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The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1982

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Array THEJJBYSSEY
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 5,1982
228-2301
Laws grind the poor, and the
rich men rule the law.
—Oliver Goldsmith
Soon after Jane Smith married, her husband began to beat
and rape her regularly. Jane
joined a women's support
group and quickly realized that
her husband was acting out his
pornographic fantasies on her.
In   addition,
By CARY RODIN
and ROBERT BEYNON
~f        Jane    learned
her    husband
sexually
assaulted  their
two   year   old
daughter.
Jane (not her real name)  left
her husband and sought a court
order to restrict her husband's
visits with the daughter. But her
husband's lawyer claimed Jane
was   psychologically  repressed
and charged her  claims  were
fabricated. Jane could not afford a lawyer.
The court ruled her husband
was entitled to unrestricted access to their daughter all day
every Sunday.
Horror stories like this will
likely increase due to provincial
government legal aid cutbacks.
It will be open season on women
and children in B.C. without
legal aid, says Debra Lewis,
Battered Women Support Services worker.
The B.C. Social Credit
Government cutbacks in August
trimmed $1.3 million from the
Legal Service Society's $13.4
million budget. But because the
cuts came late in the LSS's fiscal
year, they represent an actual
budget reduction of 20 percent,
says board member Steve
Owen. 6,000 B.C. residents who
were previously eligible for legal
aid will not receive it.
These cuts could not come at
a worse time, says society vice-
chair Don Silversides, adding
that compared to this time last
year, the demand for legal aid
has increased 33 percent. "We
don't know the full impact yet,
we're just seeing the tip of the
iceberg."
The LSS mandate is to ensure
that people who cannot afford
legal aid receive it. However,
due to current cutbacks, the
LSS cannot perform its mandate, says LSS chair David Tupper says.
"We must make the public
aware of the consequences."
The consequences are that
people will be denied their right
to legal counsel and the taxpayers' will pay more because
LEGAL AID CUTS:
that's the gvjjb*
BC Spirit! ^W
of the cutbacks say LSS representatives.
Family court will be hardest
hit. For example, a woman filing a maintenance order against
her spouse often cannot afford
a lawyer, but the husband,
usually earning more money,
can. Owen says women often
lose these cases and therefore
are forced onto welfare. In rhe
past the LSS provided these
women with lawyers at a total
fee of SI80. The cost represents
a significant saving to the taxpayer, compared to the cost ol
welfare. But the LSS has had to
eliminated this service.
Ann Reed is experiencing this
exact dilemma. She is currently
on welfare and trying to collect
maintenance from her ex-
husband.
"In no way am I competent
enough to speak against my ex-
husband's lawyer. I'm very
scared."
In addition to family court
cutbacks, the LSS has narrowed
legal assistance in criminal proceedings to only those cases in
which the risk of imprisonment
is probable — rather than merely possible.
The LSS predicts unnecessary
guilty pleas by innocent individuals will increase due to
court room intimidation, and
guilty verdicts will increase as a
result of inadequate defense.
"In criminal matters the
Crown is always represented,
while legal aid does not cover all
defendants," says Owen.
Although B.C. per capita expenditures on criminal legal aid
defence services are below the
national average, B.C. has one
of the highest per capita expenditures on Crown Counsel, according to latest figures.
In addition, the LSS is unable
to defend individuals who, if
convicted, face only a fine.
However, these individuals may
be imprisoned for nonpayment. The proportion of offenders being admitted to pri-
sions for not paying fines has
risen by 24 per cent this year,
based on Ministry of the Attorney General statistics.
Due to the lack of legal
defence available, calls to Ihe
UBC Legal Advice Clinic requesting legal aid have increased 300 percent. The clinic processes up to 1000 files a year,
but as the legal aid is provided
by students the cases they accept
are relatively simple, says staff
lawyer Dan Egleston.
"It's always been policy to
refrain from criminal cases
where jail terms are possible."
Aside from people lacking
defence, the principle of equality before the law, guaranteed by
the Charter of Rights, is
possibly being violated.
"We are retreating into a
society where there is a law for
the rich and one law for the
poor," says former Attorney
General Alex McDonald, now
the NDP's official legal critic.
Before cutbacks, people
qaulified for legal aid when paying legal fees impaired their
ability to feed, clothe, shelter or
otherwise adequately accommodate themselves and their
family. The new eligibility requirements are based on strict
poverty line statistics.
For example, rural area
families of three must make
$900 a month or less to qualify
for legal aid. Typical private
lawyer's fees are $100 to $150
per hour. Owen wonders if people who cannot hire legal advice
are receiving their constitutional
right to legal aid.
But the Attorney General
ministry thinks they are. "I
doubt we are at the stage now
where the Charter of Rights is at
stake," says assistant deputy
Attorney General Bob Adamson.
Adamson says the cuts are
justified. "Reluctantly we had
to reduce our support for LSS
because of restraint programs."
Adamson says the ministry
made predictions and evaluations on the effects of these cuts
with LSS cooperation.
But LSS vice-chair Silverside
denies the LSS advised the attorney general on legal aid cutback effects. "I can't see how
he could have made these
predictions."
Owen says the LSS is encouraging people without
defense counsel to demand the
court appoint them a lawyer
because the Charter of Rights
guarantees them the right to
counsel. If the province does
not increase legal aid, these
court appointed lawyers will
cost more in the long run, Owen
says.
The LSs also has printed self-
help booklets to provide summary legal advice to the public,
he stresses.
"We don't want people to
shrink away from court because
they can't get lawyers." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, 1982
United we fall: axe wielding madman
takes a cut out of graduating party
— especially since he kept using the
axe at the reunion.
To keep matters in the swing of
things, Walter chased just about
everyone around the school (really a
By JACK TIELEMAN
Dear Mom and Dad:
We at Lizzie Borden High are
singularly disturbed at your son
Walter's behavior at a recent 10th
anniversary reunion of 1972's
graduating class.
National Lampoon's Class Reunion
Playing at Capitol Six
We understand that some of our  castle), but was finally taken off in
students played a prank on Walter a straight jacket,
ten years ago, but it's awfully silly      Actually,  the only good  thing
of him to grind the axe for so long  about the reunion was the remain-
. ing class which danced to Walter, in
which everyone pretends they're in
a straight jacket.
We did show a Three Stooges
short before the reunion, and that
got more laughs than the rest of the
evening. Walter really doesn't have
a sharp sense of humour.
Walter's conduct is intolerable at
Lizzie   Borden   High,   which   we
would like to think is, according to
our motto, a Cut Above the Rest.
Yours sincerely,
Principal
Vice-principle's widow,
and other survivors
THE
DEVILS
by John Whiting
An M.F.A. Thesis
Production
Directed by Beryl Baylis
NOVEMBER 8-13
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $5.00
Students: $3.00
Box Office: Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
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Call TWIZZLE, 738-1733
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IRDNHDRSE
Real Mens Diet. Friday, November 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
e
c
**
ing, burning confusion. The next three, in a
row, contain a vulva, delicately etched,
followed by a dripping voluptuous rose, and
finally two women in a passionate embrace.
The last box houses a photograph of a female
athlete, accompanied by a anthem to strong
but forgotten women of history, the super-
women. The understanding dawns. The artist, Anne Quigley, creates her own closets,
and comes out.
Is it terrible or wonderful for a lesbian to
maker her sexuality public? The four women
exchange amused glances. "Both," they all
say and laugh.
"But you have to do it, "Woodsworth
says. "I had to do it this year, again, with my
arts class. They were pretty stunned."
Worlend mimics the class's reaction. "But
you don't have to be a lesbian. You'tepretty.
"Sometimes it makes me afraid,"
Woodsworth admits.
Woodsworth's two pieces in the show are
Women with Child and The Affair.
The woman could be an Aztec fertility
goddess, with her serene expression and bulging belly. Made of carved and polished stone,
the impulse to stroke the graceful curved
body and proudly lifted little head is encouraged by a sign that says, "Please
Touch."
A clay creation, The Affair is simply two
female figures arms affectionately thrown
about each other's shoulders, with their
backs  to  the  viewer.   To  their  left,   the
By KELLEY JO BURKE
Two plaster body castings hang on the gallery
wall.
One is white. The shoulders sag, the
breasts hang from her body like superflous
appendages. The casting seems to crumble
apart below the belly. The genitalia have
been ripped away. Her expression is one of
utter despair and in her arms, like jewels set
in brown, caked blood, are razor blades.
The second casting is a glorious metamorphosis; . the same face, the same
body, another razor blade, though repositioned. The skin is now brown, and the
blood bright red, flowing down her arms and
legs. The breasts are proudly erect, with the
vulva in full detail. Her hands are firmly
planted on her hips; joy and defiance sing
from her face.
The text behind the castings, created by
Sheila Gilhooley and Persimmen
Blackbridge, tells the story of "the behaviour
mod ward." A woman, committed by her
parents for lesbianism, is told by the head
nurse to shave her legs — like a lady. At first
she considers complying. But to the anger
of the nurse, she instead smilingly mutilates
herself.
The four artists who organized the Women
in Focus display of lesbian art, sit in a circle,
and talk about rage.
"I think the anger comes out of our pain
and lonliness," Ellen Woodsworth says with
a gentle smile. "Our lives are distorted, hidden. People think of lesbians living in Paris
or New York, but we're here. There's a lot of
people who have to put fake names on their
art in this show. They can lose their jobs,
apartments, husbands some. The same is true
for our lovers. To put a picture of them on
display is more than we can dare."
'^:
|^*W**
— charlet Campbell photos
background against which they stand erupts
into a horrified, disgusted face. The
outrageous indignation of the huge face,
countered by the complete indifference of the
tiny figures, is irresistably funny.
Woodsworth explains that the carving is of
a woman who, to the shock of many, was artificially inseminated so that she and her
lover could have a child. Sourkes talks about
the special fear that lesbians who affirm their
right to happiness provoke in society.
"We're at the very bottom of the system.
When the bottom starts moving, everything
moves. What if somebody's mother, or sister
turns, out to be a lesbian, and likes it? That's
terrifying."
"We're a power challenge as well," says
Woodworth, "Society is male-dominated.
We're a society without men. Very few of
them can handle that. Some accept and rejoice in lesbianism . . . some are glad."
"There are some men who I call lesbians,
because they're female-identified, and love
women," says Sourkes.
There are a few men then, who would
smile with the three photographs of lesbian
lovers. Each, taken by a necessarily
anonymous photographer, are clearly defined and balanced. They show three sets of
lovers in fond and easy embraces. The joy
and pleasure they take in each other, their
complete relaxation, is lovely to look at.
"We love women's bodies, we love
women," says Lorraine Chisholm. " Straight
women haven't that freedom. They aren't
supposed to celebrate their own bodies, or
each other. That's for the men."
"To even admit to being a lesbian is a test
of trust. Among us there is support, affection, physical openness, all the good things,"
says Woodsworth. "To be a lesbian is really a
badge of courage.
"You can see it in the joy side of our art."
If there is a lesbian culture, the four
women are not prepared to define it. Only
the difficulty in getting it expressed.
"Everything in this room is lesbian
culture," says Worlend.
The four artists organized and funded the
show, because as Woodsworth says, "We
don't even try to enter the commercial art
world. We apply for grants, with substantial
support, and get turned down. Even with this
show, we have trouble with out posters being
torn down."
With any luck the silver collection from the
show may cover the artists' costs, but there's
no guarantee. The social repercussions, as
well as the financial gamble, make the display
seem a terrible risk.
"We're out on a limb," Worlend says
seriously. She looks around at the other
three, and again they all smile, not seeming to
mind.
The Dark of the Moon, by Cheryl Sourkes,
one of the organizers, and Lorraine Oak,
could be the set for one of Shakespeare's
blasted heaths. A broken window, scattered
leaves and earth, an empty chair, the piece
cries of fragmentation, desolation and
pathetic loneliness. Shards of glass and shattered worlds are present in much of the art
displayed.
"It is lonely in society", says writer Betsy
Worlend. "it's all focused on the heterosexual experience. You go to the theatre, particularly to the ballet, and that's the only
conception of love you see. You go through
the world, and it's like not having a
shadow."
The little white cupboards hanging on the
wall could be mistaken for fuse boxes, until
the doors are openend. Behind the first door,
Chaos settles that question with it's scream- Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, 1982
Opera anecdotes full of hot air
By KERRY REGIER
During a performance of Bizet's
Carmen led by Sir Thomas at the
Covent Garden Opera, the horse on
stage suddenly turned tail to the audience and audibly and obviously
— defecated. The singing stopped,
the orchestra stopped, and to the
hushed audience, Sir Thomas loudly exclaimed, "A critic, by God!"
Even Greater Operatic Disasters
By Hugh Vickers
St. Martin's Press, $US 7.95
An anecdote collection consistently of this calibre would be a
treat, but Even Greater Operatic
Disasters, a sequel to a similar book
by the same author, is in fact a padded, gabby, and expensive waste.
The Beecham story and one or
two other bits are the only ones
worth reading. Crude and childish
drawings, generous blank spaces,
large type, and little of interest fill
out the remaining 79 pages.
Author Vickers treats us, and I
do not exaggerate, to: a list of
theaters, any of which, we are told,
might be "largest opera house in
the world;" his belief that gongs
make the author think of Upstairs,
Downstairs, spoiling Bellini's Norma for him; and a long
"I-don't-like-it" about Joseph
Losey's stage esthetic.
So.what?
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pttaibiy created jpt royalty on * horaa, growing on the horimn behind her.
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Fitzcarraldo
A Film by Werner Herzog
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EXTRAVAGANZA.
Now you're talkin taste. Friday, November 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
External hype fails to sink old Fitz
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
In the film industry where promotion is so important, the hype
surrounding a film can end up doing it damage. One's expectations
can be built up so much that a good
film disappoints.
Such was the case with
Apocalypse Now. The same thing
has happened with Werner
Herzog's Fitzcarraldo.
Most people who go to see the
ton steamship to be hauled up a 40
per cent grade over a mountain,
presented Herzog with a few
logistical problems.
Bulldozers broke down and parts
were weeks away. When they
weren't breaking down, the
bulldozers were stuck in the mud
during the Amazon's rainy season.
The native Indians who were extras in the film began distrust their
boss. Don't ask me why.
KINSKI
this ain't an easy job, you know
film will know the story behind the
film. They will probably go to see
the film because of it.
They may have heard that Herzog originally wanted Jack
Nicholson for the leading role, then
negotiated with Warren Oates
before finally settling on Jason
Robarts. Certainly they'll know
that Robarts and co-star Mick Jagger left the film when it was 40 per
cent complete due mostly to
shooting delays at the remote
Amazon location.
At that point the script was
changed from English to German,
the part of Jagger was written out,
and Klaus Kinski was brought in for
the leading role.
But things didn't get much better
for poor Herzog. Three people were
killed in a plane that crashed bringing supplies to the site of the filming.
The shooting of the crucial scene
in the film, which called for a thirty
In all the film took four years to
shoot instead of six months.
The film's audience may also
know the true story on which the
movie is based. There was in fact a
man named Fitscarraldo whose
reason for being was to bring grand
opera to the Amazon shanty town
of Iquitos. To raise the money he
had to find a way to exploit a vast
territory of rubber trees that were
isolated by a treacherous rapid on
an Amazon tributary.
The solution of this obsessed individual was to take the ship up
another tributary and haul it over a
mountain at a point where the two
rivers came within a mile of each
other. The original Fritz was nevertheless clever enough to move the
boat in sixteen pieces. But that
wasn't good enough for Herzog.
He's a film director. He needs
spectacle. One piece, over the
mountain. Great shot.
The people who go to see Fitzcar-
Audience leers at
explosive Lear
By RICHARD THOMAS
Vera Lynn. Thunder. Air raid
sirens. The Dresser sings the sounds
of a dangerous and romantic time
in England's history.
The Dresser
By Ronald Harwood
Directed by Timothy Bond
At Q.E. Playhouse
Set in a dingy theatre in one of
the counties during WW II, the
play peeks at the back stage
pressures of Sir, an old, semi-senile
yet powerful Shakespearean actor.
William Hutt, as Sir, is a huge
force on the stage. His strong voice
rings with authority and conviction
when thrown outward with full
force. It whimpers for compassion
in its whispering fragility. Hutt's
lungs parallel his gestures and expressions, always playing with unfailing consistency.
Sir is an old actor unaware who
his friends are. He constantly
wallows in self pity and his valet,
Norman, continuously tries to console him.
Robin Phillip's role of the
Dresser is well presented through
his balance of pity and impatience
for Sir. Phillips brings a motherly
quality to his performance, and
gives us most of the humor in this
otherwise emotional and powerful
play.
A unique treat for the audience is
to watch Sir apply his makeup,
transforming his soft, round face
into one that powerfully exudes
dramatic features of King Lear.
Feature-altering applications of
mascara and pencil sink Hutt's
cheeks and strengthen his eyes. He
puts on a long grey beard, a new
character emerges. The transformation is a treat that audiences rarely
get to see in theatre.
The technical side of the
evening's performance is outstanding. Brian Jackson's set and
costume design are magnificently
detailed and intelligently planned.
The view we get is of Sir's dressing
room, the backstage area with the
imaginary audience watching King
Lear. Obviously, this was a
challenge that needed — and got —
great creativity and resourcefulness.
The diverse and well-mixed
sound effects are the good work of
Bruce Ruddell. The effects include
noises of an imaginary audience,
bombs flying overhead and air raid
sirens screaming their warning.
Donald Scarrow's lighting is also
designed and executed flawlessly.
The Dresser entertains our minds
and souls. The audience can sense
the power that attracts people to a
life of acting.
raldo might even have seen the
documentary on the making of the
film, Burden of Dreams. The film
parallels the artistic odyssey of Herzog with the Fitzcarraldo's quest to
bring opera to Iquitos.
Fitzcarraldo
Directed by Werner Herzog
At the Varsity
It's an excellent film that has
more subtlety and drama than its
fictional counterpart. It even provides the best scene that the two
related films have to offer, complete with Herzog raving in a
perfect Peter Lorri voice. "It's insidious. The vines they grow in the
night, closing in, strangling you.
This jungle is possessed by the
devil. I hate it. But I love it." Herzog then says he might belong in a
lunatic asylum.
The documentary also manages
to create more interest in the effort
to get the boat over the mountain
than Herzog's film.
The result for those that saw the
documentary first is that much of
the dramatic potential of Fitzcarraldo is stolen.
But Fitzcarraldo weakens itself in
several other ways. The first is that
Fitz's absurd money making
schemes, from the Trans-Andean
Railway to ice making to rubber
production, only add up to the folly
of an obsessed and unsympathetic
man.
The strong focus on the main
character erodes the potential of the
most interesting aspect of the film.
But the contrast between Fitz's attempt to bring his operatic god,
Caruso, to Iquitos and the Indians
desire to appease the god of the
rapids is never fully exploited. The
character of the Indians isn't explored enough to make the contrast
meaningful.
Even the central metaphore is too
explicit, almost naked. Fitzcarraldo
actually says things like "I will
move a mountain." The result is tht
the metaphor of moving the ship
loses its emotional weight like a
joke that has to be explained loses
its humor.
Another problem with the movie
is that Fritz is too weird and obsessed for us to sympathize with his
quest.
The film survives scene by scene
though. The image of the possessed
Fitzcarraldo fawning over his
phonograph at the rubber baron's
cocktail party and that of the ship
steaming upriver with Caruso blaring away to sooth the bloodthirsty
Indians keep the audience going.
They sustain the film when the central story isn't enough.
Fitz tells of the French trapper
who was among the first to travel
west from Montreal. "When he
came back he said he had found
waterfalls bigger than anybody
could imagine. But people asked
'What proof have you that these
waterfalls exist?' The trapper said
'My proof is . . . that I have seen
them.' "
The rubber baron looks at Fitz as
though he has told a joke without a
punch line. "Oh, I'm sorry," Fritz
says. "I don't know what that's got
to do with me."
Forsooth, theatresports is tops!
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
"Piss thee off"
— King Claudius'
royal command to prince Hamlet,
Theatresports style.
What's this? You expected a
straight version of the Bard's play
and got something entirely fun and
delightful? You expected to hear
Hamlet's great soliloquy, To Be or
Not to Be, and got, To ICBM or
Not to ICBM instead, as this
Hamlet added a touch of the computer age to the tragedy?
Theatresport Hamlet
Directed by Ray Michal
At City Stage, 751 Thurlow,
Until Nov. 13
What will your English teacher
say? Hamlet appearing to be altered
My, doesn't that just break every
rule imposed by proscenium arches? (It must, for City Stage
doesn't have a proscenium arch.)
You say you remember the
Playhouse production three years
ago, and it put you to sleep despite
a very handsome prince? You say
you finally understood Hamlet?
But you did have a good time at
theatresports. Admit it. Wasn't it
great to have actors do Shakespeare
— or at least a production which
lists in its program "additional
scenes and dialogue by Wm.
Shakespeare" — where you didn't
feel the stuffiness of production in
which the term classic weighed the
play down?
And admit it, you did enjoy seeing those talented former UBC actors who were part of Stage Campus '82 in the summer. Even if it
was Hamlet's dad — returned from
the grave, and competing for
Hamlet's team against Claudius' —
who juggled skulls at Ophelia's
grave site, and not Hamlet himself
with Osric at this side.
It was good to see Hamlet performed as a sports event, with
Team Claudius vs. Team Hamlet.
And it was positively hilarious when
Fortinbras, as theatresports judge,
asked the teams to perform soliloquies and Polonius protested:
"My lord, Prince Hamlet hath the
best soliloquies!"
And who could deny that
Shakespeare's Hamlet is itself a
sparring match of sorts — with the
prize as Fortinbras sees it — is one
in which "To the winner the crown
of Denmark; don't block."
You fear the performance of
Theartresports Hamlet might not be
as enjoyable as the one you participated in? You think the improv
quality will wear down.
There is only one way to cure
that, forsooth, and that's to enjoy it
all over again.
and everything that was supposed
to spring dissertations in your head
tickled your funny bone instead?
You think theatresports is fine
for those rowdy weekend nights,
but its sacrilegious to do Hamlet in
such a style, where the audience gets
to participate (or thinks it gets to
participate) in a live theatrical sporting match?
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Support Your Campus Theatre Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Red hot
solution
Red Hot Video, has 13 outlets in B.C., and very soon a new chain called
Tri-color will open its doors.
The distribution of violent and degrading pornography which depicts
violence against women, and reinforces coercion and exploitation, is on
the increase.
But the reasons why Red Hot's business has expanded so rampantly are
worth examining.
First, the government agencies, whether it be the police, the crown
council or the attorney-general's office, refuse to stop its growth.
A second reason why Red Hot and other video outlets flourish is
because the public appears unprepared to stop them.
The public is truly not prepared. Most people are unaware of what is on
Red Hot's distribution list because they have no desire to consume hard
core pornography in the privacy of their own home.
The third reason is that there are those who choose to line the pockets of
Red Hot Video at the expense of human decency and respect.
Just as there are several reasons for Red Hot's existence, so are there
solutions.
One solution might be to classify Red Hot's products the same way commercial films are classified. For a government that won't prosecute blatant
criminals that is the easy solution. But it is the worst. It will only force ex-
trmely hard core pornography underground, and legitimize the films that
remain legally available to the public.
The best solution is to avoid unsympathetic government bureaucrats.
People should collectively, in their communities, force Red Hot out of
business.
Friday, November 5, 1982
-o
Movement marked with misunderstanding
By BRAD WATSON
Of all the political debates that
are currently being waged
throughout the Western world,
perhaps none are as crucial as the
one between the pro and anti-
disarmament forces. As a consequence, it is indeed lamentable that
there is such a widespread
misunderstanding of the issues involved by the people in general, and
by the mass media in particular.
This misunderstanding manifests
itself in a number of ways, and can
only be resolved by carefully
scrutinizing the world view of the
pro-disarmament forces and offering a more realistic alternative.
perspectives
The first criticism that can be
leveled against the peace movement
is a definitional one. Those advocating disarmament have a
distinct tendency to label their
enemies in the West as "pro-war"
rather than "anti-disarmament."
This myth, implicit in most anti-
nuclear sloganeering, is given
credibility by a host of intellectuals,
some of whom have tenure here at
UBC. In particular, the notion that
the United States is primarily
responsible for the threat of nuclear
most sinister of motives to U.S. administrations, and especially the
Reagan administration, this practice is not a particularly reasonable
one. When, for example, President
Reagan expresses his commitment
to genuine arms control negotiations, it is rejected as a cynical ploy
to confuse the public. Conversely,
when secretary Brezhnev expresses
similar desires, it is viewed as a
sincere statement which reflects the
increasing "moderation" of Soviet
policies.
One cannot help but wonder on
what this dichotomous interpretation is based. The American president, who is the product of a liberal
democracy and subject to all the
constraints and criticisms inherent
in such a system, is deemed to be a
uniquely evil figure. On the other
hand, the sincerity of the Soviet
leader, who dictates policy to a closed, totalitarian society, is unquestioned.
In the current clamor for disarmament, we must never lose sight
of the type of enemy we face. The
Eastern bloc does not represent a
traditional alliance system with
which it is possible to reach a long-
term understanding and mutual
respect. Rather, it is a civilization
premised on a pseudo-science
which, as Solzhenitsyn has
repeatedly   warned,    is   radically
.;y
ponents of disarmament must come
to grips with the fact that they have
no counterparts in the Soviet
Union. Although they may claim to
favour "mutual" disarmament,
they can, in fact, influence only the
policies of Western governments.
As a consequence, the
psychological advantage which the
Soviets already enjoy will encourage them to engage in further
adventurism and successfully
enslave millions more people.
The Soviet Union is governed by
a bandit regime that has, since its
inception, murdered tens of
millions of its own subjects. Those
people in the West who think that
the Soviet leadership would be unwilling to take similar action on an
international scale are sadly
mistaken. The growing acceptance
to the idea that nuclear war must
not be prepared for under any circumstances increases the probability that it will have to be fought. The
West has but two choices: peace
through strength, or war through
weakness. I suspect that not many
years of procrastination remain to
us.
Brad Watson is an Arts 3 student
interested in maintaining world
peace. Perspectives is a column of
opinion open to university students,
faculty and staff.
Abortion stance 'dangerous'
war is one that enjoys considerable
currency in the proverbial ivory
tower. This revisionist formulation
of culpability represents one of the
most amazing spectacles in the intellectual world, and must be laid to
rest if we are to clearly discern
which courses of action really lie in
the interest of the human race.
Although   it   is   fashionable   in
liberal-left circles to attribute the
-nato review graphic
hostile to the human race. Given
this fact, it is difficult to imagine
why the West should fail to keep
pace with the expansion of the
Soviet nuclear arsenal.
Our failure is as much symbolic
as it is substansive. By
demonstrating our lack of moral
resolve in the face of a power committed to world domination, we
openly invite hostilities. The pro-
To Sheri Dekoven:
With reference to your perspectives (Oct. 29), your ideas on Pro-
Life are as unsanitary and
dangerous as the backstreet abortion!
Pro-Life is what the name says —
Out to
lunch
bunch
We would like to set the record
straight regarding the grant and
loan money the provincial government has made available to
students.
Through the ministry of education, the Social Credit government
has committed $24.2 million to the
B.C. student assistance program.
That is $8.7 million more than last
year, amounting to a 50 per cent increase in funds available for
students. Four thousand more
students will benefit, increasing the
number of students who receive
grants and loans to 17,000.
The funding for health grants
was also increased this year despite
the fact that students have never requested all the money available
through the grants administered by
the ministry of health.
Does the UBC Social Credit club
welcome the investigation by the
provincial Ombudsman office into
shortages of grants? YOU BET WE
DO. We are proud of the Social
Credit government's committment
to increasing access to post secondary education.
UBC Social Credit club
Pro (meaning for); and life (do you
need a definition for this word?).
Pro-Life does not ignore the extreme trauma the woman suffers
during her pregnancy and Pro-Life
is certainly not against a woman
receiving proper medical care
before, during and after her
pregnancy. Pro-Life encourages a
woman to receive medical and
psychological care and counselling
during her pregnancy. They offer
these essentials!
Pro-Life is not pushing morality;
we are expressing concern for a
woman in a traumatic experience
and a preborn human being facing a
life or death situation.
you are fighting for Women's
Rights — good for you! God knows
we have been oppressed too long!
But who's fighting for the pre-
borns rights? Do not forget that 50
percent of those aborted are of the
same sex you and I are so fervently
fighting for.
And Sheri, you must know that
there are single cell organisms, living organisms in our world: the
amoeba and euglena plus outers.
Scientifically theoretically, practically or any other way you slice it,
the moment, the second, the instant
the sperm empregnates the egg, a
living human cell has been created;
18-25 days later there is a heart
beat; 7 weeks later all living systems
are working. Fractions ofseconds
after impregnation the cell has
divided, again and again — human
life has been created. But you need
no course in biology, you know it
already.
You are worried about the
woman and her rights, we are concerned about the woman and the
child's rights. Let us join forces and
give them both the support they so
desperately need to grow healthily
as human beings.
Paula King
arts 2, Langara
THE UBYSSEY
November 5, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/06. Advertising 228-3977/78.
"Hooray!" yelled Jack Tieleman as Kelley Jo Burke and Muriel Draaisma blew out the candles
on their birthday cake. Arnold Hedstrom poured drinks for Shaffin Shariff and Peter Berlin as
Craig Brooks and Chris Wong polished off the champagne. Meanwhile Glen Sanford, Lisa
Morry and Kerry Reiger sang drunken rounds of Happy Birthday accompanied by Charles
Campbell and Sarah Cox on kazoos. Richard Thomas and Monte Stewart danced on the table
as Jane Bartlett and Philip Kueber gazed blenkly at the balloons. Harry Hertscheg was so
drunk he couldn't spell his own name, but the Webster committee (Victor Wong, Rob
Robertson and Steve Weiaenthal) rushed to his aid. Party bouncers Chris Gaynor, Keith
Baldrey and Eric Eggertson were celled in especially to deal with Donna Sanford and Brian
Jones. Glen Schaeffer and Robert Beynon rode into the sunset and promptly passed out. Friday, November 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY-    CITR    page
Page 7
WIFL final tonight at UBC
By PHILIP KUEBER
Incredible. Powerful. Devastating. Awesome.
And the list could go on and on.
In fact, as the UBC football team
enters Friday night's western intercollegiate football league final, the
superlatives describing them are
becoming overworked. They are
simply the country's top collegiate
football team.
(SPORTS)
Take into consideration the offense. It has racked up a league
leading 294 points this year, averaging close to 37 points per game.
Consider too the defence. It has
made it possible for the offence to
work for most of the games, collaring opposing offences with an easy
flair and allowing a paltry 93 points
to be scored on them.
On paper, this weekend's final
should be a laugher for the 'Birds.
But as coach Frank Smith knows,
the game is played on the field.
UBC lost the WIFL final last year
11-8.
This year's opponents, the
University of Manitoba Bisons,
finished with a 5-3 record, and lost
to UBC 37-6 and 21-14. According
to Bison head coach Dennis
Hrycaiko, the last game was more
the type his team is capable of playing.
"We've definitely reached a
higher peak than our last game
(against UBC)," Hrycaiko said.
"But we still have to maintain a
consistency in stopping their
ground game."
As  for the Thunderbirds, they
have simply to play up to the level
they're capable of, something the
team definitely did in their last
outing, a 60-19 victory against
Saskatchewan. It shouldn't be
much of a battle for the 'Birds, but
you can be sure the Bisons won't go
down without trying to put up a
fight.
The prize for the victor is a trip to
the Atlantic Bowl in Halifax next
week.
In the WIFL poll this year the
Thunderbirds placed an impressive
6 offensive and 8 defensive
members on the league's all star
UBC Birds bounce Chinese checks. Next?
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
The Chinese national hockey
team are disappointed they didn't
win Tuesday night's game against
the UBC Thunderbirds, but they
say the international contest was a
learning experience.
The team is in Canada to learn
more about game tactics and playing the body, said coach Li Wanji
through an interpreter.
The team has already gone to
Europe to learn about skating,
stickhandling and passing, Li Wanji
said.
Judging from Tuesday night's
play in their 5-3 loss to the
Thunderbirds, it appears the
Chinese have learned more from the
Europeans than the Canadians.
"They have very fast skaters,
were tenacious and played extremely well, and came right at us", said
UBC coach Jack Moores.
"We tried hard, we worked hard,
but we didn't want to create an international incident so we stayed
away from starting any
altercations."
Nine years ago, the 'Birds went to
GRAD'S
Phone   now   for   complimentary portrait sitting.
RESUME PHOTOS
AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
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CORRECTION
NOTICE
The London Contemporary Dance Co. will be
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Nov. 6, 1982. Not on Friday as printed last week.
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China and won all five games there
without seriously being challenged.
But the Chinese team seems to have
improved dramatically, but their
tactics were sometimes sloppily executed and they often fell down
after being hit.
However, a number of piayers
made outstanding individual efforts, notably China goaltender Cui
Ting Wen who kept the game close
despite his team being outshot
52-26.
Although most of the play was in
the Chinese end, the game was tied
1-1 after one period and the 'Birds
led 3-2 after two.
China's Wang Jin Gang scored a
breakaway goal to tie the game in
the third period, but Don
McLaughlin and Graham Kerr
replied for UBC to put the game
away before a relatively large crowd
of 700. Interestingly, China received more cheers for their goals than
the 'Birds did, as well as receiving a
standing ovation after the game.
The Chinese team is now in the
Maritimes to play eight university
teams there.
UBC's hockey team will be looking for their first win against Canadian competition this year when
they open their Canada West
regular season against Alberta this
weekend.
The Thunderbirds have won all
five of their international contests,
but lost two and tied one against
Canadian teams at last weekend's
Empress Cup tournament in
Calgary.
The University of Alberta Golden
Bears beat UBC 4-3 last Saturday.
Alberta went on to win the sscond
annual tournament with a 5-4 upset
victory over the host University of
Calgary Dinosaurs on Sunday.
"Alberta is very fast and they're
a hard checking team," said UBC
coach Jack Moores, "and they're
also very disciplined and
tenacious."
"They are a good, fundamentally
strong team," said UBC assistant
coach Fred Masuch.
In other league action, the
Calgary Dinosaurs and Saskatchewan Huskies are idle this
weekend  since  they opened their
seasons two weeks ago, when they
split a pair of games.
Saskatchewan was last year's
league champions, but lost in the
Canadian university final for the second straight year. The University
of Moncton was last year's national
champs.
As for the 'Birds, if the great improvement made over the course of
last year's season continues this
season, the team could make a
serious play-off bid in the competitive Western league.
If the exciting hockey action
witnessed at the Thunderbird Arena
already this year is any indication of
what's to come, fan turnout should
be well above last year's average of
about 250 spectators. This year's
Denver series drew about 1,400,
while the China game saw around
700 spectators.
Game time is 8 p.m. on both Friday and Saturday.
INTRAMURAL
BUCHANAN BADMINTON
Round II
Sat.-Sun., November 20, 21
Men and Women's
All levels plus doubles
Registration starts
Nov. 8
WMG Rm. 203
$5 per person
THUNDERBALL/
Thunderbird Football
Western Championship
#1 Ranked UBC Thunderbirds
vs MANITOBA BISONS
Friday, November 5th — 7:30 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD
STADIUM
Come early to get a good seat!
TICKETS ON SALE DAILY AT
WAR MEMORIAL GYM LOBBY
Hours 11:30-2:30 and 4:30-5:30
Adults $6.00 - Students with AMS Card $3.00
team. The only surprise was that
place kicker/wide receiver Ken
Munro was overlooked. Munro
scored a record 100 points this
season, and was the country's
leading scorer.
In addition, head coach Frank
Smith was voted WIFL coach of the
year.
Hoopsters to
play SFU
By MONTE STEWART
The men's basketball team begin
their regular schedule this weekend
in the annual Buchanan Classic
series versus Simon Fraser University.
The 'Birds are a strong contrast to
last year's squad which posted a
dismal 8-12 record. Under new
coach Bob Molinski the Birds had a
5-1-1 record on their recent Asian
tour and defeated the Meralomas
and the Slammers in exhibition
games at War Memorial gym last
weekend.
SFU will be the 'Birds first
significant opponents this year.
This season's triumphs will all stand
for nought if UBC cannot complement them with similar Canada
West victories.
Molinski said he is confident his
team can begin the UBC basketball
program's "Renaissance" and is
looking forward to meeting the
Clansmen.
The first game of the tournament
is tonight at SFU while the second
contest takes place tomorrow night
in the War Memorial gym at 8 p.m.
If necessary, a tie-breaking game
will be played at SFU Tuesday.
GRAND OPENING
SALE
November 4 - 20
* factory seconds
* jeans, cords, sportswear
* end of lines, samples
* designer fashions at prices
* that fit the student budget
1336 NANAIMO STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C. V5L 4T6
TELEPHONE: 251-6940
Hours: 10:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Mon. - Sat. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,1982
\v\«
CITR & THE PIT
Present
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Mon., Nov. 8, 1982
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Board makes land grab
By BRIAN JONES
In a move Duddy Kravitz would
be proud of, the UBC board of
governors has applied to the provincial cabinet for legal title to the entire university endowment lands.
"We feel that we should have
long-term control of the land,"
David McLean, board property
committee chair, said Thursday.
"If there is to be development on
the UEL, it should be under the
control of the board," said
McLean. "We have to protect the
long-term interests of the university."
But the board's claim to the UEL
Censor
to classify
porn videos?
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
B.C.'s film classification branch
could soon be handling pornographic video films intended for
private use if the B.C. government
sets new guidelines, B.C.'s film
classification director said Thursday.
Marylou McCausland told about
50 people in the Dorothy Som-
merset studio that "there is talk (in
the government) that video
classification will come to film
classification (office)."
McCausland said the recent controversy surrounding the sale of
hard-core pornographic video
material, especially by local Red
Hot Video outlets, has centred new
debate on censorship and classification.
Although the film classification
office sets its own guidelines for
classification and censorship,
public pressure and court decisions
could force tougher standards for
public and private exhibition, McCausland said.
"My office will have to tighten its
rules, and there will have to be a
fourth rating: 'X' for the new video
material, she added.
McCausland said the exhibition
and sale of pornographic films and
video sometimes causes problems
with the branches of government involved with film exhibition in the
community. Although her office is
the primary centre for classification, she said Canada Customs and
the local police are often called in if
a complaint is lodged against a film.
The exhibition of Caligula, which
played in B.C. for more than a
year, caused problems for the
classifier's office, McCausland
said. "We knew there was going to
be a backlash".
McCausland said Caligula was
shown in B.C. uncut because court
decisions in the U.S. and defenses
for the film convinced her office
that its exhibition would not violate
"community standards" and would
not be considered obscene under
the Criminal Code.
McCausland said contrary to
popular notions about censorship,
community standards do not mean
what an individual decides he or she
would personally see. "It means
what you tolerate what your
neighbour will see."
When asked by an audience
member what criterion she uses to
judge community standards, McCausland said what is tolerated in
other media — including magazines
as diverse as Family Circle and Penthouse — is frequently a guide. In
addition, she keeps up on the latest
studies on the connection between
violence and sexuality in "aggressive pornography," McCausland said.
"I'm not (only) a classifier, I'm a
censor."
is not legitimate, said Bowie Keefer,
UEL regional park committee
chair.
"The legislation on this is very
clear. The university does not own
the UEL, except for the area the
campus is on," said Keefer. "Right
now they have no legal right to do
anything outside the campus boundaries," he added.
McLean and the board disagree
with Keefer. "There is no question
that we have a legal claim to the
lands. We feel that it (the claim) is
very legitimate," he said.
"The board of governors has
every right to its heritage. We have
a legal, historical right to the land."
McLean based his argument on
legislation passed by the provincial
government when the university
was established on West Point Grey.
"The intention was for the UEL to
in some way benefit UBC," he said.
But according to Keefer, any
revenue generated 'from the UEL
was to be used by the province to
pay the expenses of establishing the
university.
"They (the UEL) are not an endowment at all to the university.
The intention of the UEL was for
the province to recoup its
expenses," said Keefer. "If there
was a surplus, then money to the
university could come out of that.
"It wasn't a piece of land that the
university could flog on the
market."
The board is using a "contorted
and stretched argument," said
Keefer.
"There is no justification for the
university to want to control a
large, complex urban piark," he
said. "It (UBC) is not a corporation
or an urban land entity.
"The board is encroaching on the
UEL for land development to
generate money so they can have
funds under their control that they
can do anything they want with,"
said Keefer.
"Their motivation is all wrong.
They're trying to squeeze money
out   of   it,   and   what   it   is,   is
parkland," he added.
But the board is only interested in
actually using a very small part of
the UEL, McLean said.
"We would lease the majority of
it, about 80 per cent, to the Greater
Vancouver Regional District for
parkland," said McLean. The
university is maintly interested in
the area bordered by 16 Ave, Blanca and Chancellor, he said.
"They want the whole shot,"
charged Keefer. "Then they want
the GVRD to take a lease from
them for some land for park. As for
how much land they would take
out, I don't know. I don't think
they know themselves.
"They think they should have
control as a secret body that has no
accountability to the public,"
Keefer said.
Talks stalled
—craig brook* photo
THERE IS LIFE behind SUB basement wall, cons true tion worker
discovers. Council is cutting hole, through foot of concrete near Pit, to
show students 16,000 square foot undeveloped area under SUB plaza really exists. Door should be finished by later today. Area was left empty and
sealed when SUB was built in 1968. Dead bodies, ghosts, and purged student politicians are rumored to be in area. So why is the door being made
after 14 years? Because there's a referendum on developing the area Nov.
15-19 — that's why. See story page 11.
By SARAH COX
Four months of contract negotiations between the teaching
assistants union and UBC's administration ended abruptly
Wednesday.
Both parties claim they are willing to participate in further discussions, but each accuses the other of
refusing to continue negotiations.
"Oh, negotiations have broken
down, have they?" asked Bob
Grant, director of employee relations and UBC's chief negotiator.
"That means they're refusing to
consider our offer. We've gone as
far as we can go."
"The administration refuses to
negotiate further," said TAU president Yorgos Papatheodor. "Every
year they force us to demonstrate
that we have support for our
demands."
Paptheodorou said the major
outstanding issues are job security,
union security, and wages. "We're
trying to make the hiring procedure
fair," he said. "They're trying to
destroy any provisions for job
security."
Papatheodorou said the administration was doing this through
a vague job security clause in the
contract which allows people to be
hired on the basis of performance
judgements by their supervisors.
"They want to have total discretion
without recourse when it comes to
hiring people," he said.
Kelowna students stop strike
By JANE BARTLETT
and
Canadian University Press
Three post-secondary institutions
in B.C. are on the brink of shutdown due to labor disputes, but
students at one institution —
Okanagan College — have succeeded in stalling strike action.
In a last-minute appeal to both
sides, students at the Kelowna campus of Okanagan College convinced
the faculty association and the administration to resume bargaining.
The faculty originally planned
pickets for Thursday.
At Capilano College in North
Vancouver, the faculty association
will be in legal position to strike
next week, while at the B.C. Institute of Technology in Burnaby,
clerical and support staff are
threatening job action.
The Okanagan dispute is temporarily calm after the board of
governors decided late Thursday
night to reopen all outstanding
issues for negotiation. A strike had
appeared certain Wednesday, but
students staged a sit-in Wednesday
night to urge the two sides to
resume bargaining.
Before the sit-in, students met the
faculty association and convinced
them to hold off on strike action
until students could make an appeal
to the board. Sixty students then
occupied the student services
building; 40 stayed overnight.
"The point was to show we're
serious about our education," Darrell Perreault, an executive member
of the student society said Thursday
morning.
That evening 100 students attended the regular board meeting where
administrators agreed to resume
bargaining. Should negotiations
break down again, the faculty
assocition is still in a position to
strike.
"Their tactics would be a total
disruption of student services,"
said student society staffperson
Nobu Ono. "They're not playing
foosball."
The society has called on the provincial government and official opposition to offer "support and
assistance" in ending the dispute,
and more than 370 students have
sent letters to both sides calling for
binding arbitration.
The Capilano College faculty
association and administration met
until   early   Friday  morning,   but
results of those talks were not
available at press time. Should the
talks fail, pickets could be up next
week.
The faculty association voted two
to one in favor strike action Oct. 28
to pressure the administration to
halt plans to lay off eight instructors.
The association is also fighting
plans to hire three adminstrative
directors.
"We are trying to strengthen the
article about job security to provide
recourse for people who get bad job
evaluations. This was one of the*'
reasons the union was formed in the
first place."
Grant said the administration's
position on evaluations was given to
them by the academic community.
We really don't think we're taking
anything away from them," he
said.
Last December, the TAU held a
successful strike vote and planned a
one-day campus strike in January
before signing a one year contract
with the university. The contract expired Aug. 31.
"Our information sheets are our
main way of getting in touch with
people before they come here. We
feel that people should be informed
that the union exists and what it
means. The administration only
gives us names after the people are
here. They are deploying those people of essential information regarding their employment."
"We are not prepared to issue the
union's propaganda sheets," said
Grant. He said the administration
was willing to hold orientation
meetings for new teaching assistants
but would not make them compulsory because the turnout by TAs
was so poor. They want us to
force the people to come," he said.
He said the administration's final
proposal included a "laughable"
wage proposal (average increase of
6.38 per cent which was well below
inflation and lower than wage offers made to all other campus
unions.
Grant said the offer to the TAU
was as high as offers to other campus unions. "The general increase
we've offered across campus was six
percent, plus adjustments. We see
no necessity to make any special ad-
justments for the teaching
assistant's union.
"Compared to what other people
in society are getting it's a damn
good offer," he said.
SFU scorns porn
Red Hot Video's growing hard core porn distribution business gets
heat from opponents today.
The Simon Fraser University Women's Centre has organized a
picked line in front of the Red Hot outlet at 4439 E. Hastings in Burnaby at 5:15 p.m.
Red Hot has 13 stores in B.C. The store specializes in selling and
renting out video cassettes dealing explicitly with sex.
Women's groups on the North Shore and community based anti-
porn groups are protesting against Red Hot because many of the
cassettes being distributed violate laws by showing sex-related
violence and hatred towards women.
The campaign against violent porn in B.C. is being called a "test
case" by Rebecca Butovsky assistant to the minister responsible for
the status of women because B.C. is the province where she thinks
violent porn is trying to gain a foothold. Page 10
Hu#t
UBC Chamber Singers: 12:30 and 8
p.m., Nov. 5, Recital Hall.
Valdy: Rock, 7 and 10 p.m., Nov. 5,
Soft Rock Cafe. Tickets $6 advance, $7
door.
UBC Symphony Orchestra and
Van. Youth Symphony Orchestra:
Kazuyosh Akiyama conducting, 2:30
p.m., Nov. 7, Old Auditorium. Tickets
$4 students.
Wednesday noon-hour concert:
classical, Nov. 10, Recital Mall.
Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass
Boys: 8 p.m., Nov. 8, Van. East
Cultural Centre. Tickets $12.50.
Faculty Recital: Peter Hannan,
recorder, 12:30 p.m., Nov. 12, Recital
Hall.
Masterpiece Music Series:
Beethoven and Strauss, 2:30 and 8
p.m., Nov. 7, Van. East Cultural Centre.
Mary O'Hara: Celtic, 8 p.m., Nov. 7,
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse.
Academy Symphony Orchestra:
classical, 8 p.m., Nov. 12, Orpheum.
Tickets $2 students.
London Contemporary Dance-
Theatre: lecture and demonstration, 2
p.m., Nov. 6, SUB Ballroom. Tickets
$2.
The B-Sides, Buddy Selfish and
his Saviours, and The Nazarites:
rock? 9 p.m.. Commodore Ballroom.
Tickets $7.
Wynton Marsalis: prodigal jazz artist, Nov. 9, Commodore Ballroom.
White Boys: contemporary comedy
of manners, opens Nov. 5, Vancouver
Playhouse, 8 p.m. Tickets at VTC and
Info Centres. Warning! Contains nudity
and coarse language!
Talking Dirty: more Kitslano sex, at
the Arts Club, Seymour St., 8:30 p.m.
Crimes of the Heart: Pulitzer prize
winner but not a story about incest.
Arts Club Theatre, Granville Island,
8:30 p.m.
A Theatre Sports Hamlet: title self
explanatory, at City Stage, 751 Thurlow
St., at 8:30 p.m. Tickets $3 students.
Snoopy: a Peanuts Gang Broadway
musical, Presentation House, North
Van., 8 p.m.
The Wolf Boy: Firehall Theatre, 280
E. Cordova, at 8:30 tonight.
Chicago: at the Metro Theatre, 1370
S.W. Marine, 8:30 p.m.
HfiVl£6
SUB Films: Nov. 4-7: Serial, 7 p.m.,
S.O.B., 9:30 p.m.; Nov. 11-14: Cat
People, 7 p.m., Quest For Fire, 9:30
p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema: (7th &
Commercial 253-5455). Luchino
Visconti tribute: Nov. 1-7 at 7:30 and
9:30 p.m.; Godard double bill, Nov. 8-9
at 7:30 and 9:15 p.m.; Lord of the
Flies, Nov. 10-11, 7:30 p.m.; Most
Dangerous Game, Nov. 10-11, 9:15
p.m.; Woody Allen triple bill, Nov.
12-14, starts at 7 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th & Arbutus
738-6311): Shakespeare triple bill,
Nov. 5-7, starts at 7:30 p.m.; The
Magic Flute, Nov. 8, 8 p.m.; Don
Giovanni, Nov. 9, 8 p.m.; James
Joyce double bill, Nov. 10-11, 7:30 and
9:25 p.m.
The Savoy Cinema: (3321 Main,
872-2124): On Golden Pond plus Four
Seasons, Nov. 5-7, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.;
Arthur plus 10, Nov. 8-9, 7:30 and 9:30
p.m.; Bilitis plus Private Lessons,
Nov. 10-11, 7:30 and 9:15 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque: Miz-
oguichi's The Life of a Film plus
The Downfall of Oseen, Nov. 12 at 7
and 9:30 p.m.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium): All
About Eve, Nov. 8, 6 and 9 p.m.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Sports Day, 3:30-5:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym,
or gym A.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Alberta Golden Bears in Canada West
Home Opener, 8 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
No.    1    ranked    UBC   Thunderbirds   take   on
Manitoba Bisons for the western championship,
7:30 p.m. Winner goaa to the Atlantic Bowl,
Thunderbird stadium.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Happy Hours: cheap refreshments, 4:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campua center.
UBC CHAMBER SINGERS
Fall concert: Music of Gesualdo, Monteverdi,
Morley, Hindemith, free admiasion, noon and 8
p.m., Muaic Building Recital Hall.
WATER POLO DANCE
»2 per ticket, ph. 731-0164, cheap burl, 7:30-1
a.m., SUB 207/209.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beer and Pizza Night, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
LEON Er THEA KOERNER LECTURE
Muaic Lecture,  Berlioz and Romantic Myths,
Professor  Pierre  Citron,   Universite  de  Paris,
3:30-5 p.m.. Music Bldg. library, seminar room.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Nursing week dance, featuring the Average Rock
Band, 8 p-m.-12:30 a.m., SUB ballroom. Tickets
$5 from AMS box office.
Intramurals nursing fun run (3 and 5 km in
lengths), noon, SUB. Spot prizes.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion,    noon.    International   houae,    main
lounge.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr garden, 5-9 p.m., SUB 211
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Physical Activities for Visually Impaired Children,
by Charfea Buell,  noon. War Memorial gym,
211/213.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Craig Smith, contemporary musician, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 125.
ORAL ROBARTS OF THE THEATRE
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Informal meeting, express yourself orally, bring a
poem, noon. Brock hall 302.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, 2:30 p.m., SUB 212A.
SATURDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Internationally famous London Contemporary
Dance Theatre's first Canadian tour, tickets $2
AMS Ticket Centre, 2 p.m., SUB Ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC vs SFU Clansmen in annual Grudge Match,
second game in best of three series, 8:30 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
FAMILY HOUSING
Ordinary people, 3 p.m., SUB auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Alberta Golden Bears, 8 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
WEST VANCOUVER UNITED CHURCH
Fourteenth annual "Elegent" flea market, 9-3
p.m., Esquimsft Ave. and 21st.
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR
STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE
Dance: Theme — Depression '82, Alternative to
the Pit, special drinks, door prizes, dress the
part, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., SUB ballroom.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Special demonstration/performance by London
Contemporary Dance, 2 p.m., SUB ballroom.
UBC JAPAN CLUB
Japanese dinner, sake & beer, tickets at office
SUB 237A, 7 p.m., SUB 207/209.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton  night,   bring  your own  birdie and
rackets, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Osborne gym A.
Table tennis tournament,   1   p.m.,  SUB  party
room.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Dance: A Fall Fantasy, 8 p.m., West End community centre.
PSI UPSILON FRATERNITY
60's party, 9 p.m., 2260 Westbrook Mall.
SAILING CLUB
Intermediate racing, refreshments, $3, 9 a.m.
Bzzr garden, A p.m., both at Jericho.
SUNDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Cycling ride, everybody welcome!, 9 a.m., meet
between SUB and the Aquatic Centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, everybody welcome, 10 p.m., UBC
Aquatic Center.
UBC DANCE CLUB
intro-Comp: an introduction to competitive
ballroom dancing, doors open at 7 p.m., program begins at 7:30 p.m. SUB Party room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Weekly meeting, singing, teaching, testimonies,
you name it, 10 a.m., SUB 125.
WEST POINT GREY COMMUNITY CENTRE
Sale, display and tea, 2-4 p.m., Aberthau
Cultural Centre, 4397 w. 2nd and Trimble.
WEST POINT GREY COMMUNITY CENTRE
Sale, display and tea, 2-4 p.m., Aberthau
Cultural Centre, 4397 w. 2nd and Trimble.
MONDAY
UBC POTTERY CLUB
Important general meeting, noon, SUB 251.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Guest speaker Harry Guttormson, past president
of the Surrey Access For All Committee on Access for the Disabled and Handicapped, noon,
SUB 206.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening, 7:30 p.m.  International house Gate 4.
CANADIAN PROFESSORS FOR PEACE
IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Peace in the middle east: Does Canada have a
role?, noon, Buchanan A203..
ROCKERS CO-OP
Guitar workshop,  members bring your guitars
and amps, 5:30-8 p.m., SUB 125.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, coast guard talk on hypothermia, noon, SUB 205.
TUESDAY
LEON AND THEA KOERNER LECTURE
Philosophy    seminar    and    discussion:    moral
motivation,  professor Paul Grice,  university of
Washington, noon, Buchanan penthouse.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Paty, neurology department, noon, IRC 1.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
General   meeting,    noon.    Biological   sciences
5458.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner, program, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus cen-
Friday, November 5, 1982
**wfc
PACIFIC BALLET THEATRE
Performing works from the fall program, free admission, noon, SUB ballroom.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Recycling committee, guest speaker Mencia
Spickney, the paper recycling market, noon,
SUB 206.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
AMS PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Paul Watson of the Sea Shepherd society, talk
and film on 1983 campaign, noon, SUB
auditorium ... $2 students, unemployed. $4
employed.
WEDNESDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance  languages,   7:30  p.m..   International
House.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214.
ISMALI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Alumni night, speakers and a music party, 8:15
p.m., UBC graduate centre.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Open meeting on Poland, 1 p.m., SUB 212. Day
of Action.
THURSDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Convocation 1982: solutions to the arms
race, discussion with several prominent
speakers, 1-5 p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring and racing events, 83 planning
meeting, noon. Biological sciences 2449.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Meeting for those interested in attending
model parliament, 2 p.m., SUB 205.
REMEMBERANCE DAY
Classes cancelled, all day, all over UBC.
FM 101.9; Cable FM 100.1
CITR News Menu
Every weekday . . .
8 a.m. Wake-Up Report; 9 a.m. Breakfast
Report; 1 p.m. Lunch Report; Afternoon
Breaks with News at 3:30 p.m. and Sports at
4:30 p.m.; 6 p.m. Dinner Report — including
the following After Dinner Portions: Birds'
Eye View (reviews past weekend's UBC
sports action on Monday; InSight (analysis
and editorials) on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday; UBC Capsule (reviews the week's
UBC news events) and 'Birds Eye View
(previews the weekend's UBC sports action)
on Friday.
Thursday, November 11th, at 6 p.m.
The Remembrance Day Holiday Mega-
Report.
Every Sunday at 6 p.m. The Doug Richards
Magazine.
At UBC
Everyday . . .
UBC announcements at 8:40 a.m., 12:40
p.m., 4:00 p.m. and 8:40 p.m. If you would
like to put in a free announcement, go to SUB
233 or call 228-3017 between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays.
UBC On Tap
Every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. .  .
The new public affairs show which
dispenses information and knowledge tapped
from UBC for community consumption. Nov.
9th: the topic will be venereal disease, and in
particular, herpes.
Sports
Friday Nov. 5 (that's today!) . . .
Live play-by-play broadcast of the WIFL
Bowl between the Manitoba Bisons and the
UBC Thunderbirds in the league championship at Thunderbird Stadium. Pre-Game
Show is at 7:15 p.m.; the Game is at 7:30 p.m.
Bring your radio to the game.
Every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. . . .
Sports Unlimited: sports stories, information and interviews.
Generic Review
Every weekday at 11:30 a.m. and 6:45 p.m.
Entertaining reviews of movies, plays, books,
restaurants, etc.
Final Vinyl
Everyday at 11 p.m. .  . .
An album played in its entirety. Monday -
jazz, Tuesday and Wednesday - new albums,
Thursday - import album, Friday - neglected
album, Saturday - classic album, Sunday -
CITR's number one playlist album.
Mini Concerts
Monday to Saturday 12 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Music from past and present with commentary on one band for about 30 minutes.
Playlist Show
Saturdays 3:30 p.m.
Noel Baker counts down CITR's top 40
records including the latest from The
Psychedelic Furs, Captain Beefheart, Iggy
Pop, Nina Hagen, Peter Gabriel, Trio, X, Egg-
Head, Grandmaster Flash, and The Gun Club.
Music of Our Time
Sundays 8:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Paris Simons and Jay Leslie explore 20th
century music,  primarily from the classical
tradition.
Sunday Brunch
Sunday 12:15- 12:45 p.m.
Literay digestables.
Reggae Show
Sundays 12:45 p.m.
Debuting this week I Catch the sounds of
The Island.
In these times of misery and woe,
what we need is cheeriness. Wrong, we
need melodrama. Come get your share
of melodrama and see Pure As The
Driven Snow featuring the United
Players. Playing Nov. 11-13, with a performance for students Nov. 10 (by
donation). Tickets $3.50, $2.50
students, St. James Auditorium, 3214
West 10th and Trutch.
Kids, Lots of them. Big ones,
small ones, wide ones, you name it.
The Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood
House needs volunteers to work with
children, ages 6-12. Call Ann at
879-8208, or drop in at 535 East Broadway.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:      AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c.
Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
60c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver, B.C.   V6T 2 AS
15 — Coming Events
BAHA'I FAITH — Informal discussion. This
week's topic: "Principles for a New Age."
This Friday, 8 p.m., 5529 Univ. Blvd. Tel:
224-3596. All welcome, refreshments.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
DR. CLARK KERR
Institute of Industrial Relations,
University of California, Berkeley
PROSPECTS FOR
HIGHER   EDUCATION   IN
THE U.S. - 1982-2000
Dr. Kerr is considered one of the most influential people in North America in the
field of education.
Lecture Hall 2.
Woodward Building
SATURDAY, NOV. 6 at 8:15 p.m.
CUSO INFORMATION
SESSION
Tuesday, November 9, 1982
7:30 p.m.
in the Lower Lounge at
International House
Marlene   Green,    CUSO's    Regional
Representative  in  Grenada will discuss
CUSO   postings   in   the  Caribbean   and
other regions. Slide-tape show:
CUSO in the Caribbean
Everyone is welcome.
Further Information:
228-4886
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE: Return ticket to Calgary.
Depart Dec. 15th, Return Jan. 2nd. $140
OBO before Nov. 10th, 263-2562.
15 — Found
FOUND: Green plaid pencil case in Buch.
bldg. To claim describe contents. 224-6842.
FOUND: Blue and white knit mitts. B lot,
UBC. Phone 224-7788.
20 — Housing
OLDER first year Fine Arts student, male,
unconventional, vegetarian, needs bright
room in shared (non-coop) house in Pt.
Grey or W. Kitsilano. $225 limit (pref. less).
Ph. 921-2002.
ON CAMPUS: full room and board,
shared accommodation $1240 per term,
phone 224-3606 or 224-9431. Ask for
House Manager.
COMFORTABLE CHINESE home can
accommodate Taiwan, Hong Kong,
Singapore students. Furnished, convenient. 261-7033.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
85 — Typing
25 — Instruction
LEARN TO SAIL: 30 ft. cruiser/ racer.
Hands on Basic Coastal Cruising, C.Y.A.
Certificate. Next class registering now
734-1675 after 7:00 p.m. Sailcraft Ltd.
CANADIAN INSTITUTE of Tai Chi Chuan.
Classes starting in Nov. Steve 731-3021.
35 - Lost
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Weekends all day. Friday, November 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Aid, tuition up 5 per cent
By CRAIG BROOKS
Six and five is alive and well at
UBC.
The UBC board of governors approved a five per cent tuition fee increase for next year at its meeting
Tuesday.
The board also approved a five
per cent increase in student aid,
with an extra $500,000 to be spent
over the next five years on aid.
"I   think   the   increase   is
reasonable," student board
representative Dave Dale said
Wednesday. Dale said the move
shows some leadership on the Dart
of students to bear part of increased
costs.
The increase in aid is a "step in
the right direction," Dale said. I'm
really happy we got that."
"We argued mainly for increased
bursaries?' Dale said.
Alma   Mater  Society  president
Dave Frank said the AMS did not
make a presentation since "it was
looking like five per cent." Any
protest or presentation "wouldn't
have changed the circumstances,"
he said.
Dale said administration president Douglas Kenny proposed the
small increase.
"Kenny said he did not want to
increase tuition too much, bearing
in mind the current (economic) con-
— rtck katz photo
IN RACE to get through university, students gasp for relief and try to avoid drowning in ever increasing pool of
administration boggle and fiddle-faddle. Students complained to administration but were told they were all wet.
Door fo spur development
By CRAIG BROOKS
Student council voted Wednesday to spend $6,000 on a door to a
void.
The money will be spent to cut an
access path from SUB's lower
floor, near the Pit, to a 16,000
square foot undeveloped space
under SUB plaza.
Alma Mater Society president
Dave Frank said the door would
help promote a Nov. 15-19 referendum to develop the space by allowing students to see the area.
Most students don't know the
area exists, said arts representative
Margaret Copping.
Frank said the money will come
from a SUB construction reserve
fund. The fund contains money left
over from a $15 student levy after
SUB's mortgage was paid off two
years ago.
The work would eventually have
to be done when the area is
developed, Frank said. Even if the
upcoming referendum is defeated,
the access will provide "continuous
pressure"   on   future  councils   to
develop the area, he said. "I wish it
(the door) was done years ago."
The work should be completed
by  this  afternoon,   AMS  general
manager Charles Redden said.
* * *
Athletes  should  be  guaranteed
space  in  residence,  according  to
Council Briefs
members of the UBC women's
athletic committee.
External affairs coordinator Cynthia Southard, who is an AMS
representative on the committee
told council a WAC sub-committee
on "revamping housing policies in
general" has been struck.
Southard said faculty members
on the committee pushed the idea.
The universities of Simon Fraser
and Victoria are breaking a
"Gentlemen's" agreement regarding recruiting athletes Southard
said.
UVic and SFU both mail out
academic   acceptance   to   athletes
Election questioned
By ROBERT BEYNON
Candidate Scott Ando committed several irregularities during the
recent Director of Administration
campaign, Alma Mater Society vice
president Cliff Stewart charged in
student court Monday.
"I laid the charge so the court
would make a decision on the recent
election," Stewart said.
He charged the election committee acted improperly and some of
the candidates or the election
should have been ruled invalid.
Ando said election irregularities
are common and the election should
be ruled valid. "The election committee was biased .against me," he
said.
Stewart said fraternity polling
clerks assigned to the Computer
Science building moved the poll to
Woodward building on Oct. 19 to
slant the vote in Ando's favor.
AMS external affairs minister
Cynthia Southard said the clerks
had a motive because Ando is a
fraternity member and the inter-
fraternity council supported him.
Stewart said Ando campaigned
late and supportive polling clerks
electioneered for Ando at polls.
Fraternity polling clerk Steve
Harris said, "That's a lie. None of
my polling clerks electioneered."
Ando charged that election commissioner Al Irwin's actions were
biased, allowing the engineers to
move a polling station. Ando said
that move was equally as serious as
the fraternity clerk's move.
A judge asked if a poll move endorsed by the election commissioner is actually of equal importance to the poll moved by the
fraternity clerks without permission.
Judge Ted McNabb said election
irregularities occurred in past elections but went unpunished. He said
the invalidation of the election or of
some candidates was a possibility.
The court reserved judgement. A
decision will be made within two
weeks, court clerk Gray McMullin
said.
before the July 15 agreed date, she
said.
The letters guarantee acceptance
to the university and a place on the
team, Southard said.
"UBC is losing out on athletes."
Southard said UBC will now also
mail early. "Everybody cheats,"
she added.
The athletics department also
wants the registrar's office to issue
confirmation or rejection of
academic acceptance earlier for
athletes. The Registrar currently
refuses to release academic details
to the department early, Southard
said.
Professors may soon be responsible for their library fines.
Student senator Ken Freeman
told council a motion will be introduced at the Nov. 17 senate
meeting to clarify wording in the
university calendar regarding
library fines.
Freeman told council one professor was aquitted of $1,100 in
fines because of the vague wording.
* * *
Gordon Comer and Miriam
Sobrino are the new arts representatives on council, while Peter
Homberger is the new applied
science senator.
Senator Stephen Henderson has
not registered yet this year, so his
position has been declared vacant.
The AMS elections committee will
choose a replacement.
ditions," Dale said.
The $500,000 comes from a $6.8
million surplus from the previous
fiscal year. The board also allocated
$500,000 for work-study and summer job funding at a summer
meeting.
Last year's 30 per cent fee increase met angry protest and inspired a funeral march to mark the
death of accessible education.
In   other   board   business,   the
master campus plan was approved.
The 110 page plan will be reviewed
annually by the board property
committee.
Kenny also announced that gifts
and donations to the university are
up more than $6 million from last
year. The only decreases have been
the B.C. Health ministry and the
United States government. "A large
number of people in the community
support students," Kenny said.
Myths wrong
HAMILTON (CUP) — Wife
battering is shrouded in myths that
have stalled its emergence as a
political issue, according to a
Hamilton researcher.
Judy Orr said at a recent
McMaster University forum that
most people harbor several myths
about wife battering, including:
• Men batter women because of
the stresses of modern life. Orr said
wife abuse has been a "legally and
morally sanctioned system of
behavior for centuries."
• Alcohol causes wife battering.
A 1980 study by the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of
Women concluded that alcohol is
involved in only half of the cases.
The report also slated that
alcohol rarely causes men to behave
violently; rather, men drink to
justify their violence. Alcohol may
act as a catalyst in wife abuse, but it
is not a determining factor;
• Battered women "ask for it."
Men who have beat women frequently complain "I wouldn't have
hit her if she hadn't asked for it" or
"she nags me to death."
Orr said this myth focuses blame
on the victim rather than her
assailant, and it assumes battering is
caused by personality clashes rather
than social structures.
• Only women in low-income
groups are battered. Orr said battering permeates all of society. But
middle and" upper class women have
easier access to doctors, therapists
and other services than women in
low-income groups do. These
women are forced to rely on the official human services network, so
their abuse is more visible, she said;
and
• Battered wives are illogical not
to leave their husbands. Orr said a
typical question is, "Why doesn't
she leave him for good?"
But many women have nowhere
to go, said Orr. Despite the feminist
movement, they are still
economically dependent on their,
husbands, especially is they have'
children.
Orr said victims face the attitude
that husbands should have "natural
authority" over their wives. When
they seek help from friends and
family, they are often rejected and
told they should feel ashamed, said
Orr.
Dr. Paul Steinberg, a Medical
Reform Group member, quoted
statistics showing that because of
their dependence, most women endure years of battering. The average
duration is 6.7 years, with 80 per
cent of battered wives abused during the first year of marriage.
The common denominator linking all these myths about battering
is the theory that individual circumstances rather than social institutions cause the problem, Orr
said.
SFU squalors dollars
Canadian University Press
The Simon Fraser University administration has finally disclosed it
is spending $34,000 to support
Team B.C., a mysterious business
organization that some students
suspect is a front for the Social
Credit party.
But SFU president George
Pedersen defended his decision to
allocate the services of a university
administrator and secretary to the
controversial organization which
promotes positive thinking as a
solution to the current economic
depression.
Pedersen said the university has a
policy of donating personnel to
worthwhile causes, and has
previously done so for the United
Way, community colleges and
universities ministry.
But John Knowles, a student
member of the SFU board of governors, criticized the donation, saying
the money could have been better
spent on salaries for professors.
Knowles also criticized the board
for making its decision to support
Team B.C. in camera. "There's no
reason for it," he said. "The administration's passion for secrecy is
a major issue."
Team B.C. created controvery at
both SFU and the University of
B.C., which has donated $20,000
worth of an administrator's time.
Little is known about the organization, but critics point out the
group's logo, "let's keep B.C. moving" is similar to "let's get B.C.
moving again," the motto used by
the Social Credit when it formed the
government in 1975.
Until last week, SFU administrators refused to say how,
much money they spent on Team
B.C., but students continuously
pushed for an answer.
Health grants still in limbo
The war on the B.C. government to find more
money for students in the health sciences is
escalating UBC's awards director said Thursday.
Byron Hender said students and the board of
governors are putting pressure on the health
ministry to keep the issue alive.
At its meeting Wednesday, student council also
voted to send a letter to the ministry supporting
about 40 UBC students who, without warning or
explanation, had their health bursaries cut.
Students get $50 per week over a 12 month period.
The health sciences director and the awards office have already sent letters and Thursday health
sciences coordinator Dr. B.E. Riedel sent a protest
letter.
Health ministry official Richard Bassett would
not say if the government would increase its deficit
to meet its commitment to health care students in
the province.
At UBC, the bursary program needs $250,000 to
meet the demand. The education and university
ministries Oct. 19, increased student aid funding by
$8.7 million. The funds came out of the provinces
deficit budget.
Meanwhile, an investigation of health grants by
the provincial ombudsoffice is still proceeding.
Investigator Bill Trott said the office is gathering
information to try to resolve the problem. THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5, 1982
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