystic, half stock epic hero.
The blame must be laid upon the writer — for the only
decent performances in the film are Ralph Richardson's
grouchy Gladstone, and Charlton Heston's magnificent
struggle with an inadequate script as Gordon.
Creating a total character out of personal mannerisms
and tricks of speech, this must be Heston's finest screen
performance — the film also, alas, witnesses Laurence
Olivier's worst. Wearing the leftovers of his Othello makeup, he portrays the Mahdi in a style closely modeled on
Leo MacKern's high priest in Help! A few supporting
actors dutifully roll flashing eyes beneath their lavish
makeup.
Khartoum is strictly for the camels.
Art gallery: ten years
of craftsmanship
"Ten Years of Painting"
by Gordon Smith which
opened Tuesday, in the Fine
Arts Gallery, runs until
Nov. 12.
The painting is fine. It
starts with Smith's well-
known flowershapes, a little
over-repetitive, a little too
well-known.
Travelling down the wall
through subtle ochre landscapes, it undulates through
bright elegance and soft
ephemeral bursts to pits of
red spiralling back from
"Spinning Square".
The retinal pieces are
some of the most honest the
Gallery has seen. Honesty
plays through the fourteen
seriographs in typically
modest disciplined Gordon
Smith fashion.
"Their given forms, whose
scale always seems to be
exactly right," is aptly com-
mejnded 'by Professor Anthony Emery, whose foreword appears in the brochure.
•    •    •
Faithful followers will be
glad to summarize the
work of the internationally-
known but locally-developed work of Gordon Smith
who is both a major articulator of the west coast country school and a fine technician in his own right.
Some   of   them    stood
amongst the canvases loaned
iby eminent Canadians like
Pierre Burton and Lawren
Harris. They began with
sandwiches in 1954 and ended up with cake at the seriographs.
It is comfortable, painterly, and disciplined.
Friday,  October 28,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  14 Comrade
Mate not
so great
By ODNAMRA
Comrade Mate is at it
again.
As usual his subject is Viet
Nam.
The problem is clear. The
Americans are the bad guys;
the North Vietnamese are the
good guys.
It is refreshing to know
that amongst all the confusion there is one mind that is
clear and stands out like a
bright beacon in a sea of
darkness.
• •    •
As usual he writes from a
well informed point of view
knowing in advance the position of the North Vietnamese
government. Refering to that
fiend's (Johnson's) aid offer
he says, "The offer is not going to be accepted, or even
seriously considered by the
North Vietnamese."
Of course his statements
are always back by facts, "In
fact of course, until the American bomlbdng of North Viet
Nam the war had 'been a civil
war, begun and fought by the
South Vietnamese."
His examples are vivid and
very demonstrative, "...
North Viet Nam could no
more end the war than could
Canada have ended the American Civil War."
• •    •
He continues with the facts
as to why North Viet Nam
will not accept American aid
offers. These consist of his
wondering whether America
will act in good faith and
brilliantly suggesting that the
North Vietnamese will not
want American handouts.
He shows a deep understanding of the North Vietnamese after having lived
among them people for ten
year. (He had to return;
sciatica you know, suffered
from planting rice in the
rice in the people's communes near Hanoi.)
He gives accurate statistics
about the standard of living,
"Her people, though they had
to work hard, were no longer
starving as in the days of
white colonialism, and they
were gradually improving
their standard of living." (He
should know he was there.)
• •    •
Comrade Mate goes on to
show how wonderful things
were before the Americans
came and ruined everything.
He cites South Korea as an
example of American stupidity. Again he backs up his
statements with facts,
"Among South Korean children the incidence of scurvy
and beri-beri — two diseases
due directly to malnutrition
—is one of the highest in the
world."
#:f * f    ^ "K
Mi^J^***
V$9»*.
fe#;
WH
RED MAGIC, Ghelderodes'
play in three acts at the
Frederic Wood Studio Nov.
2 to ii.
He concludes by stating the
true issues at stake in the
war, outlining his solutions
and remarking on how the
North Vietnamese will accept
the offers. He says, "They
will dismiss them as mere
rhetoric, designed to obfuscate the true issues involved
in the Vietnamese conflict."
•    •    •
We should all be proud to
have such an open minded
newpaperman as Comrade
Mate.
There are rumors that he
is about to leave and take up
a position with the Red
Guard Daily.
Please Mate don't go!
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Page    15
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966 a#»<^   V!'!"
China on Guard
By BERT HILL
It seems that Canadians have never had
a moral crisis over selling grain to China but
have been a little more worried about listening to the words from our trade partners.
Perhaps there is some insidious threat
involved in listening to them.
UBC's students may be unsophisticated
politically speaking to some extent, but it
is highly unlikely a "red scare" would
attract any support on campus. A teach-in
on China supported by several campus radicals including Dr. Willmott of the UBC
faculty will take place next week.
Attempts have been made to put out a
"fact" sheet at UBC by some unidentified
right wingers "revealing" the organizers of
this event. The difficulties of tieing the
communist label on several speakers were
more humourous than anything else.
Little reaction followed from the sheet
due to its limited distribution.
The China Teach-in series will run from
October 31 to November 5 and will include
speakers on a wide variety of topics about
China including the highly publicized but
little known Red Guard.
The Red Guard, what is it and how long
has it been formed? Newspapers have been
filled with stories of this group of resurgent
young Chinese activists but little is actually
known about them.
According to a recent article in the
National Guardian the Red Guard began as
a movement of left wing students who
wanted to protect themselves against reactionary school authorities.
The first organization connected with
Chinghua university began at the end of May
1966 but only came into view June 6.
Other schools organized various groups
with similar ideas but with different names
such as the Red Eagles, the Red Banners and
the Red Flag.
According to one youthful organizer the
group's big chance came in late August. The
National Guardian quotes him as saying:
"Chairman Mao said he was joining the Red
Guards and let us put the red armband on
him.    This was at a rally on August 18.
"Then people of all ages wanted to join,
even children and old people."
Originally the Red Guard was limited to
select groups such as children of pre 1945
party members, and those whose parents
were workers, poor or lower-middle class
peasants and liberation armymen.
"This was to guarantee a class basis of
a revolutionary type," said the organizer.
Later the gates were opened to include
young and old alike.
The Red Guard have streamed steadily
into Peking and according to another
organizer in charge of statistics 470,000 had
contacted the Red Guard liason centre between August 27 and September 12.
The Red Guard is evidently interested in
stopping a creeping capitalism.
Through consulting police and neighbors
the Guard has unearthed quantities of gold
and silver bars, illegally held arms, money
dating from Chiang Kai-Shek and old land
deeds from land since redistributed through
land reform.
These objects taken from "class enemies"
were quite a revelation for some young Red
Guards.
"Some had never seen such things and
did not know what they were" said a Guard
leader.
The Red Guard admitted they had over
stepped themselves occasionally.
One young female named Chan-hong
(Fighting Red) who had changed her name
from Hsu (Elegant) had this to say: "We
have guarded against mistakes by mutual
criticism and by frequent summing-up and
discussion of our actions.
"We have learned that one should act
by reasoning and not by coercion."
As. in any organization there are slip ups.
The Red Guard had theirs with street renaming. Some streets were renamed by
several groups whose activities were not
co-ordinated. Many streets were named
Anti-Imperialist St.
"The final street names will be determined by municipal departments in consultation with the Red Guard," said Fighting Red.
This story goes on to say that the Red
Guard takes the works of Mao as their
primary authority and feel at liberty to write
to him.
While many of the Red Guard are in
Peking they frequently go into interior
provinces such as Kwangsi to observe the
area. "We all like to get experience in other
provinces," said Fighting Red.
ff IGen
NOV. 9=NOV. 9=NOV. 9=NOV. 9
8:30 PM.
8.30 P.M.
The pipe-dream presents
==IN CONCERT^^
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE I
I^MUDDY WATERS^
ITOM NORTHCOTT TRIOi
=QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATREi
Z__= Tickets: Vancouver Ticket Centre & All Eaton's Stores ZZZZ
Friday, October 28,   1966 T H E      U B Y S S E Y
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to be held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 R.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.M.S. Office).
1967 CANADIAN UNION OF
STUDENT NATIONAL SEMINAR
CO-ORDINATOR
Applications are now being received for the Co-ordinator of the 1967 Canadian Union of Students National
Seminar to be co-hosted by the Universities of British
Columbia and Simon Fraser in AugustJSeptember,
1967. Please state interest, experience, faculty and
year. Further inquiries and applications should be
directed to Miss Daphne Kelgard, Chairman, Canadian
Union of Students Committee, Box 153, Brock Hall.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEES
Applications are now being received to select students
to sit on joint student-Administration advisory committees concerned with:
1. Food Services
2. Traffic and Parking
3. The Bookstore
4. Student Residences
Applications in writing stating interest, experience,
faculty and year should .be submitted to the A.M.S.
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
C.U.S. CONFERENCES and SEMINARS
Letters of application for the Laval Seminar on "La
Greve" (the Strike) to Ibe held on November 9^12 are
being received by the CUS Committee, Brock Extension 258. Applications must toe in by November 1.
Applicants must speak French. Further information
from the CUS office 224-3242 (local 43).
Letters of application for the 7th Annual Conference
on Commonwealth Affairs, Jan. 24-28, 1967, will be
received until Nov. 3. The top will be Independence,
Instability and International Tension. Further information from the CUS office Brock Ext. 258.
Letters of application are toeing received for the McGill
Conference on World Affairs, The New China and
International Community, Nov. 9-12th. Applications
must toe in by Oct. 28. Further information at the
CUS office, Brock Ext. 258.
Letters of application for St. Paul's College 3rd Annual Conference on Canadian Affairs, "A Critique of
the Canadian Press", to toe held Jan. 27, 28, 29 will
be received until November 7. Further information
from the CUS office, Brock Ext. 258.
The Leaders
of
Tomorrow
Must
Prepare Today
Participation in the COTC provides familiarity with service life to
young men and an opportunity to decide whether they wish to make a
career in the Regular Army or serve as part time officers in the Militia.
Above all, the COTC provides valuable leadership training and technical
knowledge  leading  to the Queen's Commission.
The training is for a minimum of two years: One night a week at
University and during the summers for approximatey mid-May to the end
of August.
COTC students receive Full Pay as Second Lieutenants during the summer
plus travel expenses, room, board and uniforms. During the Winter Session the COTC student receives three-quarters of a day's pay each
training night.
On completion of COTC Training the qualified officer is not obligated
to serve further.
Regardless of one's future career the holding of the Queen's commission is proof of ability to succeed.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: CAPT. D. I. WttUAMS, ARMY RESIDENT
STAFF OFFICER AT THE ARMOURY.
Page   16 Friday,  October  28,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   17
TO CANADA  CUP?
Birds aim for top
in soccer league
UBC's soccer Thunderbirds come face to face with first
place    Saturday    at   Varsity stadium.
Birds play North Shore the
team they are currently tied
with for first place in the
Pacific Coast League. Each
team has nine points.
Coach Joe Johnson has the
happy problem of deciding
which members of his healthy
team will play.
But the results of the game
is more serious. "We must
get into full stride early in
the game or we're in
trouble," Johnson said.
The stakes are impressive.
The league winner will represent British Columbia in
the Canada Cup playoffs. The
Cup is emblematic of soccer
supremacy in Canada.
No UBC team has made
the    national    playoffs    but
JOE JOHNSON
... all the way !
Johnson     says     this    years'
Birds can do it.
And they deserve support.
Game time is 2 p.m.
JVs SING SWAN SONG
The UBC Football Jayvees'
season ends , Sunday against
the Seattle Cavaliers.
Cavaliers, a semi-pro team,
specialize in tough crowd
pleasing football.
Varsity coach Frank Gnup
is pleased with Jayvees' development and will bring
several players up to the
varsity squad for the remain
der of the season.
Among the players he
mentioned were Blair Mc-
Carry, Dave Penner and Don
Walden.
Coach Gnup also named
Gordon Hardy as a strong
candidate for quarterback
next year.
Game time is 2 p.m. Saturday at Wolfson field.
Grads  haunt
gymn   tonight
The annual Grad-Varsity
basketball games always
provide top entertainment.
This year's game goes tonight at 8:30 p.m.
Coach Peter Mullin's
Birds will face ex-stars like
Bob Barozzuol, Gene Rizak,
Dave Way and Mike Pot-
konjak.
Harry Kermode, a Thunderbird star of the late forties, will coach the Grad
team.
Slocks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos   Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACES
"War on the Agrodome Floor"
FOREIGN STOCKS
A cross between  stock car
racing  and a  demolition
derby.
AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Children   under  12   FREE  with  Adults
wlwt
Vancouver £ki Jair
TONI SAILER    -    ART FURRER
JIM McCONKEY
in person skiing on the Queen E. stage
-„.   ...---Thrilling   90   minute   movie   of   skiing   in   the ..,,   „,—c
SM   WC9I Northwest    personally   narrated   by J""   Kite
FASHION SHOW
Elmer   Gill  plus  II
A hobby full of displays, ski
equipment, fashions, c lubs,
shops,  and ski areas.
November 3—Q.E.T.
Vancouver    Ticket    Centre,    all    Eaton's   Stores,   Town
TICKETS:   Country   Home   Furnishing  —   Kerrisdale  and   Richmond
$1.50  and  $2.00.
DOORS: 4 p.m. to midnight. SHOW TIMES: 6 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.
ARLBERG
THE ORIGINAL SKI HUT
Cordially invites you to attend their
Eighth Anniversary Open House
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 9 p.m., Nov. 2, 3, 4.
Meet ski expert Art Furrer (Nov. 2) and Toni Sailer (Nov.
3) - 2 - 4 p.m.
(Refreshments and Gifts)
ARLBERG
SPORT HAUS
Downtown at
816 Pender at Howe
and  at Whistler Mtn.
The Western Look was never better looking.
Rugged, comfortable, tough enough for day-in
dayout hard wear. In split cow-hide and corduroy. Take your pick partner.
$25 to $40
Sty* <&tg VUtfr Stpp
FOR YOUNG MEN
550 GRANVILLE   MU 1-7814 ■FOCUS-
BCIT courses draw the action-minded
By BONI LEE
They do a lot of doing out
there.
And the emphasis on action over abstraction has sent
1,200 students, many from
universities and industry, to
the British Columbia Institute of Technology.
The sprawling industrylike (building complex in
Burnaby opened in 1964, the
first post-secondary technical institute in the province.
Since then, its enrolment
has doubled and its students
and instructors have evolved a philosophy that stresses
work.
NO SLOPPINESS
"We don't tolerate sloppi-
ness or backsliding — we do
something about it," vice-
principal W. S. Adams said.
"We always watch our students. If problems develop,
somebody burns energy to
help him," he said.
Many students have at least
one year of post-secondary
training.
Bill Hawk, editor of the
BCIT newpaper, "Link", attended the University of
Hawaii and UBC.
"People get tired of chasing nebulous ideas. They
come here to learn to do a
job and nothing else," he
said.
"You   get   a   concentrated
course and better equipment,
more individual attention and
practical  training,"  said  one
student.
STRONG   MOTIVE
"BCIT students are very
highly motivated," says
Adams.
Students agreed.
"The average person here
knows what he "wants more
than the average person at
UBC," said one.
Students leaving BCIT do
so not through failure but because their educational concept does not fit that of
BCITs.
Recently a former UBC
student told an instructor,
"This isn't what I wanted,"
and returned to UBC.
But student council president Eric Shulz, a former
UBC engineer, now a second-
years BCIT technologist, believes 25 per cent of UBC's
engineers should be at BCIT.
MAKE  YOU  WORK
He said,  "The learning facilities are class A. I think it's
pretty good. The courses make
you work."
Other     students     agreed
courses were hard.
"Much more scope is covered. They try to cram
everything into two years
time.   But   all   core   subjects
are oriented to the technology
studied," said one student.
"Before we came, we thought
it would be fairly easy, but it's
not; it's hard," remarked two
broadcast and technology students.
"You're supposed to be
able to come directly from
high school but a large percentage of us don't," a male
student noted.
"Selection is fantastic.
There is a preference to high
caliber students," said Shulz.
70 PER CENT
One instructor reported the
average mark of his students
was 70 per cent.
A surprising number of
BCIT students come from
UBC or other universities.
Some attend BCIT through
compulsory hospital programs; others come directly
from industry.
"Financially, you're better
off out here," said Shulz.
BCIT had its first commencement exercises in September. Some 420 students received their diploma of technology.
By August, all graduates
had found acceptable positions in industry.
The BCIT student is a university program graduate.
His course takes two years
and will cost $360.
His normal course load is
a 35 hour week: seven classes
a day, five days a week.
APPLY PRINCIPLES
BCIT students study fundamental scientific principles
and applies and verifies them
in laboratories. Practical training and training with equipment is emphasized.
Technology students spend
as much as 60 per cent of
their  time in  laboratories.
Student recreation facilities come in for more criticism.
There is one student lounge
in BCIT. There are no food
or drink vending machines,
but there is a cigarette machine.
Students must walk to the
cafeteria at the rear of the
complex   for   coffee,   an   un
to  smoke or  eat  in  class  or
skip lectures.
"We even have fire drills,"
one girl ventured.
Student council agreed the
administration has a lot of
power.
"We're still working on
our constitution. Our first
draft fell through with the
administration. We threw out
a clause that allowed them
final say,"  said Shulz.
The   four   bulletin   boards
glass and lock and
Student works at
draughting
feasible feat during ten minute breaks.
Students have one large office, and it is presently shared with the grad photographer.
There is no gymnasium
and all social activities are
held  outside  the  institute.
BCIT student council boycotted commencement exercises in September to protest
the postponement of student
union building and playing
field plans.
Commencement speaker
Deputy Minister of Education Dr. Neil Perry later announced plans to build a student lounge in the new library and a playing field by
1970.
Students also grumbled
about lack of communication
among themselves.
BCIT does not have a public anouncement system, and
until this year, students had
only one bulletin board.
SPLIT  LUNCH
With split lunch hours, it
is impossible to hold a mass
meeting.
Some   students   compared
BCIT  to  senior  high school.
Students are not permitted
are under
key.
VICTORIA  PUSHES
"But the administration
gets the push from up top
(Victoria) which the university doesn't,"  said Shulz.
BCITs dress regulations
met with little opposition.
"I think they're terrific,"
said Shulz.
Vice-president Brian Dins-
dale commented, "Most of
the guys go right into industry and the first thing they
do is put on a tie."
Very rarely does anyone
rebel against dress regulation.
TEACHING  GOOD
Most BCIT students feel
the quality of teaching is
good.
Some feel the instructors
know a lot but don't know
how to put things across to
students.
The majority of instructors
come right from industry
and take an institute teaching  course.
"Coming right from industry, I'm enthused by BCIT's
educational concept," said
broadcasting communications
instructor P. L. Sanderson.
"I'm enjoying BCIT very
much," said R. C. Starr of
civil and structural engineering.
"The discipline problem is
very, very light," physics instructor B. Z. Burgel commented.
EAGER   TO   LEARN
Chief electrical and electronics instructor R. E. Rids-
dale noted that students were
far more eager to learn and
far more responsive.
"We're   certainly   a   happy
DANCE TO
SOUL UNLIMITED
Technologists govern petroleum distilling in the BCIT lab.
Page  18
at the
ED. U. S.
"GREAT PUMPKIN" MIXER
Monday-Oct. 31 8-11:30 p.m.
Education Lounge $1.00 (75c with card)
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966 FOCUS
BCIT   has   its  own   closed-circuit   radio-television   setup.
and  harmonious   staff,"   said    UBC   are   staged   in   BCIT's    week,   it   seems,"   said   one
L. A. Taylor of electrical and    open air quadrangle.
electronics.
At the institute, knowledge
is applied in simulated technical situations.
The    medical    radiography
Building tech placed a modern    air    conditioned    out
house shack in one corner.
GOLD FISH
Electrical    and   electronics
lab, for example, is set up tech set up an acquatic dis-
in a standard hospital situa- play of 16 gold fish in the
tion   with   operating   tables,    BCIT pond.
dummies,   and   an   entrance
bathroom.
The   broadcast   and   corn-
Students have even been
unceremoniously dumped into   the   pond.   (This   practice
munications lab has a closed has  since  been  discouraged.)
circuit  television   and   radio Mechanical tech has a cog
unit, including a  color tele- wheel symbol called Sammy
vision camera. Stud.
The hotel, motel, and res- Sam    was   hoisted   on    a
taurant  management   lab   is crane in the construction area
set-up with front desk, furn- until  he   mysteriously   disap-
ished rooms, linen closet, and peared.
fully equipped cocktail bar. Rumor   has   it   that   Sam
BCIT   drinks   have   the
strength of colored water.
PER CLASS
The average BCIT class has
Stud is now pregnant.
Social life is good.
"There   are   parties   every
male.
"And there is one fifth of
a girl more per boy this
year," injected another.
BCIT males outnumber
BCIT females five to one.
BCIT is currently expanding to meet the needs of a
growing number of applicants. The institute's enrolment is expected to double
again in 1967.
Five new technologies will
be added to the institute's
program.
A new wing of labs, classrooms and lecture halls will
be built.
A library building and student auditorium - gymnasium
are also planned.
In fact, says BCIT principal E. Cecil Roper, "I am
overwhelmed by BCIT's success.
30   students.   Tutorials,   labs,
and seminars have as few as
eight  students  and no  more
than 15 students per instructor.
Rivalry    between    the    17
technologies   is   firmly   established.
The   mechanical    and   the
1 ARMSTRONG & REA 1
1         OPTOMETRISTS          1
1    EYES EXAMINED         2 Convenient Offices               1
■ -BROADWAY at GRANVILLE    I
■ CONTACT LENSES      .KERRISDALE   41 sit at YEW    1
technologies    are    currently
battling for control.
Stunts not unlike those of
IMPORTANT
NOTICE
to students  awarded
Government of British Columbia
SCHOLARSHIPS
if the award notice mailed to you in triplicate from the Minister of Education, Victoria,   has   not   been   handed   in   to   the
accounting office, this is to be done immediately
Fall Campus                   1
_____________■.*■ _■-__•■ _r-v ____________■
RAINCOATS
by
CROYDON
$]<p95
We Can Fit All Young Men
in   the   Latest   Styles.
Regularly $29.95
Take advantage of this
Manufacturers   Clearance
by
UNITED  TAILORS
BRITISH   WOOLLENS
549 Granville      MU  1-4649
Open    Fri.   till   9
Special Events, Academic Activities
and
Canadian Union of Students
present
the UBC
CHINA TEACH-IN
PROGRAM
The Teach In will consist of noon hour lectures every
day next week except Tuesday. There will be three sessions on the weekend starting on Friday evening at 8:00
p.m. "Eye Witness China", Saturday morning at 9:30
a.m. "America and China" and Saturday afternoon "The
Continuing Cultural  Revolution in  China".
Monday's lecture will be on the Red Guard. The lecturer
will be Clive Ansey a UBC graduate student who has
recently returned from studying in Peking. Auditorium
12:30 -  10c.
little lzppy cowers
ccmsternatipna-ly
xuidpt ttie wrea r
ot tastionia
tantaUaab^fl'.
-lappinesg is a ttiiuf
caned.iHimtim. Vae,°
ovposiie of wlucJi is
oub-of-tuition,.
\qJpvU(.&in~.
8h tiarv! said a
irieany in the
registrar's o£fk:e.
ft-is tuition time
ejgain!
rfreaftgdtfes! said
l&pbxette. tuition
time usually »ieans
like moKey. xh& follow
feeling tluaV Somehow
a#*2mpaiu£Slan.
empty pi^yi»anK».
and-sundry
circumstances
dc similar sorrow.
lappy was about- to
i-irow in the carrot*
and gk a job a* a
waitress in, a health,
food shop whea, m a
fiV of rampant-
■t&cdlUcivon, She vhaxgu?
cS her friendly teiuK,-
he- explained to Tier
an about tlie
government -b&pked
Student loa_a bit'.
a. Xosm lent"
<£houid1>e „
"Wisely spent...
VMY BANK7
to multitudinous many.
Bofm
^tie tajtly of nuwvtreal
ckxa't-
liave to worry aioiit1
a thing!
So site- ramped down
-town, and purchased
a whole zvew f anoy
wardrobe.
She lias anotJier
appoirvfc'rriervt" with,
:bprnorrow.
guese why.
i4ea.
Friday, October 28,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
cattipasbatik branch
in, \he. BuXtniiiishralion building
Page  19 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Revised bible pondered
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Dr. Wilch discusses bible revision at noon Monday in Ang.
104.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting   today   at   noon   in
Bu.    1221.    Hear   Marc    and
Andre. Today is the final day
for payment of dues.
SUS
AWC—M e e t i n g   today  at
noon in Henn. 200.
MUSSOC
Second audition for singing
and acting, Saturday at 11:30
a.m. in the auditorium. Banquet Saturday night at 6:30 in
Brock.
CHINA TEACH IN
Special events, AAC and
CUS present China Teach In
Oct. 31 to Nov. 5. First lecture Monday, noon, in the
auditorium. Admission 10
cents. Topic will be The Red
Guard; speaker, Clive Ansey.
MAA
Meeting   today   at  noon   in
Gym.   211,   for   all   interested
in promoting men's athletics.
CHRISTIAN  SCIENCE
Testimony meeting   every
Friday at noon in hut 0-12, between Education building and
West Mall.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
All members coming on the
field trip meet at the lab at
8:30   Sunday   morning.   Bring
lunch  and warm  clothing.
EUS
Engineers sign up for chariot race pulling and police
squad. List on bulletin board
■—bring grubby t-shirt for race
Thursday.
POETRY READING
American poet Robert Huff
will read poetry today at noon
in Ang. 104.
HELLENIC  CULTURAL SOC
Prof.   A. W.  Wainman   will
show   Photographic   Impression of Greece on Monday at
7:30  in   International  House.
SKI  TEAM
See   ski   movies,    including
Ski  Colorado  Friday  at  noon
in the  auditorium.   Admission
50 cents.
VCF
Jack  Shaver  speaks  on the
student: Himself and God, Friday at noon in Ang.  104.
ECONOMICS SOC
General   meeting   today   at
noon in Ang. 213.
IH
Fall fair tonight and Saturday at   IH  and Pan  Hellenic
House. Dance Saturday night
at IH.
UBC SOCREDS
MLA Herb Bruch speaks on
Pollution    and    Buttle    Lake
at noon in Brock lounge.
FILM SOC
Filmsoc   presents  six   showings   of   Felix   Green's   China
Thursday   in   the   auditorium.
Admission 50 cents.
DEBATING UNION
Forum debate today at noon
in  Bu.   217.   Topic:   Resolved
that Sudent Protest is No Protest.
DEBATING UNION
International debate Monday at noon in Ang. 110, UBC
vs the British Debating Team.
Topic is Resolved that the
Welfare State has Sapped Individual Interest.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
General meeting Monday at
noon in Bu. 203.
NDP
MLA Ernie Hall speaks   on
NDP—the   next   three   years,
Monday at noon in Bu. 204.
GERMAN CLUB
Would   you   like   to   speak
German?  Meeting at noon today in Bu. 203.
CIRCLE K
General meeting Monday in
Bu. 2205.
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack speaks today at
noon in Ed. 206, on Inspiring
Creativity.
WUS
Meeting Monday at noon in
Brock council chambers.
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting Monday in
Bu. 223.
GEOPHYSICS
Gary Boyd speaks on Ionosphere   and   Magnetic   Micro-
Tex a columnist,
not a communist
In Thursday's Ubyssey in
a 'Tween Classes announcement, Tex Enemark was referred to as an "outspoken
communist".
He is not.
He is an "outspoken columnist" for the B.C. Liberal
Federation's p u b 1 i c a tion,
Young Liberal Voice.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE    DINNER    JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE    COSTUMES
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
CA 4-0034  4397 W. 10th
DOZENS OF
Enthusiastic Engineers
are on our payroll  now —
and we need more!
See Your Student Placement Office
for information about
^■OLUMBIA ^MELLULOSE
VANCOUVER. BRITISH COLUMBIA
pulsations, Wednesday at 3:30
in Henn. 301.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
All students come to the
Hallowe'en Party at 8 p.m.
Saturday in the Lutheran Centre.   Admission   35   cents.
Alan Solly Pullovers ...
English  Double Weight
Lam
bs Wool
11   new
Pall shades
1 Alexander/
k      $16.95
I  Power '
1        MEN'S
V       WEAR      .
{    759 Granville
1            and
*       Oakridge
Shopping Centre
Coming:
Felix Green's
CHINA
Thursday, November 3
Auditorium
50 cents
A Film Society Presentation
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST—ONE MAN'S BLACK RAIN-
coat with girl's purse in pocket
at Amouries' Homecoming Dance
Sat.  nite.  Please call 733-1020.
LADY'S     WRISTWATCH      LOST
Thursday.  Please  phone  278-1594.
LOST   BLACK   WALLET   FINDER
please  contact   277-3861.
REWARD — FOR WALLET LOST
in Brock Lounge last Wednesday.
Must have I.D. and papers. Phone
Bill 224-1961.
LOST IN GYM AFTER THURS-
day's rally, lady's gold watch
with back inscribed. Reward
phone 738-8915 after 6.
SECOND YEAR LAW NOTES
lost. They were in a black four-
ring binder. Finder please call
Dave  at  YU  7-4746.   Reward.
AN AUTOMATIC SILVER WATCH
was lost in War Memorial Gymn
on Tuesday. Contact Ken, HE 3-
6218.  Reward.
Transportation (Cont'd)
RIDE   WANTED   FROM VICINTY
of    Lonsdale    and    13th, for    8:30
classes.     Phone     Sonja 733-0393,
after   6.
RIDERS WANTED M-F, KINGS-
way and Joyce. Three late labs
every week.   Phone   433-8070.
Travel Opportunities
16
FOUND: ONE LADIES' RING IN
Buchanan washroom. Contact the
Ubssey   Publications  Office.
WILL THE RIDER WHO FORGOT
Roller's book ULTRAVIOLET
REACTION in my car Monday
pick it up in the Department of
Asian   Studies   Office.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took the wrong UBC jacket from
the Chem Undergrad wing outside of room 472. phone Garry at
224-9845   in   Room   4.
Greetings
12
Coming Dances
12A
PUSSY GALORE AT THE BLACK
Cat Ball, October 29th in The
Armory. Dance to the novel sound
of the Brave New World from
8:30 to 12:30. Admission $1.25 per
person. Costume optional.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome.
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further Information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
POETRY CONTEST: UBC's LITER-
ary Guild announces a contest open
to all UBC students. Entry fee:
25c per poem, limit 25 lines maximum. Payment: one contributor's
copy, and prize of $5 for best poem
published. All rights reserved. Address entries to 'Literary Guild
Contest', c/o BE 259, Brock Hall.
DEADLINE:  Dec. 1, 1966.
HAIR CUTS WHILE YOU WAIT!
Campus Barber Shop. 153 Brock
Hall.
TALK   BACK   AT   ST.   ANSELM'S
Church   Sunday   7:00   p.m. "^
ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD
are represented at the Fall Fair
at I.H. and Pan-Hellenic House
tonight 7-12 p.m.,  Sat.  2-12 p.m.
FROM SAN FRANCISCO— BRUCE
Gladwin (now at Bunkhouse) and
the Great White Light folk rock
group. Joe Mock — folk, blues,
Gerry Nakatsuka — folk, Tuesday, November 1st. 7:30 Education   Auditorium  75c.
ATTENTION — CREATIVE STU-
dents. Open House wiants a theme
symbol for construction. Submit
design to Prof. Lionel Thomas
Lassere Building by Nov. 4. $25
prize  for  winner. 	
(WP) PAPUA. CANNIBALS ATE
one Treasure Van salesgirl. Masks
and   boomerangs   unpalatable,
hence    intact.     Koala     bears    ran
amuk wit elephants.
Transportation
14
RIDER WIANTED: ANY POINT
on 41st Ave., for 8:30's. Maurice
434-9907.
RIDE WANTED. NEED A RIDER?
from West End (Harwood) Mon.
to Fri. Call Bob 6S4-0748.
VISIT CHINA .FOR 50 CENTS
Auditorium, Thursday, November
3.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE: 1964 TRIUMPH, RADIO,
rebuilt engine, 1 year guarantee.
Only |1,050. 224-6857.
HONDA DRIVERS
COLD?
WET?
HIDE WARM AND DRY ALL
WINTER!
I will trade my 1954 Olds Rocket for
any   50cc   late   model   motorcycle
complete with accessories.  This is
a one owner car in excellent running   condition.   Only   65,000   well
cared  for miles  since  new.  Some
of    the    features    include:  - power
brakes,   automatic   trans.,   custom
radio,   backup   lights,   seat   belts,
undercoat,  tinted glass.  Tires and
battery   almost   new.
Will trade, or sell for $225.00. Phone
733-1078   or   drive   by   and   see   at
rear of 2171 W. 1st Ave after 5:00
p.m.	
1958 HILLMAN, GOOD CONDI-
tion, new brakes. Must sell immediately. $450. Call Sandy, 731-
4344.
FOR SALE '57 FORD, EXCELLENT
cond., w.w., radio, etc., $450 or
best offer.  988-9354.
'58 JAGUAR XK-150 Coupe $1,035.
Phone Bob, Room 213, Sherwood
Lett,   224-9752.
1950 PLYMOUTH, GOOD CONDI-
tion. Recent engine overhaul. Offers  738-8180 after  6  p.m.
MUST SELL OR QUIT SCHOOL!
'61 Corvette, excellent condition.
Two  tops  call  Jim   LA   2-0467.
1954 ZEPHYR IN GOOD RUNNING
order and body. A-l, phone Ber-
nie 224-9064 $145.
1958   AUSTIN   A55   GOOD   TRANS-
portation.   best   offer   922-6419.
ANCIENT MORRIS, LICENSED
ready to run. Good motor, rubber,
about   $90.   Phone   736-9463.	
1955 MK VII JAGUAR, AUTOMA-
tic, stored since 1961. Head off
for valve grind. Licensed. Best
offer or trade on almost anything
portable, 3508 W. 17th Ave. RE
8-1971   or  736-5036.
'56 FORD, $195.00. RADIO, V-8
Standard must sell, phone Kit
Taylor,   CA   4-1753  or  CA  4-0781.
Accessories ft Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them  all  at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%    Student   Discount)
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
HAND CARVED
Teakwood chairs and lamps from
the  orient.
Unpainted single pedestal desks
$14.95 and up. Unpainted double
pedestal desks $24.50 and up. Unpainted chests of drawers $11.95
and up. We now have over 5,000
sq. feet of floor space to serve you
better.
KLASSEN'S FURNITURE MART
3207  W.   Broadway   -   RE   6-0712
Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store.
TREASURE VAN ARRIVES MON-
day at International House. An
exotic bazaar of handicraft goods
on sale from 12 to 5 during the
day and 7 to 10 evenings, through
to   Saturday.   Admission   free.
Scandals
39A
HAVE A PEEK UNDER THE
bamboo curtain, Thursday, November   3.    Auditorium.    50   cents.
FRUG! JIVE! THEY'RE DOING
everything to the Trinidad Steel
Band at I.H. Sat. 9-12 p.m. Visit
the  fair  too!
Tailoring
41
EVERYONE COME TO THE FAIR!
At I.H. and Pan-Hellenic House
tonight   7-12   p.m.   Sat.,   2-12  p.m.
Typing
43
TYPING   SERVICE
Mrs. Gail Symons
3885  W.  12th Ave. CA  4-6435
ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED
70th & Granville
263-4530
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
COMMERCE GRADS '67: ATTEND
briefing sessions and job interviews being held on campus —
Government of Canada.
Briefing: Oct. 26, 12:30 to 1:30,
Rm. 214 Angus Bldg. (Refreshments will be served.)
Interviews: Oct. 27 & 28, Student
Placement Offices, West Mall.
DELIVERY BOYS WHO KNOW
UBC and have own cars. Late
evening work. Modest salary plus
car allowance. CA 4-0833 — 4423
W.  10th.
WANTED. EXPERIENCED BLUE
and ryhtm guitarist. Phone Ber-
nie   936-1559.
GOOD HOT DINNER IN THE Exchange of hour's kitchen duties on
campus. Nate, RE 3-2105 after 6
p.m.
WAITRESS APPROX. 17-30 YRS.
to work Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat.
and Sun. — approx. 30 hours
must be pleasant and hard worker. Experience not essential if
quick learner. CA 4-0833 — 4423
W.  10th.
Music
63
FOLK
bers.
GROUP    REQUIRES
Phone   929-2769   Steve
MEM-
INSTRUCTION  —
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available next week.
Limited Number. Order now, only
75 cents from Phrateres or publications  office,  Brock  Hall.
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.	
SONY 102 TAPE RECORDER AND
5000 ft. tape, new condition. Phone
224-9029.  Dick,  room 9.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock. 	
FOR SALE: 2-SPEED TAPE RE-
corder $45.00; several 5-tube electric radios $9.95 each. Phone TR
4-5025.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
DOUBLE SLEEPING ROOM. Private bath, entrance, Seven mln.
walking dist. from Brock. Mrs.
Boyce,   224-5700.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR MALE
student. Private entrance. Share
shower, toilet. Phone 224-5883 —
3917  W.   11th.
DISSATISFIED WITH YOUR Accommodation ? Room available
November 1, Southlands area —
off Dunbar, $45 per month —
Bathroom and shower adjacent,
use of kitchen, washer/dryer —
10 minutes to University along
Marine Drive — 15 minutes Dunbar bus — Phone before 10:30
a.m. or after 5:30 p.m. — 266-
2696.
BASEMENT  ROOM   NEAR GATES.
Call  224-1581.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD, CLOSE TO
UBC gates.  Share. Phone 228-8380.
RM. AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Phone   224-9665.   PSI   Upsilon.
Furn. Houses 8e Apis.
83
WANTED SR. FEMALE STUDENT
to share apartment. Quiet non-
smoker with two of same. Phone
731-8832 after 10 p.m. Granville
and Mathews,  car pool.
Halls  for  Rent
85
FURNISHED AUDITORIUM FOR
rent. 50 cents per day. November
3 only. Sharing with 800,000,000
Chinese.

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