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The Ubyssey Apr 7, 2014

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Array NO POOL FOR YOU
DJ DOUBLE FEATURE
NEST IN THE MAKING
LIVING THE DREAM
S&SSJ
Mr
^Itmvm // Page 2
WHAT'S ON l    THIS WEEK, MAY WE:
MONDAY   07
HOWTO BE
MORE COMPASSIONATE
8 P.M.-9 P.M. ©GREEN COLLEGE
In this lecture, education psych
PhD student James Floman says
mental practices can change a
person's capacity for compassion
Free
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
TUESDAY ' 08
BLOCK PARTY/LDOC
2:30 P.M.-9:15 P.M. @ MACINNES FIELD
It's what you've been waiting
for all year long: the last day of
classes. The Weather Network
says there's 90 per cent chance
it'll rain, butthatshouldn't
dampen the performances of Dan
Mangan, Adventure Club and the
like, right?
$30
WEDNESDAY' 09
RESUMES THAT GET
RESULTS
12 P.M.-l P.M. @ IRVING K BARBER
Learn key tips on how to master
the job application. Volunteer career advisors will offer
practical guidance to support
your job search during these
lunchtime sessions.
Free
THE
COVER
HENRY HOLA I SON DOPO ON
INTERVENTO INIZ10 AD
HERE PROBLEHI DI HEMORI
A BREVE TERHINE
HENRY HOLA I SON
INIZIO AD
AVERE PROBLEHI DI HEMORI
BREVE
Our cover is inspired by Wired Italia's illustration by Chad Hagen. The fax paper going
from the mouth to the head is the informationyou eat, you know, since our cover story
is aboutstudying and stuff. Illustration by Indiana Joel.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
^|THE UBYSSEY
4^
APRIL7.2014 | VOLUMEXCVI ISSUE Lll
EDITORIAL
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coordinating@ubyssey.cs
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Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
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eopy@ubyssey.es
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The Ubyssey Is the official stuclentnews-
oaper of the University of Rrirish Cn-
urnbla. It is published
anclThursclaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
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Editorials are chosen and written bythe
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Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
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=HOTO COURTESY SAM ROCHA
The move from North Dakota to the West Coast shouldn't be too hard for philosophy of education prof Sam Rocha, as he is
already in touch with his woodsy, forest-dwelling side.
New prof Sam Rocha excited
to accept "dream" job at UBC
Harsev Oshan
Contributor
University acceptance season has
been going on for some time and
usually Twitter is abuzz with
celebratory status updates by
those who are newly admitted to
UBC — but not all of those people
are students.
Sam Rocha is a professor who
will make the move to Canada
from Grand Forks, N.D., to start
teaching at UBC in the fall. He
also took to Twitter to share his
excitement.
"In grad school everyone said
that it's crazy to think that you'll
get a job specifically tethering
to your subfield. And it is!" he
tweeted back in March.
Rocha will be joining the Faculty of Education where he will
be teaching courses in philosophy
of education through the lens of
political theory.
"To be honest, it was like a
dream. I never thought in my life
that I would have a job where I
would be a philosopher of education," he said. "This is what I have
been trained for. For me, from
the moment I got the offer, I had
every intention of accepting it.
Rocha was born in Brownsville, Texas, next to Matamoros,
Mexico, and ended up living in
Utah, Ohio and a few years in
Mexico. He did his undergrad
degree in philosophy in Spanish
literature in a small liberal arts
institution called Franciscan
University and went on to pursue
his master's at the University
of St. Thomas. Rocha finally
obtained his PhD in education at
Ohio State.
Rocha has taught at a variety
of educational levels, ranging
from elementary school-level
Spanish to college-level history.
He currently teaches educational
foundations and leadership at the
University of North Dakota.
I don't want to sound
too gushy about it,
but for me, really
this is a best-case
scenario. I hope to be
at UBC for a long time
— I don't plan to just
stop in for a while.
Sam Rocha
Incoming education professor
Apart from his passion for
philosophy, Rocha also has a
strong passion for music. His
background is in folk music, and
he came into jazz about 12 years
ago where he performed with a
few groups.
He recently launched a campaign on Kickstarter to raise
funds needed to record Late to
Love, an album that blends his
artistic side with his academic
side. The songs are inspired by
soul, jazz, folk music and the
confessions of St. Augustine.
"The campaign was on Kick-
starter to pay for the upfront cost,
so studio time, musicians and just
logistics for travel time," he said.
"It has a small record label that
will be carrying it.... They will
be covering the post-production
costs."
The campaign closed on March
20, having gotten 153 backers and
raised $8,250 of his $8,000 goal.
As with new incoming students, Rocha is eager to find his
place at UBC.
"I'm excited to find some open
mics, and I'm excited to find
some little book groups. To me,
that's what's exciting about the
university — it is a unique place
where you can find both intellectual and artistic cultural pockets
to fit in."
And his excitement extends to
Vancouver as a whole.
"Vancouver has so much to
offer. [The] Pacific Northwest is
just an amazing place culturally.
It's exciting to me at all levels.
"I don't want to sound too
gushy about it, but for me, really
this is a best-case scenario, and
if everything works out, I hope
to be at UBC for a long time — I
don't plan to just stop in for a
while." XI
Congrats to our newly elected
2014-2015 editorial board!
Coordinating Editor
Will McDonald
News Editors
Veronika Bonderanko, Jovana Vranic
Culture Editor
Jenica Montgomery
Sports + Rec Editor
Jack Hauen
(more on p. 11)
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EDITORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
DEMONSTRATIONS »
REC»
=HOTO WILLMCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
An Anti-abortion group showed graphic images of aborted fetuses in front of the SUB, prompting protest from pro-choice groups.
Anti-abortion "Choice Chain" demonstrates outside SUB
Joshua Lee
Contributor
A group of UBC students held
an anti-abortion demonstration
outside the SUB on Friday.
Nine UBC Lifeline volunteers
gathered just outside the SUB for
"Choice Chain," holding graphic
posters of aborted fetuses and
distributing pamphlets promoting their cause. They remained
outside the SUB for around an
hour and a half, though Campus
Security ordered them to take
down their signs for not following proper protocols for displays.
"The main aim with Choice
Chain is to educate with abortion
victim photography, but also
to facilitate discussion, which
we think is really important,"
said acting Lifeline president
John Flores.
Their message did not go
unopposed. Several pro-choice
advocates also gathered in the
area, holding signs and distributing pamphlets of their own.
"Their explicit purpose of
being here is to deliberately
traumatize as many people
as possible, and those who
get traumatized, they want to
emotionally antagonize them,"
said Jamie James, a non-student advocate who attended the
protest. "They want people to
start talking and not be able to
stop talking, until they think that
this opens a magical window that
a fetus is a human being and de
serves some sort of legal protection that it doesn't have, and they
want the law changed."
Both parties remained in the
square for over an hour, handing
out their respective brochures
and speaking with passersby, but
despite apparent strong disagreements, no hostile exchanges
broke out.
"I'm glad that it's all out here,"
said Patrick McBeth, a first-year
engineering student. "It's never
nice to look at pictures like that,
but if you're goingto take one
side on this issue, it's definitely
right that the other side should
be out here."
Partway through the demonstration, Campus Security asked
Lifeline members to turn their
signs inward, since they didn't
book the space in advance. There
were also no warning signs
posted to let students know what
images they would be exposed to
in the area.
"There's a process where any
groups, whether pro-life or any
other group who wants to [set up
a display], they have to reserve
and go through the booking
process. They have for whatever
reason chosen not to do so this
time," said Campus Security
director Barry Eccleton.
Choice Chain was not the only
event Lifeline has hosted this
year. On March 19, they hosted Silent No More, an event where four
guest speakers spoke about their
experiences with abortion. XI
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC researchers design trees
that produce pulp easier
UBC researchers have created
genetically modified trees that
make it easier to break down to
produce paper and biofuel.
"We're designing trees to be
processed with less energy and
fewer chemicals, and ultimately
recovering more wood carbohydrate than is currently possible,"
said Shawn Mansfield, a UBC
professor of wood science.
Mansfield said one ofthe largest problems forthe pulp industry is lignin, which makes up much
ofthe cell wall in plants and must
be removed in a waste-producing
process. With this modification,
the lignin is easierto break down.
"It is truly a unique achievement to design trees for decon-
struction while maintaining their
growth potential and strength,"
said Mansfield.
Scientists want to talk about
the environment
Asurvey of more than 500 researchers indicated that scientists want to
get more involved in public discussion and policy decisions regarding
environmentalissues.
The study, conducted by the
Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC,
also found that scientists were
concerned their peers would disapprove of this, xi
CRIME »
RCMP still looking
for suspect, motive
in campus murder
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Five years after Wendy Lad-
ner-Beaudry was murdered in
Pacific Spirit Park, the RCMP have
taken on a new strategy for the
unsolved case.
At a press conference on April
3, five years from the day Lad-
ner-Beaudry was killed at the
southeast entrance to the park,
Sgt. Jennifer Pound ofthe RCMP
Integrated Homicide Investigation
Team (IHIT) said the RCMP have
yet to find the suspect or motive for
the crime, and believe a stranger
committed the murder.
The case was transferred to the
Special Projects Unit (SPU) ofthe
B.C. RCMP major crimes section on
April 1, though IHIT will continue
to work with them on the case.
"That transition is simply because
they [SPU] have the capacity to deal
with the enormous amount of work
that's still left to be concluded on
this file," said Pound. "There are a
high number of persons of interest
on this file that we are still looking
to identify."
Pound said a large number of
these individuals are homeless and
thus hard to locate, and some of
them have not been cooperative
with the police.
The IHIT team that took on the
case five years ago has since taken
E&&
u
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC3THE UBYSSEY
Ward Lymburner, officer in charge of the Special Projects Unit, spoke on Thursday. Sgt.
Jennifer Pound with IHIT and Peter Ladner, Wendy Ladner-Beaudry's brother, look on.
on 35 additional homicide investigations. Ward Lymburner, the officer
in charge ofthe SPU, said the unit
has 21 investigators, and some of
them will be assigned directly to
the case.
Peter Ladner, Ladner-Beaudry's
brother, said the family is pleased
about the new strategy.
"I think in fairness with the IHIT
team, they always have priority with
the most recent murder and this
one tended to get bumped down
the list," said Ladner. "Now that it's
getting this extra attention, we are
counting for this new effort to bring
closure to all of us."
The RCMP and the family of Lad-
ner-Beaudry asks that anybody who
thinks they may have information
about the murder to come forward.
"We lost a wise mother, a loving
wife, a compassionate sister, a loyal
friend, cheerful mentor, dedicated
community member, a healthy living advocate, a running companion,
a great Scrabble player," Ladner said
of his sister, who would have turned
58 last Sunday.
"I read recently that Pacific Spirit
Park is the most popular park in
Vancouver and that 97 per cent of
people surveyed think that their
parks are safe. Until this murder is
solved, this park is not safe. People
from all over the region who use this
park do not feel the same way about
it as they once did. They too have
lost a piece of their lives because of
this senseless crime," said Ladner.
Anyone with information is asked
to call the RCMP at 778-290-5291 or
Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.
Lymburner said there is no link
between this case and the campus
sexual assaults earlier this year. XI
UBC's only pool
expected to stay
closed until Apr 17
=ILE PHOTO COLIN CHIA3THE UBYSSEY
The pool was closed on April 2 after the
main valve failed.
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The only pool on campus is closed,
and is expected to reopen on
April 17.
The indoor pool and hot tub
closed on April 2 after the main
valve failed, according to Linda
Finch, senior manager of programs
and operations for UBC Athletics
and Recreation. The entire pool
is being drained in order to fix
the valve.
Finch said they will also try to
conduct regular annual maintenance on the pool during the closure,
which requires the pool to be closed.
The maintenance had been scheduled for December.
"We're trying to make the best
of a situation which was really unexpected," said Finch.
Finch said the sauna is being
repaired, and she is hopeful it will
be running by the end of May.
"April does seem to be a quieter
month, so it's not like January or
September when things are really,
really busy. So although it's never an
ideal time to close down a facility,
this is probably one ofthe better
months to close it down," said Finch.
UBC's swim team is currently
at the Canadian Swimming Trials
in Victoria, which continue until
Saturday. According to head coach
Steve Price, they are on break after
the meet until April 14.
Price said the team is currently in
the process of booking pool time at
Vancouver and Richmond city pools
for the first week back.
"With the permanent closing of
the outdoor pool and now the indoor
pool needing repairs, it is obvious
we need the construction ofthe new
pool to begin ASAP," Price said.
Brendan Andresen, shop manager ofthe UBC Aqua Society, said
the club will be relocating to Lord
Byng Pool in Point Grey for scuba
diving lessons in the meantime.
"[The closurej's obviously a big
problem for us, because we use
the pool several times a week and
we need it to do training because
we're running training all the time,"
said Andresen.
Andresen said the club has had
trouble booking the indoor pool
since the outdoor pool closed on
Feb. 28.
"It's a lot harder to book now
because there's so much limited
space," said Andresen. "Sometimes
we can't book [at all]."
However, he said UBC is doing
their best. "They've definitely
tried their best to work with us,"
said Andresen.
Lessons and rentals ofthe pool
are cancelled until the pool reopens.
According to Finch, anyone with
a pass to use the pool will have it
extended by two weeks due to the
closure, and refunds will be provided for lessons and bookings.
The Aquatic Centre will remain
open for use ofthe weight room and
steam room. XI NEWS    I    MONDAY, APRIL 7, 2014
QUEBEC»
6 arrested in Montreal student protest
Jill Bachelder, Carla Green and
Igor Sadikov
The McGill Daily
MONTREAL (NUW) - Between
5,000 and 15,000 protesters took
to the streets on the afternoon of
April 3 to call for the end of economic austerity policies in Quebec.
Demonstrators gathered at Place
Emilie-Gamelin and marched
for over three hours throughout
downtown Montreal.
The Association pour une solidarity syndicale etudiante (ASSE),
one ofthe student unions behind
much ofthe mobilization during
the 2012 student strike, organized
the protest. Approximately 60,000
students voted to strike on the day
ofthe demonstration.
The Service de police de la ville
de Montreal (SPVM) declared
the protest illegal before it left
Place Emilie-Gamelin, but let
the protesters march for about
three hours before intervening. In some instances, SPVM
agents blocked off streets from
traffic, and in others, protesters
wound their way through cars on
crowded streets.
At around 5 p.m., the SPVM's
riot squad charged on protesters
and ordered the crowd to disperse,
using rubber bullets and tear gas
to break up the crowd. At least two
people are known to have been injured as a result ofthe SPVM intervention — including a photographer
from The McGill Daily — while six
were arrested.
Benjamin Gingras, finance
secretary and co-spokesperson of
ASSE, said in an interview with The
Daily that ASSE decided to organize the protest to emphasize that
austerity was not the only option.
"We're here to show that there
are alternatives to austerity, there
are alternatives to the systematic
impoverishment of people who are
already precarious," he said
Alexa Conradi, president ofthe
Federation des femmes du Quebec,
7'V'^ A-
=HOTO SHANE MURPHY3THE MCGILL DAILY
Several thousand people took part in a demonstration against economic austerity policies in Quebec.
noted that austerity policies particularly affect women and other
marginalized groups.
"We're looking for a government
much more ... engaged in social
justice-oriented policies, or policies
... directed towards equality, and
that's just not happening, so we're
supporting the students here," she
told The Daily. "Women have been
working in [areas where jobs are
precarious] for many years, and it's
just getting worse under neoliberal
paradigms, so we'd like to see that
change."
ASSE had already planned
the march before the provincial
elections were announced by the
Parti Quebecois (PQ) for April 7,
but Gingras said it was nonetheless
"a pleasant coincidence that this is
a just a few days before the actual
vote."
Philippe Hebert, a software
engineering student at Concordia,
said he was there to protest how
the current government has dealt
with economic issues. "They're
pushing us into a corner and...
trying to tell us that... our debt is
too big, so that we won't ever be
able to have any services," Hebert
said. "But the only thing they're
actually trying to do is to take ...
the wealth from us and be able to
keep control."
The otherwise peaceful march
turned violent about three hours
in, as protesters arrived at the
intersection of Sherbrooke and
Pare. Commotion began after
SPVM agents ran into the crowd
and made several targeted arrests.
The police also used tear gas on the
crowd, and in response, protesters
threw projectiles, such as bottles,
at the police.
Some protesters saw the SPVM's
actions as a provocation. "It's horrendous," Louis-Philippe, a student
who attended the demonstration,
told The Daily in French. "The police are always provoking us."
One ofthe several riot squad
charges toward the end ofthe
march left a man lying on the
ground, bleeding from his head.
The man, who looked to be in his
50s or 60s, was later taken away
by an ambulance. A video clip
from 99%Media's livestream of
the protest shows the man falling
off his bike and clutching his head
following the riot police's charge.
Daily photographer Shane
Murphy was also injured during
the protest while he was taking
pictures ofthe protesters getting
arrested. One ofthe SPVM officers,
he said, shot him "point blank"
with a rubber bullet. He has since
gone to the hospital for his injury.
"[The impact was] like if you can
imagine getting shot by a paintball
times 10," he said.
Before the protest began, many
protesters believed that even
though the march had been declared illegal, the police would not
intervene. "I'm an older woman....
I've been to a lot of protests, usually everything goes fine," protester
Martine Lacroix told The Daily in
an interview before the protest
began. "The police presence seems
reasonable to me. I hope that
everything goes alright on both
sides."
In a phone interview after the
protest was over, Gingras told
The Daily ASSE was both surprised and unsurprised by the
march's conclusion.
"Yes, we're always surprised
that... we can't protest peacefully without being repressed and
brutalized by this police force
that [decides arbitrarily] when a
protest can take place and when it
cannot take place, but at the same
time we're not surprised because
we know how the SPVM behaves,"
Gingras said. "The protest went
very well; it was peaceful, until the
police decided to get involved and
ruin everything."
DIVESTMENT »
UVic group holds satirical rally for fossil fuel investment
Taryn Brownell
The Martlet
VICTORIA (NUW) - Divest
UVic used reverse psychology for
an April Fool's joke on campus on
April 1.
The group set up a satirical
rally around the fountain that
condemned the divestment movement and voiced the need for the
University of Victoria to invest
more in fossil'fuels. According
to a press release, the rally was a
part of a nationwide day of action
against the fossil fuel industry,
known as "Fossil Fools Day," that
spread from Tofino to Halifax.
Along with a replica of a pump-
jack made of cardboard and a long
replica of a pipeline, the group
displayed signs with such sayings
as "We heart climate change"
and "Big oil needs big love." One
member ofthe rally, UVic student
Malkolm Boothroyd, sported a
jacket covered in the logos and
names of oil companies and spoke
to the crowd through a microphone. He started off by saying
he was finally wearing an outfit
he felt fully comfortable in.
"It is unacceptable that the
University of Victoria only has
$20 million invested in the
fossil fuel industry," he said to
the crowd. "We must put even
more money into bankrolling the
most destructive industry on the
planet. The University of Victoria
must put pipelines, petroleum
and pollution in its portfolio."
Standing with Boothroyd were
three supporters ofthe divestment
movement — or, for the sake of this
rally, supporters of investment.
Among them was Matt Hammer,
current director of finance and
operations for the University of
Victoria Student Society and ardent
supporter ofthe divestment movement. During Boothroyd's opening
speech, Hammer held his protest
sign high and shouted in agreement
as Boothroyd satirically encouraged
the crowd to support further investment in fossil fuels.
Alongside the rally was a Divest
UVic table where passersby had
an opportunity to sign a petition to
support divestment. The movement,
which the U VSS board of directors
voted unanimously to support in
February, calls for UVic to immediately freeze all further investments
in fossil fuels as well as divest (that
is, remove their investment) from all
existing fossil fuel holdings within
three years. They are currently
circulating a petition to present to
the university on the matter. Their
goal is to collect over 2,000 student
signatures, as well as support from
faculty, staff and alumni.
In a press release, the organizer
ofthe rally, Emily Thiessen, said
satirically: "We know that UVic is
proud to invest in these compan-
Divest UVic held a fake rally against fossil fuel divestment on April Fool's Day.
ies when they're spilling oil and
poisoning communities in distant
indigenous lands, so why can't we
have these disasters happen right
here on campus?"
The point ofthe rally appeared
to be to get the attention of students
in a way that both shocked and
amused them. Boothroyd continually referred to the fossil fuel industry
as the "dirtiest industry on the planet" and spoke ofthe importance of
bringing such a destructive industry
to UVic. He said the Divest UVic
movement was trying to take power
away from the fossil fuel industry.
"When you hear the news about
another climate-related disaster —
another oil spill, another fracking
operation poisoning a community's
=HOTO TARYN MARNELL/THE MARTLET
water source — whenever you hear
about this destruction, it's great to
be able to open up your investment
portfolio and see the names ofthe
corporations responsible right
there," he said in jest. "And I fear
that if divestment takes away the
financial and social wherewithal of
the fossil fuel industry, then these
catastrophes might stop." II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
MOVIES »
WINE»
Vampiric video
UBC grads maie feature debut with Afflicted
UBC grads Clif Prowse and Derek Lee directed, produced and starred in Afflicted, a found-footage vampire horror flick.
Jenica Montgomery
StaffWriter
Have you ever wondered what
it would be like to actually be a
vampire? Not the young-and-
beautiful-forever kind, but a real,
bloodthirsty beast? UBC alumni
and local independent filmmakers
Clif Prowse and Derek Lee explore
this unnatural illness in their first
feature film.
Afflicted, a documentary-style
film directed by and starring
Prowse and Lee, follows the lives
of two best friends as they embark
on a trip around the world. One
night changes everything for
the two friends as it becomes
apparent that Lee's character has
contracted an incurable plague.
The film captures his transformation and the psychological and
emotional turmoil that naturally follows as he becomes an
inhumane animal.
"We were asking the question:
what if it were real? And what if
it were scary, even? We got rid of
all the stuff we didn't think was
necessary, and focused entirely on
living forever where homicide was
your daily activity, and the impact
it tolls on us psychologically and
emotionally, and there's no easy
way out," said Lee, who graduated
with a degree in Asian studies in
2001. "We got really interested in
the idea of exploring the depths
and the natural reaction of two
regular guys going through that
situation."
The two filmmakers took the
opportunity to reinvent the current supernatural horror genre
through a first-person documentary perspective. With pop
culture monsters such as those in
the Twilight, the current concept
ofthe vampire is vastly different
from the real fear of vampires in
the 1800s. In contrast, Afflicted
represents the concept ofthe
vampire as an incurable illness,
a life-changing plague that turns
a well-adjusted young man into
a beast.
We got rid of all the
stuff we didn't think
was necessary, and
focused entirely on
living forever where
homicide was your
daily activity
Derek Lee
Co-director
"Genre movies offer these
hyper-dramatic situations where
you're plunging people into the
most massive conflict you could
imagine," said Prowse, who received his honours history degree
in 2000."Sometimes it's supernatural, wartime, whatever.
"It's this heightened environment that really lets you put the
more human and personal aspects
of your personality under the
microscope because the situation
you're in is so intense."
Afflicted is already starting to
make waves in the film community, premiering at Midnight
Madness at the 2013 Toronto
International Film Festival and
going on to win a handful of
awards at Fantastic Fest. The
film is the first feature from
Prowse and Lee that has not only
been distributed in Vancouver,
but across the country and across
the globe.
"This is the culmination of a
lifelong dream to make a feature
film, and as local independent
film makers you're lucky if you
ever get to make a first feature,"
said Prowse.
The two filmmakers have been
working together since they were
16 — well before they started at
UBC, where they continued to
make films while they studied.
It was only after graduation that
they decided to make their passion
into their profession.
"Once we graduated, you were
about to go out into the real world,
or what are you going to do now,
and it was at that point that we
were like, 'Oh, you know, this
has been a fun hobby. What if we
try to make this a profession?'"
said Prowse.
"Once you take that step back
and look at it, it's incredibly surreal, humbling and exciting." Vt
Afflicted is now screening in theatres across Vancouver.
STUDENT
ESSAY
CONTEST
NEW CATEGORIES AND PRIZES
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2nd Prize:
3rd Prize:
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For complete contest details, visit:
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2014 Topic
For more information contact the Education Programs
department at student@fraserinstitute.org or by phone
?F   at1-800'665'3558ext.526.
The rise of crony capitalism: how government
and business gain at the taxpayers'expense
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MAY 30,2014
Celebrate the end times
A primer on sparkling vino
You, too, can be a We$tside Wine Sippa once you've learntyour moscato from your prosecco.
JOSHUA DEC0L0NG0N
Wine
The end is near.
As students sing bittersweet
praises to final classes and shed
salty tears on Facebook about
horrible exam schedules, hints
of sunny warmth ooze their way
through the solar system and into
our lives. It's "fear time" as much
as it is "beer time" (although when
is it not?), and the combination
of sunny promises and year-end
celebration makes the rest of us
want to pop open the sparkling
wine. But the hundreds of products confuse us, and we all want to
buy the pretty labels because they
make us look spicy and special
(and of course you are!) — but
let's look at four famous types of
sparkling wine.
Rules number one and two: all
champagne is sparkling wine, but
not all sparkling wine is champagne.
Legit champagne is the stuff
that comes from the French region
ofthe same name. Its premium
prices are largely due to image
and prestige, but its intrinsic
balance and finesse are not unlike
the liquid equivalents of classic
orchestral numbers. The northerly
climate of Champagne means that
these wines are generally of high
acidity, and mandatory aging on
the lees contributes to absolutely
delicious yeasty and bread-like
aromas. These wines can be
hard to appreciate, and sometimes the hefty price tags are less
than tempting.
Anyway, you just had a bad
exam and all you want to do is
get drunk.
The younger generation is
drinking more wine — and that
might explain both the drastic
increase of over 300 per cent in
sales over the past eight years
(by volume, in B.C.) of Italian
prosecco. Appealing here are
the easy apple and pear notes,
as are the lower price tags and a
fun-sounding moniker reminiscent of both an exotic-sounding
place and a porn star surname.
Where champagne sings with the
precision of a violin, think power
chords or Cyndi Lauper when it
comes to prosecco.
If there ever was an awkward
and underappreciated sparkling
wine, the unfortunate non-
award would go to Spanish cava
. It's similar to champagne in
terms of production method, but
that's where the similarities end.
Unlike champagne, cava's image
is that of Crocs, and some cava
producers are striving to rebuild
its image. Buy cava for some
earthy and lower-acid goodness,
and subsequently feel good about
the fact that you're helping out a
wine that feels like it's the new
character on Glee.
"Moscato" seems to be a word
that's slowly moving into Vol-
demort-level depths of spoken
blasphemy; maybe because it
tastes like stale Skittle juice at its
worst. But at its best, it tastes like
flowers, peaches and fresh bags of
tropical Skittles. Some of my wine
colleagues would scold me for
admitting to periodically wanting
to drink a bottle of cheap sparkling
moscato like I'm angry at it — but
much like sex, sometimes the bad
times aren't super bad. The wine
is an infamous subject in several
rap songs, so that's got to count
for something.
In any case, there's always a
sparkling wine to pair with any
sort of mood. Who really needs an
excuse? Cheers to that. V CULTURE    I    MONDAY, APRIL 7, 2014
PRO
TIPS
THE GREAT ENERGY EXPERIMENT
HOW TO STUDY LIKE A
BOSS
Study before bed: During
and processes what you've
learnedduringtheday.lt
is more likely to solidify the
things you learn right before
you fall asleep, so reviewyour
most important notes before
Get out ofthe house/library/
study space: Not only will
It's 11 p.m., and you've just opened up your textbook. Your final is tomorrow and you haven't studied once all semester. You have a choice
to make. It's not whether you should cram — that's already a given — but rather, what stimulant you should use to stay up.
The default option is, of course, caffeine, typically in the form of coffee or tea. However, some sources suggest that apples are an effective energy source — potentially more so than caffeine. But could it really be true? If you're planning an all-nighter or cramming for a final,
should you reach for the caffeine, or the fruit?
For the betterment of night owls everywhere, The Ubyssey commissioned two of our fine writers, Alexis Wolfe and Victoria Lansdown, to
find out the truth through an informal experiment.
On the first night ofthe experiment, our volunteers attempted to stay up as late as possible without imbibing any sort of stimulant. Then,
they waited a few days, and stayed up again — this time, drinking a standard Monster Energy drink at the time they would normally go to
bed. Lastly, after several more days, instead of going to bed at the regular time, our volunteers ate an apple. We asked both writers to reflect
upon their experience each night, and the experiment as a whole. The results may surprise you.
Editor's Note: This was not a scientific experiment. The data listed below is almost entirely anecdotal, and should be read for entertainment
purposes only.
DAY ONE
DAY TWO
DAY THREE
CONCLUSION
Alexis Wolfe
I was a
functioning
insomniac for
most of high
school, so I
figured staying
up one night
would hardly
phase me. I
soon realized
the significant
difference between being awake
by and against your own will. At
around 2:30 a.m., I felt the first
wave of drowsiness. Without
caffeine or any other substance in
my system, it was simply Tumblr
and Daily Show reruns keeping
me awake.
It wasn't a struggle to keep
myself awake until 4 a.m. rolled
around. At this point, the idea
of sleep became particularly
seductive. With no real panic
of an overdue paper or midterm to study for, there simply
wasn't enough demand to keep
me awake. Knowing this, I was
asleep by 5:30 a.m. With three
hours of sleep, I feel exceptionally
well rested. I don't know why I do
— however, I will not question it.
I am beginning to wonder whether or not regular sleep patterns
are just a social construct to keep
one from habitually watching a
different television series in its
entirety each week.
It's 10 a.m., and I haven't slept for
what I will attribute to a placebo
effect. As instructed, I consumed
a Monster energy drink at 11 p.m.
last night, then waited to see how
far it would take me. I'm convinced caffeine has no effect on
my wakefulness after working at
Starbucks, where I required six
shots of espresso poured into a cup
of dark roast coffee to keep me conscious. Despite this, I managed to
stay awake for the entire night, this
time with a task at hand. With two
papers due today, I figured their
completion would fit quite well
into this experiment.
The night started with good
intentions, but inevitably ended in
a haze of distractions. I believe one
can pass any amount of time aimlessly browsing the Internet while
they put off an assignment. But the
moment you realize you're browsing simply for the sake of browsing,
all those random articles, conversations and videos quickly lose
their lustre. That's what happened.
I was watching videos of live ABBA
performances by 3 a.m., and at
5 a.m. I was fully committed to
"Watch Nicki Minaj transform into
reptilian - ILLUMINATI conspiracy!" It's quite possible that the
Monster kept me up until 3 a.m.,
but the all-nighter was successful
purely due to self-indulgent procrastination and determination.
The apple-equals-energy idea is
a myth.
This time around, I only
made it to 5 a.m. I understand
that an apple sustains you with
a food-like kind of energy, but
it's nothing compared to the
God-given gift of caffeine. While
trying to imagine the sugar and
nutrients ofthe apple coming to
life and turning the wheels in my
brain, I couldn't help but wish for
a cup of coffee. As a night snack-
er, I'm sure I've accustomed my
body to understand that eating
is followed by sleep. Oftentimes
I'm asleep before my head hits
the pillow despite eating several
"energy bars" minutes prior.
I had a paper to work on last
night — however, it's not due
for a few days, so there was a
severe lack of urgency at play. It's
important to realize that proper
time management skills are fairly
important, and in actuality, there
is no reason to ever find yourself
stuck pulling an all-nighter. After
all, sleep trumps cramming.
Ultimately, your level of determination and panic will decide
how late you can stay up. I
suggest eating throughout the
night and drinking several cups
of coffee and tea as if it was 2
in the afternoon, not the morning. If cramming for an exam
or working on an assignment is
important enough to you, you
will physically will yourself into
staying up until it's complete. Or
you could just avoid this dilemma
altogether by practicing efficient
time management.
mm
#N.5TER
MiXXD
Ek,ErIqy + juic£
Victoria
Lansdown
On the first
night, I
studied for
my psychology midterm
the next
Friday, and
learned about
adolescent
development.
Even though
the material was interesting
and relatable, reading is not the
best way to stay awake. Actually, trying to stay up wasn't that
difficult, because I was also
hungry, and the hunger kept me
awake. However, trying to focus
when I was exhausted without
any extra source of energy was
hardly possible. I eventually gave
up studying around midnight and
watched a television show until 1
a.m., when I fell asleep after forcing myself to make it to the hour.
Surprisingly, on night two, I
was ready to stay up for hours
and finish my creative writing
assignment due in a few days,
but I passed out after an hour, at
midnight. Maybe it was my addiction to caffeine and the fact that
I drank two cups of coffee earlier
that day, but the Monster made
me so tired I had to sleep.
I drank the can at 11 p.m. and
it gave me a burst of energy, but I
must have used it up faster than
it took my body to produce more.
I was in the middle of writing
my creative writing assignment
short story when my eyes started
getting really heavy. At about
11:45,1 gave up trying to concentrate and watched television for
about 10 minutes until I decided
I had to sleep, so I went to bed at
midnight.
On the third night, March 26,1
ate an apple at 11 p.m. and was
able to stay up until 1:43 a.m.
That's the last time I remember seeing on the clock before
passing out.
It was much easier to stay
up on the third night, probably
because I had less homework to
do. I didn't have to spend all of
my energy on psychoanalyzing
scholarly articles or reading my
psychology textbook or doing
anything creative, so I was able to
stay up a lot longer. Also, I wasn't
hungry because I ate an apple —
so I was full, and ready to focus
on my television shows. I honestly think the amount of work you
have to do has just as much of
an impact on your attention and
energy than a cup of coffee or an
energy drink. The less homework
I had, the more motivation I had
to stay up. Also, I didn't use all of
my energy so quickly when I was
just watching television, so I was
able to stay up for a while.
3&
I can safely say the apple made
the biggest difference. I have had
a few days here and there when
caffeine didn't do the trick, but
it's never made me actually fall
asleep. I believe that my anticipation ofthe Monster working so
well caused me to use all of my
energy in one hour, so I had none
left by midnight. So, to all the
UBC students reading this: buy
some apples instead of coffee or
Monster and get ready to ace that
next test. Vt
m ■
lLLUSTRATION INDIANAJOEL3THE UBYSSEY MONDAY, APRIL 7, 2014    |    CULTURE
Sincerely Hana spins up a storm
MGH! protege experiments on stage
PHOTO COURTESY HANA PESUT
In addition to her work as a DJ, Hana Pesut is also a self-trained experimental photographer.
Reyhana Heatherington
Senior Lifestyle Writer
As a child, Hana Pesut would draw
floor plans in preparation for a
career in architecture. Today, as
Sincerely Hana, she designs the
musical framework for events
around Vancouver.
But it took some pressure for Pesut to start spinning vinyl. About a
decade ago, friend and fellow Block
Party 2014 perfomer My! Gay! Husband! — a.k.a. MGH! — picked up
some records and convinced Pesut
to use his extra equipment.
"He lent me his turntables and
told me to go buy some records and
learn how to D J," Pesut said. "Sol
was sort of pushed into it, I guess,
but it worked out great."
The moniker "Sincerely Hana"
also came by chance. As fledging
DJs, Pesut and two friends sent an
email to friends requesting name
suggestions. When they signed the
note "Sincerely Dani, Hana and
Justine," the name stuck, and the
trio went on to DJ together before
Justine went back to school and
Dani moved to New York.
Apart from the transition to
DJing as a solo act, Pesut also had to
get used to a lighter load that came
with the shift to digital media.
"When I first started DJing, I
played all vinyl and would lug all my
vinyl around and constantly be record shopping, but now I play MP3s
like most people," she said. "It's definitely a different way of DJing, but
I'm glad that I learned on vinyl."
Pesut now has a regular Saturday
night gig at the Biltmore Cabaret's
Glory Days. Whether she is playing
at restaurants, clubs or fashion
shows, Pesut tries to provide audiences with positive energy rather
than just playing songs and "being
done with it." She particularly
enjoys Glory Days since the DJ sets
are not bound by one genre.
"Usually [in] the early set we can
play weirder, slower indie stuff then
get into more club music," she said.
"It's nice that we are open to everything rather than just being club
music or just being rock and roll. I
have a hard time describing what
I play because I do play so many
different kinds of music."
At her last Block Party performance at UBC, Pesut remembered
the distinct "school's out for the
summer" atmosphere.
"I just had a really good time
because everyone's so happy to be
done school that everyone's in a
really good mood and really going
wild," she said.
The diversity of genres represented at Block Party 2014 gives
Pesut the freedom to spin a range
of tracks.
As much success as DJing has
brought her, Pesut is also a self-
taught photographer, and has
compiled a book of side-by-side
portraits of couples dressed in their
own clothes and each other's clothing. She is determined to maintain
variety in her professional life.
"I think it's important to just stay
open to trying new things and being
open to working in different fields of
creativity rather than just focusing
on one," Pesut said. "Some people
are really good at focusing on one
thing and being excellent at that,
but for me, I prefer to try a bunch of
different things and see where those
take me." Vt
MGH! an old school mixmaster
Local remix superstar a regular at Maclnnes
Jolin Lu
Contributor
Every night, Granville Street is
plagued with the sound of cliche
pop music.
MGH!, a fixture at the Biltmore Cabaret, is the antidote.
Jason Sulyma, formerly known
as My! Gay! Husband!, has been
playing the Vancouver music
scene for over 10 years, and is a
regular at both the AMS Block
Party and the Welcome Back
BBQ. Whether it's remixes of hip-
hop, rap, Icelandic melodies, or
even boisterous, classical Indian
music, Sulyma can always add a
twist to make the songs his own.
Sulyma's synthesizer-generated arpeggios bounce in the
background like minions on a
trampoline; his laid-back grooves
are juxtaposed with bustling
energy. MGHFs music is like the
Care Bears gone bad — ebullient
in appearance with a hint of sarcasm and mischief.
Sulyma, however, is modest
about his style.
"[My music] is lazy," he said.
"It's boring. I don't know. It's
easy-going, just like a house
party. I only started doing music
because there was nothing to do
and there were no parties back in
the day. I hated Granville Street
and I hated all those nerdy DJs. It
was kind of an 'anti' of everything
else I haven't been included [in]."
Despite being raised in Vancouver by white parents, much of
Sulyma's inspiration comes from
traditional Indian music. In fact,
in 2010 he released an hour-long
record based on traditional Indian music.
"I love Indian music," he said.
"I love Punjabi Takeover on
REDFM. I think Indian music is
=HOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Vancouver favourite MGH! is no stranger to Block Party.
the most forward-thinking. The
scale is just crazy, and also the
rhythm sections are the best in
the world."
Sulyma's prominence in the
Vancouver music scene may
mislead listeners into assuming
that music has always been his
true calling, but he never thought
about being a DJ until a police
officer gave him an innocent
suggestion.
"The cops kept coming to my
house and the same police officer
would show up every week or
two when I have house parties,"
Sulyma said. "One day he was
like, 'Why don't you go to the bars
across the street that don't have
anything?' I was like, 'That's actually a good idea!' Then I actually
took him up on it and I started
doing parties [at] weird places by
my house on Hastings."
Now far removed from his
days of lawlessness, Sulyma is
setting up his own venue with
a couple of friends. Boring or
otherwise, MGH! will continue
to support the local art scene. V
MGH! plays at the Biltmore Cabaret every Saturday from 10:30 p.m.
to 2 a.m.
How much longer are you willing to
wait for what you really want in life?
Get out of vour fishbowl!
Professional
Life Coach
Cecilia Lopez
V. +7789264022
@ cecilia@getoutofyourfishbowl.com
B www.getoutofyourfishbowl.com // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
MONDA1
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKERATHE UBYSSEY
UBC's Connor Moran, Ron Denischuk and David Maybury are one of three Canadian teams headed to Europe to take part in Red Bull's "Can You Make It?" competition.
ROAD TRIP »
UBC trio taking part in Red Bull hitchhiking competition
Natalie Scadden
Sports + Rec Editor
A week to get from London,
England to Berlin should be no
problem, right? That's the task at
hand for UBC students Ronald Denischuk, Connor Moran
and David Maybury. The catch:
they'll be travelling without
phones, cash or credit cards. All
they have to barter with is a case
of Red Bull.
Denischuk was browsing
around on Facebook when he
found Red Bull's "Can You Make
It?" competition and convinced
two of his frat brothers to apply
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for one of three spots for Canadian teams. "I knew it would
be a really cool thing to try, and
even if we don't get it it'd be
worth a shot," he said.
The application involved
making a one-minute video and
creating a team name. It wasn't
long before Salmon Force 5 was
born. "Connor's good at making
movies, so that was definitely a
thing, and also he did the Mongolia rally, which I thought would
be of benefit," said Denischuk,
of choosing teammates from his
FIJI brotherhood. "It's right
during the middle of exams, so
the hardest part was finding
somebody to commit to actually
come with us. We tried a few
people before Dave."
"I was just there. I didn't have
any exams and I was down,"
said Maybury, who had previously been called an "inefficient
human being" by Denischuk.
"I'll be on point this week for
sure. These guys will keep me in
shape."
In order to successfully complete the task, the trio will have
to clear a minimum of six out of
30 checkpoints scattered around
Europe. Passing through additional checkpoints might take
them out of their way, but it will
give them bonus points toward
winning the overall championship, and each checkpoint offers
an opportunity to win more cans
of Red Bull.
In terms of team strategy, the
group wants to keep it simple,
and admitted they didn't practice
hitchhiking at all. The plan is
to make use of their charm and
charisma, and to have no shame
while begging for food, shelter
and transportation. Luckily,
more than one member can speak
French, which should be an asset.
"We're pretty confident that the
people [in Europe] will be fairly
helpful [and] fairly friendly, so
that if we go up to them, it'll
work out," said Maybury. "Our
house pretty much functions on
a beggar system and we're pretty
good at getting our way in there,
so that's something."
The competition began on
Friday, April 4, and it could still
be near zero and rainy outside in
parts of Europe. Denischuk said
he is most worried about being
cold and wet and having to sleep
outside under a truck. Maybury,
on the other hand, said he has
spent a couple nights stranded
outside and it was no big deal —
he's most nervous about starving
to death. Having road-tripped
across Mongolia last summer and
done plenty of camping, Moran
is clearly the most experienced
traveller and seemed to exert a
calming influence on the team.
"We can't get robbed for anything other than Red Bull, so we
should be fine," he said.
While the group would love to
win the grand prize — a free trip
to any Red Bull-sponsored event
in the world — they acknowledged there are 99 other teams
competing, so the focus will be
more on enjoying the journey.
Their ultimate goal is to trade a
case of Red Bull for a flying mode
of transportation, giving a whole
new meaning to the slogan "Red
Bull gives you wings." XI
You can follow Ron, Connor and
David's journey and help them
earn extra points by liking their
team Facebook page at wwwface-
book.com/SalmonForceS.
=HOTOSSTEVEN RICHARDSATHE UBYSSEY
Ron Denischuk (top), Connor Moran (middle) and David Maybury (bottom). MONDAY, APRIL 7, 2014    |    SPORTS + REC
SPORTS MEDIA»
Callum Ng living his dream with the Canadian Olympic Committee
Former T-Bird swimming standout now working as a senior writer and producer for Olympic.ca
Jaime Hills
StaffWriter
"What do you want to do when
you're done school?"
We learned to dread this
question in our last years of high
school and have continued to
do so every time someone asks
us what we study at university.
We may have an idea of what we
want to do with our degree, but
who knows if that will end up
being the path we take.
What we do know is there
are people we admire and jobs
we dream of having. It isn't
every day that you get to have a
conversation with someone who
is doing your dream job and who
took a similar path to get there as
the one you are on.
Callum Ng is a senior writer
and producer for the Canadian
Olympic Committee. But before
that, he spent five years as a
member ofthe UBC swim team
while completing his bachelor's
degree in philosophy. Like many
varsity athletes, he remembers
his time as a Thunderbird with
fond memories he shared with
his teammates.
Ng went on to earn a master's of management from the
Sauder School of Business. He
then attended BCIT, taking
classes in radio arts and entertainment. In his time at UBC,
he could be found interviewing
his fellow athletes, but it was at
BCIT that Ng knew he wanted
to be involved in the world of
sports journalism.
"This was when I realized this
is my thing," he said of his time
at BCIT. "Sport and news change
all the time. It's thrilling and
interesting to keep up, to share
what's new with people."
As a current Thunderbird
aspiring to be a sports journalist, it was humbling to get the
opportunity to talk to Callum
Ng. There is something about
knowing that someone so successful went through the things
you are experiencing now that
is encouraging.
Using a connection of common experience is something
with which Ng is not unfamiliar.
When your job is to have conversations and write stories about
athletes, it without a doubt helps
to be an athlete yourself.
"In media, you're always looking for a fresh story," Ng said. "In
the field of journalism, stories
are everywhere, and some ofthe
PHOTO COURTESY CALLUM NG
Callum Ng is working his dream job as a senior writer and producer for the Canadian Olympic
Committee, where he gets to interview athletes, write stories and host videos.
=HOTO COURTESY CALLUM NG
Ng took classes in radio arts and entertainment at BCIT, and also broadcasted hockey games on CiTR, UBC's campus radio station.
most interesting ones are right
around you."
Ng provides a fresh perspective in his work by thinking like
an athlete himself, and asking his
interview subjects questions he
would have wanted to answer. "I
love having the freedom to tell
stories in so many ways. I get to
interview athletes, host videos,
write stories, follow great events
and refine everything again and
again. I think we should always
be doing that — [getting] better,
always."
At 12 years old, Ng wanted to
be a sports journalist, but after
high school he found himself at
UBC. He had two reasons for
this. The first was an academic
pursuit. "I was really guiding
myself to a university education,"
Ng said.
The second reason was a
simple one in the mindset of a
competitive athlete. "UBC just
happens to be in a brilliant city,
not to mention having a dominant swimming program," Ng said.
"It was an easy decision. When
I set my heart on UBC, I really
wanted to go."
If you ask any athlete what it is
about their sport that makes it so
important to them, you will get
an interesting answer. "There is
something really cerebral about
swimming fast," Ng said. "You
have to be powerful and strong,
but translate that to grace in the
water. I loved searching above
and beyond what I thought I
could do. Thinking about racing
even now makes me shiver. It's a
memory you never lose."
Ng's swimming career at UBC
was nothing if not impressive.
He was awarded CIS Swimmer of
the Year honours at the 2006 and
2008 national championships.
The men's team won the CIS
national championships 10 years
in a row until the 2007-2008 season, Ng's fourth year. Naturally,
this was something that fuelled
him and his teammates to be
better the next season.
"I remember telling the team
after we lost to remember the
feeling, to hate the pain. I think
we won in 2009 because we
knew what losing was like. And
we knew how good we could be
when everything came together,
and it did. Winning in 2009 was
unforgettable."
Although he now works and
lives in Toronto, Ng has nothing
but good things to say about Vancouver. "I found UBC was a place
where there was so much opportunity for me," he said. "Vancouver is such a vibrant city. It's such
an open-minded place." 31
To check out some ofCallum's work,
please visit his website at www.
callumng.com.
Why don't people
stretch?
Stretching is one of the basic
tenets of physical activity, or so
we're often told. So why don't we
do it more often?
I talked to Lisa Bonang, UBC's
assistant varsity strength and
conditioning coach, the other
day about effective stretching. I
said I wanted to write an article
on stretching not working for
most people, and she said, "Well,
stretching doesn't work for most
people, because most people
don't do it!" It was a fairly simple,
yet profound statement.
This led me to question why
people don't stretch. The reason,
I realized, is because the way
they've been taught to stretch
simply doesn't work.
Most people stretch passively,
without much attention to their
stretch. Stretching this way often
results in no change, at least not
for a long time.
I'm goingto explain a stretching
technique that actually works. In
order to understand the technique, we need to understand how
stretching a muscle works.
People often think that stretching
a muscle simply lengthens the tissues, like stretching a rubber band.
In reality, you're teaching your brain
to allow your tissues to lengthen. It's
a trust thing. The reasonyour brain
won't allow your muscles to lengthen is because it thinks that your
body isn't strong enough.
To use an analogy, imagine
your boyfriend or girlfriend isn't
trustworthy. You're not going
to let them far from your sight
— but the distance isn't from a
physical attachment, it's a lack
of trust. In order to teach your
muscles to lengthen, you need to
teach your brain to trust that it
can lengthen its muscles without
getting hurt. (Perhaps this article
is a thinly disguised chautauqua
on relationship issues?)
So the key to stretching isn't
to physically lengthen your
muscles, it's to teach your brain
to allow the muscles to relax and
lengthen. When that happens,
your muscles can function optimally, recover better and receive
proper blood flow. When certain
muscles are short, they can force
you into poor posture, or predispose you to injury.
when you simply hold a
stretch, you aren't doing much to
send the brain a message to relax
the muscle. In order to stretch
effectively, you need to do what's
called the "contract, relax" method. Here's what to do:
• Choose a muscle to stretch.
• Stretch the muscle to
the point where you feel a bit
of tension.
• Take a deep breath in.
• You're going to tighten
every muscle in your body and
you're goingto hold your
breath. Try to create tension
using your breath, too, by
blowing against your
closed lips.
• After five seconds of con
tracting and holding your
breath, you're goingto exhale.
• As you exhale, concen
trate on relaxing your entire
body, especially the muscle
you're stretching.
• Notice that you can prob
ably move deeper into the
stretch now.
• Hang out in that relaxed
state for a second.
• Repeat.
This technique is like a
shortcut for getting your brain
to trust your muscles to lengthen, but it also forces you to pay
attention to what you're doing.
Stretching becomes a mind-body
activity, so you get the benefit
of muscles that are a lengthened and relaxed, but you also
get all the relaxation benefits of
breath awareness.
If you're saying to yourself,
"Hey, this sounds like yoga," you're
pretty close! Yoga takes advantage
=ILE PHOTO STEPHANIEXU3THE UBYSSEY
People often think that stretching a muscle simply lengthens the tissues, like stretching a
rubber band. In reality, you're teaching your brain to allow your tissues to lengthen.
of synchronizing breathing with
movement and relaxation. But now
you can use yoga's secret without
going through their elaborate
poses, or buying $80 yoga pants.
I do this type of stretching everyday. The beauty is that it works very
quickly. So, if you're standing in a
line and you feel a tight muscle, you
can quickly help it relax by using
the contract, relax method.
Try it out, and when you notice that this technique actually
works, you may find yourself
stretching more and more. XI
Jason Yee is a third-year kinesiology student and a defenceman on
the UBC men's hockey team. To
check out his sports and fitness
blog, go to train2point0.word-
press.com. II Opinions
The AMS has yet to come to a final decision on whether there will be slides in the New SUE
LLUSTRATION JETHROAU/THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
AMS SHOULD PUT SLIDES
INTO NEW SUB
The AMS says they will soon confirm whether or not there will be
slides in the New SUB.
Slides could cost up to $50,000.
Some say this is a waste of money,
and that argument has legitimacy.
The Ubyssey, however, supports building the slides. The
building already costs over $100
million, and each student is
contributing up to $400 for the
building, depending on what year
they enter the school. Incoming
students this year will pay $370;
next year's entrants will pay
$390; and $400 for each year
after that until the building is
paid off.
If we're already each paying
hundreds of dollars a year for a
building, one more dollar going
toward making the New Sub
more awesome seems like money
well spent. XI
Why UBCC350 supports fossil fuel divestment
MOLLY HENRY
ALEXANDER HEMINGWAY
NICHOLAS CURRY
As students of UBC, we are proud
of our university's reputation for
sustainability. The time has now
come for the university to take the
next step, and live up to its ideals
by divesting from fossil fuels.
Humanity confronts a grave and
urgent crisis in climate change.
The evidence that we are hurtling
towards a future dangerous for
humankind is persuasive. Immediate, dramatic actions are required.
We have a moral duty to address
the climate crisis.
Scientists have clearly stated that
we have a limited amount of fossil
fuels we can burn and still have a
reasonable chance of staying within
2 C of warming. While 2 C may not
sound like much, even this small
number would bring about serious
disruptions of natural systems,
impacting everything from our food
supply to the spread of infectious
diseases. However, known fossil
fuel reserves are significantly larger
than the well-documented limits
of what is safe to burn. We can only
"afford to burn" 30 to 39 per cent of
the remaining carbon reserves on the
planet. In other words, 61 to 70 per
cent ofthe world's fossil fuel reserves
are "unburnable" if we want to avoid
dangerous climate change. Despite
this, fossil fuel companies have demonstrated that they plan to exploit
these resources for the sake of profit,
regardless ofthe known impacts.
As part ofthe effort to keep
greenhouse gas emissions at a level
that will allow our economy and
the environment to remain healthy,
we are asking UBC to immediately
forgo further investments in fossil
fuel companies and divest from all
existing fossil fuel holdings within
five years. We need a rapid transformation of our energy system
away from fossil fuels, and divestment can help promote this. Anything less will simply not be enough.
Some would prefer UBC to
maintain ownership and exercise
leverage as a shareholder. Because
the business model of fossil fuel
companies is so reliant on carbon
reserves we can't afford to burn,
working through shareholder
channels is inadequate to achieve
the transformative changes
required. On the other hand, divestment can reduce a company's
stock price and pressure fossil fuel
companies to shift their investment to clean energy such as wind
and solar power. We recognize
that a single divestment campaign
won't make a difference; that's
why we're part of hundreds of
fossil fuel divestment campaigns
across North America and Europe.
Some argue that these companies are already providing the answers to our energy problems and
shifting us away from fossil fuels.
While they are involved in sustainable research and development to
a certain extent, their behaviour
has shown that they need much
stronger incentives, such as divestment, to fully transform their business models. Moreover, divestment
calls attention to the pollution of
politics fostered by the fossil fuel
industry, including campaigns to
mislead the public about climate
science, as well as efforts to block,
dilute or delay the adoption of
meaningful climate policies.
Some are concerned divestment might hurt the income UBC
receives from the endowment, but
this doesn't need to be the case.
There are many opportunities
in the market for an endowment
to make equivalent or better
returns, and studies designed to
measure the impact of divestment
have found little or no impact on
returns. There are also increasing
concerns that a "carbon bubble"
could pose significant financial
risks to investments in fossil fuels.
We call on UBC to use the endowment as a living laboratory: design
a profitable fossil-free portfolio,
and use it as a model to inspire
sustainable investing behaviour at
other institutions.
We recognize this will be a complex and challenging task, which is
why we included a five-year timeline for full divestment.
We are not suggesting that oil
is the root of all evil and needs to
be banned from existence. We
are simply stating that science
has demonstrated the need for a
dramatic transformation of our
energy policies, something engineers, scientists and economists have
called achievable, practical and
affordable. On this particular issue,
"responsible" investing has proven
to be ineffective, and simply not
enough. Universities have always
been a catalyst for change, and the
kind of change needed will require
large institutions to take the lead. By
divesting, UBC can show leadership
in fostering this necessary transformation. Indeed, as we face the
gravity and urgency ofthe climate
crisis, it is our moral imperative. XI
The authors are members of
UBC3S0
Why engineers should
support divestment
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
The author responds to a previous op-ed by an engineer opposed to divestment.
LEO ROBINOVICH
Op-Ed
We are, we are, we are the engineers! At least, hopefully we will be
one day. And when that day comes,
all of us will stand for something.
In fact, we already stand for many
things, from the choices of our
specialization and co-ops to what
student teams we join and how we
interact with other students and
faculties.
Engineering is one ofthe
strangest faculties in that so much
effort is put into the degree, but
so little of that effort focuses
on the bigger picture of what
we're actually working towards.
There is little to no formal moral
evaluation, and we fall back on
technical jargon when we don't
have immediate answers to
good questions.
One good question — a great
question, actually — is what
engineers are doing about climate
change and our reliance on fossil
fuels. I won't try to convince you
that energy usage and climate
change is one ofthe biggest issues
the world faces today. If you've
successfully ignored the UN, oil
spill after oil spill, Obama, climate
science PhDs, overwhelming scientific evidence based on expansive research over the last 40 years
and Bill Nye the f lippin' Science
Guy himself thus far, I doubt you'll
have any problems ignoring a
second-year mechanical engineering student. I'm not here to
convince you that climate change
is serious business.
What I'm here to say is that
UBC engineers should not compromise morality for technicality,
nor external truth for internal
validation. We are better than that.
Why are we becoming engineers
anyway if not to be superheroes of
technology and society? I'm not installing a tiny arc reactor into my
chest anytime soon, but I'm going
to improve the world through all
social and technological means
possible. Being an engineer means
being a visionary, not a corporate
sheep. We can lead the lifestyle we
want to lead while maintaining
strong moral compasses. We don't
have to engage in things in which
we don't passionately believe.
Everything we do is a choice between spite and hope; impending
doom and optimism.
Divestment is a shining opportunity for us to choose the right
path. It's not going to bankrupt
any ofthe 200 companies that
control the majority ofthe world's
coal, oil and gas reserves, but it
will demonstrate our opposition
to the current profit-based system
that could be transformed into
a real sustainable industry, both
economically and environment-
ally.
UBC students have a lot of say
in the future of energy. Instead of
defending a clearly dysfunctional,
self-serving system, let's stand
together and say that things could
be improved significantly. I say
join this cause, champions of technology and society, and let's shake
things up for the better. XI
Leo Robinovitch is a second-year
mechanical engineering student at
UBC.
Mike Silley's BoG
backtracking not OK
LETTERS
Dear Editor,
I find myself shocked and upset to
hear that UBC's Board of Governors
voted to increase tuition. Domestic
undergraduate students will see a
two per cent tuition increase this
year and incoming international
students a three per cent increase
next year.
I am especially shocked that
the BoG representatives that are
supposed to be representing the
student body voted unanimously
for the increase. What is even more
unfortunate is that at least one
student representative lied in their
campaign.
Let's look at Mr. Mike Silley, who
voted for the tuition increase.
On Jan. 23,2012, The Ubyssey
asked Silley: "In recent years,
student BoG members have often
abstained from votes on tuition
increases. Would you abstain on
tuition votes? How would you push
UBC to make education affordable?"
He replied: "I plan to vote against
tuition increases.... Many students
feel like they are being gouged left,
right and centre. Bythe end of their
time at UBC, the average student
graduates with $27,000 in debt....
This is unacceptable, and I plan to
make the voice of students clearly
heard at the board level."
I wonder what's causing that
$27,000 in debt? I should seriously
be writing my papers right now, but
after being at UBC for three years
and constantly pressing "I agree"
to the two per cent increase on my
SSC every year, I really can't stand
people who campaign to stop the increase and then vote in favour of it.
Sincerely,
BilalShamsi, UBC student II Scene
The Nest Within the Nest will be a multipurpose performance space.
The Graduate Student Society, who also pitched in financially
with their student fee, will have a prime spot on the fifth floor
with a balcony.
NEW SUB
QUICK FACTS
Price tag: $106 million
Funding: AMS student levy,
($81.76M),UBC($25M)
Projected Completion
date: Nov. 14,2014
Projected opening date:
Jan. 5,2015
Originally planned opening date: Sept. 2014
Size: 250,000 square feet
Sustainability: aiming for
LEED Platinum+, the highest
green building rating in North
America
Number of floors: 5
New AMS restaurants: 5
Architects: Dialog (HBBH)
and BH Architects
Construction:
BIRD Construction
The Ubyssey's new office will be above ground and get natural light. We'll also get more rooms, new furniture and be right
beside the climbing wall.
"Staircases are very prominent so that people will make that their first choice rather
than riding up the elevator," said Kingsmill. But if stairs aren'tyour thing...
The AMS will have a rooftop childminding service.
CONSTRUCTING
THE NEST
The Ubyssey got the chance to tourtheNewSUBthe AMS Student Nest
alongside AMS designer Michael Kingsmill. Photos by Will McDonald.
Phase 7:
Construction
The Pit will remain in the basement, but will be fused with the old Knoll.
The building will have several balcony views of campus accessible by students.
...there are two spaces alloted for slides in the building, but the AMS has yet to
determine if the slides will be put in.
Our continued congratulations to our newly elected editorial board!    (continued frompi)
Opinions + Blog Editor
Austen Erhardt
Design Editor
NickAdams
Photo Editor
Mackenzie Walker
Web Developer
Steven Richards
Want to be our video producer? The job Is still open! Go to
ubyssey.ca/jobs for the full
position description.
£?Get up & running in minutes
/ Managed from your iPhone/iPad/iPod
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